RM Sotheby’s, Fred Guyton Collection, St. Louis, Missouri, May 4-5, 2019

RM Sotheby’s sale of Fred Guyton’s collection in St. Louis was the second time in two weeks that a large collection was sold out to the bare walls.

The collections were markedly different in concept from last week’s sale of engineer Frank Spain’s Tupelo Automobile Museum. Fred Guyton was an architect with, based upon the sketches reproduced in the catalog, a artistic talent. His cars reflected that architectural/design inclination with some wonderful coachwork, but most of it on high quality chassis with technical merit even if several of the best were on architectural-sale Rolls-Royce Phantom III chassis.

In addition to the 72 vehicle lots, from a Benz Patent Motorwagen replica to a Porsche Carrera 4S Cabriolet, representing over a century of the automobile’s history, there were many, many lots of automobilia, documents, toys, models and memorabilia that kept auctioneers Brent Earlywine and Mike Shackleton on their toes parceling it all out on Saturday morning and continuing into an overflow session on Sunday.

The quality of, and enthusiasm for, the Guyton cars is evidenced not only in the $10.3 million sale total but more importantly in their performance against RM’s pre-sale estimates, a highly unusual ratio of 113% of hammer bids to the pre-sale low estimates and 20.8% sold on hammer bids over the pre-sale high estimate.

And anyone who maintains that old cars don’t have present-day collectors will find these results hard to fit into their fantasy scenario.

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2019 72/72 100% 48.6% 20.8% $143,323 $56,000

[39.1%]

$10,319,256

The descriptions that follow are sorted by Marque and Year.


Lot # 371 1932 Auburn Eight Custom Cabriolet; S/N 9443; Engine # GU75424; Silver, Carmine fenders and accents/Lilac leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $77,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $86,800. – 269/100hp, 3-speed, Dual Ratio axle, Carmine wire wheels, blackwall tires, sidemounts with mirrors, Stabilite headlights and matching cowl lights, rumble seat, Black cloth covered luggage trunk. – Excellent paint, chrome, top and lightly stretched driver’s seat upholstery. Very clean restored engine compartment looks like new. The chassis and underbody, however, are only superficially redone and are oily and slightly road grimy. A gorgeous cosmetic restoration driven on the month long CCCA Grand European CARavan in 2008. – An attractive and sporting cabriolet with excellent performance from its Dual Ratio rear axle and 100hp eight. Its condition attests to its touring qualities and still commends it for similar tours which this moderate price makes practical.

Lot # 381 1935 Auburn 851 Eight Custom Cabriolet; S/N 2311; Engine # GG 4224; Ivory/Claret leather; Claret cloth top; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Rebodied or re-created, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $84,000. – Claret wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemounts, rumble seat, dual ratio axle, Unity fog lights, Dual Ratio axle. – Converted from a coupe by Joseph Coppola in the early Naughts. Good older paint, chrome, upholstery and top. The chassis and suspension are aged and surface rusty, as is the engine. It’s nothing that requires much more than careful attention to cleanup and detailing. A quality older restoration that’s holding up very well. – An excellent car for tours with plenty of power from its Lycoming eight and high speed gearing available from the Dual Ratio rear axle, the result here is little discounted for the cabriolet conversion which was accomplished in factory fashion.

Lot # 346 1886 Benz Replica Patent Motorwagen Buggy; S/N 35; Black/Black leather; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Non-factory replica, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $39,200. – — Most of these John Bentley Engineering replicas have spent their lives on display and are nearly pristine. This one has been driven and shows it in its rather dilapidated condition. – It was sold by Bonhams at Quail Lodge in 2007 for $53,820 in essentially the same condition as it is today. This is a reasonable price to pay for it.

Lot # 365 1927 Bugatti Type 40 Grand Sport Torpedo; S/N 40661; Engine # 565; Blue, Dark Blue fenders/Black leather; Estimate $200,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $325,000 plus commission of 11.54%; Final Price $362,500. – RHD. Chrome wire wheels, Sears Allstate tires, Cibie headlights, single right-hand sidemount, Zenith sidedraft carburetor, cycle fenders. – Very good older paint, chrome and upholstery. The driver’s seat cushion is worn and surface cracked. Good wood instrument panel, steering wheel rim and crisp, clear gauges. Dry, well-organized engine compartment. The chrome wire wheels are out of character but the Bugatti is going to be great to drive. – Many of the Guyton cars were “museum” quality: good enough, but neglected and static displayed for long periods. This Bugatti isn’t one of them. It’s up to date, maintained and, as stated in the catalog, obviously one of Fred and Beverly Guyton’s favorite drivers. Taking it all into consideration this is a realistic price even over the pre-sale high estimate.

Lot # 350 1908 Buick Model 10 Runabout; S/N Engine No. 928; Engine # 928; Buick Grey/Brown; Black cloth top; Estimate $35,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $47,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $52,640. – Gray & Davis acetylene headlights, kerosene sidelights and taillight, mother-in-law seat – Sound old paint, upholstery and top. Dull brass. A neat old thing that deserves a good home and wouldn’t take much work to become a rewarding weekend driver. – In 1908 Buick sold almost as many cars as Henry Ford managed to build Model Ts, and the Buick Model 10 was every bit as good, maybe even better with its overhead valve engine. This is a quality but old example that will take some work to bring back to running, driving life, work that is factored into the price it brought here.

Lot # 343 1903 Cadillac Model A Rear-Entrance Tonneau; S/N Engine No. 1070; Engine # 1070; Black, Maroon accents/Black leather; Black leather top; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Concours restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $170,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $190,400 Picks. – RHD. Phare Solar acetylene headlight, Dietz kerosene sidelights and taillight, wicker pannier baskets, bulb horn – Excellent paint, brass, upholstery and top. It takes pains and needlessly close inspection to find a chip or flaw. Even the engine and running gear is nearly pristine with only a little oily residue to keep things moving. Previously owned by Charles A. Moore and John B. McMullen, a 1975 AACA Grand National winner and maintained in show-quality condition. – Although it is not VCC dated it should be only a formality for such to be achieved, giving a high level of confidence that it will be London to Brighton Veteran Car Run eligible. The trouble is that it has been so well-maintained in the nearly 50 years since it won its AACA National First Prize that subjecting it to the rigors of the Brighton Run risks imperiling its preservation, a decision the next owner paid a strong price for assuming.

Lot # 344 1912 Cadillac 5-Passenger Touring; S/N 37206; Engine # 62784; Dark Blue, Black fenders/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $55,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $61,600. – RHD. Nickel brightwork, dual right-hand spares, folded trumpet bulb horn, Gray & Davis electric headlights, sidelights and taillight, body color wood spoke 36-inch wheels, folding windshield, Standard speedometer. – Very good older paint with edge chips from use. Good upholstery, interior wood trim and top. The radiator is painted black and has some dirt inclusions. The nickel brightwork is sound but needs polishing. The engine compartment isn’t up to the same standards as the exterior and interior. A quality older restoration with some years and miles but excellent care. – The copper water jackets on the engine cylinders gives the engine compartment of this Cadillac a presentation like the inside of a miniature craft brewery. 1912 Cadillacs are the first production automobiles equipped with an electric self-starter. The restoration’s age is apparent but it is plenty good enough to be taken on tours and weekend jaunts and is a sound value at this price.

 

Lot # 383 1929 Cadillac 341-B V-8 Sport Phaeton, Body by Fisher; S/N 325545; Engine # 325550; Metallic Green, Green fenders/Dark Green leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $140,000 – $180,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $110,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $123,200. – Fender color chrome spoke wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual sidemounts with mirrors, pedestal spotlights, dual windshields, radiator stoneguard, single Pilot-Ray, Trippe lights, Black leather covered luggage trunk. – Block is stamped 3-25830. Originally delivered to Badajoz, Spain, acquired in 1968 by Phil Wichard and restored for him by Walter Seaburg. 1980 AACA National First Prize, CCCA Senior #1267. Excellent older paint, upholstery, chrome and top. The engine compartment is restored like new and only a little aged, as is the chassis and suspension. A showpiece that needs very little. – Despite the colorful history and well-preserved restoration this is, at the end of the day, a V-8 with Fisher coachwork (as attractive as it is) in a marketplace dominated by V-12s and V-16s bodied by Fleetwood and this is an appropriate price for it.

Lot # 353 1941 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible Sedan; S/N Engine No. 8359499; Engine # 8359499; Dove Grey/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $50,400. – Hydramatic, radio, heater, turn signals, skirts, bumper overriders, Red wheels, wide hubcaps, wide whitewall tires. – Good paint, major chrome, top and very good, inviting interior. Excellent dash woodgraining, chrome and gauges. The side window frame chrome is thin but the grille and hood vent chrome is excellent. Very clean, restored engine compartment with only a little fuel residue below the carburetor. Dirty underbody with road use. Chipped paint under the hood ornament. It is more than good enough to be used as is. – 1941 is the last year Cadillac built a convertible sedan, and there were only 400 of them made, making it unusually rare, particularly with the Hydramatic automatic transmission, in only its second year in 1941. This is a lot of classic car for the money, an excellent value.

Lot # 348 1931 Chevrolet Series LT 1½-Ton Triple-Combination Fire Pumper, Body by Boyer; S/N; Engine # T2140289; Red/Black leatherette; Estimate $15,000 – $25,000; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $22,400. – Ladders, siren, bell, extinguishers, nozzles, pump, searchlight, firefighting tools. – Unusually complete with equipment and tools but original, chipped and dull. A Champion 500gpm pump is disconnected and in the bed with its driveshaft. – The most unusual feature of this Chevy truck is the amount and period origin of firefighting equipment with which it is equipped. Always fun and a great parade vehicle, the

 

Lot # 397 1966 Chevrolet Corvair Corsa Convertible; S/N 107676W129201; Regal Red/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Estimate $8,000 – $12,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $17,920 picks. – 164/140hp, 4-carbs, 4-speed (with a 3-speed aftermarket wood shift knob), pushbutton radio, wire wheel covers, narrow whitewalls. – Mediocre old repaint, sketchy chrome, sound upholstery and top. Orderly but aged and oily engine compartment. A modest driver. – The low estimate would have been cheap, but the high estimate was generous. The price paid was awe-inspiring but among so many six- and seven-figure cars in Fred Guyton’s collection it might be understandable for someone standing at the back of the room hoping for a piece of the Guyton legacy to become over-enthusiastic. This was a highly over-enthusiastic result, but only by a few thousand bucks.

Lot # 399 1966 Chevrolet El Camino Custom Pickup; S/N 136806B115488; Engine # T1105EEH; Black/Red vinyl; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $22,400. – 327/300hp, automatic, power steering, power brakes, Rally wheels with trim rings and hubcaps, Firestone blackwall radial tires, pushbutton radio, underdash gauges, bench seat, knee-knocker 90-degree tach, SS grille and hood added. – Orderly engine compartment. Solid body good interior and chrome but the paint on the hood is chipped and marred, like it had been used as a shelf. The bed is scuffed from use but less abused than the hood. Just worn enough to be a practical weekend hauler while looking good in the process. – This isn’t a bargain, but it’s a truck with both style and utility that brought a modest price that takes into account some of its more glaring flaws.

Lot # 400 2005 Chevrolet SSR Pickup; S/N 1GCES14H45B116464; Silverstone Metallic/Black leather; Estimate $25,000 – $30,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $26,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $29,120. – Automatic, CD stereo, chrome wheels, air conditioning, power steering and brakes, power windows, cruise control, running boards, cockpit windbreak, bed storage drawers. – One owner, 6,329 miles. The engine compartment is very clean and barely used. Paint is unblemished and the interior is lightly creased on the driver’s seat only. – A well-maintained low mileage SSR bought for a generous retail price.

Lot # 364 1937 Cord 812 Phaeton; S/N 8121633H; Engine # FB1865; Black/Beige leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $134,400. – Large hubcaps, wide whitewalls, radio, outside exhaust headpipes, Cord fog lights. – Mediocre quality old paint, erratically wet sanded. Good chrome and slightly stretched and surface creased upholstery. Dirty underbody and chassis. The left door window has fallen off its track. Handsome and complete but without much more than that to recommend it before its next restoration. – It’s a tired example of a marvelous automobile that brought a superior price not substantiated by its condition or any notable history.

Lot # 367 1926 Duesenberg Model A Touring, Body by Milspaugh & Irish; S/N D61H; Engine # 1610; Green, Black fenders/Black leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $112,000. – Tilt-Ray headlights, dual spotlights, Cream wire wheels, dual sidemounts, leatherette covered luggage trunk. – Microblistered old paint, scratched and chipped. Worn, cracked and torn original upholstery, discolored old top. The engine has been cleaned up but not refreshed and shows oil leakage. The chassis and underbody are original and dirty. Ideal for restoration but not much else, in the Guyton collection since 1971. – Fred and Augie Duesenberg’s single overhead camshaft 260 cid 88 hp inline eight was not the only innovation cultivated by the forward-thinking brothers: at introduction in 1920 it also had 4-wheel hydraulic brakes. While this Model A is old and tired it’s also all there and amenable to recommissioning for touring use although restoration is an exercise in good money following bad.

Lot # 362 1927 Duesenberg Model X Dual Cowl Phaeton, Body by Locke; S/N D95D; Engine # X3; Old Ivory, Painter’s Green accent/Green leather; Grey vinyl top; Estimate $300,000 – $400,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $475,000 plus commission of 11.05%; Final Price $527,500 picks. – 322/100hp overhead camshaft inline eight, dual windshields, Green wire wheels, blackwall tires, Warner DeLuxe drum speedometer and gauge panel, Beige cloth covered luggage trunk, dual sidemounts with mirrors, Ryan-Lite headlights, Bosch horn. – One of only about 13 Model X built of which four are known to survive. Provenance includes Howard Chappelle, William Harrah and Ed Weaver. Sound old paint, chrome and upholstery. Organized if somewhat oily and aged engine compartment. A Harrah’s restoration that is holding up very well. – As the price it attracted illustrates, this was one of the most avidly sought vehicles in Fred Guyton’s collection, a rare opportunity to acquire one of the last automobiles built by the Duesenberg brothers before their enterprise was subsumed into the E.L. Cord empire that produced the Model J. Its Harrah’s restoration is nearly a half-century old and shows its quality in the way it has held up over the years, a car with history and provenance that would be impaired by a concours restoration and is still good enough to be shown and driven with pride. The room full of informed collectors, and many others on the phones or internet, knew what they were buying and vied mightily to secure it, even at this healthy price proving conclusively that this is what it’s worth.

Lot # 379 1930 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Sedan, Body by Murphy; S/N 2345; Engine # J-329; Blue, Dark Blue fenders/Dark Blue leather; Beige cloth, Blue leather binding top; Estimate $900,000 – $1,100,000; Concours restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,000,000 plus commission of 10.50%; Final Price $1,105,000. – Firewall number 2345. Body color wire wheels, Firestone tires, Twilite headlights and matching cowl lights, Lorraine remote spotlight, dual sidemounts, Black leather covered trunk with beige cloth cover and fitted luggage, outside exhaust head pipes. – Bought by Fred Guyton’s neighbor Norris Allen in 1936, later sold to Arthur Watson (IBM) and restored in 2003 by Chris Charlton for Watson’s son, Kitt, from whom Fred Guyton bought it in 2012. Restored and maintained to concours standards with minor storage dust and engine rear main seal leakage. The cosmetics are newer than the chassis and the engine compartment has age but recent (yesterday) polishing on its aluminum. Gorgeous paint, chrome, top and an interior that still smells fresh. – This is an important car even among the many important Duesenbergs with a known history from new and the kind of continuing care that only ample resources and dedicated connoisseurship can provide. It was one of the stars of Fred Guyton’s collection sale and brought a deserved seven-figure price.

Lot # 375 1930 DuPont Model G Convertible Victoria, Body by Waterhouse; S/N G985; Engine # 1385; Beige, Toledo Brown/Beige cloth; Brown cloth top; Estimate $400,000 – $600,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $330,000 plus commission of 11.52%; Final Price $368,000. – 322/125hp Continental L-head eight, Espania Red wire wheels, blackwall tires, dual Brown cloth covered sidemounts with mirrors, Eagle mascot, opening windshield, Brown cloth windshield visor, Depress Beam headlights, radiator stoneguard, Brown cloth covered luggage trunk. – Displayed at the 1931 New York Auto Show, one of six bodied by Waterhouse. Clean, orderly engine compartment with some modern hose clamps. Very good unblemished paint, upholstery and top. Bright chrome. Restored for Fred Guyton in the Naughts, a high quality older restoration with little evidence of use and only a little aging. – For a “Brown” car this is remarkably attractive, as are most of the G. Briggs Weaver-designed Waterhouse Convertible Victorias, and the bidders’ reluctance to pay more for it is not readily ascertained. Since so many DuPonts now reside in the family’s ownership this is an unusual opportunity to acquire one with choice Waterhouse coachwork and a good value at this result.

Lot # 388 1928 Ford Model `AR’ Open-Cab Pickup; S/N; Engine # A126026; Dark Green, Black fenders/Black leatherette; Black leatherette top; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Truck restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $18,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $20,160. – Apple Green wire wheels, whitewall tires, wind wings, remote spotlight, dual sidemounts, agate shift knob, accessory warm air “waffle” exhaust manifold heater, mirror-mounted clock, step plates, MotoMeter, clock mirror. – Decent older paint with a few small scuffs and plenty of dust inclusions especially on the bed. Sound upholstery, top, chrome and wood bed floor, Freshly sealed engine and nearly spotless compartment. Not too good to be driven or even to make runs to the feed store, but good enough to stand out at cars’n’coffee. – This is a utilitarian open-cab pickup, bought for a moderate price that reflects its early production “AR” status, rarity and style.

Lot # 352 1930 Ford Model A DeLuxe Roadster; S/N A4102652; Rose Beige, Black fenders, Dark Green accent/Brown leatherette; Beige cloth top; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Older restoration, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $21,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $23,520. – Straw Yellow wire wheels, whitewall tires, leatherette covered luggage trunk with side curtains inside, radiator stoneguard, dual chrome wrapped sidemounts, rumble seat. – Good older paint, chrome, interior and top. The engine compartment is orderly but the cylinder head is off and three pistons are out of rusted cylinders. The one that’s there is rusted solid in the cylinder bore. – This is an exceptional price for an obviously defective Model A, a result that should have been enough to buy a running, driving older restoration like this.

Lot # 358 1923 H.C.S. Series IV Model 6 Touring; S/N 3130; Engine # 90089; Burgundy, Black fenders/Brown leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $44,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $49,840. – Orange wire wheels, wide whitewalls, drum headlights, dual cloth covered sidemounts, spotlight, leatherette covered luggage trunk, Warner drum speedometer, cycle fenders, aluminum step plates, German silver brightwork, full weather equipment. – Sound older paint with some fisheyes and microblisters on the hood, minor joint cracks. Very good upholstery, Clean and orderly but aged engine compartment. Lightly soiled sidemount covers. Aged and road grimy chassis and suspension. – Harry C. Stutz’s successor to his namesake automobiles enjoyed less success, in no small measure due to bought-in engines from Weidely and Midwest, and was out of business by 1925. Nevertheless it takes an H.C.S. to complete a Stutz timeline and this is a Stutz timeline completing price that recognizes the restoration’s age.

Lot # 369 1928 Hispano-Suiza H6B Cabriolet de Ville, Body by Hibbard & Darrin; S/N 11707; Engine # 301712; Blue/Black leather, Beige cloth; Beige cloth top; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Concours restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $300,000 plus commission of 11.67%; Final Price $335,000. – Body color wire wheels, whitewall tires, dual sidemounts with mirrors, Marchal headlights, Notek fog lights, Grebel spotlight Beige cloth covered luggage trunk, rollup division, smoker’s kit, vanity. – Very good older paint, chrome, interior and top. Intricate interior wood trim. Orderly, dry engine compartment and chassis. There are a few small edge chips and faint cracking at panel joints but not enough to detract in any meaningful way from a gorgeous and well-preserved restoration that was completed in the early 80’s. – Little used since its nearly ancient restoration and a lovely example of the marque, the coachbuilder, the restorer and its custodians over the last four decades. It caught the bidders attention here but even at this price is a sublime example and a moderate price, exactly the same price that Bonhams got for Frank Spain’s 1930 H6B Coupe Chauffeur with coachwork by J. Fernandez a week earlier in Tupelo, Mississippi.

Lot # 349 1912 Hudson Model 33 Drophead Coupe, Body by James Young; S/N Engine No. KK15554; Engine # KK15554; Brown, Orange coachline/Beige cloth, Brown stripes; Black leather top; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $47,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $53,200. – RHD. Smiths speedometer, Yellow wire wheels, blackwall tires, single right side spare, dicky seat, Duco bell headlights, CAV sidelights, electric taillight, pullup side windows, rear window shade. – Called a “Doctor’s Coupé” by the coachbuilder but with a fully collapsible folding top better described as a drophead coupe. Believed to be one of six similar Hudsons bodied by James Young. Edge chipped older paint with minor joint cracks. Good interior and top. Fair brass in need of polishing. Clean, orderly engine compartment. A very cool thing that has been used but also consistently maintained. 1983 AACA National First Prize and holding up well. – It is hard to accept that this Hudson was restored almost a half century ago, its condition is that good even though its age is apparent. Its quality and rarity are a good value at this price.

Lot # 372 1939 Jensen 4 1/4-Litre H-Type Sports Tourer; S/N H79447; Engine # 3980/9447; Red/Tan leather; Tan cloth top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $167,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $187,600. – RHD. 3-door dual cowl tourer, chrome wire wheels, 261/115hp Nash Ambassador 8 powered, 3-speed with Columbia 2-speed rear, Lucas headlights and fog light, trafficators, rear seat aeroscreens, rear-mounted spare. – An excellent older restoration, still in show condition with beautiful paint, interior and chrome, almost no wear beyond a smattering of small edge chips. One of only 14 believed built, 11 believed to survive of which this is the only one known to be in the U.S. – Sold by Christie’s at Pebble Beach in 1998 for $101,500 and apparently little used since then, just twenty-one years older. Jensen built very attractive bodywork on their Anglo-American chassis and drivetrains, a qualification that certainly applies to this H-Type with its overhead valve Nash engine. It will take some effort to bring it back to reliable driving condition, but little attention to the cosmetics and that makes it a realistic acquisition at this price and a car that will not meet itself coming ’round the corner anytime soon.

Lot # 351 1931 LaSalle 345-A V-8 Roadster, Body by Fleetwood; S/N Engine No. 903324; Engine # 903324; Dark Red, Black fenders, Maroon accent/Black leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $80,000 – $120,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $55,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $61,600. – Black wire wheels, wide whitewall tires, dual enclosed sidemounts with mirrors, pedestal spotlights, Pilot-Ray, Trippe lights, wind wings, rumble seat, body color luggage trunk, radiator stoneguard. – Good older paint with microblisters on the hood sides and shrinkage on the cowl, Bright chrome. Worn at least partially original upholstery with surface cracks and creases. Older top with tarnished snaps. Clean, orderly restored engine compartment showing some age and use. Needs no more than a thorough mechanical service before being proudly toured despite its restoration’s completion in the 1960s and a 1962 AACA National First Prize. – The sporty Fleetwood coachwork contributes much to the value of this LaSalle, as does the quality and preservation of its ancient restoration and its extensive equipment list. A CCCA Full Classic ™, it is a surprisingly good value at this result.

Lot # 384 1926 Lincoln Model L ‘Gothic Phaeton’, Body by Murphy; S/N 40539; Engine # 40539; Dark Green, Black fenders/Dark Green leather; Heather cloth top; Estimate $100,000 – $150,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $112,000. – Brown wire wheels, wide whitewall tires, dual sidemounts with mirrors and heather cloth covers, dual windshields, wind wings, heather cloth covered luggage trunk, hinged steering wheel, drum headlights, junior Pilot-Rays. – Dull brass window frames and door handles. Good older upholstery. Sound older paint, interior, top and chrome. Orderly engine compartment and chassis. Corners and crevices are dirty. A well-maintained old restoration showing its age. – If idiocrynsatic applies to any automobile, it does to this one with its odd and personalized specifications for its first owner, Thomas E. Sharp from San Diego. The side windows (framed in brass) fold and latch together to enclose the interior. The seats fold into a bed. The exterior brightwork is mixed brass and nickel, the interior’s is gold plated. The body ends in a boattail. The body is not original to this chassis, but is from a Model L Lincoln, swapped during restoration for Reverend T.L. Osborn in the Sixties. It’s a fascinating story, endorsed by the price it brought here.

Lot # 387 1941 Lincoln Continental Cabriolet; S/N H119672; Sand/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $27,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $30,240. – Body color wheels with hubcaps and trim rings, remote Unity spotlight, Unity fog lights, bumper overriders, skirts. – Microblistered, chipped old repaint from a 60’s cosmetic restoration. Sound old upholstery and interior trim. Weak chrome. Dull body color paint in the wheel wells. Largely original engine compartment. Aged and superficially repainted, this Continental needs a lot even before being driven, including brakes according to the tag on the steering wheel. – This is restoration project money for a restoration project.

Lot # 396 1942 Lincoln Continental Club Coupe; S/N H133541; Silver-Grey/Grey cloth, Blue leather; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $42,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $47,040. – 305/130hp, 3-speed, skirts, radio. – Restored to show quality a while ago and still with very good paint, chrome and upholstery but showing the restoration’s age. The engine compartment is good but has some leakage stains and surface rust. The underbody is almost like new but with storage dust. More than good enough to be toured with pride. – Built as a 1942 model before civilian production ended in February, this is a rare example with some visual features to set it apart from Continentals built in other model years and a slightly larger and more powerful V-12. That and the well-preserved restoration make this an appropriate price.

Lot # 366 1931 Marmon Sixteen Convertible Sedan, Body by LeBaron; S/N 16149554; Engine # 16568; Light Grey, Maroon body sides/Light Grey leather; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $152,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $170,800. – Chrome wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual chorme-wrapped sidemounts with mirrors, oval Depress Beam headlights, integrated trunk, fishtail exhaust outlets. – CCCA National First Prize #1689 and Senior, 1985 AACA National First Prize and Senior. A thoughtfully preserved and maintained but now aged and edge chipped concours restoration. Rebodied with an original Sixteen convertible sedan body in the 70’s by William Raithel replacing the ex-chicken coop close-coupled sedan in 1985. Comes with a set up recast and updated heads (not installed.) – Howard Marmon’s 45-degree aluminum block overhead valve 200hp V-16 was a marvel: powerful, efficient and beautifully elegant in its intrinsic engineering sense. It also was late, arriving after Cadillac’s 185hp V-16 and vastly expensive in the dire early days of the Great Depression. None of which detracts from its daring quality and performance or MIT student Walter Dorwin Teague, Jr.’s sublime, understated coachwork as completed here with convertible sedan tonneau by LeBaron. The bidders may have been put off by the replaced coachwork but they shouldn’t have been. It is magnificent and even though aged is an outstanding tour car with all weather coachwork and freeway performance bought advantageously.

Lot # 347 1970 Maserati Mexico 4.7 Coupe, Body by Vignale; S/N AM1121872; Engine # AM1121872; Blue/Cream leather; Estimate $60,000 – $90,000; Unrestored original, 4- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $54,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $60,480 picks. – ZF 5-speed, air conditioning, chrome spoke bolt on wire wheels, Jensen cassette stereo, power windows. – Dirty, shrinking old repaint, rusty bumpers. Stiff, cracked, discolored leather with pulling seams. Grubby, dirty engine compartment. Sound and appears to be substantially complete, but needs everything. – It is unclear what possessed Fred Guyton to have this disreputable Maserati in his collection. It is completely different from everything else. Nonetheless it brought a realistic price for its condition and specification. Now the real work begins.

Lot # 359 1906 Mason Touring; S/N 77; Orange, Red fenders and chassis/Black leather; Black leatherette top; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $112,000. – RHD. Overhead valve 2-cylinder engine, wood spoke wheels, white tires, Heineman-Pearson acetylene headlights, Gray & Davis kerosene sidelights and Badger Brass taillight, folded trumpet bulb horn, Motor Accessories clock, Columbia acetylene generator, dual outside mirrors. – One of about the 25 Fred Duesenberg-designed Masons built in 1906 before its aquisition by Maytag and the earliest known Mason. Good older paint and upholstery. Dull brass needs hours of polishing. Oily engine. There are a few edge chips and panel joint cracks. Polishing the brass will make an immense difference in this Mason’s presence. – Owned by the Hunt family in National City, California until 1970, restored thereafter and later owned by William S. Harrah. It’s a distinguished history and a charming presentation with many original details. It was the earliest bookend in Fred Guyton’s 4-car Duesenberg history and it deserves to be for another collection. Its rarity and primacy at this price is an astute purchase.

Lot # 370 1932 Nash 1090 Advanced Eight Convertible Sedan, Body by Seaman; S/N 520625; Engine # 403925; Blue, Dark Blue fenders and upper body, Light Blue accents/Grey leather; Blue cloth top; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Concours restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $305,000 plus commission of 11.64%; Final Price $340,500. – 322/125hp inline ohv eight, 3-speed, Light Blue wire wheels, blackwall tires, folding windshield, dual sidemounts, integrated trunk, Glolite headlights, Trippe lights. – Excellent paint, interior, top and major chrome but some trim chrome is weak. The underbody and chassis are better than new. It’s impossible to criticize this Nash except to note it’s not “fresh.” In all other respects it is magnificent. Restored for Fred Guyton in the Naughts and displayed at Pebble Beach in 2010. – This is an extraordinary automobile in excellent condition, a star of the auction. One of two 1932 Nash Eights sold within a week, the other was Frank Spain’s at Tupelo, Mississippi last weekend. Also a convertible sedan, Spain’s was a 261/100hp 1080 in nowhere nearly this good condition but still brought $84,000. The bidders here in St. Louis recognized the innate quality of this Nash and its superb restoration and avid pursued it to this exceptional result.

Lot # 374 1915 Oakland Model 37 Speedster; S/N 372702; Engine # L2782; Light Grey/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Concours restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $72,800. – 192/40hp four, 3-speed, Red wood spoke wheels, blackwall tires, Stewart drum speedometer, electric bell headlights, spotlight, nickel brightwork, folding windshield, dual spares on the rear deck, electric starter. – Very good paint, upholstery, top and brightwork. Clean, barely used engine compartment and chassis. There are a few small spots of wear and tiny edge chips but not enough to detract significantly from an exceptional presentation. – Oakland was succeeded by Pontiac in the General Motors multi-marque evolution and if there was an “Oakland GTO” in 1915 it would have been this charming little car with a sparkling restoration by Brian Joseph in the 90’s. There were many charismatic vehicles in Fred Guyton’s collection, but this little Speedster stood out for its style, verve and superb restoration.

Lot # 363 1916 Packard Twin Six 7-Passenger Touring; S/N Engine No. 87352; Engine # 87352; Olive Green, Black fenders/Black leather; Black leatherette top; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $95,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $106,400. – Body color 37-inch wheels, folding windshield, wind wings, MacBeth Evans Liberty Lens electric headlights and sidelights, dual rear-mounted spares, Waltham clock, Warner speedometer, Sireno siren, Schwarze electric horn, Lincoln Highway Moto Meter, Sparton electric horn. – The front seat cushion has been reupholstered but the rest of the upholstery is original, if somewhat torn and worn. The paint is old, chipped and rubbing through. The engine compartment is unrestored, clean, orderly and surprisingly dry. The fuse panel has been updated to Buss style fuses. Largely original and needs only a careful checkout to be a marvelous tour car. – The virtues of Jesse Vincent’s V12 engine are manifest in the low, narrow hood that conceals it on this commodious 7-passenger Twin Six. It is a marvelous, highly original automobile that appears never to have been restored, or needed it. The array of horns and sirens makes it perfect for a gangster film set in the Teens, or for that matter just about any parade or tour. “Restoration” would ruin its glorious preservation, and it isn’t even expensive. Its condition may be “4+” but it is a highly desirable Twin Six bought for a highly desirable price.

Lot # 377 1930 Packard 734 Speedster Eight Phaeton; S/N 184101; Engine # 184107; Red, Black fenders and accent/Saddle leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $800,000 – $1,100,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $600,000 plus commission of 10.83%; Final Price $665,000 picks. – 385/145hp inline eight, 4-speed, cloth tonneau cover and rear-mounted spare, wind wings, chrome spoke wire wheels, radiator stoneguard, sliding girl mascot. – Ex-Tom Mix, one of five known survivors of 32 built in this body style. First owned by Sanford Cluett, principal in Arrow shirts and originator of the Sanforized shrink-reducing process. Restored in the present colors in the late 90’s for Mix. Sound older paint with touched up scrapes and edge chips. Very good newer upholstery. Decent but erratically aged chrome. Orderly engine compartment with a tidy rebuilt engine sitting in a largely unrestored compartment. Some modern hose clamps and original frayed wiring, particularly coming out of the steering column. Old paint inside the hood and under flaking black paint under the fenders. Original green paint visible on the frame and suspension. Good dash and gauges. A wonderfully preserved automobile with just five owners from new. – Given 2/3 of a million dollars to spend on an historic automobile it could not be better spent than on this overlooked gem within the Fred Guyton collection. Gooding has twice sold Speedster Phaeton 184065, first at Pebble Beach in 2012 for $975,000 and later at Pebble Beach last year for $1,127,500. Neither had this Speedster Phaeton’s marvelous never-taken-apart originality. Put it beside any other 1930 Packard and its style and grace are apparent. How it was bought for this little is a mystery, but it is one to be cherished by its new owner who has one of the landmark automobiles of the classic era for little enough money, plenty of room for joyous rides with grandkids and a car that will perform like a Model J on classic tours with little concern for bird strikes or stone chips. It is a great value.

 

Lot # 357 1932 Packard Standard Eight Coupe Roadster; S/N Engine No. 345198; Engine # 345198; Green, Dark Green fenders and accent/Beige cloth; Beige cloth top; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $62,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $70,000. – Chrome wire wheels, wide whitewall tires, Depress Beam headlights, wind wings, dual horns, radiator stoneguard, rumble seat, rear-mounted spare – Good older paint with edge chips and a big scrape on the left door from the wind wing. Orderly but dirty, oily and aged engine compartment. Dusty chassis showing road miles. A typical “museum car” that probably hasn’t moved under its own power in years. – 1932 was the first year Packard used the term “Coupe Roadster” for its convertible coupe and it was sporting coachwork that deserved the distinctive appellation, an extraordinarily handsome model that in this case is spoiled (or enhanced, depending upon the observer’s aesthetic sensibilities) by the afterthought rear-mounted spare. Dusty and neglected, the bidders discounted the style and the 120hp Standard Eight powerplant appropriately in this result.

Lot # 355 1937 Pierce-Arrow Eight Coupe; S/N 2225007; Engine # 315016; Buff, Brown accent/Pear cloth, Brown leather rumble seat; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $78,400. – Dual enclosed sidemounts, Butterscotch wire wheels, wide whitewall tires, Dawley headlights, rumble seat. – The only known survivor of seven built in this body style in the final year of Pierce-Arrow production, restored by Lanny Sims in the early 80’s. Cracked, shrinking old paint, weak chrome, sound upholstery. The engine compartment is clean, fairly dry and scratched and chipped. A handsome car, good enough to be toured but with many age flaws that suggests a re-restoration is not far in its future. – This 1937 Pierce-Arrow marks an unfortunate milestone in the marque’s history, namely “the end”, but it is still a quite magnificent headstone with an old restoration that is sound if not pristine. It will take some work to make it run and drive reliably and quietly but that is reflected in the price it brought.

Lot # 403 2004 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet; S/N WP0CA299X4S652321; Arctic Silver Metallic/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $40,000 – $45,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $44,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $49,280. – 6-speed, Bose stereo, Red calipers, Bridgestone tires with good tread, heated seats,. – The driver’s seat is stretched, the rest of the upholstery is nearly like new. The electronic odometer reads 11,630 miles and the car is in appropriate condition. – This is full retail.

Lot # 373 1909 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost 40/50hp Roi des Belges, Body by after Barker; S/N 1203; Engine # 1203; Silver, Polished aluminum hood/Dark Green leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $800,000 – $1,000,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,200,000 plus commission of 10.42%; Final Price $1,325,000 picks. – RHD. German silver trim, Boa Constrictor horn, Bleriot “bullseye” acetylene headlights, Lucas kerosene side lights and taillights, dual windshields, Elliott speedometer, Smiths clock, Chadburn’s barometer, single sidemount, dual windshields, Rudge-Whitworth wire wheels, electric starter. – An excellent older restoration that still presents very well but is aging and dusty. Coachwork believed built by Jarvis (or Willis) about 1972 after the chassis was found on Cow Roast scrapyard near Tring in the U.K. in 1946 replacing the original Hooper 7-passenger landaulette. Re-restored by Jonathan Harley for Sydney Cooper in the naughts. One of few pre-1910 “parallel bonnet” Ghosts to survive. Owners include Jimmy Skinner, Rick Carroll, Bill Lassiter and Richard Solove. Deserves to be driven until it’s re-restored. – This Ghost has an intriguing auction history. It sold for $332,500 at Christie’s sale of Bill Lassiter’s collection in 1999 before its most recent restoration, then for $626,504 (GBP 330,000 at the time, this result is GBP 1,008,400.) Gooding & Company sold it in 2007 from the Richard Solove collection for $1,485,000 and again in 2011 for only $825,000 from the John O’Quinn estate. It is a showpiece, even with the reproduced coachwork, with an illustrious provenance and brought a fully-deserved price here at the Guyton sale.

Lot # 376 1925 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost 40/50hp Piccadilly Roadster, Body by Merrimac; S/N S369RK; Engine # 22684; Dark Blue/Beige leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $250,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $280,000. – Chrome wire wheels, wide whitewalls, Bausch & Lomb drum headlights, dual sidemounts, rumble seat, luggage rack, Chelsea clock. – The original body, as delivered by Rolls-Royce in 1926 to A.E. Fitkin, a New York bond dealer. Later owned by golfer Gene Littler. Restored at some point, it has sound but visibly aged old paint, nickel brightwork and upholstery. Various small edge chips and scuffs on the paint. The driver’s seat is lightly stretched and surface cracked. The dashboard varnish and the gauges are aged. The engine compartment is clean and dry with some surface rust on iron parts. – Post- WWI Ghosts, particularly those assembled in Springfield, Massachusetts, were highly evolved from the earlier “parallel bonnet” Ghosts. Their brake horsepower was at least 70, not the 40/50hp of earlier Ghosts, and their American ancillaries were both more reliable and more easily serviced. American coachbuilders built high-quality, sleek bodies-in-white inventoried and marketed by Rolls-Royce as “Rolls-Royce Custom Coach Work.” This is a prime example, and Mr. Fitkin must have been both prosperous and very proud of his Piccadilly, as should the buyer of this impressively restored and preserved example of Springfield’s finest.

Lot # 378 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Continental Fixed Cabriolet de Ville, Body by Thrupp & Maberly; S/N 4JS; Engine # OV35; Black, Silver sides, Black padded roof/Black leather; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $150,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $168,000. – RHD. Rollup division, cobra grain roof and tendelet, chrome spoke wire wheels, blackwall tires, dual rear spares, spotlight, wooden running boards, fender mirrors, Lucas tri-bar headlights and modern Lucas driving lights, fender mirrors, turn signals added. – 1963 RROC National Award winner, unnumbered early CCCA National First Prize. An old restoration redone some time ago and very pretty. The paint on the chassis and underbody is thick. Interior is excellent, particularly the wood which is almost liquid under multiple coats of varnish. – Offered by Bonhams at Brookline in 2008 and bid to $200,000, it was successfully sold by RM at Hershey in 2009 for $176,000. Ten years later and 89 more miles on its odometer its condition has deteriorated somewhat and is usable and orderly. Formal town cars like this were staples of Rolls-Royce Phantom production but are much less appreciated by collectors today. This is a reasonable result for a quality example like this.

Lot # 390 1937 Rolls-Royce Phantom III Sedanca de Ville, Body by H.J. Mulliner; S/N 3CM67; Engine # K18S; Black/Black leather, Beige cloth; Estimate $100,000 – $150,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $130,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $145,600. – RHD. Wheel discs, blackwall tires, Lucas tri-bar headlights, fender mirrors, dual Raydyot spotlights, rollup division, electric driver’s intercom. – Indifferent old repaint over old paint with big chips on the left front door and left front fender. Microblistered left front fender. Sound chrome with thin door handles. Sound but aged and worn original upholstery, dull interior wood, peeling varnish. Surface rusted underbody and fender wells. Largely original but probably a restoration project. – There are probably many miles left in this PIII for tours and parades, not to mention weddings and anniversaries, but at some point its age will overtake its patina and it’ll head out for restoration, a future that is realistically reflected in the price it brought here.

Lot # 385 1938 Rolls-Royce Phantom III ‘Parallel Door’ Saloon Coupe, Body by James Young; S/N 3DL86; Engine # Q48N; Belco Navy Blue/Cognac leather; Estimate $150,000 – $250,000; Concours restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $380,000 plus commission of 11.32%; Final Price $423,000 picks. – RHD. Wheel discs, dual enclosed sidemounts, Lucas tri-bar headlights, Notek fog light, Victor multiband radio, dual horns, sunshine roof, fitted luggage, parallelogram hinged visors, overdrive added. – Seductive but imposing 2-door coachwork with parallel-hinged doors that fold back for easy entry to both front and rear seats. Bought off the 1938 Earls Court Motor Show display by Robert Constantine Graseby. then to Fred Guyton’s neighbor Norris H. Allen who bequeathed it to Fred Guyton in 1990. The engine is broken, in place only for show and needs a new crankcase. Very good older paint, chrome and inviting interior with supple leather and brightly varnished wood dashboard. The chassis is clean and lightly oiled, a delightful and rare Rolls-Royce with three owners from new – PIIIs were challenged years ago for their exceptionally complicated V12 engines that traced their origins to Rolls-Royce’s aircraft engines where maintenance was daily. Fred Guyton’s appreciation of them was apparent in the Rolls-Royce Merlin display engine proudly offered today, complete with a comprehensive kit of tools and gages employed in their meticulous care when failure in the air meant catastrophic crashing and sold for $57,000. Today a PIII is understood and while not inexpensive to own and drive (witness this one’s history) they can be used and enjoyed with proper and informed care. The bidders largely ignored the huge engine rebuild cost under the hood and looked instead at this marvelous James Young coachwork. I asked Roger Willbanks and Donnie Gould, “If the engine were on a stand and a Chevy LS6 was under the hood for driving on the Colorado Grand, would it be worth any less?” They agreed that it would … but not a lot less. This is coachwork money, and dramatic and special coachwork it is.

Lot # 360 1939 Rolls-Royce Wraith Saloon Coupe, Body by James Young; S/N WHC47; Engine # K3WB; Light Grey, Grey fenders/Grey leather; Estimate $100,000 – $150,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $130,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $145,600. – RHD. Dual enclosed sidemounts, Light Grey wheel discs, blackwall tires, multiband radio, heater, Lucas headlights and fog light, trafficators, complete tool set. – Excellent paint, chrome and interior. The engine compartment is orderly with a little oil leakage and some modern hose clamps. Full of thoughtful, creative and subtle coachwork details. A gorgeous car with wonderful coachwork design and intricate details like the crowned fenders with sharply defined inner and outer skirts. The huge doors close like a bank vault. – A 4 1/4 liter Wraith is not the most prestigious Rolls-Royce. Most have clumsy, badly proportioned attempts to replicate Phantom style on the smaller Wraith chassis, but this Wraith’s coachwork is magnificent, every bit as distinctive and seductive as would be seen on a Phantom and it is somewhat surprising that it didn’t find more favor with the bidders here in Fred Guyton’s collection.

Lot # 394 1939 Rolls-Royce Phantom III Limousine de Ville, Body by Hooper; S/N 3DL180; Engine # N58Q; Black, Burgundy body sides/Brown leather, Camel cloth; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Unrestored original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $110,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $123,200. – RHD. Lucas headlights and fog light, retractable hard tendelet, single enclosed sidemount with mirror, skirts, power division, jump seats, wheel covers, wide whitewalls. – Body originally on PIII s/n 3DL120, mounted on this chassis for Dr. Sam Scher (originally an Inskip limousine.) Generally sound older paint except for a chipped area on the left rear door. Greasy, road grimy chassis. Aged unrestored engine compartment. Sound but aged original upholstery, attractive interior wood. An elegant PIII, but with plenty of patina. – The coachwork is definitely by Hooper, configured with extended rear windows the better to see its occupants. Not run in years and needing some work to freshen its mechanical operation, but also an elegant, prestigious way to arrive at the opera.

Lot # 382 1930 Ruxton Model C Roadster, Body by Baker-Raulang; S/N 11005; Engine # 18S162; Light Yellow, Green accent/Brown leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $350,000 – $450,000; Older restoration, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $675,000 plus commission of 10.74%; Final Price $747,500 picks. – Dual cloth covered sidemounts with mirrors, disc wheels, wide whitewall tires, rumble seat, wind wings, Woodlite headlights and matching fender lights, single Pilot-Ray, luggage rack, alternator. – Chipped, dull, scratched and chipped old paint, fair chrome, torn old upholstery. Old, lightly oiled engine compartment. Sleek and slick, but beyond preservation. A complete and straightforward restoration project that was taken out for a long test drive on Friday and returned unscathed and under its own power. – OK, perhaps this Ruxton is not “beyond preservation”? It has provenance (first owned by the ultimate Ruxton assembler Kissel’s co-principal George Kissel.) Later by M.H. “Tiny” Gould and essentially never restored, just given attention when it was needed. It runs and drives, as demonstrated on Friday, and isn’t nasty, just old. That said, it is the most expensive Ruxton ever sold at auction, vastly surpassing similar Roadsters in much better restored condition which reflects a huge premium for the age of its restoration and originality. This should be considered an outlying Ruxton result, but a fabled car unsullied by the restorer’s touch.

Lot # 361 1922 Stutz Series KDH Bearcat Runabout; S/N 12974; Engine # D12972H; Yellow, Black fenders/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $120,000 – $160,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $155,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $173,600. – RHD. 361/80hp 16-valve L-head four, body color wire wheels, drum headlights, Sparton electric horn, Hawthorne spotlights, rear deck mounted spare, Waltham clock, folding windshield. – Clean and orderly engine compartment showing age and use, as does the chassis. Good paint, nickel brightwork, upholstery and top. The cosmetics are newer than the engine and chassis. Long term owned by William Greer, founder of the Stutz Club. – This is not the Stutz Bearcat of legend, but an evolved and rather more comfortable variation that still has the Bearcat’s sporting style. Despite twelve years static display in Fred Guyton’s collection the 1980’s cosmetic restoration still holds up well and bodes well for a straightforward recommissioning to reliable and exhilirating performance on the road. It was bought reasonably enough for what it is.

Photo © 2019 Darin Schnable, courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Lot # 368 1925 Stutz Series 695 Speedway Six 5-Passenger Sportster; S/N 14370; Engine # 14444; Yellow, Black fenders/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $120,000 – $160,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $72,800. – Stewart drum speedometer, key-wind clock, Depress Beam drum headlights, matching running lights and cowl lights, cloth-covered rear spare, fender mirrors, Red wire wheels, Stutz Moto-Meter, 4-trumpet Testaphone bulb horn. – CCCA National First Prize, 1989 Senior and Premier #1384. The only known Speedway Six Sportster to survive. Very good paint and upholstery, clear, crisp gauges. Clean, dry engine compartment. A very well-preserved older restoration that needs nothing. – Fred Guyton liked Stutzes as evidenced by the four of them (plus an H.C.S.) in his collection but this rare Speedway Six Sportster was overlooked by the collectors here or on the phone/internet. It’s really well-preserved and in rare specification and bodywork. But it looks like a duck, with undistinguished 5-passenger coachwork. The successful bidder took home an outstanding, rare car for modest money.

Lot # 402 1926 Stutz Model AA Vertical Eight Brougham, Body by Brewster; S/N AA682074; Engine # 82070; Dark Green, Black fenders, Grey leatherette roof/Black leather; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $22,400. – Twin Beam headlights, windshield visor, glass side window rain deflectors, single rear-mounted spare. – Fred Guyton’s first collector car, bought in 1970. The first year of the “Safety Stutz”. Repainted and reupholstered a while ago, otherwise original and showing plenty of age. The paint is scraped and blistering but sound enough to be driven. Foggy gauges. Not good enough to be toured, but a sound and complete restoration project. – The “Safety Stutz” was a significant innovation by Harry Stutz that really did add to occupants’ safety and also had adequate power from its 287/92hp overhead cam six-cylinder engine. There is a long restoration process between the car that changed hands here today and one that its owner will drive and show proudly and this price is a realistic place to start.

Lot # 380 1930 Stutz Model M 2-Passenger Speedster; S/N M824SD220; Engine # 32431; Light Yellow, Yellow-Green accent/Brown leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $130,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $145,600. – 322/110hp inline eight, 3-speed, Orange wire wheels, wide whitewall tires, dual sidemounts with mirrors, Beige cloth covered luggage trunk, rumble seat, Ryan-Lite headlights, Trippe lights. – Steering wheel note says “No Brakes “, one of several similar notes on the Guyton cars. The top is torn and the frame is broken. The engine compartment is aged but dry and orderly; the chassis is better. Paint is old, chipped and cracking at some panel edges. Good upholstery, dash and gauges. Unnumbered early CCCA National First Prize. A sound basis for touring or a straightforward re-restoration. – This coachwork is a catalog body built by LeBaron and badged accordingly, and it exemplifies LeBaron’s style and quality. It’s good enough to to be mechanically freshened and toured, but will warrant re-restoration soon and brought a price here appropriate to that future.

Lot # 398 1962 Volkswagen Beetle Deluxe 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N 4270114; Engine # 6227432; Red/Black leatherette, cloth; Estimate $5,000 – $10,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $9,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $10,080. – Folding sunroof, Motorola radio, hubcaps, bias ply narrow whitewalls, bumper overriders. – Heavy water damage behind the rear seat and cheap upholstery kit interior. Quick older repaint with overspray inside the engine compartment. Both rear fenders are scraped and dented. The engine compartment is oily and messy. A project Bug, but nothing difficult. – This is, however, an astounding price for a beat up Beetle, essentially convertible money for a sedan with a sunroof.

Lot # 354 1922 Wills Sainte Claire A-68 Roadster, Body by Budd; S/N 1867; Engine # 3679; Tobacco Green, Brown fenders/Brown leather; Tan cloth top; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $64,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $71,680. – 265/66hp V8, 3-speed, overdrive, Duolite Micro-Tilt headlights, fender mirrors, Tobacco Green disc wheels, dual spotlights, rumble seat, turn signals, underdash auxiliary gauges, single rear-mounted spare. – Sound older paint, top, chrome and interior. The paint is edge chipped and scraped. Trim chrome is thin. The engine compartment is dry and orderly but aged. A quality old restoration now in presentable touring condition. – Built to C. Harold Wills’ obsessive standards, every aspect of a Wills Ste. Claire is thoroughly engineered including the 265 cubic inch 90-degree V8 engine with shaft and bevel gear driven single overhead camshafts. Any glimpse under the hood is a delight. Rarely seen (only about 12,000 were built during the company’s six year life) and intensely interesting, the new owner took home an extraordinary automobile at a modest but appropriate price.

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