RM Auctions, Auburn Fall, Auburn, IN, September 3-5, 2020

If there’s any remaining question about how well the collector car auction market is adjusting to CoViD-19’s restrictions and revised value chains it’s nowhere better seen than in the recent history of Auburn Fall.

It handily beat 2019’s pre-CoViD sale total and nearly matched it in average transaction value. It didn’t match 2018’s sale total but it had 27% fewer lots and brought a total sale of only 21.3% less

In recent auctions we’ve seen relative strength in high six- and seven-figure lots; what Auburn Fall illustrates is that with reasonable (or no) reserves buyers step up and pay historically rational prices.

Consignors are – on the basis of the two Auburn sales of RM and Worldwide – willing to accept the risk of No Reserve. 308 of Auburn Fall’s cars were No Reserve, 56.5% of the lots consigned.

They were, on balance, rewarded with realistic prices.

There were no million dollar cars. Only seventeen were bid into six-figures of which thirteen sold, a sale rate of 76.5%.

Of the cars viewed only three were considered “expensive”. Offsetting that, two were considered “good values”, a reasonable distribution that reflects an orderly market.

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2020 452/529 85.4% 59.7% 13.9% $37,210 $22,550

[60.6%]

$16,818,825
2019 413/553 74.7% $37,628 $26,950

[71.6%]

$15,540,440
2018 527/721 73.1% 73.5% 4.8% $41,076 27,500

[67%]

$21,646,790
2017 530/728 72.8% 78.3% 6.2% $35,833 $19,250

[53.7%]

$18,991,443
2017 was the last Auburn Fall under the Auctions America banner before it folded into RM Auctions

Megan Boyd attended and provided on-site observations of 25 of the 29 cars described here, which is exemplary as she was also describing cars from Worldwide during the same period. Rick Carey and Andrew Newton each described two cars from the online catalog and photos.

The reports are sorted by lot number.


Lot # 2028 1964 Lancia Flaminia Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 826030001858; Engine # 8260301816; Light Gray/Red leather; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Older restoration 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $18,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $19,800. – 2,775/150hp V-6, triple Webers, 4-speed transaxle, hub caps, single wing mirror, pushbutton AM/FM radio. – From the Walter Miller estate. One of 1,085 2.8 coupes. The paint is in fair condition with chips and scratches throughout. The red leather interior is fair condition as well, with the driver’s seat very worn but still complete and comfortable. The carpet is very stained and the interior door chrome is rusting. The exterior chrome is fair with several pieces pitted and hazy. The glass is good with some minor scratches on the windshield. The engine bay is grimy, but the car card claims a new clutch. A driver-quality Lancia that could be given straightforward improvements while enjoying it on the weekends. – This is a significant car with intriguing technical details and sedate Pininfarina coachwork of the period that belies the 3-Weber 150hp engine under the hood. Its disappointing condition no doubt turned off bidders, but the one who persisted and bought it at this result got a great value.

Lot # 2054 1942 Crosley Convertible Coupe; S/N C12828; Red/Black; Black cloth top; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Older restoration 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $14,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $15,400. – 35 cid twin, hub caps, rear-mounted spare. – From the Walter Miller estate. Recently out of long term ownership. The paint has begun cracking at the body seams. The very basic interior is in good condition with only the felt in the window channels faded and in need of replacement. The glass is good other than slight delamination of the windshield. The small amount of brightwork is fair, and the hub caps in particular are pitted. The engine is driver quality having not been touched since the restoration several years ago. A neat little Crosley, with an unusual 1942 model year, in driver condition. – Better known for its postwar 4-cylinder cars, the prewar models with their diminutive 2-cylinder engines are a rarely seen but important precursor to the more popular postwar models. Even Powel Crosley realized after years of trying that the microcar was not going to make it in America. This is a significant little car that doesn’t need a restoration to be enjoyed and is a reasonable buy at this price.

Lot # 2056 1971 BMW 2002 Sedan; S/N 2571397; Engine # 2571397; Monte Carlo Blue/Black vinyl; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Visually maintained, largely original 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $9,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $10,450. – 1,990/114hp, 4-speed, hub caps, wood shift knob. – From the Walter Miller estate. Desirable round taillights. Poor paint with orange peel and sanding marks as well as scratches throughout. The interior is in fair condition but usable as is. The engine bay is driver quality – a little grimy but no cause for concern. All the brightwork is fair with fading and many pieces corroded. The glass is all good and the tires appear to be new or at least newer. Perfect for a new enthusiast to drive and enjoy as is while restoring a component at a time. – 2002 Turbos and tii’s have surged in value over the past few years, but even more pedestrian versions of this famous shoebox Bimmer are significantly pricier than they were only a few short years ago. It’s no wonder they’re desirable. A strong engine, roomy interior and trunk, and lively driving experience make them very usable classics, especially for people new to the hobby. A lot of them out there are still in this kind of rough but usable condition, and this one deserves to be brought back to shinier standards. At this price, the new owner isn’t in the car very deep and has an enjoyable running project.

Photo (c) and courtesy RM Auctions

Lot # 2057 1966 Toyota Crown Deluxe 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N RS4194577; Engine # 3R382765; White/Black, Red; Estimate $10,000 – $15,000; Visually maintained, largely original 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $8,250 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $9,075. – 1,879/95hp four, column shift 3-speed, bench seat with armrest, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, rear seat cigarette lighter and ashtray, radio. – From the Walter Miller estate. Rough old paint with numerous large chips and a few scrapes. Aged original brightwork. Good upholstery, but worn switchgear and aged door panels. Grubby but complete and maintained engine bay. Comes with numerous spare parts, which surely aren’t easy to find for this car. An interesting oddball early Toyota, but nothing to write home about condition-wise. – Back in the mid-1960s, Japanese cars were still something of a curiosity in the U.S. market and Toyota was still a ways off from becoming a household name here. The second generation version of the Toyota Crown, which looks part Ford Falcon and part 1960 Imperial Crown, was available in America in sedan and wagon form. But few sold and far fewer are left today. An interesting car but neither super collectible nor particularly clean, it sold for a rational amount.

Lot # 2060 1952 Volvo PV444 DS 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N 30528; Light Blue/Red cloth piped in White; Estimate $8,000 – $12,000; Unrestored original 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $10,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $11,550. – 1,414/51hp four, single carburetor, 3-speed manual, hub caps and trim rings, heater. – From the Walter Miller estate. The paint, likely original, has somewhat dulled and has some minor chips, especially on the roof. The interior has some tears on the driver’s seat and the headliner is loose around the rear window. The chrome is fair condition and appears much like the rest of the car to be original. All the glass in the vehicle is good as are the tires. Remarkably well-preserved and a rarely seen early PV444. One of the highlights of this collection. – The PV444 was Volvo’s first unibody car and one of the cars that made built Volvo’s reputation for rugged and dependable but not particularly sophisticated automobiles. PVs didn’t come to our shores until 1956, and although this one’s early history isn’t represented, its early build date makes it a curiosity. It’s an appealing value at this price, but not far off from what other PVs sell for. Among Volvo enthusiasts, however, it is a rare predecessor to the much loved U.S. imports and will get avid attention.

Lot # 2067 1956 DeSoto Fireflite Pacesetter Convertible; S/N 50385872; White, Gold/Gold leather, Brown cloth; Estimate $70,000 – $80,000; Cosmetic restoration 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $53,000. – 331/255hp, automatic, power steering and brakes, power windows and bench seat, pushbutton radio, Highway HiFi, slotted gold wheel covers, bias ply whitewall tires, dual outside mirrors and rear antennas. – One of 400 Fireflite Pacesetter convertibles produced after DeSoto paced the 1956 Indy 500. Comes with original build card. Sporting an older restoration with blemishes in the paint throughout, including cracks near the trunk and messy seams. The interior is in good condition with exception of the steering wheel being chipped and cracked. The convertible top boot is also dirty. The glass is good but the felt is dried and cracking in the window channels. The chrome ranges from fair to poor condition with pitting on mirrors, the top of the door trim and emblems. The engine is in poor condition with paint peeling from the intake and the valve covers. The tires are in poor condition as well with discoloration and cracking from age. Distinctive and inherently collectible as a Pacesetter, but it has many needs. – This car sold here in 2017 for $66,000. It is in largely the same condition, so the consignor shouldn’t have expected bids much higher this time around. And it didn’t get them, just a modest offer in line with the last time it crossed the block and its age which would have been $58,300 with the commission added.

Lot # 2068 1959 Edsel Corsair Convertible; S/N B9UR723656; Light Aqua/Blue, White; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Enthusiast restoration 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $27,500. – 332/225hp, automatic, hub caps, whitewalls, pushbutton radio, dash clock. – One of 1,343 Corsair convertibles built for 1959. A rare car in need of a restoration. The paint is poor with cracks in the rear, bubbles on the front right fender and scratches throughout. The interior is poor with the seat covers loose in the front and overstretched in the rear. Most of the silver trim from the seats is missing as well. The paint on the steering wheel is worn. The chrome is fair condition likely from the last restoration but still presentable as is. The engine bay is driver quality and the firewall is peeling paint. The antenna is missing from the car. The glass is delaminating on the vent windows and the tires are discolored from age. In need of a lot. – Even though it has been over six decades since the Edsel’s flop, the car’s reputation sticks with it and they aren’t particularly valuable. It will cost more than this car may ever be worth to bring it back to top condition. It should have sold at this price, and it’s unlikely to bring more elsewhere. For reference, it sold for $36,300 in Fort Lauderdale last March.

Lot # 4039 1935 DeSoto Airflow 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 5085100; Light Yellow/Brown cloth; Estimate $25,000 – $30,000; Older restoration 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000. – Wide whitewalls, hubcaps, trim rings, skirts, dual windshield wipers. – Originally Surf Blue. Having been restored nearly 10 years ago the paint remains in good condition with only minor surface scratching. The interior is in great condition with zero sign of wear. The glass has some overspray on the passenger’s side windows which likely could be removed. The chrome is fair with minor pitting throughout the chrome pieces on the car and the rear bumper inside tarnished. The tires are yellowed from age. A nice driver quality car with an older restoration of a rare sedan. – This car was freshly restored back in 2011 when RM sold it at St. Johns for $27,500. It was a good value then, and the car has only lightly aged in the nine years since so it’s an even better value here. DeSoto Airflows are generally less desirable than their Chrysler counterparts and sedans are of course less desirable than coupes, but this is still a bargain.

Photo (c) and courtesy RM Auctions

Lot # 4055 2006 Cadillac XLR-V Convertible; S/N 1G6YX36D565602398; Black Raven/Black weather with suede inserts; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Unrestored original 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $32,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $35,200. – 4.4/443hp V-8, automatic, alloy wheels, wood interior trim, Bose CD stereo. – Showing 13,339 miles. Light wrinkling to the seats and otherwise only showing the light age one would expect from a car with mileage this low. A lightly used and fast modern cruiser. – Cadillac’s first two-seater since the front-drive Allante, the XLR has performance bona fides since it rides on the C6 Corvette platform, but its Northstar V-8 left it a bit down on power compared to its LS-powered Chevy cousin. Cadillac remedied that by sticking a supercharger on the Northstar to create the XLR-V. Cadillac also charged about 100 grand for it, over twice the cost of a new Vette in ’06, and sold fewer than 2,200 examples. They’re far cheaper a decade and a half later, but clean XLR-Vs are no longer depreciating, either. This result is right on the money for a car with this kind of mileage.

Lot # 4073 1949 Buick Super Series 50 Sedanet; S/N 15085022; Black/Gray cloth; Estimate $24,000 – $28,000; Older restoration 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $17,600. – 248/115hp straight-eight, automatic, hub caps and trim rings, fender skirts, pushbutton radio, dash clock. – From the Dave Leimbach Collection. Very good paint with only a few chips around the hood where it has been improperly closed a few times. The interior is in good condition. It appears original with faint staining on the front seat, hazy gauges and some interior chrome pitting. The exterior chrome is in good condition with only minor corrosion on the ventiports. The glass is good other than slight delamination on the vent windows. A solid, handsome, honest Buick for casual enjoyment. – Buick’s sedanet was an innovative design that foreshadowed the aerodynamic development of Fifties American styling and they are still appreciated today. This older restored example has many ways for its presentation to be improved but most of them are inexpensive and can be undertaken progressively while still enjoying it on weekend drives. The result here is healthy but not seriously so.

Lot # 4096 1991 GMC Syclone Pickup; S/N 1GDCT14Z7M8802521; Black/Black cloth piped in Red; Estimate $35,000 – $40,000; Unrestored original 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $52,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $57,200. – 262/280hp turbocharged V-6, automatic, air conditioning, factory cassette stereo. – Showing just 2,228 miles and looks like a new truck from top to bottom. – The famous Ferrari-beating GMC Syclone often led a hard life, racking up the miles a quarter at a time. A decent number like this one, though, were mothballed collectibles and there are more low-mile examples out there than one might think. Even so, 2,228 miles is low enough to make this one a standout. It’s the most expensive Syclone we’ve seen since B-J sold a 3,400 mile Marlboro limited edition at Las Vegas in 2014 for $66,000. It is the most expensive regular production Syclone sold at auction, along the way blowing RM’s $35-40,000 pre-sale estimate out of the water.

Lot # 4123 1995 Ford Taurus SHO 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 1FALP54P8SA289984; Red/Beige leather; Estimate $8,000 – $12,000; Unrestored original 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $11,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $12,650. – 182/220hp DOHC V-6, automatic, sunroof, air conditioning, power windows, alloy wheels, factory CD stereo. – From the Dave Leimbach Collection. Showing just 12,055 miles. Good paint with some minor blemishes from use and a scratch on the driver’s side of the rear bumper. Very good interior other than significant wear and some dirt on the driver’s seat. The door seal on the driver’s door is disintegrating from age. The glass is in great condition and the tires appear to be new. The engine compartment shows mild dirt and age. It could use a good detailing, but this is nevertheless one of the cleanest SHOs anywhere. – It’s not the most illustrious name in the car biz, but the original Taurus saved Ford’s bacon in the mid-1980s, staving off bankruptcy and selling over two million units. And the performance version – the SHO – was a genuine BMW fighter. At 143 mph, it was also one of the world’s fastest four-doors in its day. The zinger of a V-6 under the hood, built by Yamaha, puts out just 5hp less than that year’s Mustang GT and with its six long intake runners the engine is nicer to look at than the car itself. All that said, it’s still a front-drive ’90s sedan with a Taurus badge, and SHOs don’t have much more than a cult following. This is probably one of the cleanest examples available, and justifiably one of the most expensive even at barely 12 grand.

Lot # 4153 1929 Chrysler Series 75 Roadster; S/N CL316E; Blue/Tan leather; Tan top; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Older restoration 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $46,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $50,600. – 249/84hp straight-six, 3-speed, painted wire wheels, Firestone wide whitewalls, dual sidemount spares, luggage rack and trunk, golf bag door, rumble seat. – 55 years of ownership, AACA Grand National First Prize winner 2002-03. Despite being a nearly 20-year-old restoration this Chrysler is in great condition. The paint is excellent as is the glass, engine and top. The interior is in great condition with only slight wear to the seat back. The chrome and brightwork are near perfect but could benefit from a thorough polishing. The tires are slightly discolored from age. A very presentable roadster in a stunning color combination. – Selling for just over its $45,000 pre-sale high estimate, this is a quality car when it was built, when it was restored and as it is now. ’29 Chryslers had updated styling as good as anything else at the time and this is a super-enjoyable ride that can be shown with pride and confidence. Its only disappointment is that it’s not on the CCCA’s list of Full Classics, but that probably would have made it more expensive and detracted from the underlying value proposition.

Lot # 6028 1957 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud Sports Saloon, Body by Hooper; S/N SDD148; Engine # SD74; Black, Silver/Red, Beige leather; Estimate $50,000 – $65,000; Older restoration 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $42,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $46,750. – RHD. Wheel covers, fog lights, dual wing mirrors, column shift, rear seat tables. – From the bankruptcy estate of entities previously controlled by Bikram Choudhury. Good paint with some minor blemishes throughout. The interior is in decent condition but is in need of a thorough cleaning. The glass is delaminating on the windshield and the seats are dry and cracking, but the wood is solid. The chrome is poor with haze and pitting on all components. The tires are good but the wheel covers are pitted. The engine bay is driver quality with rusty manifolds. An interesting coachbuilt Silver Cloud but it has age and flaws, and on a classic Rolls that can mean serious expense in the future. – While not the last word in elegance, the Hooper coachwork on this car is distinctive and rare. That considered, this price is certainly on the modest side despite the flaws. It didn’t meet its low estimate, and didn’t sell for much more than a Standard Steel Cloud I in this condition would typically sell for.

Lot # 6033 1961 Rolls-Royce Phantom V Limousine, Body by James Young; S/N 58X16; Engine # PV58B; Queen’s Black Cherry/Beige leather piped in Burgundy; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Older restoration 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $71,500. – RHD. Wheel covers, fog lights, dual wing mirrors, suicide rear doors, air conditioning, rear seat tables and drinks cabinet, jump seats. – From the bankruptcy estate of entities previously controlled by Bikram Choudhury. One of 832 Phantom Vs produced from 1959-68, and one of only 217 featuring James Young coachwork. RHD example ordered new through Jack Barclay, accompanied by copies of R-R build info. Typical of the collection this is another driver quality Rolls-Royce. The paint is in good condition with some blemishes at the body lines. The interior is in decent condition but the leather is wrinkled and dirty, as is the carpet. The wood garnish moldings are damaged on the driver’s door. The glass is good as are the tires which appear to be new. The chrome and brightwork are fair with scratches, haze and pitting throughout. The engine bay has not been detailed and the manifolds are rusty. – A popular car among royalty and heads of state, and the James Young versions are both rarer and more attractive than the Mulliner-Park Ward Phantoms. The bidders discounted appropriately for its right-hand drive configuration and various flaws, and it’s still a lot of style, class and sheer size for the money even with its various issues.

Lot # 6041 1969 Intermeccanica Murena Station Wagon; S/N 69001414; Red/Red leather with White inserts; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Enthusiast restoration 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $37,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $41,250. – 429-cid Ford Thunderbird V-8, automatic, sunroof, air conditioning, power steering, modern Momo steering wheel, console, modern AutoMeter gauges. – From the bankruptcy estate of entities previously controlled by Bikram Choudhury. The first Murena produced and one of only 10 or 11 built, documented by marque historian Paula Reisner. Originally finished in Salchi Verde Gemma over black leather with green carpet. An older restoration unfortunately not very correct to original specifications. The paint is in poor condition with blemishes throughout, including cracks in body near the taillights and mirrors. The bumpers are painted body color and the remainder of the chrome is in poor condition and pitted. The interior is in poor condition with dirty, faded carpet and candy cane striped seats. The engine bay is driver quality and not detailed and is host to some aftermarket components. The tires are fair with some discoloration from age and the rims are pitted. Hopefully the buyer will return this Murena to the original configuration as it was when built. – The Murena was dreamt up by American Joseph Vos but built by Intermeccanica in Italy, a company more well-known for other Italo-American hybrids like the Italia, Indra and Apollo GT. The Murena carried a $14,750 sticker price, a preposterous number in the late 1960s, so despite a lot of interest when it debuted at the New York Auto Show, few people actually bought one and it remains on the long list of cool but obscure performance cars. The new owner really should put this one back to its original specifications, and at this price isn’t too far into this oddball sport wagon yet to keep from rationally contemplating that.

Lot # 6061 1936 Lagonda LG45 Tourer; S/N 12043; Engine # 12043; Red/Red leather; Tan cloth top; Estimate $250,000 – $350,000; Enthusiast restoration 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $195,000. – 4,453/134hp ohv straight-six, black painted wire wheels, dual enclosed sidemount spares, dual chrome horns, single driving light, folding windscreen, dual aeroscreens. – One of 278 LG45s built and one of only 25 tourers. Sold new in Scotland and came to the U.S early in its life. Rough paint that is cracked around the hinges and body lines, and has blemishes throughout. The interior is in good condition other than the steering wheel and column which is chipped and unrestored. Fair, aged interior but the glass is all in good condition. Clean tires but the wheels could use a detailing. The running board trim is incomplete. The engine bay is driver quality and appears not to have been restored with the rest of the vehicle. A rare, elegant car that both needs and deserves some serious attention. – Offered by Bonhams at Quail Lodge in 2018 where it attracted a reported high bid of $280,000 but didn’t sell, then in RM Sotheby’s Shift/Monterey Online Only auction a month ago where the high bid was $205,000. It’s been with the same Lagonda collecting owner for almost three decades and there’s more than a little affection-myopia involved in turning down bid after bid for it. It should bring over $200,000 but its auction history weighs heavily on bidders’ perception of value.

Lot # 6088 1936 Cord 810 Phaeton; S/N 8101779H; Engine # FB985; Rich Maroon/Red leather; Black top; Estimate $120,000 – $160,000; Older restoration 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $92,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $101,200. – 289/125hp V-8, 4-speed pre-selector, hub caps, wide whitewalls, engine-turned dash. – From the Duane Sell Collection. An older restoration, this Cord is beginning to show age in the paint with cracking at some of the seams. The interior, however, is in excellent condition and appears nearly new. The chrome is fair with heavily pitted door handles. The glass and tires are in good condition. The engine bay is detailed with some minor rust stains on the heads. A sound, lightly aged Full Classic (TM) with lots of enjoyment left even as-is. – A little tired, but in decent enough condition to be enjoyed, and in excellent colors that show off Gordon Buehrig’s landmark design, this is a solid result in a solid car.

Lot # 6107 1951 Mercury Series 1CM Station Wagon; S/N 51LA11364M; Luxor Maroon Metallic, Wood/Red; Estimate $70,000 – $80,000; Older restoration 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $55,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $60,500. – 255/112hp Flathead V-8, column shift 3-speed, wheel covers, whitewalls, sun visor, rear-mounted spare, dash clock, original radio. – From the Duane Sell Collection. Final year for Mercury woody wagons, and one of 3,812 produced.  The paint is in good condition with only typical wear from cleaning and age. The interior is in good condition but could be great with a thorough detailing. The chrome is fair with some scratches on the door handles. The interior and exterior wood is essentially flawless with no sign of water damage or clumsy replacement framing. The dashboard and gauges are crisp and sharp. The glass is good as are the tires and hub caps. The engine appears to have been detailed at the time of restoration but the intake and heads have some surface rust from storage. One of the more beautiful cars of the Sell collection that, with some cosmetics and thorough detail, could easily be brought to a higher level. – This result is right on the money for the year, model and condition, a reasonable result for both the seller and the buyer.

Lot # 6113 1960 Chrysler 300F 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 8403140244; Formal Black/Tan leather; Estimate $45,000 – $55,000; Older restoration 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $56,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $61,600. – 413/375hp, dual quads, Torqueflite automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, dual mirrors, power steering, power brakes, power windows, power seat. – From the Duane Sell Collection. The paint is fair with some cracks, especially in the trunk area. The interior is fair as well with seats that are stained and worn as is the carpet. The dash chrome is pitted and the steering wheel is cracked. The chrome and brightwork are fair with bent window trim and pitted mirrors. The engine bay is driver quality not detailed whatsoever. The glass and the tires are in good condition. An older restoration in need of a refresh. – The Letter Series Chrysler gained more pronounced tailfins and more chrome for the grille with 1960’s 300F. Underneath, it gained unibody construction and cross-ram intake. A total of 969 coupes and 248 convertibles sold that year, but the survival rate is relatively high and many of the ones left have received high dollar restorations followed by careful ownership. This one needs another round of work and it won’t be cheap. This price is $1,000 more than the car’s pre-sale high estimate and the new owner is already in the car for several thousand dollars too much.

Lot # 6122 1962 Chevrolet Corvair Monza Spyder Convertible; S/N 20967W296111; Engine # T0731YR; Roman Red/Red vinyl; Black top; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Older restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $30,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $33,000. – 145/150hp turbo flat-six, 4-speed, chrome wire wheels, narrow whitewalls, bucket seats, AM radio, original manuals. – From the Duane Sell Collection. Comes with owner’s manual, shop manual, convertible top operating guide and Spyder specific manual. The paint is in good condition as are the chrome, glass and tires. The interior is excellent as well with only some minor pitting on the steering wheel. The engine bay is good, not recently detailed but very clean. A good car and a highlight of this collection in terms of both its quality and rarity. – The second ever production automobile fitted with a turbocharger (Oldsmobile introduced the Turbo Jetfire a month earlier in 1962), the Corvair Monza Spyder is among the more desirable versions of Chevy’s rear-engined wonder. This one was the right mix of options, condition, colors, and the right people being in the room to bid. The price is huge, way past its $20,000 high estimate. A slightly more desirable ’64 model sold for a slightly higher $35,963 on Bring a Trailer last year, but this is still a very expensive Corvair.

Lot # 6132 1933 Auburn 12-161 Salon Speedster; S/N Engine No. 7116460BJ7124; Engine # 7116460BJ7124; Silver, Maroon fenders and accent/Red leather; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Older restoration 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $300,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $330,000. – Chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, dual chrome horns, dual sidemount spares with mirrors, wing mirrors, suicide doors. – Restored in this configuration in the 1960’s for Gene Zimmerman joining an original Auburn Twelve chassis and an original Speester body. The Salon trim is probably sourced from Glenn Pray and the block has been replaced by one from an American-LaFrance fire truck. In current ownership since 1979. Sporting a nearly 40-year-old restoration and beginning to show signs of that age. The paint is chipped at the seams around the hood. The interior remains in good condition with some signs of wear on the leather. The chrome is good with only minor pitting on the mirrors and the interior of the rear bumper. The glass is in good condition as are the tires and chrome wire wheels. The engine is tidy and although thoroughly detailed it does show signs that it has overheated at one time. An interesting Auburn with additional chrome trim, headlamps and dashboard and special “ribbon” bumpers. – It takes only one look at this 12-cylinder, 160hp streamlined masterpiece to understand why Gene Zimmerman went to such lengths to assemble the pieces that make it up, but in the end it is a combination of a chassis from here, an original body from there and a fire truck engine block. An A-C-D Category One example is worth much more than this, but there are more than sufficient original Twelve Speedster assemblies for it to be well worth the price it brought, even $50,000 more than the pre-sale high estimate of $250,000.

Lot # 6140 1936 Duesenberg Model J Tourster, Body after Derham; S/N 2599; Engine # J-575; Chocolate Brown/Tan leather; Brown cloth top; Estimate $550,000 – $650,000; Rebodied or re-created 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $575,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $632,500. – Chrome wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual chrome horns, dual sidemount spares, suicide rear doors, wind wings, engine-turned dash, Jaeger chronograph. – Originally a Rollston 4-door sedan delivered to Merry Fahrney, a colorful figure and pilot of Thirties’ society. Represented as the original engine, driveline, frame and firewall. While being restored the building containing the sedan body burned with this body built by Carl Amsley for Ken Gardner. Although rebodied, it is a solid older restoration that still presents well. The chocolate paint is beginning to show age with cracking at the seams. The interior, more recently refreshed than the rest of the car, is in good condition with only slight wear on driver’s seat. The glass is good as is the chrome and brightwork, with only minor pitting on the cowl lights. The battery cover for the car appears to have fallen off recently and is very scratched on the edges. The engine is nicely detailed but the polished aluminum components do have some tarnished bits. The whitewalls are yellowed from age. It’s a rebody and it’s brown, but it’s an attractive and honest Model J. – Offered by Worldwide at Pacific Grove in 2018 where it was reported bid to $680,000, then by Gooding at Scottsdale this January where the high bid was $550,000. The seller’s expectations were adjusted to a pre-sale estimate of $550-650,000 and was modestly exceeded with the $575,000 successful high bid here. This is a solid Duesenberg with lovely coachwork. It needs no excuses, especially at this price.

Lot # 6142 1935 Auburn 851 Supercharged Speedster; S/N 85133219E; Engine # GH4511; Nassau Orange/Black leather; Estimate $700,000 – $800,000; Older restoration 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $700,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $770,000. – Wheel covers, dual spotlights. – Represented as the original body, engine, data plate and special supercharger carburetor, air filter and sump with a known history since the 1970’s. First time offered since 1998, previously owned by Alfred and Mary Foglio of Milwaukie, Oregon as well as Ray and Dorothy Radford of Vancouver, WA in the early 1970s. The recipient of a restoration long ago, the paint is in fair condition with orange peel and cracking throughout. The interior is in good condition with minor wear on the seat. Chrome is great overall with only minor haze on spotlights. The glass as well as the tires are good. The engine compartment is fair with signs of a detailing, but the manifold has signs of corrosion from use and storage. A very attractive Auburn finished in the rare, period correct Auburn Nassau Orange with an excellent history to accompany it. – With Worldwide selling s/n 32573E later today for $1,072,500 this wonderful 851 supercharged Speedster seems like the bargain of the week in Auburn. It isn’t such a bargain, but it is an honest, complete and well-preserved example that checks the boxes.

Lot # 6151 1953 Kurtis 500 B Indy Car; S/N C36153; Engine # 164; Black, White graphics/Red; Estimate $350,000 – $450,000; Competition restoration 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $500,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $550,000. – Offset Offy power, period inertia starter, 17-inch Bell steering wheel, Halibrand racing wheels. – From the Bill Akin Collection. The eighth 500 B built. Four-time Indianapolis 500 competitor, including third place finish in 1955. Class winner at Pebble Beach in 2010 and Amelia Island in 2011, includes trophies and awards won by the car along with period and recent photos. Previously owned by Bob McConnell and John Mecom. AACA certified. Painstakingly restored for accuracy in its 1955 Indy Bardahl livery, this older restoration still presents nicely. The paint is in good condition with some minor damage near the hood on the right side of the vehicle near the exhaust. The leather seat is in good condition with signs of wear. An amazing example of a classic racecar of a caliber not usually offered at public auction. – One of several Bill Akin Indy roadsters in this sale, all of them restored to high and historically accurate standards, all of them bringing superior prices like this indicative of their status as benchmarks of Indy roadster design, construction and restoration.

Lot # 6152 1960 Epperly Indianapolis Indy Car; S/N 170; Blue, Orange Accent/Black, Grey cloth; Estimate $350,000 – $450,000; Competition restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $350,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $385,000. – Offset laydown Offy power, fuel injection, modern driver’s seat, gold Halibrand style alloy centerlock wheels, Englebert tires, fire system, Jones Motrola tach. – Restored from a castoff Ford-powered supermodified by Bill Akin, painstakingly reconstructed including history and parts obtained from the builder, Quin Epperly. Stated to have been driven by A.J. Foyt, Parnelli Jones, Tony Bettenhausen and Lloyd Ruby. Originally restored as the 1961 Autolite Special which finished 8th, redone in 2012 in the present 1962 Mid-Continent Securities Special. Excellent paint, chrome and mechanical presentation from the Bill Akin collection. – Opened at 100K and took off to this result, a tribute to its impeccable presentation and laboriously reconstructed history.

Lot # 6153 1961 Epperly Indianapolis Indy Car; S/N 209; Engine # 209; Black, Bryant Heating Cooling/Black cloth; Estimate $350,000 – $450,000; Competition restoration 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $370,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $407,000. – Laydown offset Meyer & Drake Offy, fuel injection, chrome Halibrand centerlock alloy wheels, Jones Motrola tach, US Gauge temp and oil pressure gauges, modern driver’s seat, mirror polished aluminum engine cover and dry sump tank. – Bill Akin collection. Don Branson put this car in Hoover Motor Express livery in the middle of the front row at Indy in 1961 but dropped out after two laps. Bobby Marshman drove it in this livery in 1962 and finished fifth. Bud Tingelstad crashed on lap 46 in 1963. Eventually rescued by Bob McConnell and restored by Bill Akin, taking 2nd in the Indy Revolution class and the Tony Hulman Award at Pebble Beach in 2018. Still in concours condition. – Another of the seriously exceptional Bill Akin Indy roadsters in this sale, a beautifully restored car with a notable history that epitomizes the high standards of fabrication, fit, finish and function of legendary Indy roadster builders like Epperly. It brought a strong but fully deserved price.

Lot # 6163 1908 Buick Model S Roadster; S/N 252; White/Red; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Older restoration 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $23,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $25,300. – 255/30hp ohv inline four, 3-speed sliding gear transmission, wood dash, wood shift knob, button tufted seats, dual cowl lights, fold-down windshield. – An older restoration of a still desirable Brass Era car. The paint is in fair condition as is the interior which has a hole in the driver’s seat. The glass and tires are both in good condition. The brass on the vehicle is sound but in need of a thorough polishing. The engine is in fair shape having not been touched since the car was restored several years ago. A very cool Brass era Buick still holding a strong value despite its older restoration. – A cute and usable little car from the period when Buick rivalled Ford as Detroit’s mass manufacturer and the year when Billy Durant used Buick as the foundation for founding General Motors. While its aged, toured and chipped condition doesn’t present any car show opportunities it has immense potential as a weekend driver and its 30hp is a third more than the Ford Model T’s 22hp. It is a sound value in this transaction.

Photo by Theodore Pieper (c) and courtesy RM Auctions

Lot # 6166 1949 Buick Roadmaster Model 76C Convertible Coupe; S/N 45296545; Black/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $65,000 – $75,000; Older restoration 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $52,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $57,200. – 320/150hp straight-eight, Dynaflow automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, fender skirts, power windows, AM radio. – Despite likely being an older restoration this car presents well with good paint other than a few chips at the doors. The chrome is good except for pitting on the driver’s door handle. There is some slight cracking in the taillights from age. The glass is good and so is the interior with the front seat slightly worn and dirty. The tires are somewhat discolored from age. A solid, slightly better than average driver that isn’t perfect but nevertheless oozes midcentury top-down style. – Roadmasters and Supers were redesigned for 1949 with updated profiles while still retaining the pontoon rear fenders that would begin to disappear in 1950. They solidified Buick’s reputation for style, value and performance while still relying on Buick’s tried-and-true “Valve-in-Head” inline eight cylinder engine. This is a solid older restored example with some miles since restoration but bought at a price that reflects its attributes.

Tags: ,
Previous Post
Next Post

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *