RM Sotheby’s, Monterey, August 15-17, 2019

RM Sotheby’s added a Thursday session for 34 Aston Martins, bringing their total consignment to 184 lots from last year’s 150. 64.7% of the Astons sold, not bolstering RM’s eventual 72.8% sell-through.

But it was the Saturday appearance of the vaunted Porsche Type 64 (actually a modified Kraft durch Freude Wagen (the VW predecessor) Porsche design project 60K10) that made unfortunate headlines with its epic fail on the auction block. More on that later (it is lot # 362 if you want to jump there), but overall its profile distracted from the many marvelous cars at RM’s Portola Plaza/Monterey Convention Center auction.

The overall result for this sale was down, despite the extra day of Aston Martins, to a level not seen since 2012 as were the median and average transactions which were at their lowest levels since 2011.

The maw of the auction beast demands satisfaction and there just aren’t enough cars to satisfy the beast’s appetite – particularly when prices are off and sellers are reluctant to consign – a situation that was evident across all the Monterey auctions this year.

RM can take some satisfaction from being the highest total sale in this 31.2% down year at Monterey but having left about $89 million on the table in no-sale high bids (some $98 million with buyer’s premium or about 82% of the auction’s realized transactions if they’d sold) it can’t be very satisfying.

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $ Prior Year change
2019 134/184 72.8% 64.9% 9.7% $766,535 $285,000

[35.7%]

$107,137,710 -32.2%
2018 125/150 83.3% 66.4% 7.2% $1,263,456 $340,000

[26.9%]

$157,930,940 +18.9%
2017 103/116 88.8% 54.0% 15.0% $1,289,233 $451,000

[35.0%]

$132,790,950 +12.6%
2016 82/100 82.0% 72.8% 9.9% $1,438,110 $462,000

[32.1%]

$117,925,000 -29.5%

On-site observations are by Rick Carey, Andrew Newton and Jose Martinez. The final copy is Rick Carey’s responsibility: good, bad or indifferent.

113 of the 184 cars offered, almost 2/3s, are reported here, sorted in lot number order.


Lot # 103 1992 Aston Martin V8 Virage Coupe; S/N SCFCAM2S8NBL50327; Black/Beige leather piped in Black; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $22,400. – Automatic, Avon tires, aftermarket stereo. – Spot of discoloration on the hood and a few tiny rock chips on the nose. More discoloration on the trunk lid and filler cap. Light wear and discoloration on the seats as well as the shifter. Mild fading on the dash top. Mileage not represented or visible, but represented with a $25,000 service last year. A used Virage. – The first lot of RM’s all-Aston day in Monterey, this very rare but largely mediocre Virage only attracted a couple of bids and was off the block almost as quickly as it came onto it. The money didn’t buy a great car, but it bought a cool one and was one of the biggest bargains of the week.

Lot # 104 2003 Aston Martin DB AR1 Convertible, Body by Zagato; S/N SCFAE62303K800016; Engine # 00443; Tungsten Silver/White leather; Estimate $325,000 – $375,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $265,000 plus commission of 11.89%; Final Price $296,500. – Red calipers, Pirelli tires. – The 16th of 99 cars built. 100 miles and like new, although most of these cars have been hardly ever been driven. – Despite there only being 99 of these Zagato-bodied DB7-based roadsters, they are not an uncommon sight at high-profile auction events like Monterey, Scottsdale or Amelia Island. This result is right in line with other ones that have come to market recently including this car’s no-sale result at RM’s Petersen Museum auction in December where it was reported bid to $270,000, only $5,000 more than the successful hammer bid here.

Lot # 106 1969 Aston Martin DB6 Mk II Vantage Coupe; S/N DB6MK24125L; Engine # 4004355VC; Silver/Black leather; Estimate $500,000 – $600,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $390,000 plus commission of 11.28%; Final Price $434,000. – Triple Webers, ZF 5-speed, wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, pushbutton radio. – The paint is good but there is a small dent and deep scratches on the roof near the passenger’s side. The weather stripping around the windshield is inconsistent, and there is sealant or adhesive on the windshield trim. The window trim has light pitting and surface scratches. The upholstery is good but the rear seat has a different grain and light cracks. The passenger’s side quarter window has pitting. Restored in the 1990s in the UK and showing plenty of age today. – Aged since 2010 when it sold for $265,500 at Bonhams Greenwich sale and the $324,500 price it brought at Gooding Amelia nine months later, but classic Astons of virtually all types are worth more today and that includes this one. This was a realistic result.

Lot # 108 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Shooting Brake, Body by Radford; S/N DB52273L; Engine # 4002241; Silver Birch/Dark Blue leather; Estimate $1,000,000 – $1,400,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,600,000 plus commission of 10.31%; Final Price $1,765,000. – Engine enlarged to 4.7 liters, ZF 5-speed, R.S. Williams suspension upgrades, DB5 taillights, wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, pushbutton radio, fog lights – Excellent paint and chrome. The seats look original and are lightly worn but the rest of the interior looks fresher and very good. One of twelve DB5 Shooting Brakes and just four in LHD. Sold new in Switzerland. Mostly restored in the early 2000s then overhauled mechanically in 2009 and refinished in its original paint color. – Among Bonhams, Gooding and RM Sotheby’s 404 sold lots only 21 brought hammer bids over their pre-sale high estimates including this DB5 which blew through the $1.4 million high estimate by $200,000, almost 15%. It is a rare and especially appealing car done to high standards some time ago and holding up well nearly two decades after it was restored. A hunting dog never had a better kennel and the new owner has nearly limitless bragging rights even at this exalted price..

Lot # 110 2006 Aston Martin Vanquish S Coupe; S/N SCFAC243X6B502007; Jet Black/Black leather, Red inserts; Estimate $90,000 – $110,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $95,200. – Car cover, original umbrella. – The are many surface scratches in the paint, and a scratch on the hood and the driver’s side rear quarter panel. The driver’s seat has some light cracks. Represented with 17,000 miles and a recent $10,000 service, but it still presents like a used car. – And priced like one too. It cost over a quarter-million dollars when it was new, but in today’s market this is an appropriate price for a used one with some miles on it.

Lot # 111 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Coupe; S/N DB52008R; Engine # 4001995; Silver-Grey/Grey leather; Estimate $4,000,000 – $6,000,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $5,800,000 plus commission of 10.09%; Final Price $6,385,000. – RHD. 3995cc/282hp, 4-speed, chrome wire wheels, Silvertown bias ply tires, Bond gadgets. – One of the James Bond Astons. Not one of the movie cars; one of two Press Cars used in press promotions and public appearances for Thunderball. Now with fresh paint, new interior, freshly restored engine compartment and like new. Described as having all its Q-features now working although some of them (the machine guns and ejection seat, for example) may not be lethally functional. – Highly promoted as “The Most Famous Car in the World”, this is not exactly that since it never appeared on the silver screen, only in movie promotions. It was sold here thirteen years ago in 2006 to similar fanfare but in seriously deteriorated condition from the Smoky Mountain Museum in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee (a real place with a name that’s impossible to make up) and has a fortune spent on it since then. It is one of a handful of cars to sell in Monterey this year within (and in this case close to its high) estimate range, a testament to the enduring fascination with Sean Connery’s 007. It is expensive, but has multitudinous bragging rights that make its generous price, and $4 million premium over the 2006 result, understandable.

Lot # 112 2003 Aston Martin DB7 Vantage Coupe; S/N SCFAB22363K303621; Engine # 03748; Islay Blue/Gray leather; Estimate $100,000 – $150,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $67,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $75,600. – 6-speed. – A final-year DB7 with a full service history and Just 3,215 miles. Light wear on the driver’s seat is the only sign of age. – A DB7 is among the most affordable cars with an Aston Martin badge and a good lightly used example can be had in the roughly $40,00 range. This car’s rare 6-speed, attractive colors, low mileage and excellent presentation make it a standout, however, and it found a very appreciative audience among the bidders at the RM Sotheby’s all-Aston day on Thursday.

Lot # 114 2010 Aston Martin V8 Vantage GT4 Coupe; S/N 048; Green, Yellow accent/Black cloth; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $72,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $81,200. – 4,735/400+hp V8, Xtrac sequential 6-speed, polycarbonate glazing, black alloy wheels, roll cage, Recaro seat, full FIA racing equipment. – Built for Lou Gigliotti, competed in some SCCA events but mostly a demonstrator. Complete and ready to go although with an orange peely repaint that would fail inspection at Earl Scheib. Some safety equipment has expired and will need replacement but it is said to have been recently mechanically serviced.. – Bid well into its pre-sale estimate range, the enjoyment potential of this Vantage GT4 was apparent in the relatively generous price it brought. Its price makes using a street car for track days seem imprudent.

Lot # 116 1957 Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II Coupe; S/N AM3001293; Engine # VB6J918; Bare aluminum/Black leather; Estimate $300,000 – $450,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $270,000 plus commission of 11.85%; Final Price $302,000. – 2922cc/140hp 2x1bbl, dirty wire wheels, Vredestein tires, spotlight, bug deflector. – Worn, torn, cracked upholstery. Battered, rough bare aluminum body. Fresh and spotless under the bonnet and on the chassis. A sleeper built from a California desert find for Don Rose. Featured in Octane March 2011. Vintage toured and rallied including the 2013 Mille Miglia. David Brown “900” tractor badge on the rear deck. – It’s probably irreverent to describe this marvelously conceived and executed Aston Martin as a “rustorod” (especially since the body is aluminum) but it fits the type and would be right at home on the Bonneville Salt during Speed Weeks when rustorods are everywhere. It was by a wide margin the most imaginative, thoughtful and creative car in the Monterey auctions, a marvel of emotional security in its concept and execution. It attracted attention like nothing else in Monterey and brought a solid price recognizing the quality of its Kevin Kay restoration and its presentation.

Lot # 118 1993 Aston Martin V8 Virage Volante; S/N SCFDAM2C0PBL60074; Red/White leather, Red piping; White vinyl top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $95,200. – Fog lights, boot cover, automatic, “wide body”, modular alloy wheels. – The paint is good but there are surface scratches on the trunk lid. The upholstery is very good. Showing 4,675 represented original miles and two owners from new. Bought new by Georges Marciano, who founded Guess Jeans, and reportedly one of 20 Virage Volantes sold originally in North America. – This is a handsome, carefully preserved, all-original Virage Volante that got no respects at all from the RM Monterey bidders and brought a price not much more than the Mustang convertibles it resembles. It’s a really good value.

Lot # 119 1989 Aston Martin V8 Vantage SIII Coupe; S/N SCFCV81V3KTL12694; Engine # V5852694LFA; Jubilee Silver/Gray leather, Dark Blue piping; Estimate $275,000 – $350,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $220,000. – Weber-Marelli fuel injection, alloy wheels, automatic, X-pack, power windows, air conditioning. – Number 131 of 137 X-Pack Vantages built. Originally built for the Japanese market. The paint is very good. The front bumper has light surface scratches. The driver’s side window trim has very light pitting. There is an inch-long scratch on the rear bumper. Tidy engine bay with age commensurate with the 77,684 km showing. A used Vantage, but a desirably configured and attractive one. – This car’s desirable specs were not enough to overcome its age and mileage in this Aston-heavy setting, and it received a modest high bid that the owner can’t be judged for refusing unrealistically.

Lot # 121 1952 Aston Martin DB2 Coupe; S/N LML50102; Engine # VB6B50553; Post Office Red/Black leather piped in Red; Estimate $160,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $145,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $162,400. – RHD. Vantage spec engine, painted wire wheels, BMIHT documented. – The paint is good but there are many surface scratches. The trim around the driver’s side window has a few shallow indentations. The passenger’s side window has many scratches. Tidy and complete but lightly used engine bay. Upgraded to Vantage specs then delivered new in Colorado, then sold to Malaysia and converted to RHD. Restored there at some point before coming back to the States and lightly aged since with service work to the suspension, brakes, rear axle and wiring done in the U.S. in 2016-17. – Misgivings about a car restored in Kuala Lumpur aside, this is a moderate result for an attractive, usable DB2 in what appears to be sound and presentable condition with sufficient recent work to give the new owner some confidence in its road worthiness.

Lot # 123 1987 Aston Martin V8 Vantage SIII Coupe; S/N SCFCV81V5JTR12583; Royal Blue/Bitter Chocolate leather piped in White; Estimate $375,000 – $475,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $300,000. – RHD. X-Pack, 6.3 liter Aston Martin Works upgraded engine with quadruple Webers, 5-speed, Ronal alloy wheels, Avon tires, woodrim steering wheel, air conditioning. – Shown at the Scottish Motor Show when new. Fully restored in the late 2000s but still looks fresh top to bottom. – This is an excellent car, but the reported high bid is an excellent car number and could have been taken without too much regret. The estimate range would only be supported by a freshly restored and impeccable example.

Lot # 124 1957 Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II Coupe, Body by Tickford; S/N AM30031345; Engine # DBA1004; Green/Green leather; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Modified restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $230,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $257,600. – Modern Tremec 5-speed, triple 45DCOE Webers, chrome wire wheels, Lucas driving lights, Nardi woodrim steering wheel, front Wilwood disc brakes. – The paint is good but there are many scratches on the hood. The front bumper has surface scratches. Raced briefly in period, restored within the past five years and participated in the Colorado Grand and the New England 1000. Still a great, and very attractive event car but the modifications detract from its collector appeal. – The collectors prevailed in this situation with this car selling at a steep discount from a factory-spec DB2/4 Mk II and from the price it brought at Scottsdale in 2014 when Bonhams sold it for $319,000. That said, it is a significant value at this price for a driving-oriented new owner.

Lot # 126 1963 Aston Martin DB5 Drophead Coupe; S/N DB5C1255R; Engine # 4001595; Caribbean Pearl/Navy Blue leather; Navy Blue top; Estimate $1,350,000 – $1,500,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,200,000 plus commission of 10.42%; Final Price $1,325,000. – Chrome wire wheels, boot cover, woodrim steering wheel, Motorola radio, overdrive. – Very good paint, chrome, interior and underneath. All of it is fresh but not overdone. Believed to be the 1963 Earls Court Motor Show car but not confirmed. Received a replacement engine at the factory in 1965. Restored at the factory in more recent years, and won Best of Show at the Techno Classica Essen this year. – A DB5 Drophead is a seven-figure car almost no matter what the condition, but this result was on the modest side given the freshness of its restoration. Then again, it doesn’t have the engine it originally left the factory with and there were dozens of other fantastic Astons on offer this week occupying bidders’ attention.

Lot # 129 1953 Aston Martin DB3S Sports; S/N DB3S2; Engine # DP10137; Aston Martin Green/Green, Plaid cloth; Estimate $8,750,000 – $10,500,000; Competition restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $7,500,000. – 2922cc/180hp, 4-speed, driver’s wraparound windscreen, Silver painted wire wheels, Dunlop Racing tires, woodrim steering wheel, Lucas LeMans 24 headlights, passenger’s seat metal cover. – Factory race car. Crashed at 1953 Le Mans, notably overall winner of the Goodwood 9 Hours (Reg Parnell/Eric Thompson). Crashed at the 1954 Mille Miglia and rebuilt with the current body and chassis. Sold to and raced by Peter Collins in 1955, then by others in the U.K. before being sold to George Gale in 1958 who added road equipment and kept it for two decades. Restored by its next owner, Richard Forshaw of Aston Martin Service Dorset. Later sold to John McCaw and took 3rd in class at Pebble Beach in 2005. Excellent paint, upholstery and engine compartment. Restored better than new and showing no use or age. Fitted with a replacement engine with the original engine accompanying it on a display stand. Thoroughly documented with period paper and photos. Extremely handsome coachwork designed by Frank Feeley and a car to be owned and driven with pride and confidence. – Offered by Christie’s at Pebble Beach in 1998 with an estimate of $1.3-1.6 million but a high bid of only $950,000, it is in much better condition today. Claimed to be the “original chassis, engine and body” it is actually an updated Series II DB3S that reused the old chassis number, a factor that may have inhibited bidders’ enthusiasm for it. Its history of drivers and races is impressive; its history of racing success is limited to Goodwood in 1953. Not to argue with the seller’s expectation of value, but in today’s market $7.5 million ($8.25 million with commission) is sufficient to buy a lot of cars with comparable history and performance. This DB3S would not have been a bargain even at the reported high bid.

Lot # 130 1987 Aston Martin Lagonda S3 Shooting Brake; S/N SCFDL01S3HTL13533; Engine # V5853533; Gunmetal/Gray leather piped in White; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Customized restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $87,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $98,000. – Automatic, alloy wheels, narrow whitewalls, rear sunroof, rear drinks cabinet, later Alpine stereo. – Unique shooting brake conversion done in Sweden in 2006, years after this car was new. Good repaint. Small dent in the right rear door. A few scratches around the rear license plate, very good wood. Lightly worn original upholstery. Small scratch at the back of the hood. Oxidized exhaust but mostly tidy underneath. A strange take on an already straight-up weird car, but there are plenty of collectors out there who love that sort of thing, and this is the only one of its kind. – This car has uniqueness going for it but it doesn’t have provenance. The conversion wasn’t from a big-name coachbuilder and was finished 20 years after the car was built. This result represents a small but significant premium over an otherwise like-new standard S3 Lagonda, which is as much as the seller could have realistically hoped for.

Lot # 135 2013 Aston Martin V8 Vantage Coupe; S/N SCFEBBAK5DGC17704; Engine # AM1419014; Stratus White/Spicy Red leather; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $67,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $75,600. – 6-speed, premium stereo, sport suspension, heated memory front seats, 19-inch wheels, Black grille and rear fascia. – The front splitter has some light abrasions in the center but this otherwise looks like a new car, has just 740 miles, and features a desirable (and rare) 6-speed manual. – It might present like new, but it’s still a second-hand late-model Aston and this result, while a fair bit off from this car’s nearly $120,000 original base price, is realistic.

Lot # 206 1977 Volkswagen Beetle Sedan; S/N 1172086650; Engine # AJ11697; Silver/Black vinyl; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $55,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $61,600. – 4-speed, chromed wheels, Vredestein tires, sunroof. – Delivered new to racing driver Pete Lovely’s dealership and went straight into his private collection. The original sticker price was $3,949 and today it shows just 128 miles, which are represented as actual. Other than a small scuff on the front bumper and an unfortunate deep but small scratch on the right front fender, it looks like a showroom fresh car. On the surface it’s just a bog standard `70s Beetle, so most of the value for this car, almost no matter what it brings, is in the low odometer reading and impressive level of preservation. – Three times the price of even an excellent-condition ’77 Beetle and over twice the $28,600 this car sold for at Gooding’s Pebble Beach auction six years ago when it had only 88 miles, this is a staggering price for any Beetle, especially one that can’t be driven without feeling pangs of guilt for adding digits to the odometer.

Lot # 207 1969 Shelby Mustang GT350H SportsRoof; S/N 9F02M481894; Black Jade, Gold side stripes/Black vinyl; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $87,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $98,000. – 351/290hp, fog lights, Magnum 500 wheels, Wide Oval tires, Traction-Lok, power steering and brakes, air conditioning, tilt steering column, space-saver spare, jack. – Lightly detail scratched older paint. The front bumper is wavy and has several scratches. The trim that surrounds the top portion of the hood also has a few scratches. Lightly scratched window trim. The upholstery is very good, but the center console does have a few burn marks near the ash tray and lighter. The shift lever also has a few light abrasions. The weather stripping around the quarter windows is dry rotted. Original other than one repaint and well kept. While the later Shelby Mustangs aren’t as desirable, this one has impressive preservation going for it and it is one of just 152 cars sent to Hertz for 1969. – This car’s originality and Hertz designation pushed it to a hefty premium over an ordinary ’69 GT350 in this condition, and have done so before. It sold at Hilton Head in 2006 for $101,200, out of the Wayne Davis collection in 2008 for $77,000, then sold out of the Sam Pack collection in 2014 for $93,500. While other values have been declining this GT350H’s value is increasing, a result largely attributable to its impressive preservation.

Lot # 208 1968 Ford Mustang Fastback; S/N 8R02R159541; Wimbledon White/Black vinyl; Estimate $65,000 – $85,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $92,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $103,600. – 428/335hp Cobra Jet, 4-speed, power brakes, fog lights, Goodyear Wide Tread tires, Marti Report documented. – Very good paint other than two small chips on the driver’s door. The front bumper has some light surface scratches on the passenger’s side. The rear window trim also has some light surface scratches. Very good interior. Sold new in California with desirable options and, while never restored, got the attention it needed when it needed it. – This would be an impressive price for this car anywhere but in Monterey where Mustangs are not exactly what bidders come looking for it is especially impressive. The result here could buy one of the best in the world, and this is not close to that.

Lot # 210 1990 DeTomaso Pantera Si Coupe; S/N ZDT874000LA009609; Red/Tan leather; Estimate $275,000 – $325,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $215,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $240,800. – Alloy wheels, Pilot Sport tires, Brembo brakes with cross-drilled rotors, rear wing, leather-wrapped steering wheel, wood dash, CD stereo. – Very late Pantera and reportedly one of only 41 of these Sis built and 38 sold to the public. Represented as 26,000 miles (actually reading 48,863 km). This is also the first one offered at public auction. The older paint is a little tired but not bad and there are no serious flaws. The windshield is delaminating a bit at the edges. Lightly worn seats and some serious cracking in the wood dash. Tidy underneath. One of the last Panteras and inherently interesting, but driven like a Pantera should be and not necessarily pampered. – The final-series Pantera Si was restyled by Marcello Gandini. It was also given a lighter chassis and modified suspension, so even though the basic design was 20 years old it wasn’t a total dinosaur. This is an interesting and desirable car, but at a price that would buy two concours-ready 1970 Panteras, it’s also a very expensive one.

Lot # 212 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe; S/N 30837S105345; Sebring Silver/Midnight Blue; Estimate $120,000 – $160,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $117,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $131,600. – 327/360hp Fuelie, 4-speed, power windows, leather steering wheel, centerlock alloy wheels (original steel wheels come with it), narrow whitewalls, AM-FM radio, – The paint is very good but there is a small chip on the passenger’s door. Lightly scratched bumpers. The rocker panel trim is covered in scratches on the passenger’s side. Very good interior for the most part but the center console has surface scratches. The passenger’s side rear window has a few surface scratches. The engine compartment is neat and tidy. Not represented as matching numbers, nor much in the way of history (including whether it was built with the FI engine) and not in stellar condition but a quality driver. – Sold at Mecum’s Houston auction in 2014 for $129,600 and fully valued for its replacement engine and mediocre condition in this result but a marvelous way to get into a Fuelie Vette for tours and weekend drives without spending a fortune or risking an irreplaceable artifact on the road.

Lot # 215 1984 Lancia 037 Stradale Coupe; S/N ZLA151AR000000057; Engine # 232AR400164; Rosso Corsa/Black cloth piped in Red; Estimate $475,000 – $600,000; Competition restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $420,000. – More powerful 2.111cc/249hp Corsa-spec engine, adjustable shocks, Evolution 1 radiator, Evolution 2 brakes, Speedline wheels, P Zero tires, Abarth leather-wrapped steering wheel. – Number 57 of 217 built. Three-owner car with 6,542 km. Works converted to Corsa specs with Evo 2 engine. The wheels are a little dull but the tires look newer. A few tiny chips and a crack on the nose. Large chip on the rear hatch. The glue on the rear window is gloppy and uneven, but it came from the factory that way. Same with the uneven panel fit. Very good interior. Condition isn’t super important for someone who wants to drive one of these the right way, but this is a solid usable car with the appeal of factory supplied performance upgrades for its first owner, Giancarlo Gianetti, a supplier to Lancia’s rally program. – The last rear-wheel drive car to win the World Rally Championship, the Lancia 037 is also one of the most valuable cars of the Group B era. RM Sotheby’s sold another Stradale (street version) in Essen this year for Euros 770,000 ($870,000), and while that car had lower mileage, the consignor here can’t be helped for expecting a higher offer.

Lot # 216 1972 BMW 3.0CSL Batmobile Coupe; S/N 2212279; Black, Red, Purple, Blue accents/Black vinyl, cloth inserts; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $117,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $131,600. – 2986cc/180hp, dual carbs, 5-lug alloy wheels, Michelin tires, replacement engine (original included). – Henry Schmitt BMW Motorsport Collection. Stone chipped air dam, later Batmobile deck lid and wing. Sound paint, thin chrome, good interior. Restored in the 90’s and in good driving condition. – Sold by Gooding at Amelia in 2014 for $148,500, today’s result is realistic for this car’s history, configuration and condition.

Lot # 217 1978 BMW 320i IMSA Race Car; S/N 003; White, Blue, Purple, Red/Black cloth; Estimate $750,000 – $950,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $660,000 plus commission of 10.76%; Final Price $731,000. – Centerlock BBS wheels, Avon tires, roll cage, fire system, cool suit equipment, polished aluminum adjustable wing. – The sole Lightweight 320i built, with unique bodywork, winner at Sears Point, Hallett and Road America and second at Mid-Ohio, Laguna Seca, Lime Rock and Brainerd. 2019 Sonoma tech sticker. Bumped and chipped but solid body. Professionally prepared and probably race ready. Henry Schmitt BMW Motorsports Collection. – An interesting back story goes with the 320i IMSA cars which were important test beds for BMW’s development of the turbo engine for F1. As the only lightweight, this car is particularly significant as well as having an excellent competition history in IMSA driven by David Hobbs and Derek Bell. Race-ready, it will be a great historic racer and commanded a superior price even if it didn’t reach the low estimate.

Lot # 218 1989 BMW M3 DTM Tribute Coupe; S/N; White, Red, Blue, Purple/Blue cloth; Estimate $140,000 – $180,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $78,400. – Dry sump 2.5 liter four, roll cage, fire system, dry sump, driver’s air supply, centerlock alloy wheels, Michelin slicks, power steering. Safecraft 4-point belts, carbon fiber wing. – Originally purchased as a body-in-white for Italian hillclimb competition. Now a DTM replica offered from the Henry Schmitt BMW Motorsport Collection. Chipguarded. A little chipped and cracked but presentable and eminently usable. – Impressively assembled but in the end it is not what it wants to be. This is a realistic price for a wannabe DTM car for exhilarating track day experiences.

Lot # 219 1974 BMW 3.5 CSL IMSA Race Car; S/N 2275987; Engine # M49318; White, Blue, Red, Purple/Black cloth; Estimate $1,500,000 – $2,200,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,200,000. – BBS modular wheels, Eagle slicks, Sparco seat, fire system, roll cage. – Henry Schmitt BMW Motorsport Collection. One of five built and four raced. 1975 Sebring 12 Hours winner driven by Brian Redman and Alan Moffat, then Sam Posey and Hans-Joachim Stuck. Converted at BMW to Group 5 specs for the 1976 Championship of Makes series where it finished first overall at the Silverstone 6 Hours. Monterey tech stickers through 2016. Scratched and cracked fiberglass bodywork, used interior. A serious race car with illustrious history. – There were four Henry Schmitt Motorsport BMWs at RM’s auction and this, the most extensively vintage raced of the four, was the only one that came up short. Its high bid is nearly double the successful bid of $660,000 for Schmitt’s Lightweight 320i Turbo. Naturally aspirated, it will be easier to drive and maintain and coupled with its history and dramatic appearance the consignor’s decision to hold out for a little more is understandable.

Lot # 220 1961 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SI Coupe Aerodinamico, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 2631SA; Engine # 2631SA; Black/Brown leather; Estimate $2,900,000 – $3,500,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $2,700,000. – 3967cc/340hp, 5-speed, Voxson radio, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Avon tires, open Marchal headlights and grille-mounted fog lights, Ferrari Classiche certified. – Originally sold in Italy but soon exported to the U.S. where it was bought through Bob Grossman by John Mecom, Jr. Later owned by Tom Mittler. Good older paint, excellent upholstery in a beautiful, rich color. The engine compartment is very good but showing a little age. Bright chrome. – Gooding didn’t sell their 400 Superamerica Coupe Aerodinamico in lesser condition than this for $2.3 million. This somewhat better car, with the April 9162 Car and Driver cover feature to its credit, didn’t fare any better. This is a surprising fail for two of the most beautiful, powerful and exclusive cars of the Ferrari Sixties.

Lot # 224 2007 Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren 722 Edition Coupe; S/N WDDAJ76F47M001313; Engine # 155980600001378; Crystal Antimony Grey/Black Alcantara, leather; Estimate $450,000 – $550,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $420,000 plus commission of 11.19%; Final Price $467,000. – Red calipers, Pilot Sport tires, XL seats. U.S. delivery – Rare 722 Edition with more power and stiffer suspension. Reportedly one of 150 built and 25 for the US market. 3,399 miles and no wear or flaws to speak of. – One of the premier GT cars of the 2000s, the McLaren SLR has nevertheless seen soft prices over the past year. This result doesn’t show that trend changing, although the same car sold for an even more modest $418,000 at RM Sotheby’s Phoenix in 2017.

Lot # 226 1992 Lancia Delta HF Integrale Evo I Hatchback; S/N ZLA831AB000576428; Giallo Ferrari/Black leather; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $145,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $162,400. – Alloy wheels, Hankook tires, air conditioning, jack and tools. – Giallo Ferrari special paint, a two-owner car with just 6,548 km and no modifications. Nearly spotless engine bay. Nearly no wear to the interior. There is a run near the driver’s door, which calls the paint into question. In like new condition other than that. – A lot of money for a four-cylinder hatchback, but the Delta Integrale is rally royalty. And since they became eligible for import to the US market, the pent-up demand for them sees strong prices like this, although it is a lower result than the $190,400 this car sold for at RM’s NYC Icons sale in 2017 when it had 37 fewer km on its odometer.

Lot # 228 1934 Packard Twelve-Series 1108 Convertible Sedan, Body by Dietrich; S/N 110887; Engine # 902444; Midnight Blue/Beige leather; Blue Canvas top; Estimate $1,200,000 – $1,400,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $925,000. – Dual enclosed spares with rear view mirrors, luggage rack, no luggage, folding canvas top, rollup division window, Solar headlamps, wood steering wheel. – First owned by Louise Arner Boyd famed for her Arctic research and her photographic record of Poland in the Thirties, Polish Countrysides. Later owned and restored for Bill Hirsch. The paint is very good but there are some light surface swirls on the hood and cowl as well as a few surface scratches on the driver’s side fender. The windshield brightwork is very good but the window trim has a few surface scratches. The trunk latch is pitted. The chrome on the headlamp housing, radiator louvers, and hood ornament are very good. The upholstery, dashboard, and instrument panel are very good. A well-restored Packard done in the late 80’s or early 90’s and cosmetically freshened in 2015 before winning an award at the Pebble Beach Concours that year. – A Packard Twelve Dietrich Convertible Sedan with an intriguing first owner’s history is a rare and desirable piece of automobile history that the owner can be understood for valuing more than the high bid here. It is a magnificent, luxurious automobile that must have made a memorable impression in Poland in the Thirties.

Lot # 229 1966 Jaguar XJ13 Replica Roadster, Body by Tempero; S/N 1B2232DN; Engine # SA7P32643; BRGreen/Green leather; Estimate $350,000 – $400,000; Facsimile restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $430,000 plus commission of 11.16%; Final Price $478,000. – RHD. Jaguar V12, ZF 5-speed, transaxle, 5-spoke Simmons modular centerlock wheels, Radial T/A tires, Autopower 4-point belts, brushed aluminum Talbot outside mirrors, Smiths gauges. – One of six Tempero aluminum-bodied replicas, dry sump engine. Cracked woodrim steering wheel. Decent paint with a few cracks and buffed through rivets. Clean, orderly engine compartment. Good lightly used upholstery. Used but still impressively usable. – It’s worth what people are willing to pay for it and that was more than RM Sotheby’s expected before the sale. Since the original is safely tucked away in Jaguar’s collection this is one of only six ways to experience the XJ13 sensation, and a sensation it should be, too.

Lot # 230 1954 Maserati A6GCS Race Car, Body by Fiandri & Malagoli; S/N 2078; Engine # 001; Red/Black leather; Estimate $3,250,000 – $3,750,000; Competition restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $2,700,000. – 1985cc/160hp inline dohc six, 5-speed, grey painted Borrani wire wheels, Pirelli Cinturato tires, full width Plexiglas windscreen, Marchal headlights. – Factory team car raced by Luigi Musso, class winner at the 1954 Tourist Trophy driven by Luigi Musso and Sergio Mantovani among other solid finishes. Sold to Ricardo Grandio in Argentina in 1955, class winner at the Buenos Aires 1000 km in 1955. Competed in the Mille Miglia 1987-1992 and 1995. Sold to the consignor in 1998; a replica built and exists in Italy based upon the Italian registration. Powered by a Crosthwaite & Gardner replica engine, comes with an original A6GCS engine renumbered 2078 on a display stand and another original A6GCS engine. Restored in 2013 and retaining good paint, older upholstery. Gran Turismo award winner at Pebble Beach in 2014. The interior and underbody are freshly painted and unblemished. – This is about as nice as any A6GCS can, or should, be, a car that is as comfortable on a race track or in the historic Mille Miglia as it is on a show field. While it didn’t find a new owner on the RM Sotheby’s auction block it should do so somewhere between the reported high bid and the pre-sale low estimate and would be a sound value when it does.

Lot # 231 1962 Jaguar XKE SI 3.8 Roadster Race Car; S/N 876825; Engine # R1095-9; White/Black vinyl; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $250,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $280,000. – Block number R2420-9. Bucket seats, driver’s paperclip rollbar, AutoMeter tach, SW engine gauges, Grey painted wire wheels, Dunlop Racing tires, big SU carbs, blank headlight covers, full width windscreen, JDHT certificate documented. – One of the first XKEs into the U.S. and immediately turned over to Joe Huffaker to be prepared for SCCA A/Production competition. Driven by Frank Morrill and Merle Brennan it was a success in West Coast events. Restored in 2011 with a 2016 engine rebuild by Joe Huffaker, Jr. 2017 Rolex Monterey tech sticker. Neat and tidy inside and out, especially the engine compartment. Thoroughly documented. including old-time movies. – This is a seriously historic SCCA race car that has been restored and historic race prepared to high standards and unusual quality. The new owner should feel privileged to own it and even more privileged to drive it.

Lot # 235 2005 Saleen S7 Twin Turbo Coupe; S/N 1S9SB18185S000062; Lizstick Red/Black, Gray leather; Estimate $550,000 – $700,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $580,000 plus commission of 10.86%; Final Price $643,000. – P Zero tires, CD stereo, polished 7-spoke alloy wheels, navigation system.. – 900 miles and like new. From the first year of the 750-horsepower twin-turbo model, of which only 30 were built. – It may not be as sophisticated as a Pagani, but the homegrown Saleen S7 was (and still is) one of the fastest cars anywhere in the world. With performance, looks and rarity all on its side, it’s not at all a bad value at this price compared to its European rivals. RM sold one here four years ago for $682,000 and Barrett-Jackson sold one in Scottsdale this year for $687,500, results which fit nicely with the one here in Monterey.

Lot # 236 2008 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Coupe; S/N VF9SA25C38M795081; Dark Bugatti Blue, Black Blue Metallic/Havanna Brown leather; Estimate $1,100,000 – $1,300,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $950,000 plus commission of 10.53%; Final Price $1,050,000. – U.S. delivery – From the Lingenfelter collection, where it has resided since new. Just 1,527 miles, recently serviced and like new. – Its performance still sounds like something from the future, but since this car was built Bugatti came out with several special versions of the Veyron and of course now there are the new Chirons to choose from. This car came at a healthy discount from its original $1.5M base price, but the result isn’t particularly surprising.

Lot # 237 1993 Jaguar XJ 220 Coupe; S/N SAJJEAEX8AX220789; Engine # 6A103325B; Silverstone Green/Sand leather; Estimate $400,000 – $450,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $370,000 plus commission of 11.35%; Final Price $412,000. – 3498cc/542hp Twin Turbo, 5-speed, alloy wheels, Bridgestone tires, power windows, Alpine CD stereo, sunroof. – Fantastic paint with no noticeable blemishes. The engine compartment has no deterioration and the interior is immaculate. A beautifully preserved car in a striking color and with just 9,100 km. It was also sold new to Tom Walkinshaw, and last year got a $50,000 service. – RM offered this car at Arizona in January where it was reportedly bid to $375,000. It sold here on a bid $5,000 smaller as the consignor adjusted expectations to the reality stated by the marketplace. Unfortunately as fast, sleek and luxurious as it is the XJ 220 will always be remembered as the car that came with a V6 (from the MG Metro 6R4) instead of the promised V12.

Lot # 238 1955 Lancia Aurelia B24S Spider America, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N B24S1044; Engine # B241052; Light Blue, Light Blue hardtop/Blue leather; Blue cloth top; Estimate $1,250,000 – $1,500,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $975,000. – 2451cc/118hp, floor shift, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin X tires, Carello headlights, Nardi intake with two Webers, soft top and Fontana hardtop. – One of 181 lefthand drive Spider Americas. Good paint. Uneven trunk fit. Passenger’s door doesn’t fit flush. Good chrome and interior. The tires are old and cracking. Orderly underbody. Restored in 1998, later modified with the Nardi intake and wire wheels and recently comprehensively serviced to the tune of $105,000. – Despite the (relatively) vast sums spent on it this is not a reassuring B24S Spider America, with many visible flaws that detract from an inference of its quality. The bidders weren’t convinced, either and pronounced it unworthy of a 7-figure bid, for a rare and desirable car that rarely brings a price as low as six-figures. Taking its presentation into account, the bidders were well within reason to hedge their bets.

Lot # 239 1965 Shelby Cobra 427 Roadster; S/N CSX3125; Blue, White stripes/Black leather; Estimate $1,250,000 – $1,500,000; Competition restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,050,000. – 427cid/425hp, single 4-barrel, cold air box, centerlock wide wheels, Eagle road race tires, white side exhaust, driver’s aeroscreen, paperclip rollbar. – A race car from new, 1968-69 SCCA Northeast Division A/Production champion. Later raced by Paul Chroinere [sic] for Sylvia Smith. Represented as the original chassis, engine, gearbox and interior with its early modified body but now has a replacement engine block. Includes original parts like heads and wheels replaced during restoration. Excellent paint, chrome and interior with a little leather stretch. The engine compartment is spotless. – There’s not a lot of original left in this 427 Cobra, particularly where the drivetrain is concerned, but it does have a credible early SCCA history and is honestly presented as a much-raced competition Cobra. The reported high bid here is reasonable considering the many replacement bits and the seller could have accepted it without serious regret.

Lot # 241 1985 Ferrari 288 GTO Berlinetta; S/N ZFFPA16B000055237; Rosso Corsa/Black, Red; Estimate $2,550,000 – $2,800,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $2,350,000. – Ansa sport exhaust, power windows, air conditioning, two-tone seats, Momo leather-wrapped steering wheel, Toyo tires, Blaupunkt cassette stereo. – The first GTO sold in Japan. Clear coating on the outer part of the wheels is coming loose. The paint is a bit tired. Lightly worn and faded seats. A Ferrari, especially a premier model like a 288 GTO, with 13,803 kilometers should really look better than this. It’s far from the world’s best example, but it does have desirable options. – This car was here a year and 224 km ago, and hammered not sold at a $2.55M hammer bid. RM also sold it for $2.75M in Arizona in 2015 and for $2.585M at Amelia Island in 2016, but in Monterey 2019 it was another seven-figure Ferrari that struggled.

Lot # 242 1964 Maserati 5000GT Coupe, Body by Michelotti; S/N AM103016; Engine # AM103016; Silver-Grey/Blue leather; Estimate $700,000 – $850,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $600,000. – 4941cc/380hp, 5-speed, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Avon tires. – Built for Briggs S. Cunningham. Quality older restoration showing some age even with a fairly recent repaint. Dusty underhood with some fluid dribbles. Thin trim chrome. Dusty and surface rusted underbody and chassis. Sound but aged and musty smelling upholstery. A famous and fast car that deserves better than it has gotten. – A unique Michelotti body on Maserati’s premier GT, but with a nose design that isn’t very successful. It was sold here in 2003 for $302,500, then again here at RM Monterey in 2017 for $1,017,500. The revised estimate reflects its deteriorating condition (and the bodywork design) even though the odometer shows only 21 more miles since 2003. The high bid is even more, apporpriately, cautious.

Lot # 243 1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 15569; Engine # B1984; Burgundy/Beige leather, Black bars; Estimate $725,000 – $775,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $520,000 plus commission of 10.96%; Final Price $577,000. – 4390cc/352hp, 5-speed. Veglia air conditioning, Becker Mexico AM-FM, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, headrests, power windows, painted nose panel, popup lights. – Excellent recent paint with no chips or visible blemishes. Good but soiled and creased original upholstery. Dead hood struts. Orderly engine compartment. The underbody has been repainted over old peeling undercoat. An FCS Platinum winner, now pretty driver. – Daytona history in a nutshell: Reported sold at Russo and Steele 2018 at Monterey for $390,500, then by RM at Amelia in 2014 for $781,000. This is pretty much the same Daytona it was back in 2014 and there is no earthly reason for it to have a $725-775,000 estimate range on a No Reserve car except to encourage unwitting bidders. They weren’t unwitting in Monterey and still paid a healthy price for this aged Daytona.

Lot # 244 1962 Ferrari 196 SP Spider, Body by Fantuzzi; S/N 0806; Engine # 0806; Red/Blue cloth; Estimate $8,000,000 – $10,000,000; Competition restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $7,000,000. – 1984cc/210hp, 5-speed, grey painted Borrani wire wheels, Dunlop Racing tires, covered Marchal headlights, grille-mounted fog lights, two tails, one high and the other low. – Originally built with V8 power and designated 248 SP, placed 3rd in class at Sebring 1962 driven by Buck Fulp and Peter Ryan for Chinetti’s NART. Updated back at Ferrari to a 2.6 litre V8 and redesignated 268 SP with only one known race, the Nürburgring 1000km driven by the Rodriguez brothers where it retired after going off-course. Given its present sohc V6 at the end of 1962 and sold through Chinetti to Doug Thiem who raced it with some success in the USRRC, later sold to Bob Grossman who achieved a class win and a second in the Nassau races. Later owned by Pierre Bardinon who had Fantuzzi construct a new high tail, later to Fabrizio Violati and from him to Rob Walton. Best in class at Amelia in 2010. Good recent repaint, older interior. Orderly engine compartment is like new as is the chassis and underbody. Represented as the original engine and gearbox. – A supremely purposeful and attractive shark-nose mid-engine Ferrari prototype with a record of informed owners that give it an impeccable provenance, it was reported sold by Brooks Auctioneers at Quail Lodge in 1999 prior to its most recent restoration for $1,285,000. Weighing only some 600 kilos dry with 210hp, it fights over its weight in historic racing and will be a welcome participant in any historic event for which it is eligible. Declining the reported high bid is optimistic, however, in current market conditions, a 2017 expectation in a 2019 market.

 

Lot # 247 2005 Porsche Carrera GT Coupe; S/N WP0CA29895L001510; Arancio Borealis/Black leather; Estimate $1,200,000 – $1,500,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,080,000 plus commission of 10.46%; Final Price $1,193,000. – Pilot Sport tires, carbon fiber shift knob. – Just 265 miles, and this special order paint looks spectacular. A top notch Carrera GT in every way. – And this is a top price for it. A record, in fact. Mecum sold a 252-mile car in Monterey four years ago for $1.1M, but this is now the most expensive Carrera GT sold at auction.

Lot # 251 2005 Ford GT Coupe; S/N 1FAFP90S15Y401180; Centennial White, Blue stripes/Black; Estimate $275,000 – $325,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $265,000 plus commission of 11.89%; Final Price $296,500. – Painted calipers, stripes, BBS wheels, McIntosh stereo (all four options). – Inch-long scratch on the driver’s side headlight. Just 1271 miles, but that’s almost on the high side for a 2005-06 Ford GT. – This car had just 7 miles on it in 2014 when it sold at Mecum Anaheim for $367,200, so someone has actually gotten some enjoyment out of that 550-horsepower blown V8. The car appeared with 1265 miles at Mecum Glendale a few months ago, but failed to sell at a $310,000 bid that should have been taken given the below-market result in Monterey. With a little napkin math, it looks like those 1264 miles over the past year cost nearly $56 each.

Lot # 252 1965 Ford GT40 Prototype Roadster; S/N GT108; White, Blue stripes/Blue cloth; Estimate $7,000,000 – $9,000,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $6,950,000 plus commission of 10.07%; Final Price $7,650,000. – Four downdraft Weber carbs with chrome velocity stacks, silver painted wire wheels, Dunlop Racing tires, Marchal rectangular headlights. – Prototype built at Ford Advanced Vehicles leading up to the GT40 Le Mans cars, one of twelve built and with a special steel monocoque intended for the roadster body. Later used by Kar Kraft in development of the Mark IV J-cars. No racing history, but the only known GT40 to give a ride to Henry Ford II. Generally restored like new but with some edge chips and an area of big cracks over the left rear tire. Restored like new some time ago and used since. – Even if it never raced this is an historic GT40 and notable that it is one of the few roadsters which gives it a special place for collectors who want to drive it on fine, sunny days. One of few cars to come close to their pre-sale estimates at Monterey this year and a showpiece for the new owner.

Lot # 253 1995 Ferrari F512 M Coupe; S/N ZFFVG40A1S0104065; Engine # 41709; Rosso Corsa/Black leather; Estimate $325,000 – $375,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $310,000 plus commission of 11.61%; Final Price $346,000. – 4943cc/440hp, 5-speed, Speedline turbine spoke modular alloy wheels, Michelin tires, air conditioning, U.S. delivery. – The last F512 M built by chassis number. Clean and unblemished top and bottom. The driver’s seat has a small cigarette burn but aside from that the upholstery is even better than expected for the 25,972 miles it has covered. Freshly serviced. – The F512 M is, despite looking like a gussied-up Testarossa, an extraordinary high performance Ferrari that usually brings vast prices on the order of double its predecessor the 512 TR. It deserves that recognition for its performance and rarity and this was a realistic result for this example’s condition and mileage.

Lot # 254 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Long Nose Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 08603; Engine # 08603; Rosso Rubino/Black leather; Estimate $2,200,000 – $2,400,000; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,800,000 plus commission of 10.28%; Final Price $1,985,000. – Triple Webers, Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Ansa exhaust, Talbot Berlin mirror, woodrim steering wheel, tools, manuals. – Used as a daily driver in the ’70s and restored at some point in later years. Very good but older paint and chrome. Very clean underneath. Lightly worn driver’s seat. Mostly gorgeous but older. – Sold at RM Arizona in 2015 for $2,750,000, then a no-sale at Mecum Monterey in 2016 at a $2.2M high bid. Sold for $2,205,000 at RM Sotheby’s Amelia Island last year and unloaded here at a significant but appropriately discounted price for 2019.

Lot # 255 1996 Vector M12 Coupe; S/N 1V9MB1228T1048005; Plum/Black; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $120,000. – Lamborghini Diablo V12. – Small crack on the passenger’s side of the nose. Otherwise looks very fresh and represented with just 5,940 miles. The M12 was a later, post-Jerry Wiegert model with a Diablo engine, but it’s outrageous in standard Vector fashion and very rare with just 14 built. – The catalog’s description of Vector’s saga, “Vector Aeromotive’s downfall was unlike any the automotive world had ever seen before” is brilliant and it makes owning a Vector a welcome topic of discussion at any Cars ‘n’ Coffee. This Vector was sold at Barrett-Jackson in 2009 for $94,600 when it had 5,388 miles, so it has actually been driven 552 miles in the past decade, more than most Vectors which are usually dysfunctional garage display cars. The Monterey bidders didn’t care.

Lot # 256 1952 Ferrari 225 Sport Spider, Body by Vignale; S/N 0214ED; Engine # 0214ED-0225E; Red/Tan leather; Estimate $4,000,000 – $5,000,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $3,350,000. – RHD. 2715cc/210hp, 5-speed, Silver painted Borrani wire wheels, Dunlop Racing tires, full width Plexiglas windscreen, woodrim steering wheel with finger buttons. – Raced in Ireland and Britain by Bobbie Baird and Roy Salvadori with modest success, then in Argentina by Carlos Lostalo. Later owned by and restored for Luciano Bollaert and driven on the historic Mille Miglia 1986-88. Original gearbox, engine 0225ED is installed, original block 0214ED comes with it. Excellent repaint, good interior, Cracking tires. Replaced right front fender. Loose wire hanging under the body. Paint blisters on the right side of the nose. Not as good as it deserves to be and showing the age of its restoration. – But good enough to set out on the Mille Miglia again with scant worry about stone chips because the presence of the original engine will go a long way to supporting another restoration. The bidders took all this into account with the realistic offer, a bid that is consistent with similar Ferraris and warranted serious consideration by the consignor.

Lot # 257 1967 Jaguar Pirana Coupe, Body by Bertone; S/N 1E50950; Engine # 7E532308; Silver/Tan leather; Estimate $400,000 – $600,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $290,000 plus commission of 11.72%; Final Price $324,000. – 4,325cc/265 XKE SI engine and 4-speed, Dunlop centerlock wheels, Dunlop tires, Smith’s air conditioning, pushbutton radio, woodrim steering wheel. – Special one-off Gandini-penned car commissioned by the editor of the Daily Telegraph that caused a splash at Earls Court, Turin, Montreal and New York then disappeared. Fully restored to its original appearance, this car foreshadowed the Lamborghini Espada that came shortly after. Restored to its original Earls Court appearance in the early teens. The chrome looks tired, but the paint is fantastic other than a small chip on the tail. Very good fully redone interior. Clean underneath. Condition is good but unremarkable, but the condition isn’t as relevant as the uniqueness and the story. – One-off car, one-off price reflecting the standard Jaguar components. A small fortune was spent restoring the original features after subsequent revisions, probably no less than the price it brought here. With the 4.2 XKE underpinnings it should be a joy to drive but a quandary where to show it: Italian events or those for Jaguars? It’s a choice the new owner doesn’t have to make; it’s a one-off that can be taken pretty much anywhere and appreciated everywhere, an outstanding buy at this price.

Lot # 258 2017 Pagani Huayra Roadster; S/N ZA9H12UA0HSF76016; Engine # 94100; Black carbon fiber, Crimson accents/Crimson leather; Estimate $2,750,000 – $3,250,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $2,500,000. – “Black Mamba” carbon fiber exterior, carbon brakes, Red calipers, Gold anodized engine compartment elements, matte titanium interior trim, matching Schedoni luggage, roof panel. – <500 miles and like new. Number 94 of 100 built. – Honestly, this is more a work of art than an automobile, displaying intricate details from its flying outside mirrors that resemble the antennae of an exotic moth to the lush highly stylized instrument pod and steering wheel. It is a constant fascination to look at and no wonder it hasn’t traveled far. At the reported high bid just short of the low pre-sale estimate it should have traveled off the Monterey Peninsula with a new owner.

Lot # 261 1994 McLaren F1 LM Specs Coupe; S/N SA9AB5AC1R1048018; Engine # 6112160020859; Platinum Silver Metallic/Beige, Brown Alcantara; Estimate $21,000,000 – $23,000,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $18,000,000 plus commission of 10.03%; Final Price $19,805,000. – Upgraded at McLaren to Le Mans GTR specs including an unrestricted 680hp engine, one of only two so modified. Later upgraded again with the Extra-High Downforce kit, 18-inch centerlock GTR wheels, improved air conditioning, gas discharge headlights, additional radiators and transmission cooler. Matched fitted luggage. – Serial number 018. Represented as <21,500 km. Light usage is visible only on the seats. Chipguarded nose. Participated in three McLaren F1 tours in 2012, 2014 and 2017. – This result is some $4 million more than Bonhams got for s/n 044 at Quail Lodge in 2017, but that was a standard street car and this has much more performance and special built-by-McLaren features that set it up as the pinnacle of McLaren F1s. The mileage is unusual, but people who have driven a McLaren F1 uniformly agree that it is the most satisfying and rewarding supercar ever built, with comfort, blistering performance and phenomenal handling – despite having no modern driver aids. Its result here is a benchmark not likely to be repeated unless the other “LM Specs” F1 comes to market.

Lot # 262 1967 Porsche 911 S Coupe; S/N 308081S; Engine # 961788; Polo Red/Black leatherette; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $142,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $159,600. – Fuchs wheels, Porsche woodrim steering wheel, Blaupunkt radio, fog lights. – The paint is very good. The windshield trim is very good but there are few very light surface scratches towards the center. The rocker panel trim on the driver’s side has a few small surface scratches. Very good interior. The rear window has surface scratches and is dull. Represented as matching numbers and fully restored, just not perfect. – Sold by Bonhams at Scottsdale in 2015 for $137,500 this is a quality example of an early 911 S, good enough to be shown with pride but not so good it can’t be driven to experience its performance and handling. It could have brought more without being expensive and is a good value for the new owner.

Lot # 263 1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupe Speciale, Body by Ghia; S/N 0476AM; Salmon, Anthracite Grey/Grey leather, Coral inserts; Estimate $5,000,000 – $7,000,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $4,700,000. – 4522cc/340hp, Silver painted Borrani wire wheels, Clayton heater, Marchal headlights. – Built for Bob Wilke, Indianapolis entrant and 3-time winner with his Leader Card Specials, one of several special Ferraris built for him, this one on the full competition 375MM chassis. The last Ferrari bodied by Ghia and displayed by them at the Turin Motor Show. Good recent repaint, bright chrome. Dull wheels, no name tires. Sound surface cracked original interior. Dented grille trim. Loose wires dangling under the dash. The left side of the hood doesn’t latch and the front suspension sits much lower than the back. Orderly but aged engine compartment. Given a cosmetic redo at some point and not much else but has covered only 13,371 km from new. Ferrari Classiche certified. – This is a singular Ferrari that deserves the frequently misapplied adjective “unique”. It has had a benign history of caring owners including the Wilke family until the mid-Eighties and is reasonably well-preserved although the interior is getting a little edgy. It was bid to 1.3 million Swiss Francs at Bonhams auction in Gstaad in 2002, $912,000 at the time against a generous estimate range of 2.2-2.5 million CHF ($1.5-$1.7 million). It came closer to getting sold today and represents a wonderful opportunity that was missed by a margin small enough that it might have been sold if RM Sotheby’s had been willing to share some of the Buyer’s Premium with the seller if there was money at or close to this bid.

Lot # 265 1932 Duesenberg Model J Victoria Coupe, Body by Judkins; S/N 2354; Engine # J354; Light Green, Olive Green, Straw accents, Light Green padded roof/Green; Light Green Roof Cover top; Estimate $1,400,000 – $1,800,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,250,000. – Dual exposed sidemount spares with mirrors, chrome wire wheels, luggage trunk, chrome running board trim, Twilite headlamps, folding front passenger’s seat, Crosley radio. – Designed by Gordon Buehrig for Judkins, one of two built to this design. Restored in 1996, the paint is very good but there is a small crack where the driver’s side cowl and A-pillar intersect. There is also a small touched up paint chip on the driver’s side drip rail and a small scratch on the driver’s side fender. The upholstery is very good. The chrome on the radiator shell, headlights, and wire wheels are very good. Very well restored and freshened more recently, it has an award at Amelia Island in 2015, Best in Show at the 2018 Milwaukee Concours d’Elegance, display at Pebble Beach in 2017 and awards at Hilton Head, St. Johns, San Marino and Boca Raton to show for it. A magnificent Model J with exceptional Gordon Buehrig-designed coachwork. – Just seasoned enough with sufficient age and patina after a meticulous high quality restoration, this is a choice Duesenberg of the highest quality and elegant design and colors. The Monterey bidders missed an opportunity with this car although not without trying at the reported high bid.

Lot # 266 1964 Shelby Cobra 289 Roadster; S/N CSX2216; White/Red leather; Estimate $825,000 – $900,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $725,000 – 289cid/271hp, chrome wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, grille and trunk guards, wind wings, translucent sun visors, documented by the original instruction book with the first owner’s business card and notes, window sticker, Shelby invoice and AC invoice copy. – Very good paint, chrome, and interior with light wrinkling on the driver’s side. Recently restored to original colors and very high standards with no significant flaws. Sold in these original colors, then lightly crashed by a service center employee in the late 1960s. Modified in the 1970s with roll bar, 12-quart oil pan, oil cooler, sway bars and Koni shocks, but restored to its original specification within the last few years with a correct period K-Code engine – The replacement engine is a dead weight around the neck of this Cobra’s value, but one that is hardly as heavy as indicated by this bid. Auctions America offered it at Auburn Fall in 2016 where it was reported bid to $700,000. RM offered it at the Petersen Museum last December where it achieved a bid of $840,000, one that looks positively generous after today’s result. Its condition is essentially like new and somewhere close to the bid here it will bring immense joy to a new owner without undue damage to the 401K.

Lot # 270 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Speedster; S/N WP0EB0911KS173786; Engine # 64K06570; Cinnabar Red/Cashmere Beige leather; Estimate $200,000 – $275,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $340,000 plus commission of 11.47%; Final Price $379,000. – Suede interior trim and steering wheel rim, chromed Fuchs wheels, gold lug nuts, Comp T/A tires, air conditioning, power windows and seats, snorkely brake light, Blaupunkt Charleston cassette stereo, wide body, short throw shifter, limited slip. – Special order suede on the dash, steering wheel and door panels, basically everywhere but the seats. It’s not fine or smooth suede, either, but almost shaggy and from a distance looks like it’s made of golden retriever. It’s an odd touch that will likely turn a lot of bidders off, but it does have just 253 miles on it and was the last ’89 Speedster produced. – RM Sotheby’s brought this car to Arizona last year with identical mileage and in identical condition. it didn’t sell then at a high bid of $310,000, which was a perfectly fair offer. Suede isn’t all of a sudden in vogue in 2019, but this car’s odd special order features found more fans in Monterey and sold for a hefty premium over a standard Speedster in this condition.

Lot # 274 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350 Fastback; S/N SFM6S180; Wimbledon White, Blue stripes/Black vinyl; Estimate $275,000 – $325,000; Modified restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $305,000 plus commission of 11.64%; Final Price $340,500. – 289/306hp, hood pins, woodrim steering wheel, Hurst shifter, later top-loader transmission (the original T10 is included), 3.50 rear axle, Shelby wheels. – A carry-over ’65 with ’66 tags. The paint is good but there is a crack on the cowl near the passenger’s side as well one on the passenger’s side A-pillar. The driver’s side drip rail also has a foot long crack. Good chrome up front, but the rear bumper is lightly scratched. The passenger’s side quarter window trim is raised with adhesive and crud visible. The upholstery is good but the driver’s seat does have some pulled stitching. Originally used as a dealer demonstrator in OKC and the engine was replaced very early on with the one currently in the car, documented by a Shelby invoice. Restored in the mid-2000s and set up for touring. – Generously valued by the bidders here in Monterey who looked past (or perhaps appreciated) the top-loader transmission and 3.50 axle upgrades and accepted the early replacement engine as a fact of early Shelby history. These were not infallibly identical series-produced cars. In a sketchy analog age engine build details were missed in the rush to meet orders and engines blew up, particularly dealers’ demonstrators that might (?) have gone to Hallett for a weekend’s competition only to have their drivers’ enthusiasm exceed their competence. This is a magnanimous price even taking all those factors into account and should be considered carefully in fitting it to a ’65 Carry Over GT350 value curve.

Lot # 275 2016 Jaguar F-Type Project 7 Convertible; S/N SAJWA7A88GMK28188; British Racing Green, White nose band/Black leather; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $125,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $140,000. – Rear-wheel drive, rear spoiler, Yellow calipers, 5-spoke 5-bolt wheels, racing helmet (size unknown), original documentation. – 4800 miles and no wear or age to speak of, which it shouldn’t. One of 250 Project 7s built and 50 for the US market. A development of the Jaguar SVR with rear wheel drive and no roof – Sold for less than this car cost new. Gooding sold a nearly identical one at Pebble Beach last year for $198,000, but that car had just 50 miles at the time. This seller at least got some enjoyment out of its 5 liter 567hp engine.

Lot # 303 1964 Peel Trident Coupe; S/N E127; Engine # 80416004771; Red/Black; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $67,200. – Single cylinder 49cc/4.5hp Zweirad-Union 2-stroke engine, 3-speed, bubble roof. – Restored 20 years ago and aged, but one can’t be picky when shopping for a Peel and its personality is more important than the condition. Peel didn’t keep strict production records, but the long-time owner and seller of this car thinks there are about 10 left. – At nearly $1400 per cc, this isn’t a great buy in terms of performance, but personality sells and this car has it in spades. It got more attention during the auction preview days than any of the Astons or Ferraris. It looks like it came straight from a Jetsons comic strip and made all the young women smile. Peel’s advertising slogan was “Almost cheaper than walking” which isn’t true today. RM has made hay from Peel Tridents for years and despite how this appears on a $/cc basis it actually is about half what similar Peels (the only “car” assembled on the Isle of Man) have brought in the past.

Lot # 305 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350H Fastback; S/N SFM6S977; Candy Apple Red, Gold stripes/Black vinyl; Estimate $140,000 – $180,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $122,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $137,200. – 4-speed, Magnum 500 wheels with Hertz center caps, power steering and brakes. – The paint is very good but the passenger’s side gold stripe has an inch long spot where the outline is inconsistent. The front bumper is very good but there are light surface scratches. The passenger’s side quarter window is dull. The windshield trim has a small misalignment on the driver’s side top corner. The rear window trim is also slightly misaligned on the driver’s side. The upholstery, carpet, dashboard and instrument panel are in very good condition. One of barely 60 red GT350Hs. Represented as matching numbers engine, has the desirable 4-speed, and restored a while ago to solid standards. – Documented by SAAC as having the correct Ford VIN, the 4-speed is most likely a later conversion, improving driving enjoyment but not doing much for collectability but at this price who cares? This is a good value in a sound and presentable GT350H.

Lot # 307 1955 Austin-Healey 100-4 BN2 Roadster; S/N BN2L228730; Engine # 1B228730; Black/Persimmon Red; Red vinyl top; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $95,200. – Painted wire wheels, Michelin XAS tires, overdrive, banjo steering wheel, BMIHT documented, Le Mans camshaft, fog lights. – Matching numbers engine CA black plate car. Long stored until found and restored. Older but very good paint and chrome. Excellent newer top with freshly painted frame. Very good fully restored interior other than original gauges and steering wheel. A sound, attractive older restoration. – If this Healey has been used at all since the restoration was completed it has been very carefully and has been equally carefully stored. It impressed the generally well-informed bidders in Monterey who bought it for a generous but not unreasonable price.

Lot # 308 1956 Volkswagen Type 2 Samba Microbus, 23-Window; S/N 170230; Chestnut Brown, Sealing Wax Red/Tan; Brown top; Estimate $155,000 – $195,000; Recent restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $112,000. – 1853cc, 95hp engine, Freeway Flyer gearbox, hub caps, whitewalls, folding top, roof rack. – Mostly very good paint, but there are a few masking errors. The belt line trim is good, but the portion on the driver’s door is dull. Most of the windows are in good condition but a few have large scratches. Both the driver’s and front passenger’s door has chipped glass on the edges. Very good interior. A mostly very attractive, well-restored 23-Window in interesting colors, but the restoration missed on a few significant details which do not augur well for the restoration’s overall quality and consistency. – Microbuses had mixed results in Monterey this year, with many selling for modest results but also a 21-Window Samba selling for 132 grand at Mecum and this one bringing a surprisingly high six-figure result despite its numerous flaws and incorrect, but more powerful, engine. The bidders were counting windows instead of looking closely at the Bus and paid too generously even at this price well under the presale estimate.

Lot # 311 2004 Ferrari 360 Challenge Stradale Coupe; S/N ZFFDU57A740134741; Black, White stripe/Red, Black Alcantara; Estimate $220,000 – $240,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $195,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $218,400. – 3586cc/400hp, paddle shift, SF shields, Black calipers, carbon discs, carbon fiber mirrors, engine cover and interior trim, Alpine stereo, power windows, climate control, 7-spoke alloy wheels PZero tires. – Represented as <10,700 miles, one owner. Sand pitted nose, swirled paint, lightly faded dashtop. Unusually “used” for a Challenge Stradale. – The bidders picked up on the evidence of use and resisted the temptation to get overly enthusiastic but still paid a retail price.

Lot # 312 1968 Ferrari 365 GTC Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 11969; Engine # 11969; Red/Beige leather; Estimate $500,000 – $600,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $530,000 plus commission of 10.94%; Final Price $588,000. – 4390cc/320hp, 5-speed, Becker Europa II AM-FM, centerlock alloy wheels, Michelin XWX tires, power windows, Carello headlights. – Even panels, flush fits, regular gaps except the trunk which is slightly offset and stands proud on the left. Good unworn upholstery. Microblistered paint on the cowl and polisher swirled on the hood. The chassis and underbody are unrestored but clean and dry. – Reported bid to $375,000 at RM’s Amelia Island auction in 2012, it has now added 3,255 to the odometer bringing it to 34,990 km. The years are not wearing well and it would make a much better visual impression in its original Azzurro Hyperion. Excellent road cars with sleek, handsome Pininfarina coachwork, 330 GTCs are off their peak and this is a realistic price in 2019.

Lot # 313 1965 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster; S/N 1E11898; Opalescent Dark Blue/Light Grey leather; Blue cloth top; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $270,000 plus commission of 11.85%; Final Price $302,000. – 4235cc/265hp, 4-speed, 6-inch rim chrome wire wheels, Michelin Defender tires, no radio, 3.07 rear axle, Jaguar Heritage documentation – Beautiful clearcoat repaint over a skim coat of filler. Attractive wrinkled upholstery. Bright chrome. Show polished engine compartment. Makes a great first impression but the finish is almost too good, confirmed by the paint gauge. – The bidders bought the glitz although the impression created by this XKE is so good their reaction can be understood and appreciated. This is not an exorbitant price, just a generous one.

Lot # 314 2017 Ford GT Coupe; S/N 2FAGP9CW9HH200063; Beryllium Orange, Black stripes/Black Alcantara; Estimate $1,200,000 – $1,500,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,125,000 plus commission of 10.44%; Final Price $1,242,500. – 213cid/647hp EcoBoost V6 Twin Turbo, carbon fiber wheels, Silver calipers, carbon fiber deck and engine cover molding, dark tinted windows. – 400 miles and like new. Serial number H063. – This result was considerably more than Bonhams got ($1,050,000) for their Heritage Edition earlier this week. Maybe it was the eye-searing color of this one.

Lot # 315 1995 Ferrari F50 Berlinetta; S/N ZFFTG46AXS0103351; Engine # 40789; Rosso Corsa/Black leather, Red cloth inserts; Black cloth top; Estimate $3,000,000 – $3,500,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,722,727 plus commission of 10.18%; Final Price $3,000,000. – 6-speed, SF shields, PZero tires, hardtop, fitted luggage, manuals, spares, tools and accessories. – Represented as <8,000 miles from new, which is a lot for an F50. Driven carefully without any evidence of wear or road hazards. Ferrari Classiche certified, FCA Platinum. – This transaction concluded post-block with a negotiated all-in price that reflects a major premium considering the relatively high miles. Its condition and record of recent comprehensive service are reassuring, but it is still expensive.

Lot # 317 1997 Ferrari F355 Spider Convertible; S/N ZFFXR48A2V0107584; Rosso Corsa/Tan leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $175,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $196,000. – 6-Speed, P Zero tires, Black calipers, climate control, power windows. – From the Ming collection. Just 705 miles, so it has hardly ever been driven, but it was reportedly serviced regularly, which is important and expensive on a 355. Given the body style, the mileage and the shifter between the seats, it’s among the most desirable production 355s around. – A shockingly expensive price, well over even RM’s ambitious $150,000 high estimate. Until an even lower-mile time-warp example comes out of hiding, however, the new owner can at least claim to have the world’s best 355 Spider.

Lot # 318 1991 Ferrari F40 Berlinetta; S/N ZFFMN34A5M0087568; Engine # 24929; Rosso Corsa/Red cloth; Estimate $1,500,000 – $1,800,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,525,000 plus commission of 10.33%; Final Price $1,682,500. – Centerlock modular wheels, Pirelli PZero tires, SF shields, air conditioning, power windows, U.S. delivery, Assembly number 04651. – Ming Collection. 1,707 miles and like new. – This result is a serious premium for low miles and meticulous preservation, a 2016 price for an F40 that has existed in a time warp since at least then and one of few lots offered in Monterey to break into the auction companies’ pre-sale estimate range even if was only by a bidding paddle twitch.

Lot # 319 2007 Ferrari F430 Spider Convertible, Body by Scaglietti; S/N ZFFEW59A970156806; Red/Tan leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $180,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $201,600. – SF shields, Red calipers, carbon brakes, carbon fiber rear fascia, center stack, console and seats, Tubi exhaust (original included), heavily optioned including a leather-wrapped fire extinguisher in the passenger’s footwell, Assembly number 73967. – Ordered new by the Ming Collection with a sticker price of $313,000 and meticulously preserved with only 262 miles. Like new, if not better. – This is a superior price but it bought the new owner what is essentially a brand new 12-year old Ferrari at a big discount from the original price. Now, what to do with it? A few careful miles won’t have much effect on its value, but roll it over into four digits and the cost of the driving experience will become material. On the other hand, preserving it further seems rather pointless.

Lot # 320 1984 Ferrari 512 BBi Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFJA09B000050965; Rosso Corsa/Tan leather; Estimate $350,000 – $425,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $380,000 plus commission of 11.32%; Final Price $423,000. – Power windows, Pioneer cassette stereo, Borletti air conditioning, centerlock 5-spoke alloy wheels, Michelin TRX tires. – 2,502 miles and like new. Last serviced in February 2016 and certified for use in California. Offered from the Ming Collection of low mileage Ferraris. – One of seven remarkably low mileage Ferraris offered from this collection, all but two without reserve and all of them sold on the block, the low mileage, provenance and California cert brought a significant premium of nearly $100,000. It’s expensive, but where will another one like it turn up and that supports the bidders’ enthusiasm.

Lot # 321 2013 Ferrari 458 Spider Convertible, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFF68NHA8D0193700; Red/Black leather, Red Alcantara inserts; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $320,000 plus commission of 11.56%; Final Price $357,000. – Anthracite 5-spoke alloy wheels, Red calipers, carbon brakes, carbon fiber interior trim rear fascia, engine panels and exhaust pipe surrounds, Pilot Super Sport tires, built in radar detector, lowered, Akraphovic switchable exhaust. – Ordered new by the Ming Collection and preserved in pristine condition among the collection’s other low mileage Ferraris. It has 409 miles and is like new, if not better. – This is an epochal result, not only having a huge premium for originality but also breeching RM Sotheby’s pre-sale high estimate, a feat almost unparalleled at the Monterey auctions this year. It may reflect the many custom features, an attribute that seems at odds with its low mileage and obsessive preservation.

Lot # 322 2006 Ferrari FXX Berlinetta; S/N ZFFHX62X000146355; Red, White stripe/Black cloth; Estimate $2,850,000 – $3,250,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $3,200,000 plus commission of 10.16%; Final Price $3,525,000. – Black centerlock alloy wheels, Black calipers, carbon brakes, SF shields, Bridgestone Potenza Scuderia tires, full complement of FXX equipment and regalia, still factory packed. Assembly # 62909. – Delivery miles only and still like new. Accepted at Ferrari’s Fiorano test track, then crated and shipped to the Ming Collection where it was placed on display and has never turned a wheel. – Even fewer miles than the FXX sold by Artcurial in Paris in 2018 for $3,193,431 and an all-time auction record for an FXX. It is destined to be preserved as some sort of artifact (although the only way to discover how far it has traveled is by a computer scan of its brain: it has no odometer), a waste of its hybrid performance, advanced aerodynamics and dynamic electronic vehicle stability. The result, reported as an all-in price of $3,520,000 by RM Sotheby’s in two places, does not compute back to a rational hammer bid, which was reported to be $3,200,000. The final price has been adjusted here to be consistent.

324

Lot # 324 2014 Ferrari LaFerrari Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFF76ZFA6E0205297; Grigio Ferro, Black Carbon Fiber roof/Red leather; Estimate $2,900,000 – $3,400,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,675,000 plus commission of 10.19%; Final Price $2,947,500. – Yellow digital gauges, fitted luggage, black calipers, black alloy wheels, SF shields, U.S. delivery. – <450 miles and like new except for bug residue on the right mirror support. – A generous result but it bought a distinctive and virtually unused LaFerrari with generous features that brought it the highest bid of the three LaFerraris at the Monterey auctions.

Lot # 325 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0 Coupe; S/N WP0AF2A90BS786000; Engine # 61B32027; Black, Carbon fiber/Black leather; Estimate $500,000 – $600,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $600,000 plus commission of 10.83%; Final Price $665,000. – 3,996/520hp, 6-speed, yellow calipers, carbon ceramic brakes, tinted windows and windshield, leather interior trim, Sport Chrono Package Plus, Erector set wing, front axle lift, Sound Package Plus, owner’s manuals, original window sticker and Porsche CofA documented. – Ordered new by Jerry Seinfeld through Porsche Exclusive with tons of options and a $245,515 sticker, now with 5,471 miles and, if anything, better than when it was new. – This car sold at the RM Sotheby’s Porsche 70th Anniversary sale last year for $566,000 and is in the same like-new condition. This was apparently the most expensive 997 GT3 RS 4.0 ordered from the factory and was the most expensive one sold at auction as well. It is the most expensive one sold at auction again, with the numerous desirable options and the Seinfeld history counting for even more this time across the block, a good example of the intrinsic value of ownership by a recognized expert in marque and model, but nearly breathtakingly expensive in this transaction.

Lot # 326 1972 Ferrari 246 GT Dino Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 04970; Engine # 142536; Red/Black leather; Estimate $475,000 – $550,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $435,000 plus commission of 11.15%; Final Price $483,500. – 2419cc/195hp, 5-speed, Sony CD stereo, Borletti air conditioning, power windows, Campagnolo alloy wheels, Michelin tires, flared fenders and Daytona seats, tool roll, jack, books. – Torn, seam pulled upholstery. Old repaint cracked behind both quarter windows. Old window channels. Old undercoat in the wheel wells. Scratched and scraped engine compartment. 30,785 miles and one owner until 2014. – Sold by Gooding & Company at Amelia in 2014 for $627,000, then by RM at Arizona in 2018 for $406,500, this is a charmingly original and well-preserved Dino. It brought a whopping great price here at Monterey even taking its limited ownership history and documented miles into account. The bidders looked past the crappy repaint and the torn original upholstery to see something that is ephemeral and unlikely to be found again, even in a “Chairs and Flares” Dino.

Lot # 327 1961 Jaguar XKE SI 3.8 Flat Floor Roadster; S/N 875331; Engine # R1464-9; Opalescent Dark Blue/Blue-Grey leather; Blue cloth top; Estimate $400,000 – $500,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $340,000. – 3781cc/265hp, 4-speed, exterior bonnet latch, welded louvers, chrome wire wheels, Dunlop bias ply tires, Radiomobile radio. – Represented as matching numbers engine and transmission with JDHT documentation. Very good paint, chrome and interior with stretched driver’s seat cushion. Good slightly aged engine compartment. Not fresh but very well restored and holding up well. – Sold here fresh from restoration in 2014 for $440,000 less than 300 miles have been rolled over on the odometer since then but the age is clearly showing and the high bid here is not at all unreasonable for the present condition. Flat floor XKEs with their constricted footwells and back-breaking seats are not the best driving cars. That helps explain the low miles in the past five years but also bidders’ reluctance to place a generous value on a car that is basically an object, not an enjoyable driver. The glitz and glimmer has dimmed, as has the showoff value.

Lot # 329 1958 Lancia Aurelia B24S Convertible, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N B24S1445; Engine # B241554; Ivory/Dark Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $325,000 – $400,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $300,000. – 2451cc/110hp, floor shift, woodrim steering wheel, hubcaps, Michelin X tires, no radio. – One family owned since 1977 and looks like it. Indifferent quality repaint while assembled with masking misses and old tattered door seals. Good upholstery. Cracked hood scoop and left front wheel arch painted over, not repaired. Old undercoat in the wheel wells. Deserved better attention, even if it’s intended to be a weekend tour car. – The consignor should have taken this the reported bid or negotiated a deal post-block if there was money in the vicinity.

Lot # 330 1938 Lagonda V-12 Rapide Drophead Coupe; S/N 14068; Engine # 14068; Dark Green, Ivory/Green leather; Black top; Estimate $1,200,000 – $1,500,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $940,000. – RHD. Disc wheels, Michelin blackwall tires, fender skirts, boot cover, single driving light, suicide doors, Smiths dash clock. – Upgraded by the factory with Le Mans spec engine with four SU carbs the boosted power to a claimed 206hp from the standard 2-carb V12’s 175. Fantastic older paint, chrome and interior. Excellent interior with almost no visible wear. Very clean underneath. Restored a while ago to the very high standards a rare and splendid car like this deserves, class winner at Pebble Beach in 2017. Still needs nothing. – Sold in 1991 at one of Dr. Terry Bennett’s collection disposition sales in dastardly condition (“rust bubbles under repaint, surface rust under, tired chrome, dirty and neglected engine; sold as is with two thrown rods and holed block”) for $51,480 (which was a lot of money in 1991.) Now beautifully restored, the offer here is not unreasonable, but also not sufficient to convince a rational seller.

Lot # 331 1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 4131GT; Engine # 4131; Red/Beige leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $10,500,000 – $13,000,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $9,400,000. – 2953cc/280hp, 4-speed, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, fender mirror, Marchal headlights and fog lights. – Represented as the penultimate California Spyder built, single ownership since 1994 and owned by George Carrick, author of the Spyder California book, before that. Good repaint, otherwise original with old undercoat, an orderly engine compartment with some road grime and fuel and oil dribbles, surface cracked upholstery and old chrome. Ferrari Classiche Red Book certified. – The reported high bid is 2014 money for even an SWB California Spyder and even the low estimate is 2015 money, neither reflecting this Cal Spyder’s ownership nor its originality. The bidders discounted the history, concentrated on the presentation and missed an opportunity by being overly conservative.

Lot # 332 1971 Mercedes-Benz 280SL Convertible; S/N 11304410022644; Medium Blue, Medium Blue hardtop/Cognac leather; Brown cloth top; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $150,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $168,000. – Sunroof hardtop, 5-speed, Dark Blue steering wheel, Becker Mexico cassette stereo, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, Euro headlights, fitted luggage. – Good paint, chrome and interior. The engine compartment is orderly with some oily residue, age and use. A 10-year old restoration with some miles but good care and essentially unblemished. – The sunroof hardtop was high on the list of conversations during the preview. Along with the manual transmission it added significant value and interest to this car and contributed to the healthy price it brought, an amount that is supported by the sum of its parts.

Lot # 333 1958 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Veloce Sprint, Body by Bertone; S/N AR1493E06874; Engine # AR131531877; Dark Blue/Dark Blue leather, Pale Grey inserts; Estimate $140,000 – $180,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $110,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $123,200. – Silver steel wheels, hubcaps, Pirelli Cinturato tires, 5-speed, 40DCOE Italian Webers, Black wrinkle painted cam covers, dual Talbot outside mirrors. – Excellent paint on slightly bowed panels, good chrome, very good interior. No appreciable body filler. The engine compartment is like new as is the underbody. Better than new although it is cataloged as a “series-correct” Veloce engine, not as the original. – While this result is sensible in the current market it’s hard not to think that six figures for a Giulietta, even a thoroughly restored Sprint Veloce like this, is rather staggering. Times change, though, and houses no longer cost $15,000, either.

Lot # 334 1961 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet SII, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 3009 GT; Engine # 3009 GT; Black/Tan leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $1,500,000 – $1,800,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,375,000 plus commission of 10.36%; Final Price $1,517,500. – 2953cc/240hp, 4-speed, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin X tires, halogen headlights, Marchal fog lights behind the grille. – Very good paint, chrome and upholstery. The engine compartment has been restored like new with age showing. The underbody is clean and nearly like new. A quality older restoration holding up very well. Represented as the original engine, Ferrari Classiche inspected but not yet certified. – Handsomely presented and thoroughly restored although with some age, this is a highly desirable Cab II and brought a somewhat strong but not unreasonable price for its quality and style.

Lot # 335 2005 Ford GT Coupe; S/N 1FAFP90S35Y400984; Midnight Blue, White stripes/Black leather; Estimate $300,000 – $350,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $330,000 plus commission of 11.52%; Final Price $368,000. – Four options: BBS wheels, stripes, red calipers and McIntosh stereo. – <100 miles, still has the delivery labels. – There should be a contest somewhere to find the ’05-’06 Ford GT with the fewest miles. This one has a photo in the catalog showing 59.4 miles which must be a contender although there may be one or two still at Ford without even delivery miles (they’re exempt from the contest.) In any event this is a generous price for the minimal miles and the handsome livery.

Lot # 336 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Lightweight Coupe; S/N 964015; Engine # 62N11419; Black/Black cloth; Estimate $450,000 – $550,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $410,000 plus commission of 11.22%; Final Price $456,000. – Alloy wheels, whale tail, roll cage, Recaro racing seats with Sabelt harnesses, fire system. – Unusual Carrera 4 Lightweight, one of 22 built. 4,481 km from new. Imported to the US for competition only use. Tidy engine bay. Quite a few small chips and scratches on the nose that look like they came off the track. The rest of the car is clean, so it likely just did a few track events and was stored carefully the rest of the time. – This is a staggering result for a four-wheel drive 911, but this is also a very rare car and a factory lightweight, which translates to big money in Porsche circles. It sold for just $133,500 at Bonhams Quail Lodge from Mike Amalfitano’s collection nine years ago, but the changes in the Porsche market between then and now have been massive and this result is representative of them.

Lot # 337 1962 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 3359GT; Engine # 3359; Silver-Grey/Red leather; Estimate $8,000,000 – $10,000,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $7,400,000 plus commission of 10.07%; Final Price $8,145,000. – 2953cc/280hp, 4-speed, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Pirelli Cinturato tires, Marchal headlights and fog lights, external fuel filler, tool roll, engine internal number 86/62E. – Beautiful clearcoat paint, inviting and pristine interior, spotless engine compartment. 2012 restoration by Ferrari Classiche and better than new. Ferrari Classiche Red Book certified – Offered by Gooding & Co. at Pebble Beach in 2016 where it was reported bid to $9.3 million, this is a stunningly beautiful 250 GT SWB. It was displayed during the preview with a photo similar to that used by Ferrari in its SWB presentation, an image that is iconic (and I use that word sparingly) to Ferrari fans of a certain age. It is nothing if not a good value at this result, in truth one of the best values of this year’s Monterey auctions.

Lot # 339 2005 Porsche Carrera GT Coupe; S/N WP0CA298X5L001399; GT Silver Metallic/Ascot Brown leather; Estimate $625,000 – $725,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $650,000 plus commission of 10.77%; Final Price $720,000. – 5733cc/605hp, Yellow calipers, luggage, centerlock alloy wheels, Michelin Pilot Sport tires, accessories, books and tools. – Two owners, 5,107 miles, like new. – Offered at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale earlier this year where it was reported bid to the same amount as the successful hammer bid here. It has added about 70 miles to the odometer since then with no visible effect upon condition, which is still pristine, and brought an appropriate price.

Lot # 340 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Long Nose Alloy Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 08497; Engine # 08497; Dark Blue/Beige leather; Estimate $2,900,000 – $3,500,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $2,300,000. – 3286cc/280hp 3 or 6 Weber Carbs, 5-speed, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin tires, Carello headlights, 6-carb intake is installed. – Restored in the mid-naughts with excellent paint, bright chrome and inviting interior. The underbody has been done like new. The engine compartment is tidy but has paint loss on some panels and is showing age. Built with 3 Webers but comes with both 3- and 6-Weber intakes. Ferrari Classiche Red Book certified. – A 3-carb 275 GTB, despite having 6 Webers installed, is still a 3-carb, although unusual with the rare alloy body. The reported high bid is not out of line for this car’s history and condition. It would be a sound value at anything close to the reported high bid here.

Lot # 341 1971 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 14189; Engine # B7404; Black/Beige leather, Black bars; Estimate $675,000 – $750,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $550,000. – 4390cc/352hp, 5-speed, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, silver painted nose panel, popup headlights, Michelin XWX tires, power windows, Becker Mexico cassette, air conditioning. – Four owners from new, 23,947 miles. Represented as the original paint but it appears to have been repainted at least in part and is cracking and checking. Good surface cracked original upholstery. Clean original underbody. Good chrome. Well-preserved and more than good enough to drive and enjoy. Ferrari Classiche certified. – Reported sold here in 2016 for $770,000, the owner thought the limited ownership history, low miles and overall exceptional preservation was worth a substantial premium. The bidders didn’t agree and finding a buyer who will place a premium value on it amid the plethora of Daytonas on the market (there were five in the Monterey auctions) will not be easy. This bid is light, but not unreasonable.

Lot # 342 1961 Maserati 5000GT Coupe, Body by Ghia; S/N AM103018; Engine # AM103018; Blue, Rust/Blue leather; Estimate $500,000 – $700,000; Unrestored original, 5 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $480,000 plus commission of 11.04%; Final Price $533,000. – 4941cc/380hp, Lucas fuel injection, sliding sunroof, wire wheels, Sahara tires, power windows. – Ghia’s only 5000GT, built for scooter magnate Ferdinando Innocenti, displayed by Ghia at the 1961 Turin Auto Show then tested for Sports Car Graphic by Bernard Cahier. Thought for many years to have been lost but it was abandoned outside in Saudi Arabia for decades. Rusty, dirty, peeling paint. Torn, dilapidated interior. Filthy, It’s a daunting restoration project, but it’s a Maserati 5000 GT. – Save the pictures of this car because someday they’ll be useful to compare with it after it is restored. Whether that project makes financial sense is a matter only the new owner of this project can evaluate.

Lot # 343 1949 Jaguar XK 120 Alloy Roadster; S/N 670005; Engine # W1011-8; Blue Sheen/Two-tone Blue leather; Estimate $350,000 – $400,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $320,000 plus commission of 11.56%; Final Price $357,000. – Hub caps, Dunlop Road Speed tires, fender skirts, original tool roll, side curtains but there is no top where it should be behind the seats. – Light wear on the driver’s seat but the interior otherwise looks fantastic. Excellent show quality paint, chrome and brightwork, although there is a tiny blister on the tail. Fully restored and very clean but not overly detailed engine bay. Represented as the fifth XK120 and the first LHD car shipped to the US. While it’s no longer in show-winning condition, it’s a significant car that did at one point receive an immaculate restoration that left no stones unturned. – Jaguar originally intended the XK120 to be a limited production model to promote the company’s sedans and the new XK straight-six, but demand for the two-seater was much higher than expected and Jaguar switched from alloy bodywork to steel after the first 240 cars left the factory. Today, alloy cars are worth three times as much as steel ones. This one is a better car than the price here would suggest, especially since it sold for $385,000 at Gooding’s Amelia Island auction in 2011 and again at Gooding Pebble Beach in 2013 for $451,000, but the restoration’s age is being felt.

Lot # 344 1966 Shelby Cobra 427 Roadster; S/N CSX3237; Red/Black leather; Estimate $1,100,000 – $1,250,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $925,000. – 427/460hp side oiler added, wide hip bodywork, Starburst centerlock wheels, Goodyear Blue Dot spare, Avon tires, grille and trunk guards, wind wings, translucent sun visors, extra Halibrand wheels, full weather equipment, jack, grease gun, owner’s manual. – Freshly restored and spotless. – Even though it has had an engine swap if it were valued as the 428-powered Cobra as it started life the reported high bid here is light for its immaculate condition and honest description.

Lot # 345 1932 Packard Twin Six Sport Phaeton, Body by Dietrich; S/N 900331; Engine # 900362; Dark Violet/Taupe leather; Tan cloth top; Estimate $750,000 – $950,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $675,000. – Dual enclosed sidemount spares, CM Hall depress beam headlights, Pilot Ray lights, division window with wind visors, luggage rack, rear passenger’s footrests and armrests. – One of as few as 12 in this body style. Resided in South Africa until the 60’s, then bought by Jim Hull and returned to the States. The body was swapped onto this chassis for Bob Bahre. Very good older paint, interior and brightwork. The front passenger’s window visor is cracked. Restored for the second time years ago by RM for Lee Herrington, won its class and the Gwen Graham Award at Pebble Beach in 1997. – Acquired by John O’Quinn at RM Amelia in 2007 for $1,650,000 then sold here from the O’Quinn collection in 2012 for $946,000. It is a spectacular, rare automobile of the highest quality and even though signs of the restoration’s age are beginning to appear it is still wonderful, more wonderful than the reported high bid here.

Lot # 346 2008 Ferrari 430 Scuderia Coupe; S/N ZFFKW64A380161467; Black, Silver stripes/Black Alcantara; Estimate $180,000 – $220,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $175,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $196,000. – 4308cc/503hp, paddle shift, SF shields, clear engine cover, yellow calipers and tach, carbon fiber manettino steering wheel, CD stereo with Bluetooth and navigation, fire extinguisher, power windows, air conditioning. – Two owners from new and represented with 6,200 miles. Looks like new except for a few nose chips and polishing swirl. – Offered by RM at the Petersen Museum in Los Angeles eight months ago where it was reported bid to $180,000 against an estimate of $200-220,000. The consignor accepted the market’s judgment with this result.

Lot # 348 1960 Porsche 718 RS 60 Werks Race Car, Body by Wendler; S/N 718044; Engine # 90505; Silver-Grey, Yellow nose/Crimson vinyl; Estimate $5,750,000 – $7,750,000; Competition restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $4,650,000 plus commission of 10.11%; Final Price $5,120,000. – Wide 5-bolt Tecnomagnesio wheels, Dunlop Racing tires, Bosch headlights and fog lights, driver’s head fairing. – One of four RS60s with works competition history. Driven by Stirling Moss, Joachim Bonnier, Graham Hill, Dan Gurney, Bob Holbert and Hans Hermann, its racing history includes Le Mans, Sebring, Nürburgring 1000km and Nassau Speed Weeks. Driven by Moss and Hill in the 1960 Targa Florio, a race the team led by over a minute at the beginning of the final lap only to suffer a differential failure a few kilometers from the finish. Moss in his autobiography, “My Cars, My Career”, called it “A super car, beautifully well balanced and simply tailor-made for the Targa Florio.” Campaigned by Porsche with larger engines in the 2-litre class, 718-044 is specially built with a reinforced, stiffer frame to handle the more powerful engines, longer wheelbase, uprated brakes and wishbone independent rear suspension. Sold to the U.S. after its factory racing period, it was driven by Porsche-legend Bob Holbert to a succession of wins and podium finishes in his SCCA Class E championship winning season. Recently restored in its Targa Florio livery, 718-044 is powered by a Porsche-sourced 4-cam 2-litre Typ 587/3 engine, rather than the original engine. Excellent paint, upholstery and interior paint. Both windshield posts have evidence of a different attachment on the body probably for the tall windscreen required by the FIA in 1960. An impressive restoration for a competition car, even one as famous as this. – There were two Typ 718 Porsches in the Monterey auctions, an RSK at Bonhams and this one at RM Sotheby’s. This car’s race entry and driver history is exceptional, but it rarely finished, and it has a replacement engine. It was a post-block sale in essentially the same condition at Gooding & Company’s Pebble Beach Auction in 2015 for $5.4 million. The result here tracks the market since then.

Lot # 350 1937 Packard Twelve-Series 1508 Convertible Victoria, Body by Rollston; S/N 1508220; Engine # 906331; Black/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $900,000 – $1,200,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $825,000. – 473cid/175hp, 3-speed, dual enclosed sidemounts with mirrors, hubcaps and trim rings, wide whitewalls, Trippe lights, heater, radio, documented with the original Rollston order and build sheets including two original Rollston blueprints. – Built for Frank Shattuck, founder of New York’s Schrafft’s restaurants and built on the 144-inch wheelbase chassis, Packard’s longest making the two-door Convertible Victoria coachwork even more notable. Sound older paint, chrome, top and upholstery. Attractive interior wood trim. Scratched steering wheel rim. Small paint chips and scuffed top seals. The shiny upholstery is not appealing. A quality older restoration that shows its age and a few miles. – There were four marvelous classic Packard Twelves at RM Sotheby’s Monterey auction this year, but only one, a modest Packard-bodied 1933 Convertible Victoria, sold for $390,000. The other three didn’t find a home here, and it is a sad commentary on the state of the classic car market when beautifully restored and maintained custom bodied Packard Twelves are passed by.

Lot # 351 1955 Lincoln Indianapolis Exclusive Study Coupe, Body by Boano; S/N 55WA10902; Pumpkin/Cream, Black leather; Estimate $800,000 – $1,000,000; Concours restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,000,000 plus commission of 10.50%; Final Price $1,105,000. – 341/225hp, automatic, dual rear-exiting exhaust (side exhaust is non-functional), Goodyear wide whitewalls, dash clock, alloy-style spinner wheel covers, power windows, Blaupunkt AM pushbutton radio. – A project undertaken entirely by Boano for the 1955 Turin Automobile Show in an attempt to seduce Ford into a contract with them. Very lightly worn interior. Excellent paint. Restored in the late 1990s and a winner at its debut at Pebble Beach in 2001 as well as at Amelia Island and Greenwich and again at Pebble Beach in 2013. Owners include Henry Ford II, Thomas Kerr and Paul Andrews. Starting to show some age but still spectacular. – Sold by Gooding at Pebble Beach in 2006 for $1,375,000, by RM at New York in 2013 for $1,550,000, then from the Andrews collection in 2015 for $1,210,000 this is a spectacular concept car that whether for its futuristic design or its brilliant color defines the term “attention-getting”.

Lot # 352 1935 Alta 1 1/2 Litre Roadster; S/N 52S; Engine # 52S; Black/Black; Estimate $275,000 – $375,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $200,000. – Supercharged 1,496cc/120hp dohc four, ENV preselector 4-speed, painted wire wheels, column shift, aeroscreen offset single-seater body, dual outside fuel filler caps, huge hydraulic drum brakes. – Period race history in the UK, Monaco and Italy. Class record holder at the Mountain Circuit at Brooklands. Restored in the 1980s. Original chassis, body and engine. Lots of cracks in the paint and a quarter-sized dent in the tail and another small one behind the grille, but nothing too serious for someone who wants to take this car racing. The chassis and interior are tidy. Represented as the original chassis, engine and body. A cool somewhat obscure single seater in seemingly ready to race condition. – MGs and Aston Martins of the day pale beside the performance of this supercharged Alta, not to mention its rarity and impressive preservation. Historic racers looking to stand out in a crowd missed a bet with this Saturday evening lot at RM Sotheby’s when a further bid or two could have secured one of the most exclusive and rewarding cars on any prewar historic racing grid.

Lot # 354 1930 Bentley 6 1/2 Liter Speed Six Sportsman’s Saloon, Body by H.J. Mulliner; S/N LR2778; Engine # NH2748S; Black, Cream/Red leather; Estimate $2,600,000 – $3,200,000; Concours restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $2,200,000. – RHD. Painted Rudge wire wheels, Michelin blackwalls, Lucas headlamps, rear-mounted spare, luggage trunk, sunroof, wood dash and window trim, Jaeger gauges, dash clock, wood running boards, Lalique Coq Nain radiator mascot, Clare Hay documented – Originally delivered to the Maharaja of Jaipur. Retains its original engine, chassis, gearbox and body. Shown at Pebble Beach in 2012, second in class, Montagu of Beaulieu and J.B. Nethercutt Trophy winner. Very good paint, chrome, interior and underneath. Excellent padded roof. The only real flaws are a few small paint cracks behind the hood. No longer super fresh, but still very striking and almost too beautiful to drive. – This is a seriously spectacular closed Bentley, as beautiful in its design and restoration as it is in its specification and one of the most distinguished of the several Cricklewood Bentleys on the various auction blocks in Monterey. Apparently the consignor wasn’t satisfied with this bid, understandable but also arguable in light of the difficulties its counterparts had in attracting the bids their consignors expected during the celebration of Bentley’s centennial. Finding a home for it now that the hype has died down will not be easy.

Lot # 355 1965 Shelby Mustang GT350 Fastback; S/N SFM5S089; White/Black vinyl; Estimate $400,000 – $500,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $375,000 plus commission of 11.33%; Final Price $417,500. – Steel wheels, stripe delete, 4-speed, dashtop gauge cluster, Goodyear Blue Dot tires, Ford VIN verified with SAAC – Very good older paint with light detail scratching. The front bumper is very good, but there are light cracks on the passenger’s side. The rear chrome bumper is very good. The rear window trim is slightly misaligned on the passenger’s side. The upholstery, carpet, dashboard, and instrument panel are very good. A well restored and documented first year Shelby GT350 with unusual stripe delete and wheels, but finished in the mid-2000s and showing a little age. – This is an appropriate result for an early GT350 done to high standards and still in nearly showroom condition.

Lot # 356 1993 Jaguar XJ 220 Coupe; S/N SAJJEAEX8AX220701; Engine # 6A10344SB; Spa Silver/Black leather; Estimate $400,000 – $450,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $380,000 plus commission of 11.32%; Final Price $423,000. – Pilot Sport tires, DOT and EPA California certified. – Showing 3,036 km (although the catalog confusingly refers to miles) and serviced two months ago. Chipguard peeling off the nose. Small scratch near the driver’s door handle, and the key slot is a little dull. Small scrape on the rear bumper. In roughly the same condition as the green one in this sale, but has lower miles and a more recent service, which arguably makes it the more desirable car despite its less interesting colors (the other one is Silverstone Green over Sand). – And the people in the room at the Portola agree, at least to the tune of a bid or two. The XJ 220 is largely remembered for having a V6 instead of the V12 that was originally promised, and it was quickly overshadowed by the McLaren F1 even though it was the world’s fastest production car when introduced. It is arguably quite undervalued compared to its ’90s hypercar contemporaries, but these two results in Monterey don’t point to anything drastic changing value-wise. Its auction history, however, shows that the earlier disdain for the XJ 220 has been overshadowed by its rarity and performance. It was sold here in Monterey by RM in 2006 for $214,500, then by Gooding at Scottsdale in 2010 for just $170,500.

Lot # 359 2014 Pagani Huayra Tempesta Coupe; S/N ZA9H11UA7ESF76097; Grigio Silverstone, Carbon fiber roof/Beige leather, plaid cloth; Estimate $2,000,000 – $2,400,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,850,000 plus commission of 10.27%; Final Price $2,040,000. – Special order plaid cloth in the first owner’s family tartan (leather replacement is included if desired), “Scozia” badged, Tempesta upgrades, black calipers, rear camera, parking sensors, carbon fiber splitter, Gold alloy wheels, fitted luggage, signed by the Pagani build crew, documented with the original window sticker and spec sheet. – 1,462 miles, one owner and like new. Chipguarded everywhere. – The Tempesta upgrade package cost $221,739 while the originally specified options and features added Euros 134,850 to the already breathtaking price. Paganis are highly refined, intricately detailed works of art with mind-bending performance and state-of-the-art sophistication. They command state-of-the-art prices, too, although compared with a McLaren F1 they are relative bargains in performance and rarity.

Lot # 362 1939 “Porsche Type 64 Coupe”/ Porsche Design Project 60K10 Kraft durch Freude Wagen; S/N 3841; Engine # 3843; Light Green/Beige cloth; Estimate $19,000,000 – $22,000,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 4 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $17,000,000. – 985cc KdF Wagen engine with two carburetors and 38 hp, front and rear fender skirts, sliding side windows. – Described as a Porsche Typ 64, this is a modified KdF Wagen with Porsche project number 60/10 – Porsche AG didn’t exist until years after it was built. One of three built, a 1939 project for a proposed Berlin-Rome race joining the Axis capitals. Set for mid-September the race was preempted when Germany invaded Poland on September first. Based on the 985-cc Kraft durch Freude sedan that would become the Volkswagen, this car was driven during WWII by the Porsche family, then later sold and raced by Otto Mathé in Switzerland. It has only three documented owners since passing from Porsche family ownership. Its narrow greenhouse, full envelope body designed by Irwin Komenda and skirted wheels are the template from which the entire generation of 356 Porsches developed. It gained Porsche’s famed wide-font block print logo after the war, the oldest car to bear the company’s identity – if not necessarily the first, recognition that belongs to the relatively unknown original Typ 356 mid-engined prototype. Dented, chipped bodywork. Erratic fits. Rusty headlight bezels, Chipping old paint over an earlier (and more attractive) Medium Blue. A relic of early Porsche history destined never to be restored, just venerated. – The auction room filled with excited young Porsche-phans as the appearance of this historical artifact neared. Some were so excited they were bouncing up and down on their toes.

As it reached the block cellphones were held high to record the momentous occasion. It looked like a rock concert. But on the block when Maarten ten Holder said “Thirteen million” the bid screen went to “Thirty million” and the throng erupted in a Porsche-paroxysm. The next bid was posted as $30,500,000, then progressed to $40 million when the auctioneer said “Fourteen million”. Real bidding proceeded apace in $500,000 bumps but showing irrational increments on the screen and when the real bid reached $17 million and the screen posted “$70 million” there was Porsche-pandemonium. Then Maarten realized what was happening, corrected the bid screen and the air went out of the room. The spectacle ended here in general confusion and disappointment and the real value of this lima bean shaped aerodynamic wonder remains to be established. It was great show while it lasted.

Lot # 363 1969 Alfa Romeo 1750 GTV Coupe, Body by Bertone; S/N AR1369869; Engine # AR0054877254; Silver/Black leather; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $105,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $117,600. – Dual Webers, alloy wheels, Cinturato tires, dual mirrors, woodrim steering wheel, wood dash, headrest on the passenger’s side. – Fantastic metallic paint. Very good chrome. Spotless and detailed underneath. Very good restored interior. Light scratches on some of the glass but otherwise it’s a phenomenal GTV that would be at home on a show field. Its restoration reportedly cost $170,000, more than it will be worth at any point in the foreseeable future. – This was the very next lot after the Porsche Type 64, which would have been a tough spot no matter what happened with that car. Given the bidding snafu with the Type 64 and the commotion that followed, though, this car sold amazingly well. The seller couldn’t have hoped for much more than this in any setting, and should be thrilled with this over-the-top result given the circumstances. Having bought a Giulia Sprint GTV in 1967 for just over $4,000 the idea of any GTV being worth $117,600, let alone justifying a $170,000 restoration, is mind boggling but even in that context this is a staggering price.

Lot # 365 1989 Lister-Chevrolet Knobbly Centenary Edition Roadster; S/N BHL148; Metallic Blue, White accents/Black leather; Estimate $350,000 – $450,000; Competition Continuation 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $260,000. – RHD. 327 Chevy, 4-barrel, Dunlop-style alloy centerlock wheels, Dunlop Racing tires, driver’s paperclip rollbar, full width Plexiglas windscreen, two seats, 4-point driver’s Willans belts, Black side exhausts. – Dull paint with outie stars over the wheels. Banged wheel nuts. Plenty of tech stickers, most recently from the Silverstone Classic in 2018. FIA HTP and appears to be historic race ready if rather used. – There’s an interesting discussion to be had over the value, and acceptability, of “continuation cars” like the Lister-Chevy Knobbly. It looks the part, it drives like its ancestors, it has an FIA HTP to get it in events. It’s fully-analog and simple to maintain. Race organizers want loud, raw, exciting cars like this on their grids. So where do it and its counterparts fit in the value hierarchy? It was bid to $330,275 at Bonhams Goodwood Revival auction in 2017 (GBP 250,000 at the time, this bid is GBP 214,000) and it might be a sleeper at anything close to the reported bid here.

Lot # 366 1961 Jaguar XKE SI 3.8 Flat Floor Coupe; S/N 885078; Engine # R2062-9; Pearl Grey/Dark Blue leather; Estimate $260,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $180,000. – Chrome wire wheels, Michelin XVS tires, woodrim steering wheel, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, JDHT Certificate. – Flat floor inside bonnet latch car with matching numbers. Tired chrome and lightly scratched window frames. Light scratching on the headlight covers and bezels. Sound but older paint. Fully restored, very good interior other than smudges on the transmission tunnel. Restored in the 00’s in Switzerland and needs nothing to go out and enjoy, but would need another round of work to put it on a show field. – The reported high bid is enough for a freshly restored flat floor coupe, so it is certainly plenty for this older restored example.

Lot # 370 2018 Ferrari 488 GTB 70th Anniversary Berlinetta; S/N ZFF79ALA0J0232129; Pearl White, Blue stripes/Red cloth; Estimate $375,000 – $450,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $385,000 plus commission of 11.30%; Final Price $428,500. – 70th Anniversary livery “Lucybelle” after the 250 TR s/n 0732 driven by Ed Hugus at the 1958 Le Mans 24 Hours. – 155 miles and like new. – This result represents a serious premium for the low miles and distinctive 70th Anniversary livery. The livery is unusually attractive, though, which isn’t the case with some strained 70th Anniversary editions.

Lot # 372 1974 Porsche 914 2.0 Targa; S/N 4742920115; Engine # GA014448; Olympic Blue/Black vinyl; Estimate $45,000 – $65,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $67,200. – Alloy wheels, Sumitomo tires, Blaupunkt Emden pushbutton radio, comprehensively documented since it was picked up as an European delivery in Osnabruck which makes the ski rack appropriate. – One owner until 2016, then refurbished. Very good fresh paint, bumpers, badges and lights. New upholstery, but the dash and gauges are faded, and there are some cracks in the tachometer. Tidy and maintained but not restored underneath. The mileage on this car is high at 88,904, but cosmetically it is almost new and mechanically it has been sorted, so it’s an appealing late 914. – This kind of restoration work on a four-cylinder 914 would have seemed crazy five or six years ago, but 914s have gained a lot more acceptance in the Porsche community and elsewhere and they’re worth enough now to put serious work into. While time-warp original examples have sold for more this car’s history helps it a lot. This is a top-of-the-market price and the seller here should be very happy.

Lot # 375 1999 Ferrari 550 Maranello Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFZR49AXX0115751; TdF Blue/Beige leather; Estimate $150,000 – $175,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $140,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $156,800. – 5474cc/485hp, 6-speed, 5-spoke alloy wheels, Black calipers, cassette stereo, power windows, climate control – Other than a lightly sand pitted and scuffed nose, lightly worn driver’s seat and deteriorating dashtop this is a quality car reported to have <5,000 miles and looks like it. – Generously estimated but equally generously bid late Saturday evening the seller should be pleased to have been rewarded with this price for a well-preserved 550M with some clear evidence of age and use.

Lot # 376 1959 Alfa Romeo Giulietta TI Berlina; S/N AR146817109; Engine # AR131597558; White/Brown cloth; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $55,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $61,600. – 1290cc/65hp, 2-barrel Solex, column shift 4-speed, hubcaps, Vredestein tires, no radio. – Represented as all original including the engine, represented as 35,158 km from new and delightful. The dashtop is wrinkled and the front seat needs new cushions under the very good original cloth upholstery but other than that and some aging but sound chrome it is a rare and wonderful find. Swig family collection. – The Alfas that show up today are usually coupes and convertibles, two-seaters that emphasize performance and intimacy rather than the family-friendly performance of the rarely seen 4-door Berlina. Martin Swig adopted this TI (Touring Internazionale) Berlina in 2002 and it has been faithfully maintained in nearly as-delivered condition for years. The last car in this year’s RM Sotheby’s Monterey auction, there were more than enough people left in the room to recognize this rare opportunity and it closed the auction with a satisfyingly generous result.

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