Mecum Auctions, Monterey, August 15-17, 2019

Mecum’s “Daytime Auction” at Monterey was down 34.7% from last year, similar to the overall experience at Monterey this year.

In Mecum’s case that was less unusual. As the table below shows, being up and down by a third has been a common experience at this venue and while this is the lowest total for this venue since 2012, it also had the lowest number of consignments since that year.

The top sale at $2,750,000 was a lovely Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta but the most notable results were for some of the motorcycles that were peppered through the auction led by two Crocker Small Tanks that sold for $825,000 and $715,000.

Mecum’s concept for Monterey of bringing an attractive collection of cars – enough expensive high-profile ones to attract an audience but an array of affordable ones offering onlookers the chance to see themselves as collector car owners – has produced consistent commercial success (despite the ups and downs).

It has become a positive contribution to Car Week, accessible to everyone willing to part with a few dollars for the price of admission. Its high energy auction style invites participation. The diverse offering encourages dreams.

The cheapest car sold here was a 2003 Mercedes S500 for $3,300 – $4,675 would have brought home a 1984 Maserati Quattroporte which, from personal experience, is cheap only when it’s bought.

Less than $10,000 including commission would have bought a ’64 Impala convertible, an ’89 Mustang GT convertible, a ’70 Datsun 2000 roadster or an ’87 Toyota MR2. That’s “entry-level” in anyone’s book.

Here are the numbers:

Year

Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Average Sale Median Sale Total $ Change from prior year
2019 279/569 49.0% $106,971 $44,000

[41.1%]

$29,844,925 -34.7%
2018 362/688 52.6% $126,230 $51,700

[41%]

$45,695,265 +36.4%
2017 321/629 51.0% $104,374 $46,200

[44.3%]

$33,504,075 -34.2%
2016 305/679 44.9% $166,951 $55,000

[32.9%]

$50,920,125 +12.3%

On-site observations are by Rick Carey, Greg Ingold, Andrew Newton, Chris Sharpe and Jose Martinez.

The Mecum Monterey observations (81 of the 569 lots) are sorted by Marque, Model and Year.


Lot # S90 1958 AC Ace Bristol Roadster; S/N BEX1019; Princess Blue Metallic/Dark Blue leather; Estimate $400,000 – $425,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $300,000. – 1971/128hp 100D2 engine, overdrive, chrome wire wheels, Avon tires, wind wings, woodrim steering wheel, original tool kit, roll bar included. – Excellent paint and chrome. Slightly imperfect panel gaps. Very good fresh interior. Detailed engine bay and underbody. Professionally restored in 2017, done right without being overdone. – Mecum’s $400,000 low estimate on this car was reasonable for such a fresh and attractive genuine Ace-Bristol, as was the owner’s decision to hold out at the reported high bid. Ace Bristol’s prices continue to creep up to Cobra prices.

Lot # F121 1952 Allard J2 Roadster; S/N 91J2179; Engine # 516233874; Black/Dark Red leather; Estimate $800,000 – $1,200,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $625,000. – 331/160hp, 3 Stromberg deuces on a Weiand intake, Crane cam, 3-speed, dual aeroscreens, single sidemount, steel wheels, hubcaps, Dunlop tires, cycle fenders, banjo spoke steering wheel, Lucas headlights, Koni shocks, exhaust fabricated by Mickey Thompson (before he became famous.) – Excellent paint, chrome, aluminum and upholstery. Done to high standards with some road use evident on the chassis. Dana & Patti Mecum collection. – Elaborately described as the car that “launched Carroll Shelby’s racing career” and “the car that inspired the Cobra”, and that it apparently was when owner Charles Brown had Shelby drive in early SCCA competition with at least three wins to the combination’s credit. The old restoration is very good and holding up well, but the value expectation as reflected in the estimate range is optimistic for a J2, even with a Cadillac and significant history.

Lot # F26 2010 Aston Martin DBS Volante; S/N SCFFDCCD4AGE11574; Storm Black/Obsidian Black leather; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $90,000. – Carbon ceramic brakes, navigation, Bang & Olufsen stereo. – The passenger’s side taillight has a few scratches. Otherwise presents like a new car with 8,238 represented actual miles. – The 2010 DBS Volante carried a base price of over 286 grand. The reported high bid here may be a third of that, but depreciation hits late-model Astons hard and this bid is roughly in line with what other ones are asking on the second-hand market at the moment.

Lot # S131 1935 Auburn 851 Supercharged Speedster; S/N 33168E; Engine # GH4438; Harbor Mist Grey/Tan leather; Estimate $1,200,000 – $1,400,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $675,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $742,500. – 3-speed manual, Orange painted wire wheels with hub caps, dash clock, outside head pipes, dual ratio Columbia axle. – The paint is very good. The brightwork is very good but the passenger’s side headlamp has several dull spots and some abrasions. The upholstery, dashboard and carpet are very good. Recently restored and mostly gorgeous. – Attending to some of the oversights in this Auburn’s presentation would go a long way to enhancing its value. As it is, the oversights do not inspire confidence and that was reflected in the modest price it brought leaving the new owner plenty of headroom to address pretty much any problems it might have.

Lot # F79 1957 Austin-Healey 100-6 BN4 Roadster; S/N BN4L040672; Colorado Red/Black; Black top; Estimate $50,000 – $60,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $37,500. – Painted wire wheels, dual wing mirrors, Lucas driving lights, heater, overdrive, cigarette lighter. – Lots of chips in the paint with a few of them touched up. There is a crack in the paint on the trunk. Lightly scratched brightwork. Dry weather stripping. Visible wear to the seats. Tidy but used engine bay. No history represented, but currently in sound if very much flawed driver condition. – This is a generous high bid for a 100-6 with this many issues, and should have been accepted with gratitude if there was money close to it.

Lot # S86 1955 Bentley S1 4-Dr. Sedan, Body by Freestone & Webb; S/N B202LAN; Black/Red leather; Estimate $275,000 – $350,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $240,000. – Wheel covers, Firestone tires, Lucas driving lights, pushbutton radio, rear sunroof, rear seat tables, front and rear air conditioning. – Represented as one of seven of these Freestone and Webb cars and the only one in LHD. Bought new by president of Warner Brothers Jack Warner. Very good but older repaint. Slightly uneven door gaps. Good, lightly worn leather and very good interior wood. Lightly scratched wheel covers and road wear underneath. Cosmetically restored and mechanically freshened about 10 years ago. Fine for casual shows rather than concours events, and given its rare coachwork and Hollywood history it’s sure to draw plenty of attention. – Coachbuilt Bentley S Series/Rolls-Royce Silver Clouds can be worth several times as much as their Standard Steel counterparts, but the reported high bid for this attractive but older Freestone & Webb Saloon was a fair one, especially considering it sold for $220,000 at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale two years ago.

Lot # F60 1956 Bentley S1 Standard Steel Saloon; S/N B494LAN; Gold, Brown/Tan leather; Estimate $45,000 – $55,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $20,000. – Factory LHD, hub caps and trim rings, narrow whitewalls, dual wing mirrors, Lucas driving lights, original radio. – Appears like a clean car from 20 feet, but most every finish is severely worn. The brightwork is pitted and faded and the paint is severely cracking on the rear. Dents and scratches on the right rear wheel. New front seats but severely worn rear. Cracked interior wood trim. Represented as a two-owner California car with 72,360 actual miles and service records going back to the 1960s. Mostly original, and while there isn’t serious rust to speak of, the car looks worn. – A Standard Steel (factory body) Bentley S Series/Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud isn’t as expensive to buy as it looks, in part because it’s so expensive to maintain and restore. This car needs a lot before it will be something to be proud of, and there are a lot fewer people shopping for a Bentley project than a gleaming show car or attractive driver. The reported high bid here wasn’t much, but it was all the car and its condition deserved.

Lot # F31 1974 BMW 2002tii 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N 2782661; White/Black vinyl; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $34,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $37,400. – Store brand tires, Hella rally lights, sunroof, Becker Mexico cassette stereo, original air conditioning, custom exhaust. – Unrestored but very clean and maintained engine bay. The bumpers are a little dull. Decent older paint with several big scrapes on the sunroof. Very good partially restored interior. A less desirable late 2002 with the rectangular taillights and diving board bumpers, but it’s a tii and that makes it special. Cosmetically restored and mechanically freshened in 2014, it’s a solid driver. – Sold for a steal at $22,000 earlier this year at Mecum Phoenix, this car swung the other way and brought an expensive but not quite excessive result in Monterey. It looks like a very successful flip. If only buying and selling cars was always this easy.

Lot # F74 1957 BMW-Isetta 300 Coupe; S/N 505025; Orange, White/Gray; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $30,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $33,000. – Hub caps, blackwall tires. – Very good paint and brightwork, but the windshield has a lot of surface scratches. The upholstery is very good. Restored to appropriate standards for a microcar and as charming as ever. – A straightforward result that takes both the age and the quality of this restoration into account.

Lot # S80 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air Convertible; S/N VC57S190396; Matador Red/Red, Silver vinyl; White top; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $92,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $101,750. – 283/220hp, 3-speed manual, spinner wheel covers, power steering, dual exhaust, whitewall tires, tissue dispenser, tinted glass, aftermarket stereo. – The paint is very good, but there is a small chip and light scratches on the passenger’s side fender. The chrome brightwork is very good. The upholstery is very good. The dashboard, center console, carpet and instrument panel are in very good condition. The engine compartment is very good. The weather stripping on the front quarter windows is dull. A well restored but older Tri-Five Chevy convertible. – The 3-speed is a plus for this Bel Air but that’s not enough to account for this generous price which should have been enough to buy a freshly restored showroom condition example in this configuration. Tri-Fives have fallen from grace as older guys who coveted them when new have either left car collecting or moved on to other fascinations but this result suggests they’re on an unexpected upswing.

Lot # S18 1969 Chevrolet Camaro 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 124379N543170; Engine # T1025JH; Daytona Yellow, Black stripes, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $55,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $61,050. – L78 396/375hp, 4-speed manual with Hurst shifter, power brakes, power steering, AM/FM radio. – The paint is very good, the chrome is very good, the upholstery and carpet are very good. In fact, the whole car is extremely well restored and beautiful. – A strong but realistic result for a matching numbers 4-speed SS L78. It sold for $49,500 at Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas two years ago, has added under 100 miles to the odometer and had better luck in Monterey with this appropriate result.

Lot # F84 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 454 Convertible; S/N 136670L195340; Tuxedo Black/Black vinyl; Black top; Estimate $350,000 – $450,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $330,000. – 454/450hp LS6, automatic, Positraction, Rally II wheels, console, pushbutton radio, power steering, power brakes, power windows, tilt column, 8 track. – Good original paint and body without major flaw. The bumpers appear to be replaced. The engine compartment is aged and grimy, as is the underbody. The interior shows little wear, just gracefully aged. A mostly original and remarkably well-preserved Chevelle that also ticks most all of the right boxes equipment-wise. – Well known in muscle car circles for its originality, this car sold at Mecum Indy in 2008 for $525,000. It has been carefully preserved since then but LS6 values haven’t quite recovered to their pre-Recession muscle car boom levels. it just isn’t worth as much as it was then and, while it might be a tough pill to swallow, the reported high bid here was worth considering.

Lot # F117 1953 Chevrolet Corvette Roadster; S/N E53F001300; Polo White/Red; Black top; Estimate $500,000 – $750,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $320,000. – Spinner wheel covers, whitewalls, AM radio. – The last of the 300 Corvettes built in 1953. Restored in the 1980s and again in 2007. There are chips around the fuel filler door from contact as well as a few chips along the front hood gap. The top is new and fits well. The engine compartment and underbody are completely restored and in excellent condition. The interior has been completely redone and appears unused. A great restoration overall but needs paint repair to be perfect. – Although being the last ’53 built does carry some cachet, the reported high bid here isn’t entirely inappropriate, although the highly expensive $533,500 this car sold for at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale 2016 (with the odometer stuck at exactly the same 210 miles) is likely the number sticking in the consignor’s head, and that is not unreasonable.

Lot # S12 1962 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 20867S103466; Engine # 2103466F114RE; Honduras Maroon/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $88,000. – 327/340hp, 4-speed, WonderBar radio, spinner style hubcaps with white line tires. – The paint is good but there is a run and a crack on the nose, a scratch on the top, and a large area of orange peel on the top near the passenger’s window. There are also two blisters on the passenger’s side fender. The stainless steel trim around the rear window has a fair amount of surface scratches. The rocker panel molding on the driver’s side has a few scratches. The engine compartment is neat and tidy but the air cleaner has shallow indentations. Represented as the matching numbers engine but no other history represented, and a driver. – Although the 327/340 was the most powerful carbureted Corvette in 1962, this price is on the expensive side for one with as many issues as this, and it could have bought a better example.

Lot # F21 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe; S/N 30837S116376; Saddle Tan/Tan vinyl; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $98,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $107,800. – 327/340hp, 4-Speed, 3.70 Positraction, power brakes, spinner wheel covers, narrow whitewalls. – Represented as matching numbers but no other documentation. Good paint with two small blisters on the right front and a run near the right headlight door. Uneven weather stripping on the doors. Lightly scratched rocker trim. Light track scratches in the glass. The gauges are a little faded but the interior is mostly restored and very good. Restored engine but there is some light dirt in there. Inherently desirable as a `63 Split Window, but doesn’t have much in the way of documentation and its condition is nothing to write home about. – Details are crucially important in Corvette values and while this is a realistic result for a 327/340hp Split Window the lack of any supporting documentation and no NCRS or Bloomington Gold judging results is reason for more caution than the Mecum Monterey bidders showed. There is no headroom in this result.

Lot # S81 1966 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 194676S109881; Nassau Blue/White; White top; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $55,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $60,500. – 327/300hp, 4-speed, teakwood steering wheel, FM/AM radio, spinner wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, hardtop. – Very good paint and chrome. Very good interior. Tidy, lightly run restored engine bay. Represented as a 30-year-old restoration, and although it doesn’t look super fresh, it looks much more recent than that. Not an exciting drivetrain, but attractive colors and impressive condition. – There were more exciting C2 Corvettes to choose from in Monterey this year, and despite the quality of this car’s restoration it brought a modest result that is favorable to the buyer by a few bids but nothing crazy.

Lot # S14 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427/435 Coupe; S/N 194377S112734; Engine # T223JE7112734; Sunfire Yellow, Black stinger/Saddle; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $110,000. – 427/435hp L71, 4-speed, AM/FM radio, power brakes, power steering, off road exhaust, Rally wheels with red line tires, tinted glass, Protect-O-Plate and other original paper documented. – Represented as the matching numbers drivetrain. Excellent and fresh presentation top to bottom aside from some light scratching on the rocker trim. NCRS Top Flight. – The consignor wouldn’t be unreasonable to expect at least $150,000 for this freshly restored and extensively documented car, so the decision to hold out at the reported high bid is understandable.

Lot # F132 1968 Chevrolet Corvette 427/435 Coupe; S/N 194378S424867; Engine # T527IU; Corvette Bronze/Tobacco leather; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $117,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $129,250. – 427/435hp aluminum head L89, M21 4-speed manual, power steering and brakes, narrow whitewalls, power windows, AM/FM radio, includes window sticker and Protect-O-Plate. – NCRS Duntov Mark of Excellence awarded, Bloomington Gold Hall of Fame and NCRS 5-Star Bow Tie award. Represented as unrestored with 5,341 actual miles. Good original paint with little deterioration. The door handles show use and the chrome is worn. The engine compartment is also aged with some oily residue in areas. The interior is virtually unworn. All the wear and tear can be forgiven given its age and originality. – With two L88s and the ZR2 also on offer, Corvette collectors had plenty of high-performance (and high-dollar) C3s to choose from at Mecum this year. It would be exceedingly difficult to find another unrestored L89 as good as this one, and it brought a healthy but not outrageous premium for its level of preservation and low miles. It was sold by RM at the Arizona Biltmore in 2003 for $59,400, then by Russo and Steele at Scottsdale in 2008 for $192,500, results that are representative of the market over the past decade and a half.

Lot # S149 1962 Chevrolet Corvette FI Convertible; S/N 20867S104942; Engine # 2104942F1214RF; Roman Red/Black vinyl; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $190,000. – 327/360hp fuel injection, 4-speed, RPO 687 big brake, big tank, radio delete, chrome roll bar, hubcaps, blackwall 6.70-15 bias ply tires, hardtop, quick release fuel filler. – The paint is good but older with small cracks on the nose, and small chips on the boot cover and 2 small chips on the rear. The chrome brightwork is very good, but there is one inch-long scratch on the front bumper. There are also several light scratches on the top of the windshield trim. Some minor West Coast race history in period and restored in the 1970s but holding up well considering the age. – This car was at Worldwide Atlantic City in 2011 and hammered not sold at a hammer bid of $235,000. Two years later it was at Mecum Kissimmee and bid to $170,000. It appears in largely the same condition and isn’t worth any less than it was then, a car that could (should?) have been sold if there was money at this bid. Time is not on the side of the consignor looking to get out at over $200,000.

Lot # F125 1969 Chevrolet Corvette L88 Convertible; S/N 194679S726291; Engine # I0722L019S726291; Can Am White, Saddle/Saddle vinyl; Estimate $375,000 – $450,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $335,000. – L88, hardtop, 4-speed manual, J56 heavy duty brakes, F41 suspension, radio delete. – Bloomington Gold certified, NCRS Performance Verification, NCRS Duntov Mark of Excellence. Documented tank sticker. Good paint and body with only a few minor paint chips where the hardtop meets the body. The brightwork has all been either replaced or restored. The engine compartment has been redone and shows well. The underbody has been redone. The interior is excellent and shows well. A solid older restoration and one of just 116 L88s built in 1969. – A Mecum regular, this L88 hammered not sold at a $400,000 high bid in Kissimmee in 2012, then sold for $451,000 at Mecum Monterey last year. It hammered not sold again at a $390,000 high bid at Mecum Las Vegas last year again at a $400,000 high bid in Kissimmee this year. Strangely, it was then offered in a pair with another 1969 L88 Convertible (Lot F124 here) in Indy this year and not sold at a $725,000 high bid for the pair. It deserves more than this reported high bid, but it has crossed the block a few too many times recently.

Lot # F124 1969 Chevrolet Corvette L88 Convertible; S/N 194679S710164; Engine # TIII21IT19S710164; Fathom Green, Green hardtop/Green vinyl; Black top; Estimate $375,000 – $450,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $350,000. – L88, hardtop and soft top, J56 heavy duty brakes, 4.56 Positraction. – Bloomington Gold Special Collection 1988 and 2008, tank sticker documented. Very good paint overall with a single crack on the left door gap. The brightwork has all been either replaced or restored. The engine compartment has been restored and shows minimal use. The underbody also presents well, but the exhaust does have noticeable oxidation. The interior is very good and shows little use. Restored a long time ago but holding up well, and one of 116 L88s built in 1969, the final year for the engine. – This L88 has been a regular sight at Mecum auctions. It first showed up at Kissimmee in 2014 where it was reported sold for $550,800 and has been trying to get back there ever since. It was a no-sale at Indy in 2016 with a reported bid of $500,000, at a $525,000 high bid in Monterey a few months later, at another $500,000 high bid in Dallas last year (with the exact same 37,531-mile odometer reading as it has today), and at a $410,000 high bid in Glendale a few months ago. It was also strangely offered in a pair with another ’69 L88 Convertible (Lot F125 in this sale) in Indy this year but hammered not sold again at a $725,000 high bid for the two. Like Lot F125, this car is worth more than the reported high bid but it has failed to sell publicly a few too many times and is stale but would be a good value at the reported high bid or even the low estimate of $375,000.

Lot # S106 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 (big tank) Coupe; S/N 30837S109344; Engine # F2I3RF3109344; Ermine White/Red; Estimate $600,000 – $800,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $575,000. – 327/360hp fuel injection, 4-speed, power brakes, 36-gallon tank, AM radio, 3.90 Positraction, spinner wheel covers, dealer invoice documented. – Represented as the original matching numbers engine. Excellent paint and body. The brightwork shines like new. The engine compartment has been fully restored and looks correct down to the hardware. The underbody shows like new and the interior looks u used. A very well done big tank Z06 discovered in 2015, displayed at Bloomington Gold in 2016, restored 2017 and judged NCRS Regional Top Flight earlier this year. – This car has been cleaned up a bit and presents better than it did in Kissimmee this year, where it failed to sell at a $500,000 high bid. The bidders rightly gave it extra attention without getting carried away, and put up an offer that should have been sufficient even for a Z06 as fresh and attractive as this one.

Lot # S140 1971 Chevrolet Corvette ZR2 Convertible; S/N 194671S117850; Engine # T50TCBW; Ontario Orange/Black; Estimate $350,000 – $450,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $335,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $368,500. – 454/425hp LS6, aluminum heads, M22 4-Speed, J56 power brakes, 3.55 Positraction, heavy duty suspension, heavy duty cooling, radio delete, hardtop, A.I.R smog equipment, Rally wheels, NCRS Top Flight, tank sticker documented, ownership history from new. – One of two known ZR2 convertibles. Bloomington Gold Hall of Fame, Special Collection in1999, NCRS Top Flight judged in 2013. Excellent paint and body. The engine compartment is very well restored but could use a light detailing. The interior is excellent and shows no use. An excellent example of one of the rarest Corvettes built, much rarer than an L88. – Hammered not sold at $300,000 on the block, closed later by “Bid Goes On” with this result. It’s been coming to auctions for years, bid to $210,000 at Mecum’s Bloomington Gold Corvette sale in 2004, then $500,000 at Bloomington Gold in 2009 and to $345,000 at Mecum Monterey two months later. It was reported sold for $434,600 at Bloomington in 2011, $450,000 at Kissimmee in 2013 and $380,000 at Kissimmee seven months ago. It was time to let it move on and this is a realistic price for it.

Lot # S79 1961 Chevrolet Impala Convertible; S/N 11867G136639; Midnight Blue/Blue vinyl, Dark Blue cloth; White top; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $66,000. – 283/230hp, Powerglide, steering, spinner wheel covers, AM radio, tissue dispenser, tinted glass, 1986 AACA National First Prize winner. – Excellent paint and body. Everything is straight as an arrow and the paint has no noticeable deterioration. The engine compartment presents very well and has minimal dirt or oxidation on exposed components. The story is the same for the underbody. The interior is excellent and presents very well, only the sun visors show any aging. While not finished yesterday, the quality of the restoration speaks for itself and this is still a gorgeous car. – This is a gorgeous like new Impala but the price it brought is 348/280hp money, an enthusiastic result that responded to its presentation but didn’t recognize its configuration.

Lot # S110 1937 Cord 812 Supercharged Sportsman Convertible; S/N 32226F; Engine # FC3007; Cigarette Cream/Red leather; Estimate $275,000 – $350,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $235,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $258,500. – Supercharged 288ci/190hp, 4-speed preselector gearbox, chrome wheels with yellow trim rings and whitewall tires, outside exhaust head pipes. – The paint is fair. There are many chips and cracks on the rear driver’s side fender as well as a few scratches. There are a few cracks near the boot on the passenger’s side. There are several cracks on the cowl section on the passenger’s side. There are also many chips on the hood near the simulated grille. The chrome brightwork is very good. The upholstery is very good. The dashboard has a few paint chips and the bezels around the gauges are lightly pitted. A very desirable car in the most desirable configuration and finished in attractive colors, but there are plenty of issues. – Reported sold by Bonhams at Beaulieu in the UK in 2016 for $133,070. The interior may have been replaced since then, but otherwise it’s showing the restoration’s age and has mellowed into its own patina. Bought here for good driver condition money, a realistically priced supercharged 812 Sportsman.

Lot # F136 1973 Datsun 240Z Coupe; S/N HLS30136576; Orange/Black vinyl; Estimate $60,000 – $75,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $38,500. – 4-speed, alloy wheels, power brakes, factory air conditioning. – Very good paint and body. The engine compartment has been fully restored and is very clean. The underbody is restored as well and has light road grime. The interior is very good and has little usage. Fully restored in 2003, which was long before these cars were worth very much money, but done to the standards of a much more valuable car. – The 240Z has broad appeal. It’s old enough to be a proper classic that older enthusiasts feel nostalgia for, and younger enthusiasts rightly recognize it as the car that gave the Japanese a foothold in the American sports car market. Values for excellent example have nearly doubled over the past five years, so while this would have been a barely $20,000 example not that long ago, in Monterey 2019 it sold for a spot-on price.

Lot # S141 1947 Delahaye 135M Cabriolet, Body by Guillore; S/N 800388; Burgundy, Tan/Red leather; Red top; Estimate $1,500,000 – $2,000,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,100,000. – RHD. 4-speed preselector transmission, black banjo style steering wheel, rear fender skirts, rumble seat, wood dashboard and trim, and rear mounted spare enclosed in canvas, fitted Louis Vuitton luggage, Marchal headlights and fog lights. – The paint is very good other than minor surface swirls and two small scratches on the side trim. The chrome brightwork is very good. The interior upholstery, carpet, and dashboard are very good. Show history at Pebble Beach with a first in class as well as awards at Meadowbrook, Newport Beach, Palos Verdes, Keels and Wheels, and both CCCA and AACA events. – This is an extraordinary and beautiful car restored to high standards and even showing some age on the restoration it’s still gorgeous but it has had its run of concours appearances and the reported high bid for it here is not disrespectful of its quality and design.

Lot # F88 1970 Dodge Challenger R/T Convertible; S/N JS27V0B100021; Bright Red, White side stripe/White vinyl; Estimate $550,000 – $700,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $380,000. – 440/390hp Six Pack, 4-speed manual, power brakes and steering, Track Pak, Goodyear Polyglas tires, Hurst pistol grip shifter, console. Pilot car, believed to be the first Challenger Convertible built with a 440 Six Pack. – From Dana and Patti Mecum’s collection. Early build Pilot Car. Good paint with some swirling to the finish. Very good engine compartment with few signs of use. The underbody is immaculate and appears unused. Mostly excellent restoration of one of the earliest Challengers, finished in 2004 but holding up very well. – This car sold for $495,000 in Kissimmee three years ago, then hammered not sold at a $435,000 high bid in Kissimmee two years ago and again at a $425,000 bid in Kissimmee last year. It skipped Florida for California this year, but it didn’t pay off. It’s a significant car, but it’s not likely to get much higher offers than it has already gotten and the estimate range is pure blue sky dreaming.

Lot # F119 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 10735; Rosso/Pella Nera leather; Estimate $2,500,000 – $3,000,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,500,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $2,750,000. – 3,297/300hp, 5 speed, six Weber twin choke DCN carburettors, chrome spoke Borrani RS 4039 wire wheels (replacing the original alloy wheels), Michelin XWX tires, power windows, rear window defrost, Koni dampers, tool roll, Ferrari Classiche Red Book certified. – Pristine bodywork and paint, front and rear windshield seals are new and perfectly fitted. The door glass seals are original and reused but in good condition. The chrome is perfect with every screw head lined up straight, a great detail if not consistently torqued. The seat leather is used and creased but looks correct for the mileage. A great car all-round. – A seriously wonderful 4-cam 275 GTB with every detail noticed and addressed and it brought a wonderful price in this transaction that should be satisfying to both the buyer and the seller.

Lot # F122 1966 Ferrari 275 GTS Spider, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 07967; Red/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $1,100,000 – $1,400,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,000,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,100,000. – 3286cc/260hp, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, halogen headlights. – Terrible old repaint that is cracking and checking all over. Usable older upholstery with surface creases. Restored in 1983 by Mike Kleeves, the quality of workmanship and materials is evident from its deterioration. – There aren’t many seriously nasty 275 GTSs like this. Most have been fluffed up and moved on to new owners. The most important characteristic of this tired and superficially cosmetically redone 275 GTS is its honesty. It promises no more than what appears on the surface, and it brought a price that reflects what it is.

Lot # S18.1 1999 Ferrari 360 Modena Berlinetta; S/N ZFFYR51A5X0119025; Black/Tan, Black leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $80,000. – Black calipers, P Zero tires, 6-speed, power Daytona-style seats. – Represented with 19,880 miles and some service records but no other details. The window frames are peeling. Scratch on the left rear wheel. Lightly worn interior commensurate with the mileage. The paint is lightly faded and the headlight covers are a bit cloudy. The shifter between the seats makes this car a standout, but its condition is a little disappointing by Ferrari standards. – That open-gate shifter can command a $50,000 premium on 360s, but this car’s condition and lack of history left quite a bit to be desired. The reported high bid, while not generous, was worth considering. To get much if any more than this the consignor should think seriously about addressing some of its more obvious issues.

Lot # S113 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 16537; Rosso Dino/Black leather; Estimate $725,000 – $800,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $650,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $715,000. – 4390cc/352hp, 5-speed, Cromodora centerlock alloy wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Veglia air conditioning, power windows, painted nose panel, popup lights, Becker Mexico cassette stereo. – Represented as 11,882 miles from new and one of only ten Daytonas delivered in Rosso Dino. Very good paint, chrome and monotone upholstery (no bars). Old undercoat in the wheel wells. Scuffed windshield molding and a tiny scrape on top of the right front fender. Ferrari Classiche Red Book certified. – This is a quality but not exceptional Daytona that brought a superior price. Its condition is good but not exceptional, any aspect of rarity is limited to the mileage and the color. Comparable Daytonas are selling for hammer bids $100,000 or more less making this is an expensive Daytona.

Lot # S95 1972 Ferrari 365 GTC/4 Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 15359; Rosso Dino/Black leather; Older restoration, 3- condition; Not sold at Hammer bid of $225,000. – 4.4 Litre Colombo V12 engine, 5 speed manual, restored Borrani chrome spoke wheels with 7 year old Michelin XWX tires, factory correct mouse hair dash finish, books, tools, history file and service records. – A high standard paint finish to this slightly orange Ferrari. The exterior chromework detail is good. The interior presents well but is not detailed. The engine is tidy with no leaks or problems. However, underneath this car is the truth of this car is told. Overspray, patches and a damaged rusty exhaust tell a tale of woe. Buyers beware, a resprayed but not mechanically sound car, best avoided. – Reported sold at Russo and Steele in 2011 for $86,900, then offered at Bonhams Greenwich in 2017 with a reported high bid of $190,000 before being sold at Worldwide’s Pacific Grove auction in 2017 for $205,000. Why anyone would hold out for more than 2017’s result in the current environment shows that the consignor had ostrich syndrome with head in the sand thinking no one would notice. This was not a reasonable offer for this GTC/4, it was generous, and should have been taken if there was money anywhere even close.

Lot # S170 2000 Ferrari 550 Maranello Coupe; S/N ZFFZS49A3Y0121851; Giallo Modena/Black leather, Yellow bars; Estimate $150,000 – $175,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $110,000. – 6-speed, Red calipers, Potenza tires, Daytona-style seats, factory radio. – Belt service tree years and 130 miles ago, “believed to be” 18,034 miles. Mild warping on the panel near the climate control switches. Very good original paint with no rock chips. Very good interior. Not super low mileage, but cared for like a Ferrari and a good car. – And a better car than this reported high bid but how does a recent Ferrari come to market without a credible mileage total? This is silly and no wonder why no one took a serious shot at it.

Lot # S107 2011 Ferrari 599 GTO Coupe; S/N ZFF70RCA9B0176914; Nero, Red stripe, Argento roof; Estimate $500,000 – $550,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $475,000. – Daytona-style seats, P Zero Corsa tires, Red Book, car cover. – Represented with 7,900 actual miles. Good paint overall with a few minor chips on the nose and the underbody has a little dirt but otherwise looks nearly new. – Other 599 GTOs have sold for more, and this one has gotten offers of $490,000 Quail Lodge last year and $525,000 high bid at Mecum Houston this year, but didn’t sell.

Lot # S102 2014 Ferrari LaFerrari Berlinetta; S/N ZFF76ZFA6E0207602; Red, Black roof/Black leather; Estimate $2,750,000 – $3,500,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,400,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $2,640,000. – 6262cc/949hp, Black calipers, carbon brakes, SF shields. – 427 miles and like new. – Now showing nine miles more than it had when it was reported sold at Kissimmee seven months ago, which sounds like that deal went bad, if it went at all. The buyer here was very much in evidence after the hammer fell, and he wasn’t wearing a Mecum Auctions shirt. About four hours later he was spied looking acquisitively at the McLaren F1 (Le Mans specs) at RM.

Lot # T211 1968 Fiat 850 Fastback Coupe; S/N 100GC0162198; White/Black vinyl; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $7,000. – Hub caps, narrow whitewalls, bucket seats. – Tidy but run engine bay with some grime and fuel drips here and there. Light pitting on the bumpers and lightly scratched trim. Pitted door handles. Average quality respray. Good interior with worn seat belts and buckles. Redone on a budget and just a driver, but a really charming one. – Little Fiats like this have a lot of charm and fun in a small package but they aren’t worth a lot of money, especially driver-quality examples like this. Even so, the reported high bid was on the light side, although this car sold for a somewhat expensive $12,100 at Mecum Los Angeles last year. A number somewhere in the middle would be about right.

Lot # F51 1955 Ford Fairlane Crown Victoria Transparent Top Coupe; S/N U5GW140440; Rose, White/Pink, White; Estimate $70,000 – $80,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $40,000. – 272/182hp, automatic, chrome wire wheels with whitewall tires, pushbutton radio and clock, Continental kit, fender skirts, dual spotlights, dual antennas. – The paint is very good but the chrome trim has quite a few surface scratches. The quarter window trims are pitted. The upholstery, carpet, dashboard and instrument panel are very good. Unrestored but maintained underneath. An attractive cosmetic restoration. – Although Barrett-Jackson sold this car way back in 1997 for $38,500 and in 2017 for $44,000, it isn’t worth much more than that over 20 years later and this reported high bid should have been taken if there was money close to it.

Lot # S98 2005 Ford GT Coupe; S/N 1FAFP90S25Y400037; Speed Yellow, Black stripes/Black; Estimate $800,000 – $1,000,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $570,000. – Stripes, painted calipers, BBS wheels, McIntosh stereo (all four options), roll cage, racing harnesses. – Car number 1, built in 2004, and used by Ford to certify the GT’s top speed at the Nardo Ring in Italy. Small paint chips on the nose. The engine compartment is aged. The interior is well worn from testing. Shows significant use, but any wear and tear is important to the history of the GT program. – Unlike the original GT40, the 2005-06 GT doesn’t have a serious competition history and it’s the development cars like this that are the most collectible. The reported high bid here is twice what an ordinary production GT in this condition would expect to bring, and that doesn’t seem like an unreasonable offer.

Lot # S191 1966 Ford Mustang Convertible; S/N 6F08C353752; Candy Apple Red/Black vinyl; Black top; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $43,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $47,300. – 289/200hp, automatic, power steering, narrow whitewalls, luggage rack, AM/FM radio, pony interior, power top, woodrim steering wheel. – Very good paint and chrome. The trim on the hood and around the grille is lightly scratched. The windshield brightwork is dull, especially on the top. The upholstery is good, but the center console has an area where the wood is discolored near the shifter. An attractive, well equipped car restored to appropriate standards. – Rerun of F43, a no-sale at $40,000, a fortuitous result for the seller and different from the usual run of things when someone tries a rerun as the last car of the last day of the sale. It turned out to be appropriately valued earlier and proved to be expensive in this transaction.

Lot # S30.1 1993 Jaguar XJR-S Coupe; S/N SAJSW5345PC186535; Red/Beige; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $44,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $48,400. – Alloy wheels, Potenza tires, rear spoiler, cassette stereo, books, tools, service records. Number 13 of 100 XJR SS built by TWR. – California car from new. Several large scratches on the wheels. Dull paint and exterior plastic. The gaskets around the door handles are cracking. Good interior with sound wood, but the seats have significant wrinkling to them. Certainly a cool car, and one of the most desirable XJS variants, but very much a used example despite the 49,362 miles that are represented as from new. – An obscure car with TWR credentials but not emissions compliant in the Golden State (despite coming from a California collection) and a handsome price that is triple what a standard XJS in this condition would bring.

Lot # S91 1967 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster; S/N 1E14771; Red/Black leather; Black vinyl top; Estimate $190,000 – $210,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $135,000. – Chrome wire wheels, Pirelli tires, woodrim steering wheel, original tools, jack and books. – Represented as a three-owner California car. Good but older paint and chrome. Tight, clean newer top. Very good interior. Lightly run engine bay. Fully restored and no serious flaws, but not fresh out of the shop. – Seriously discounted at this price but nowhere represented as the original drivetrain, an omission reflected in the price it brought here.

Lot # S33 1951 Jowett Jupiter Roadster; S/N E1SA61; Red/Black vinyl; Black cloth top; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $49,500. – 1,486 flat four, 62 hp, 4-speed, hubcaps, bias ply blackwall tires, trafficators, multi-band pushbutton radio, Lucas tri-bar headlights. – Eighties restoration with expected wear and touched up chips. Sound but aged and creased upholstery. Top boot liner is peeling off the panels. Surprisingly good chrome aside from some pitted trim bits. Good dash wood. The chassis is orderly but aged. Rather grubby engine compartment. Not bad, just not cared for. – Offered at Indy three months ago but bid to only $19,000 there, it found its sweet spot here in Monterey with this generous result. It’s safe to say the bidders didn’t know what to make of it but were captivated by its exotic drivetrain and funky Fifties British design. This is a seriously generous price.

Lot # F120 1954 Kurtis 500S Roadster; S/N 5686031395; Red-Orange/Black leatherette; Estimate $450,000 – $600,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $400,000. – 365cid Cadillac, single 4-barrel, 3-speed, chrome side exhausts, cycle fenders, Silver steel wheels, hubcaps, bias ply Cornell tires, headlight stoneguards, woodrim steering wheel, Davis pushbutton radio. Dana and Patti Mecum collection. – Owned for many years by Motor Trend columnist Bob Gottlieb who bought it for $2,200 at a swap meet (back when $2,200 was serious money.) Sound but scuffed old paint, good upholstery. The engine compartment and chassis show use, miles and road grime. The chrome is old but sound. A red shop rag is on the engine to sop up something that’s seeping. – This Kurtis was offered here in 2009 when it no-saled at a reported bid of $315,000. Perhaps Dana Mecum picked it up then, but even if he didn’t it’s not worth more today, in fact it’s not worth what was reported bid for it today. The Bob Gottlieb history is succulent, but not enough to support the reported high bid.

Lot # S42 1956 Lancia Appia Furgoncino S2 Panel Truck; S/N C801902; Gray/Black; Estimate $45,000 – $60,000; Truck restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $31,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $34,100. – RHD. 4-speed column shift, Light Olive wheels, Michelin X tires, Carello headlights, heater. – Cracked steering wheel rim, body cracked by a rear door hinge. Sound, lightly orange peely paint, good upholstery, dull gauge lenses. Aged engine compartment. Serviceably restored cargo compartment. Inconsistently restored but way cool. – Offered here a year ago where it was reported bid to $42,500, an illusory number that should have been taken in a heartbeat as the 2019 result shows. It is a standout, however, at any Italian vehicle gathering, will hold its own among trucks and as a support vehicle for a Lancia vintage race car is unbeatable. That’s more than enough to make this result realistic.

Lot # S39 1965 Lancia Flaminia GT 3C Coupe; S/N 826030001693; Silver/Red leather; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $37,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $40,700. – Hub caps and trim rings, Talbot Berlin mirrors mounted on the fenders, pushbutton radio, Nardi woodrim steering wheel. – Grubby engine bay. Dull chrome and brightwork. High quality older paint. Scuffs and cracks in the tail lights. Wrinkled, torn and cracked original leather, but the rest of the interior is holding up very well. Thick old undercoating on the chassis. Shiny paint and the handsome Pininfarina shape catches the eye, but this car has lots of problems. – Sold by Mecum at Houston in April for $33,000 giving it a trip to California proved to be marginally worthwhile although it’s worth keeping in mind that the buyer pocketed barely more than the all-in Houston price after paying for shipping, entry fees and the seller’s commission. The $6,300 difference in reported transaction value between Houston and here ended up in Mecum Auctions’ pocket.

Lot # S47 1969 Lotus Europa S2 Coupe; S/N 652241; Yellow/Black vinyl; Estimate $35,000 – $50,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $28,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $30,800. – 1,565/87hp, 4-speed, alloy wheels, Kumho tires, wood shift knob, later Alpine CD stereo. – Very good but not show quality paint with a touch up on the passenger’s door. Crack in the left marker lens. Very clean underneath with not a spot of rust or oxidation anywhere. Very good engine bay. Original window frames. Very good fully restored interior. The wood dash isn’t perfect, but it never is on an old Lotus. Fully taken apart and restored top to bottom. Europas aren’t worth much, especially the earlier Renault-powered cars, so they rarely get this kind of treatment. – This car sold for $23,100 at Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas last year, which was itself a very strong price. This time it’s even more expensive. Buying an old Lotus sorted out by someone else is definitely the smart way to do it and always worth paying a little extra for, but at this price the buyer could have bought one of the later, faster, more usable Twin Cam-powered Europas in identical condition.

Lot # F127 1961 Mercedes-Benz 190SL Convertible; S/N 12104210016932; Black/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $110,000 – $135,000; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $89,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $97,900. – Hubcaps, trim rings, wide whitewall radial tires, Becker Mexico AM-FM, VDO clock, ivory steering wheel and shift knob. – Good recent repaint while assembled, very good chrome and interior. The engine compartment is well-organized even though it’s not restored. Documented with original paper. The definition of a “sympathetic cosmetic restoration.” – Offered by RM in Ft. Lauderdale five months ago where it was reported bid to $97,500 but didn’t sell. The trip to Monterey didn’t pay off so well but this price is appropriate and the seller shouldn’t be disappointed with it, only with the unfortunate decision not to take the relatively generous offer in Florida which we called then “an opportunity missed.”

Lot # S41.1 2005 Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren Coupe; S/N WDDAJ76F25M000089; Silver/Red; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $200,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $220,000. – — Last serviced in 2014 and 4,000 miles ago. Now represented with 10,055 miles. Excellent paint with a few tiny stone chips on the nose. The underbody shows appropriate aging for the mileage. The interior shows almost no use. A nearly like new car. – On the modest side for a mostly excellent example, but the bidders recognized the age of the last service and the seller set a reasonable reserve. These are rare, high performance cars that make delicious throaty V8 noises. Their design, however, is extravagant and busy with many gratuitous flaps and vents.

Lot # T45 1969 MG C Roadster; S/N GCN1U8041G; Green/Black leather; Black vinyl top; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $27,000. – Wire wheels, store brand tires, banjo steering wheel, later radio. – Slightly dulled but presentable paint and chrome. Blemish on the left front fender. Clean, straight replacement vinyl top but the window is scratched and yellowed. Original leather with mild cracking. The rest of the interior looks original as well, but is very well kept. Unrestored but maintained underneath. Never redone because it never needed it. The MGC wasn’t received well and among classic British cars it’s generally underappreciated, but somebody certainly appreciated this one. – With about 9,000 built, MGCs are much rarer than the four-cylinder Bs but they aren’t exactly expensive. This car sold at Bonhams Scottsdale back in January of this year for $25,200, a spot-on result. This slightly more generous reported high bid could have been taken easily even though after entry fees and commissions the seller would have gone home somewhat out of pocket for the trade. Looking for more is futile.

Lot # T55 1949 MG TC Roadster; S/N TC9345; Cream, Green/Green leather; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $17,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,700. – Painted wire wheels, rear-mounted spare, tonneau cover, Brooklands screens behind standard windshield, wood dash, Jaeger gauges, badge bar, cycle fenders. – A few chips around the folding edges of the hood and a few touch ups on the doors but mostly very good older paint. Tidy engine bay and underbody. Very good, lightly worn interior. Light pitting on the door handles. Restored in 2000 and that was nearly 20 years ago, but it has been used lightly since and these colors look great on it. – Its performance may be modest, but the TC made America fall in love with sports cars and it launched many a racing career in the 1950s. That all seemed to be lost on the Mecum bidders, as this charming little car flew under the radar no reserve and sold for a serious bargain. It could have brought 25 grand without being expensive and this is a huge deal for the buyer.

Lot # S129 1952 Muntz Jet Convertible; S/N 52M195; Black/Gray leather; Estimate $70,000 – $80,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $32,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $35,750. – 337/154hp Lincoln V8, Hydra-Matic transmission, wheel covers, whitewalls, AM radio, Steward Warner gauges, ice chest. – The paint is aged and has lost its sheen. The right rear taillight lens is cracked. The bumpers have dulled slightly and the belt line trim is heavily scuffed. The engine compartment is aged and dusty and the interior is very aged. The upholstery fits loosely, and the steering wheel is worn and chrome tarnished. Less than stellar presentation, but less than 200 Jets were built and it is always interesting to see one. – The Muntz Jet was adapted from a Kurtis design and the first ones were built in California with Cadillac engines, but production soon moved to Illinois where Lincoln units were used. Despite a massive $5,000 price tag, Earl Muntz lost money on every single one. Today, they aren’t extremely valuable considering their rarity but are worth more than this remarkably low no-reserve result would suggest. While the car has plenty to nitpick, the new owner has tons of exclusivity per dollar. For reference, this car sold here four years ago for $82,500. The Cad-powered Kurtis 500S offered here this week was reported bid to $400,000, eleven times more than this Muntz Jet.

Lot # F98 1956 Nash Ambassador Custom 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N V14698; Yellow, Green/Green vinyl, Blue cloth; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $28,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $31,350. – 352/220hp Packard V8, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, Continental kit, pushbutton radio, dash clock. From the Academy of Art collection. – Dull chrome, very mild pitting on some of the brightwork and more serious pitting on the grille. No major blemishes in the paint, but it’s old. Some light cracking and discoloration in the vinyl parts of the seats, mild discoloration on the headliner and light pitting on the steering wheel. Maintained and tidy but unrestored underneath. Mostly original other than a repaint but never neglected, and while not the rarest car in the world, a Nash Ambassador hardly ever comes up for sale these days and it’s always a treat to see one. – Sold out of the Art Astor Collection in 2009 for an expensive $49,500, then sold at RM Monterey 10 years ago for $24,200 and at RM Phoenix in 2010 for $24,750. Despite ’50s American sedans and especially ones from defunct brands like Nash often struggling to find buyers these days, this one’s preservation and charm led it to a strong result. It is so charming and well-preserved that it is impossible to hold the Mecum Monterey bidders to a more rigorous value standard. And besides, where else can the new owner use 50’s terminology like “Twin Ultramatic”, “Speedline Styling”, “Scena-Ramic” windshield, “Iso-Thermal” intake manifold, “Jetfire” engine, “Weather Eye” and of course the “Airliner” reclining front seats that put every young woman’s father on the defensive when a beau drove up in an Ambassador. The terminology alone is worth the price.

Lot # S184 1984 Oldsmobile Cutlass Hurst Coupe; S/N 1G3AK4792EM395048; Silver, Red, Black/Burgundy cloth; Estimate $25,000 – $30,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $19,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $20,900. – 307/180hp, automatic, air conditioning, cruise control, moon roof, SS II wheels with BF Goodrich Radial T/A tires. – Excellent original paint with only one small scuff and two paint chips on the front bumper cover. The engine compartment needs light detailing but the interior is like new. Remarkably well-preserved and showing just 11,127 believable miles. – This is an impressive car that could have brought a few more bids without being expensive. It has certainly done so in the past, having sold for $27,500 at Barrett-Jackson Palm Beach 2015, for $25,300 at Kissimmee in 2016 and for $27,500 at Mecum Dallas last year. This result was not an anomaly, it was just auction fatigue.

Lot # S117 1934 Packard Super Eight-Series 1104 Convertible Victoria; S/N 76765; Blue/Blue; Tan cloth top; Estimate $160,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $145,000. – 385ci/145hp, 3-speed manual, dual enclosed sidemount spares with accessory mirrors, luggage rack, chrome wire wheels with hub caps, whitewall tires, Trippe Speedlights, Goddess of Speed mascot, Bright Green chassis, – From the Academy of Art University collection. The paint is very good but there is a small crack on the corner of the driver’s door as well a small scratch on the luggage rack. The chrome brightwork is very good. The upholstery is good. There are some indentations or light sagging on the driver’s seat. The carpet and instruments are very good. The dashboard is good, but the varnish on the woodgrain is dull in two areas towards the bottom of the dash. An aged but high quality restoration. – Back in 1992 when the Packard crossed the Kruse auction block at Auburn Fall it was reported bid to $151,000 and sported the same restoration that it has now. The pre-sale estimate here is realistic, but so is the consignor’s decision not to accept the reported high bid. Somewhere in the middle there lies a reasonable compromise that would be good for both parties.

Lot # S111 2017 Pagani Huayra Roadster; S/N ZA9H12UA1HSF76025; Bianco Benny, Carbon fiber, Red accents/Red leather; Estimate $2,700,000 – $3,000,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $2,700,000. – 6.2-liter AMG V12, titanium exhaust, front axle lift, custom interior with diamond-stitched seats. – Just 126 miles and in showroom fresh condition. – With production limited to just 100 units, the Huayra Roadster added another $1M even on top of the base Huayra coupe’s already astronomical $1.4M base price, but all 100 nevertheless sold out immediately. With demand, rarity, looks and performance like this, it’s unlikely to depreciate, but the reported high bid doesn’t seem unreasonable, particularly when it’s the same as the pre-sale low estimate.

Lot # F89 1970 Plymouth ‘Cuda Convertible; S/N BS27V0B100004; Alpine White/Black; Black top; Estimate $550,000 – $700,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $350,000. – 440/390hp Six Barrel, 4-speed manual, power steering and brakes, shaker hood, Rally wheels with Goodyear Polyglas tires, bucket seats, Hurst pistol grip shifter, AM radio and 8-track player. – Chrysler Registry documented pilot car. Very good paint and body. The engine compartment is good with signs of sparing use. The underbody is restored and has minimal oxidation. The interior has minimal wear and looks very good. An old restoration of a significant car which still presents very well. – Sold for $522,500 in Kissimmee three years ago and hammered not sold at a $425,000 high bid in Kissimmee two years ago. The bid here is seriously disappointing for a Six Barrel 4-speed convertible.

Lot # F87 1970 Plymouth ‘Cuda Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N BS23R0B184339; Tor Red, Black vinyl roof, black tail stripes/Black vinyl; Estimate $250,000 – $275,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $185,000. – 426/425hp Hemi, automatic, Argent Shaker Hood, 3.23 Sure Grip, shaker hood scoop, Rallye wheels with Goodyear Polyglas GT tires, bucket seats, console with slap shift, rally gauges, AM radio, original broadcast sheet documented. – Represented as the matching number engine. Excellent paint and brightwork. The engine compartment is fully restored. The underbody is completely redone but has some paint chips. The interior is redone but the door cards appear original as well as the seat belts. An attractive genuine Hemi Cuda that needs a few details addressed to be perfect. – Sold for $154,000 at Russo and Steele Scottsdale in 2014, then sold for $129,250 at Mecum Glendale this year followed by a $180,000 no-sale at Mecum Portland. Such confusion is unusual and it continued here, but anyone who bought a car in March for $129,250 would be mentally challenged to decline a bid of over $55,000 more five months later even if based on its original engine and very good condition it might be worth $350,000. The Glendale buy is an anomaly, but so is this.

Lot # S94 1959 Plymouth Sport Fury 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N M294100126; Bronze Metallic, White roof/Bronze vinyl with pattern cloth inserts; Estimate $150,000 – $175,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $80,000. – 318/260hp, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, dual mirrors, pushbutton automatic, pushbutton radio, dash clock, power steering, power brakes. – Touch up and a large crack on the hood but the paint is otherwise shiny and high quality. Good older chrome. A few scratches on the body side trim. Very good interior, restored other than the dash. Very clean underneath. An attractive, well equipped, lightly aged restoration. – This ordinary Sport Fury would have been generously bought at $35,000. The no-sale result and pre-sale estimate range her make no sense at all. This is an ordinary, attractively presented Fury hardtop with its base engine. Even at the reported high bid it would have been staggeringly and irrationally expensive. There is no rational basis for this result.

Lot # F85 1969 Pontiac GTO Convertible; S/N 242679B169050; Carousel Red/Parchment; Estimate $160,000 – $180,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $145,000. – Ram Air IV 400/370hp, automatic, warranty replacement block, 3.90 differential, power steering and brakes, Rally II wheels with trim rings and red line tires, hood tach, AM radio, bucket seats and console, power windows and antenna. – Sold new in Canada then traded in on a new Celica in 1974. Excellent paint and body lines. The engine compartment is clean and the engine does have some paint flaking off from heat cycling. The underbody has been redone and painted black. The interior is complete and shows little wear. An attractive and rare car, well restored but not to concours standards. – A Ram Air IV convertible is a valuable car, but not much more valuable than this reported high bid. It hammered not sold at a $175,000 high bid in Kissimmee 2017, which was a missed opportunity and it is time for the owner to recognize the realities of the 2019 market, or just keep driving and enjoying it.

Lot # S143 1958 Porsche 356A 1600 Super Cabriolet, Body by Reutter; S/N 150396; Red/Black; Black top; Estimate $180,000 – $230,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $170,000. – Rudge wheels, Blaupunkt radio, bumper guards, woodrim steering wheel, Talbot York mirror. – Good paint. The door gap needs minor tweaking, the rear bumper guards have some minor scuffs. The engine compartment is immaculate and the underbody shows little use. The interior has been redone and presents very well. An attractive 1600 Super with only minor items which detract. – Sold here last year for $209,000, not sold at a $200,000 high bid at Mecum Las Vegas last year and not sold at a $170,000 high bid in Kissimmee this year with 11 fewer miles on the clock. It hammered not sold again at a $170,000 at Mecum Glendale five months ago. This is a good car and it deserves as much as it got its last time in Monterey, but it’s getting stale with overexposure on the block, eating into bidders’ acceptance of it.

Lot # S166 1961 Porsche 356B Roadster, Body by D’Ieteren Freres; S/N 81134; Aetna Blue/Black; Black top; Estimate $160,000 – $185,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $160,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $176,000. – 912 engine, chromed steel wheels, woodrim steering wheel. – Fresh restoration with excellent paint and new interior. Some brightwork shows new while others have slight pitting. Corners cut such as original worn finish left on wipers, mirrors and engine grille as well as cracked rubber stripping around taillights. More than presentable enough to go out and enjoy, and with the later 912 engine it’s more suited to the casual weekend driver than the serious collector. – Sold by Russo and Steele in Florida in 2008, when it was an incomplete project, for $115,500. It needed pretty much everything at the time and, other than its original engine, it has gotten everything in the meantime. This is an appropriate result that takes the lack of matching numbers into account.

Lot # F22 1962 Porsche 356B S90 Roadster, Body by d’Ieteren Freres; S/N 89748; Oslo Blue/Red; Tan top; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $240,000. – Chromed wheels, boot cover. – The paint is very good. Light scratching on some of the body trim. Very good interior. Clean engine bay. Fully taken apart and restored within the past couple of years. A gorgeous open 356B in attractive original colors. – Two years ago when it was fresh out of years in storage and in need of restoration, this car was a no-sale here at $145,000. It’s an entirely different car today and should command an entirely different price, but not one much higher than this reported high bid.

Lot # S61 1967 Porsche 912 Coupe; S/N 457757; Red/Black leatherette; Estimate $55,000 – $75,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; Hammered Sold at $48,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $52,800. – 1,582cc/90hp, dual carbs, 4-speed, Fuchs wheels, Kumho tires. – Relatively fresh paint, but there are microblisters on the nose and a few scratches on the tail. Fully restored and nearly spotless underneath. Fresh-looking brightwork all around. Track scratches in the side glass. Good newer seats and carpets, but the steering wheel is worn and the gauges are very cloudy. Also not represented as matching numbers. A good enough 912, but inconsistently presented. These were cheap Porsches for a long time, but they’re worth enough now to give a more thorough restoration than this. – This price should have bought a no-excuses 912. While not a bad car, this one has a few things to answer for, brought more than it deserves and it doesn’t even have a 5-speed. The new owner is not going to be very happy with this 912, and even less happy with the price paid for it.

Lot # S112 2015 Porsche 918 Spyder Weissach Roadster; S/N WP0CA2A14FS800472; Orix Metallic/Black piped in Red; Estimate $1,600,000 – $1,800,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,200,000. – Acid Green calipers, front axle lift. – Represented with 2872 miles but still presents like a new car, as most 918s do. – The optional Weissach package subtracts about 100 pounds and adds about $100,000 to a 918 in today’s market. This bid was soft for a Weissach-equipped car with special order paint, but there is no shortage of 918’s on the market where it appears supply is greater than demand.

Lot # S150 1982 Porsche 935 DP Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ93ZCS000212; Guards Red, Yellow, Orange/Black leather piped in Red; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $280,000. – Red painted Fuchs wheels, air conditioning, sunroof, RUF BTR 3.4L/390 turbocharged engine, aftermarket CD player added. – Tested by Car and Driver in period. The front bumper has a few filled chips and scrapes. The engine compartment is clean, but shows some aging. The interior is very good, but the driver’s seat does show light wear. The oldest of the four DP 935s on offer at this sale. – One of four faux 935s built by DP Motorsports in this auction. None sold. ‘Nuf said.

Lot # S153 1985 Porsche 935 DP Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ93ZFS000558; Dark Blue, Gold/Tan leather; Unrestored original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $285,000. – Three-piece BBS wheels, roll bar, sunroof, air conditioning, CD stereo. – Originally ordered by Mario Andretti who promptly sold it. Good original paint but there is a minor scratch on the right door sill. The engine and underbody show appropriate aging and need a minor detailing. The driver’s seat has some wrinkling from use. Otherwise the interior has been well cared for. A well-maintained example. – Not sold at a $300,000 high bid in Kissimmee in 2018. DP built cars that looked like 935s and performed impressively. Reputed to have a 500hp Kremer-built engine, but other than that it’s a look-alike cafe racer and like the other three DP Porsches it attracted no interest here.

Lot # S152 1992 Porsche 935 DP Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ96ZMS470942; Silver/Gray, Black; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $275,000. – 3.3 liter/444hp turbo engine, 5-speed manual, air conditioning, Blaupunkt radio, adjustable suspension, stainless exhaust, three-piece alloy wheels. – Represented as the last air-cooled DP 935 built and one of four in this sale. Very good paint and body. The engine compartment is aged and needs detailing. The interior presents well and has little wear or use. A well-maintained original example. – But it’s an “original example” of what? It’s a made-up car, one of four in this auction and like the other three got no respect from the bidders.

Lot # S151 1989 Porsche 935 DP (Long Windshield) Coupe; S/N DP93557989; Guards Red, Gray/Black; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $310,000. – 3.3-liter twin-turbo with 450hp, G50 5-speed, 105-liter fuel tank, carbon Kevlar bodywork, turbo fan front wheels, BBS rears, racing harness, manual boost controller. – Represented as one of four with the long windshield. There is a scratch in the stripe on the right fender graphic and a few filled paint chips on the front splitter. The engine compartment needs a light detailing. The driver’s seat has slightly saggy upholstery. Otherwise the interior presents very well. Exceptionally cool and well-presented overall. – None of the four DP 935s on offer at Mecum Monterey this year sold, but this one received the highest reported high bid of them. Exhilarating or terrifying depending on who you ask, the opportunities to make the most of this car’s performance are limited and the DP 935s are aftermarket tuner specials rather than factory builds, so this bid is realistic.

Lot # F154 1985 Renault Alpine GTA Coupe; S/N VFAD50005G0030010; Pearl White/Gray leather; Estimate $30,000 – $45,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $22,500. – 2.8-liter/158hp V6, 5-speed manual, Michelin TRX tires, Phillips Hi-Fi stereo. Includes plenty of factory spares. – Very good original paint and body. The engine is clean and shows little aging. The interior is excellent mostly but the plastic pieces have a little fading. Represented with 28,626 actual km. Very cool, very ’80s and very rare in this country, but no service history is represented and finding parts for this car cannot be a straightforward process which may explain why it has a stash of factory spares (which will turn out not to be the parts it needs.) – This car sold for $18,700 at RM Fort Lauderdale last year, which makes the refusal of this high bid seem a little unrealistic. It’s rare, but it’s also obscure and a specialist collectible without the panache of the A110 rally cars.

Lot # S161 1964 Shelby Cobra 289 Roadster; S/N CSX2445; Red/Black leather; Estimate $550,000 – $700,000; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $375,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $412,500. – Centerlock starburst wheels, Michelin Energy MXV4 tires, wind wings, translucent sun visors, grille and trunk guards. – Worn wood steering wheel rim needs to be refinished. The gauge faces are old and dull. Seat coverings are loose and torn. Crack by the corner of the hood scoop. Poor hood fit. Scratched windshield frame. Dirty, dust covered engine compartment. Accident history in the 70’s sufficient for it to be written off by the insurance company. Extensively rebuilt over several years and looks like an ignored, flawed car, exceptional for a Cobra and no claims at all about original parts. – This isn’t even close to a good Cobra, but it is an inexpensive Cobra and its CSX number ID plate (even if the number appears nowhere else) gets it into some good events. It brought a superior price here, where anywhere else on the Monterey Peninsula this weekend it would not even have made it onto the auctions’ dockets.

Lot # F139 1965 Shelby Cobra 289 Roadster; S/N CSX2588; Rouge Iris/Black; Black top; Estimate $900,000 – $1,200,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $950,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,045,000. – Wire wheels, wind wings, woodrim steering wheel, Stewart Warner gauges, chrome wire wheels. – From Dana and Patti Mecum’s collection. Represented as the second to last 289 built and the last sold to the public. Good single repaint done in 2006 in its original and unusual but attractive color. The engine compartment is clean and shows some aging. The underbody is clean as well and has minimal oxidation from use. The seats have minimal creasing and the gauge display appears original. An older restoration and well-maintained since. – An auction regular, this Cobra first sold for $342,400 at RM Boca Raton in 2006 but more recently began a strong of no-sales that finally ended here in Monterey. It hammered not sold at a $950,000 high bid here two years ago, again at a $1M high bid in Kissimmee last year, again at a $1.1M high bid here last year, yet again at a $1.05M high bid in Kissimmee this year and one more time at an $875,000 high bid in Indy a few months ago. Given that it’s a bit stale on the auction scene, it was lucky to get this appropriate result this time across the block.

Lot # S165 1965 Shelby Cobra 427 Competition Roadster; S/N CSX3016; Silver, Red. White, Blue stripes/Black; Estimate $800,000 – $1,200,000; Competition restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $550,000. – Competition features such as fire suppression, dual fuel pumps, Goodyear blue streak tires, battery cut off, cold air box, 427/500hp side oiler, centerlock starburst wheels. – Period competition history and FIA papers/certification. 1966 Sebring class winner driven by Bob Grossman and Ed Lowther (4 laps behind the George Wintersteen/Ben Moore 427 Corvette), track record at Watkins Glen in 1966. Paint shows little use with no rock chips or marks. Vinyl stripes and numbers. Brightwork around windshield and lamps shows minor pitting. Tires are severely worn and cracked. Restored and lightly aged. – With a good but relatively undistinguished race history, this car is worth far more than the reported high bid. It hammered not sold at Mecum Kissimmee in 2014 at a $1.7M high bid. This result makes little sense except if it’s the result of the auctioneer realizing there wasn’t a dollar in the marquee and moving it on.

Lot # F86 1965 Shelby Mustang GT350 Fastback; S/N SFM5S148; Wimbledon White, Blue stripes/Black vinyl; Estimate $175,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $110,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $121,000. – 289cid/306hp, 4-speed, Torque Thrust style wheels, Radial T/A tires, pushbutton radio, woodrim steering wheel, dashtop tach and oil pressure gauge, bullet outside mirrors, 3.89 Detroit Locker, traction bars. – Painted over old paint and edge chips. Good interior, clean body color underbody. Vinyl graphics. Restored in 1992 and the body was replaced at the time. Extensively described, but nowhere does it state anything about the drivetrain’s originality. – Hello? Nothing in the SAAC Registry or about this ’65 GT350 suggests anything but a real old GT350 restored 27 years ago with new body panels, yet both the estimate and the price it realized indicate something more deviant than that. $110,000 for a correct ’65 GT350 ID tag is cheap and this is a whole car that runs and drives. Curious.

Lot # F89.1 1967 Shelby Mustang GT500 Fastback; S/N 67410F2A00410; Nightmist Blue, White stripes/Black vinyl; Estimate $170,000 – $190,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $130,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $143,000. – 428/355hp, dual quads, automatic, power steering, power brakes, fog lights, Magnum 500 wheels with Goodyear tires, grille-mounted high beams, Rally Pac gauges, Marti Report and delivery checklist documented. – Represented as 24,265 miles from new and the original engine. The front bumper has irregularities in the corners and appears to have been repaired. The passenger’s side corner of the front bumper also has light cracks in the chrome. The paint, on the other hand, is very good. Freshly restored and detailed engine bay. Very good fully restored interior. Not quite the concours restoration it is represented as, but a very attractive and correct GT500. – There is nothing objectively “wrong” with this GT500, only a few details that should have been attended to. It was bought here for a very attractive price.

Lot # S34 1953 Singer SM 4AD Roadster; S/N L4AD1717V; Red/Brown vinyl; Beige cloth top; Estimate $15,000 – $25,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $21,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $23,100. – 1497/58hp, hub caps, Firestone blackwalls, wood dash, floor shift, dash clock. – Tired, flat old paint with numerous deep and long scratches. Dull but presentable chrome and brightwork. Older undercoated chassis with light oxidation. Uneven gaps. Good interior with sound upholstery, although the dash, while attractive, isn’t real wood. A rare, interesting, charming little car, but it’s a bit rough and not all the details are right. – Reported sold at Mecum’s Spring Classic in Indianapolis three months ago for $14,850, like the Jowett Jupiter that crossed the block just before it Monterey proved to be the happy home for this odd British roadster. The Indy result was realistic for its condition; this price is generous.

Lot # S136 1929 Stutz Model M Tonneau Cowl Speedster, Body by LeBaron; S/N M844CY72E; Dark Green, Black fenders/Tan leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $92,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $101,200. – 332110hp eight, 3-speed manual, orange wire wheels with hub caps, dual sidemount spares, cowl lights, Ryan Lite headlights, luggage trunk. – The paint is very good, but the color does reveal swirls and there is one small scratch on the driver’s side fender. The interior upholstery is very good. The chrome brightwork is very good. The windshield is heavily scratched and the lamination of the safety glass has many air bubbles. The trim that surrounds the running boards is dull. The dashboard is not varnished. A highly restored Stutz that is stunning to look at but does have some notable flaws. – There may be some faults, but this is a great value in a CCCA Full Classic ™ with excellent performance. It may not have the A.K. Miller history of the Model M sold at Gooding’s Pebble Beach auction this week, nor does it have the cutdown doors of the ex-Nutsy Stutzy LeBaron bodied Speedster, but it is $44,000 less and that’s serious money.

Lot # S183 1965 Sunbeam Tiger Mk I Convertible; S/N B9470690LRXFE; Moonstone White/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Estimate $90,000 – $110,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $86,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $94,600. – 260/164hp, Koni shocks, aftermarket exhaust, modern radiator, Pertronix ignition, hardtop and soft top, Lucas driving lights, woodrim steering wheel, Minilite-style 8-spoke alloy wheels, STOA verified. – Very good paint and panel fit. The bumpers are in excellent shape, but the windshield trim is original. The engine compartment has been redone and is mostly correct minus the hose clamps. The interior is well restored. The wood dash is excellent and upholstery is like new. A very well done and recently finished Mk I Tiger, although not represented as matching numbers. – This is a very strong price for a 260 Tiger, but this is a very strong 260 Tiger with desirable accessories like the hardtop that make it (moderately) usable from early Spring to late Fall. These cars have come down from their peak in 2016, but the best and freshest examples still approach or even surpass six figures. This was a solid value.

Lot # F100 1939 Talbot-Lago T150 C Coupe; S/N 90060; Blue/Crimson leather; Estimate $400,000 – $500,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $340,000. – RHD. 3,996/148hp, 4-speed Wilson preselector transmission, chrome wire wheels, rear-mounted spare. – From the Academy of Art University collection. The paint is very good but there are three small blisters on the passenger’s side B-pillar near the rear window. The chrome brightwork is good. The upholstery and dashboard are very good. Restored many years ago by Richard Straman and holding up well. 1987 Pebble Beach Road & Track trophy winner. – Rather erect and practical 4-seat coupe coachwork by Talbot-Lago with some attractive details like the split front bumpers and teardrop fenders, presented in exceptional condition after its 80’s Richard Straman restoration. It has a long auction history starting in 1999 when it appeared at the NY Auto Salon & Auction where it was bid to a paltry (even back then) $80,000 against an estimate of $200,000-$250,000. Gooding sold it in 2013’s Scottsdale auction for $418,000, its high point, followed by a no-sale at Mecum Las Vegas last November at a high bid of $325,000. The coachwork is mundane but the car will be marvelous on tours and events and it has been maintained in exemplary condition. Hereabouts is the right price, the consignor only needs to realize that it’s not close to $400,000.

Lot # F33 1960 Triumph TR3A Roadster; S/N TS62514L; Green/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $23,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $25,300. – Hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, dual wing mirrors, tonneau cover, cassette stereo under the dash. – Dull older paint. Lightly scratched grille. Scratched windshield frame and pitted trunk hinges. Very good interior. Older restored underneath. Restored, but on a budget and a long time ago. It’s an attractive driver. – Slightly on the expensive side for a TR3 with so many things to nitpick, so the new owner has no money left over for any major fixes. But no matter, the car needs nothing to go out and enjoy, and it’s still a lot of fun and charm per dollar at this price.

Lot # T183 1967 Volkswagen Type 2 Samba Microbus, 21-Window; S/N 237134191; Green, Beige/Green, Mint Green vinyl; Enthusiast restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $58,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $63,800. – 1600 cc engine, hub caps, whitewalls, roof rack, cloth sunroof. – Quickly resprayed wheels, and the right front is fairly beat up underneath. Scuffed but seemingly newer tires. Good, fresh paint on the body. Light scratches on several of the windows. Very clean engine bay and underbody. Excellent interior. The body looks straight but the panel fit on all of the doors is erratic. This bus has a lot to criticize, but they’re mostly little things and from 20 feet away it’s just as attention-grabbing as any of the overrestored 23-Windows that sell for six figures these days. It’s restored well enough for casual enjoyment and very attractive. – Sambas often sell for over-the-top prices at auction, but this one’s more modest condition didn’t get the bids flying. That said, this is a perfectly sufficient result.

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Comments

    • Thomas Long
    • September 27, 2019
    Reply

    Hi Rick,

    Once again, your auction reports are the highlight of auction season. Keep it up, please.

    I have a question and would like your opinion. As a dentist, ethics with the public are paramount in my business dealings. Would you care to comment on phrases in your write-up of lot F51, the 1955 Ford Fairlane, “… and this reported high bid should have been taken if there was money close to it.” With 12% commissions, is shill bidding necessary and ethical?

    Thanks, Tom Long

      • rickcarey1
      • September 29, 2019
      Reply

      Tom,
      Good observation.
      It deserves more than a comment reply, in the close future.
      Rick

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