RM Auctions, Hershey, October 10-11, 2019

RM’s Hershey auction is a celebration of old cars, an event ideally positioned at the home of the Antique Automobile Club of America and its annual show and legendary swap meet.

I didn’t go this year due to a conflict (my wife had cataract surgery on Wednesday) but Jose Martinez and Megan Boyd ably filled in. They were challenged (and intrigued) by the many obscure marques and models that have come to be the signature of RM Hershey’s docket.

In most auctions there may be a dozen or so obscure marques and models; at RM Hershey they make up much of the docket. Among RM’s leadership and its staff there is no shortage of the spirit that promotes, preserves and presents the history of the automobile and it shows at Hershey every year.

The Thursday sale (October 10) was composed entirely of cars from the Merrick Auto Museum in Alda, Nebraska, a celebration of nickel, brass and antique vehicles which may have included the world’s biggest collection of Auto Red Bugs and their derivatives. All the Merrick cars were offered without reserve and several brought eye-popping prices.

Four collections were featured on the Friday sale (October 11): Jim Bradley, John Muckel, Jack Dunning and William B. Ruger, Jr.

Carefully curated, preserved, restored and maintained, the cars of these collections are a credit to their owners and to the spirit of car collecting and preservation, which is exactly what “Hershey” is about.

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2019 199/208 95.7% 49.8% 22.1% $76,475 $38,500

[50.3%]

$15,218,500
2018 132/148 89.2% 57.6% 11.4% $81,539 $57,200

70.2%]

$10,763,125
2017 131/138 94.9% 62.3% 13.1% $120,531 $57,750

[47.9%]

$15,789,500

The reports that follow are sorted by lot number.

Jose Martinez and Megan Boyd viewed the cars on-site; the final copy and all the market comments are Rick Carey’s responsibility.


Thursday Cars at RM Hershey


Lot # 171 1908 Dart Model B Motor Buggy; S/N C2260D341; Dark Green/Black leather; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Not viewed, notes from the catalog, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $42,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $46,750. – RHD. Wheel steering, opposed 2-cylinder, 2-speed planetary transmission, double chain drive, black painted Cincinnati Victor kerosene lights. – Restored some time ago and has received some cosmetic attention recently to keep it in presentable condition. – Purchased at Auburn Fall in 2016 for $14,300, this is the sole surviving Dart known. It has received cosmetic attention since its acquisition for the Merrick Auto Museum and is today much more presentable and usable than it was when bought, although that doesn’t explain the extraordinary price it brought.

Lot # 183 1908 Mier Model A Runabout; S/N 14084; Green, Red chassis/Black leather; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Not viewed, notes from the catalog, – condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000. – RHD. 2-cylinder inline engine, friction drive, brass headlights and cowl lamps, folded trumpet bulb horn – Sold to the Merrick Collection at Auburn Fall in 2003 for $26,500, one of two Mier automobiles known to survive, which helps explain the rather exceptional price it brought here.

Lot # 187 1923 Packard Single Six-Series 126 Runabout; S/N U21181A; Engine # U21198; Red, Black fenders/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $34,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $37,400. – Rear mounted spare, varnished wood spoke wheels, whitewalls, MotoMeter. – Paint and body in poor condition with cracking at the body lines, the rear and in the jambs. Faded top. The interior is in good condition with a few small scratches on the seat and door panels. The windshield is delaminating. Fair chrome with some pitting. Yellowed tires. A neat runabout Packard, but in generally tired condition. – This is a Packard Six for the price of a Model T, an inherently sound value that will respond well to some attention.

Lot # 195 1932 LaSalle Series 345-B Imperial Sedan, Body by Fisher; S/N 96; Engine # 1103355; Black/Black leather in front, Grey cloth in back; Estimate $35,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $30,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $33,000. – Dual sidemount spares, wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual chrome horns, mascot, luggage rack, rear and side shades, division window. – Fair, somewhat dull and faded paint. Rough interior with a tear above the driver’s door near the headliner, moth holes in the driver’s side rear, water damage to the rear passenger’s door panel and holes in the carpet. Yellowed tires. A close cousin of the Cadillac but just as stately in this limousine body style, it’s a tired old restoration that would benefit greatly from another round of straightforward restoration work. – This LaSalle desperately needs attention, but it won’t take a lot to get it back onto the road for some enjoyable tours and weekend drives. The new owner’s real risk is getting carried away with “while we’re at it” tasks that take more time, more money and more attention away from just enjoying it and the sound value that it is at this price.

Lot # 197 1926 Detroit Electric Model 98 Brougham; S/N 13690; Blue, Black/Grey cloth; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $49,500. – Wire wheels, wide whitewalls, swivel front seats – Fair, dull paint with overspray on the front right side of the car and fender. Good interior with some disintegration from age on the right seat, and the dome light is brown with age. All brightwork is slightly pitted and the running boards are faded. Paint-chipped wheels and yellowing tires. A 1926 model rebuilt and resold in 1932 at the factory. – An excellent example of the style and accessorization of later electric vehicles, this is a genteel sitting room on wheels and somewhat the antithesis of today’s electrics and their sub-5 second 0-60 times. It’s tired but (as the UAW will soon find out) is simple to assemble and service. The price is somewhat generous for its condition, but understandable within the present fascination with electric vehicles.

Lot # 198 1928 LaSalle Series 303 Coupe, Body by Fisher; S/N Body No. 606; Engine # 222238; Dark Red, Black fenders and roof/Grey; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $23,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $25,850. – Rear-mounted spare, painted wood spoke wheels, whitewalls, windshield visor – Restored in the late 1980s. Older paint with chips and scratches throughout, and a dull overall finish. Good interior with slight corrosion on the steering column and door handles. All brightwork is tarnished. Solid wood wheels but the whitewalls are dry and yellowed. A usable LaSalle that someone could drive and enjoy as is while improving it and enjoying CCCA Full Classic (TM) status. – This is arguably more car than the money it brought, but the age of the restoration and its deteriorated condition mean that the new owner is going to find many ways to spend money on it. That contingency was prominent in the minds of the bidders here who left realistic financial flexibility available at this result.

Lot # 201 1928 Franklin Series 12B Depot Hack; S/N X179948L11; Engine # E127738; Black, Wood/Black; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $22,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $24,750. – Side curtains, varnished wood spoke wheels, radiator mascot, wood steering wheel, drum headlights, 3-row seating. – Reproduction body based on a Cantrell design. Driver quality paint with a chip in the right rear fender. Excellent interior and the wood body is in excellent condition. All brightwork is slightly tarnished with small pits forming. An unusual wood-bodied air-cooled Franklin. It is a much older restoration, but the forest’s worth of wood throughout the car is mostly in very good shape and that counts for a lot. – Highly unusual and definitely imposing in size, style and skilled joinery, this is a modest result for a car that is both rare and highly attractive.

Lot # 202 1936 Cord 810 Westchester Sedan; S/N 1405A; Engine # FB452; Cadet Grey/Dark Grey cloth; Estimate $25,000 – $30,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $37,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $41,250. – Preselector transmission, chrome wheels with whitewall tires, amber fog lights, radio, bench rear seat. – Dull, chipped, and cracked paint. Decent brightwork with a high polish but has a few indentations. Engine compartment has surface rust and corrosion. Adequate interior with good upholstery but the steering wheel and column has cracks and chips in the paint. Offered by the Merrick Auto Museum, and was once part of the Charlie Sens Auto Museum. This Cord 810 received an Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club Category 1 certification in the 90s. Its restoration is showing its age. – RM’s pre-sale estimate aggressively handicaps this 810 Westchester for the age of it restoration. The bidders were less judgmental and paid an appropriate price for it even though it is well over RM’s estimate range.

Lot # 205 1926 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Open-Drive Limousine, Body by Holbrook; S/N 12DC; Engine # AD15; Red, Black fenders/Beige leather in front, cloth in rear.; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $47,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $52,250. – Dual sidemount spares with mirrors, chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, luggage rack with trunk, rear jump seats, Marchal headlights – Fair paint that is chipped at the body lines and bottom of doors. Large scratch on the front right fender and a chip on driver door. Fair interior with a stained driver’s seat, stained carpet and pitted steering column. Right rear glass is cracked and the windshield is delaminating. All brightwork is slightly tarnished and the whitewalls are yellowed. Although originally outfitted with a body by Kellner this Rolls-Royce has worn the Holbrook limo body for most of its life. – Retaining the Marchal headlights from the Kellner body is an appreciated touch that links the two bodies on this chassis. The open-drive limousine coachwork has limited appeal but it is appropriately priced in this transaction and an affordable entry into classic Rolls-Royce and CCCA events.

Lot # 212 1925 Duesenberg Model A Sport Phaeton, Body by Millspaugh & Irish; S/N 1080; Engine # 1476; Cream, Green/Dark Green leather; Medium Tan cloth top; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $215,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $236,500. – 260cid 8-cylinder, yellow wire wheels, dual sidemount spares, tilt windshield, luggage rack and luggage trunk, Boyce MotoMeter, rear passenger footrest. – Poor paint with chips, cracks, discoloration and blisters. Tired interior upholstery with cracks and damaged piping. Dingy carpeting and dull stainless steel brightwork. Offered by the Merrick Auto Museum, this 1925 Duesenberg Model A was once part of the Harrah’s Collection and was displayed at the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum for 15 years. – Sold at the 1985 Harrah’s auction for $87,000 and at Auburn Fall in 2001 for $97,400 the result here shows the appreciation which collectors have been showing for Fred and Augie Duesenberg’s single overhead camshaft Model A, a vehicle that is much more a reflection of their design inspirations than the later and much more famed E.L. Cord-inspired Model J. This is a realistic result in today’s market and gives due credit to its Harrah’s provenance as well as the quality of its restoration which probably is as it was done at Harrah’s over thirty years ago.

Lot # 221 1930 Cord Front Drive L-29 Brougham; S/N 2927601; Engine # FDA2510; Maroon, Black/Grey cloth; Black cloth top; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $94,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $103,400. – Chrome wire wheels with whitewall tires, dual sidemounts with accessory mirrors, Twilite headlamps, cowl lights and luggage rack. – The paint is decent, but there are masking errors, chipped edges, cracks and dry areas. Good brightwork that has some surface scratches. Adequate interior and engine compartment. Restored more than once, but even the most recent one was a while ago. ACD Club Category 1 certified. – Sold at Auburn Fall in 2004 for $70,200 and showing the age of its restoration, the handsome price it brought here may well rest on the attractive, low closed coachwork that emphasizes the utility and practicality of its front wheel drive chassis layout. Surprisingly, open L-29s are far more common these days than closed examples, giving this car a few rarity points to support its price.

Lot # 226 1926 Cadillac Series 314 Limousine Sedan; S/N Engine No. 101539; Engine # 101539; Red, Black fenders and leatherette roof/Tan cloth; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $30,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $33,000. – Rear-mounted spare, Orange disc wheels and blackwall tires, hub caps, vinyl roof, rear window shade, vases, wood steering wheel, windshield visor, opera windows. – Fair paint with orange peel throughout and the finish appears thin and dry. Chips in the paint at the body lines. Fair interior that is missing the dome light cover, and the carpet is disintegrating from age. Several glass panels are scratched. All chrome and brightwork is tarnished, and the bumpers pitted. An unusual and attractive body style, but it needs a restoration. – Ordered as a Custom Chassis only and fitted with this rather square and practical 4-door body. The utilitarian look is emphasized by the disc wheels. Competently restored some time ago, it is a square car at a square deal price.

Lot # 234 1933 LaSalle Series 345C Town Sedan, Body by Fisher; S/N 25003; Engine # 2000449; Red, Silver fenders and upper body/White cloth; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $38,500. – Dual enclosed sidemount spares with mirrors, wire wheels, driving lights, luggage rack. – Fair paint with some cracking on the front fenders and chips throughout. The interior is in good condition with the rear dome light cover missing and the dash chrome pitted. The exterior chrome, on the other hand, is in good condition. Paint is chipped and lifting off the wheels and the tires are very dry. Another great Full Classic sedan from the Merrick Collection that was well restored but done many years ago and could use some attention even though it is a fundamentally solid car. – The Hershey bidders recognized the quality of this older restoration with a decent price, qualified for the dated colors used in restoration.

Lot # 237 1926 Cadillac Series 314 Coupe; S/N Engine No. 130909; Engine # 130909; Red, Black fenders and roof/Red cloth; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $26,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $28,600. – Rear-mounted spare, vinyl roof with landau bars, golf bag door, rear window shade, vases, driving lights, MotoMeter, painted wood spoke wheels, wide whitewalls, windshield visor. – Faded paint with chips and scratches throughout. Fasteners showing from under the vinyl roof, which is stained with dust. Decent interior with some wear from age. All brightwork is tarnished. Yellowing tires. An unusual body style that is complete but is in need of some restoration. – This attractive and sporty Cadillac coupe with its intimate 2-place coupe body is an attractive example even though it needs work. The bidders discounted the price to leave some flexibility for the work it needs, a result that is fair to both the buyer and the seller.

Lot # 243 1930 Nash Series 490 Twin Ignition Eight Sedan; S/N 506189; Engine # 4904730; Green, Black, Beige/Tan cloth; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $19,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $20,900. – 299/100hp overhead valve straight eight, dual sidemount spares, Cream wire wheels, hub caps, whitewalls, luggage rack and trunk, mascot. – Old paint and a small dent in the left rear door. Scratches on the cowl and minor scratches throughout. Good upholstery but tired wood. The inside door handles are tarnished and the steering wheel is cracked. All exterior chrome is in fair condition. The wheels are chipped and the tires are yellowed. The windshield is delaminating around the edges. An older restored driver-quality example of the legendary Twin-ignition Nash. – This is a high quality automobile but one that has faded badly since it was restored and will take no small amount of effort and expense to get back on the road in reliable and presentable condition. This price takes that effort and expense into account, although many Model As in comparable condition bring nearly as much as the roomy, elegant and powerful Nash.


Friday Cars at RM Hershey



Lot # 374 1934 Ford Model 40 Deluxe Coupe; S/N 181216955; Black/Grey cloth; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $37,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $41,250. – Cream Kelsey Hayes wire wheels, rumble seat, rear-mounted spare, front bumper overrider. – Good paint. The door lock on the passenger’s side is missing. Good chrome other than some mild pitting on the grille. Good interior other than a tear in the floor mat. Slightly chipped wheels. A restored but driver quality early Ford V8. – A handsome example that is honestly presented and has no serious issues for which a sensible price was paid that is fair to both parties.

Lot # 376 1955 Chrysler C-300 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 3N551481; Platinum White/Tan leather; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $50,000. – 331/300hp, dual quads, automatic, power steering, power brakes, chrome wire wheels, wide whitewalls, AM radio. – Fair paint with bubbles above the drip rail on the driver’s side as well as the entire passenger’s side and roof. Paint is lifting on the cowl as well. Very good interior and chrome, however. A first-year 300 with AACA First Junior in 2007, Senior in 2008, First Preservation award in 2009. – The weaknesses in this C-300’s restoration are showing up and will require attention sooner rather than later. The bidders recognized its issues and settled on this realistic offer that contemplates the strip and repaint in its near future.

Lot # 383 1928 Ford Model A Roadster; S/N A182818; Cordova Tan, Black fenders/Brown; Black cloth top; Estimate $25,000 – $30,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $13,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $14,850. – Black wire wheels, rumble seat, dual sidemount spares with accessory mirrors. – Decent paint with chipped edges. Good interior upholstery. Good brightwork. An older restoration with a good interior and imperfect paint. Still plenty good enough for a Model A. – Sold here by RM in 2010 for $27,500 but deteriorated since then (as should be expected) and bought advantageously in this transaction.

Lot # 391 1911 Oldsmobile Autocrat Model 28 Roadster; S/N 66058; Engine # 66058; Red, Light Red/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $400,000 – $600,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $450,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $495,000. – 471ci/50hp T-head 4-cylinder, red artillery wheels, Solarclipse acetylene headlamps, kerosene cowl lamps, buttoned leather seats, rumble seat, rear-mounted spares, Jones speedometer, electric starter and tilt windshield. – Very good paint with the exception of masking errors on the hood panels and a few chips in the paint. Very good brass brightwork. Very good interior. Restored in the late 2000s, displayed at the 2009 Meadow Brook Concours d’Elegance. Owned by Barney Pollard for 20 years who discovered it as a converted utility vehicle. Offered from the Jim Bradley collection, but in need of further work before it goes on tours with confidence. – This restoration is holding up well and is in any event an epic Oldsmobile, the 4-4-2 W-30 of the teens. It’s going to go down the road with alacrity, style and imposing grandeur. It’s worth whatever the well-informed bidders in Hershey were willing to pay for it.

Lot # 392 1913 Packard Series 1-38 Phaeton; S/N 38315; Engine # 38471; Blue, Black/Black; Black cloth top; Estimate $350,000 – $500,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $225,000. – 425/60hp L-Head 6-cylinder, grey artillery wheels, tilt windshield, electric headlamps and cowl lamps, dual driver’s side spares with accessory mirrors, buttoned leather, luggage rack and nickel plated brightwork. – Very good paint other than small chips and a crack on and near the passenger’s side door. Very good nickel plated brightwork. Very good interior. A highly restored 1913 Packard 38, the first Packard model to feature an electric starter and left-hand drive configuration. Restored more than once, with the most recent finished earlier this year. Previously part of the Harrah’s collection and prior ownership by collector Richard Veghte for 30 years. Offered from the Jim Bradley Collection. – While this Packard six may have 38 horsepower by the ALAM formula by this time manufacturers were easily surpassing calculated power with higher revving and more efficient engines and with (relatively) lightweight phaeton coachwork this car’s performance should be startling. The lowball reported high bid was reasonably rejected by the consignor

Lot # 399 1904 Pierce Arrow Stanhope; S/N 868; Engine # 868; Navy Blue/Black leather; Black vinyl top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $215,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $236,500. – 2-cylinder/15hp, brass brightwork, Solar acetylene headlamps, Neverout kerosene cowl lamps, bicycle style fenders with vinyl mud-flaps, artillery wheels, buttoned leather throne seats, rear entrance tonneau, snail-shell bulb horn. – Very good paint and interior. Good exterior brightwork with exception of a few dull areas and imperfections on the arms of the vinyl top. Clean, well restored undercarriage. The interior is very good but there is a crack on the ignition cover. Previously part of the Harrah’s Auto Collection for 20 years. Prior ownership by Carl J. Schmitt and restored by Allan Schmidt of Horseless Carriage Restorations with reproduction coachwork. Winner of Best in Class at the 2006 Kirkland Concours d’Elegance and went to Pebble Beach in 2010. It also completed the London-to-Brighton Veteran Car run in 2011 and is currently offered from the Muckel Collection. – Sold by Gooding & Company at Pebble Beach in 2008 to the consignor for $165,000 and maintained in excellent condition, despite the repro coachwork it is an outstanding automobile which will be welcomed everywhere it wants to go (including back to Pebble Beach next year?) The bidders responded not only to its condition but also to its exceptional style. It is a gorgeous little thing.

Lot # 400 1911 Selden Model 40R Varsity Roadster; S/N 2480; White, Grey/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $145,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $159,500. – 356/40hp four, red artillery wheels, with whitewall tires, brass brightwork, Gaslite Lamp Co. acetylene headlamps, Atwood Castle Co. kerosene cowl lamps, tilt windshield, driver’s side spare, luggage rack, throne seats, passenger footrest and rumble seat. – Good but flawed paint with a few chips and blistering on the hood. Fair brightwork that is scratched and has some dull areas and pitting. Good upholstery and interior wood trim. An older restoration with clean wheel wells and engine compartment, aging paint, good interior, and fair brass brightwork. Originally owned by Fred Todd, prior ownership by Bob Mahoney with known ownership history from new and restored with reproduction coachwork in 1996. Participant of the 1997 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Offered from the John Muckel collection. Represented as one of just six Selden automobiles known to exist. – Sold here by RM in 2007 for $220,000 with a barely aged restoration since then. Selden, remembered as a money-grubbing sharper with an early patent who sought royalties on every internal combustion powered vehicle in the U.S. through the Association of Licensed Automobile Manufacturers (ALAM) ultimately defeated by an angry and righteous Henry Ford, isn’t remembered as a manufacturer. But, as this vehicle shows, he was, if only to vindicate his patent’s validity. It’s actually a handsome little flivver, a piece of American automobile history, and is a conversation piece at a moderate price in this transaction.

Lot # 401 1912 Locomobile Model 48 M Torpedo; S/N 5273; Engine # 5257; Red/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $400,000 – $600,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $225,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $247,500. – RHD. T-head 6-cylinder, red artillery wheels, dual rear-mounted spares, Klaxon and folded trumpet bulb horns, acetylene headlamps, kerosene cowl lamps, Jones clock and speedometer, passenger footrests, electric starter and hydraulic brakes added. – Very good paint. Very good interior wood trim. Good but imperfect brightwork. There a few abrasions on the otherwise good upholstery. An older restoration with flawed brass brightwork, upholstery and reproduction coachwork. Discovered twice and finally restored while under the ownership of Chris Figge through Ohlendorf Restorations, this 1912 Locomobile Model 48 M five-passenger Torpedo was awarded the AACA cup for the Central Division In 2006. It was also a participant at the 2009 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance while owned by collector John Muckel. – Sold by RM here in Hershey in 2007 for the magnificent sum of $660,000 in freshly restored, concours, condition, this result is both surprising and disappointing, at least for the seller. For the buyer it is a magnificent example of one of the Brass Era’s best and most powerful automobiles for what can only be characterized as a bargain price even with the deteriorating older restoration and reproduction body.

Lot # 404 1911 Rambler Model 65 Touring; S/N 26689; Engine # 930; Green/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $242,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $266,750. – RHD. 431ci/45hp 4-cylinder, manual, green artillery wheels, driver’s side mounted spare, rear passenger jump seats, tilt windshield, brass brightwork, Solar headlights and cowl lights, Badger Brass acetylene generator, jump seats, full weather equipment, trumpet style horn, Jones speedometer, 37×4 1/2 blackwall tires. – Bought new by Silas N. Johnson in Laredo, Texas with special order wide track chassis and 40-inch wheels. Stored for many years until 1963, restored in 2008. The only known example of this model. Good paint with high gloss, but there are a few cracks and large chips in the paint. Very good exterior brightwork. Very good upholstery. This Rambler Model 65 was featured at Pebble Beach in 2008 where it received a class award, and the quality of the restoration is immediately apparent but the paint does present as aged. – Offered by Worldwide at Auburn in 2009 where it was reported bid to $350,000 and later sold privately. An imposing and rare car in very good if aged condition that brought an appropriate price.

Lot # 405 1915 Stutz 4F Bearcat Roadster; S/N 4F2658; Engine # AI1006; Yellow/Black leather; Estimate $450,000 – $600,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $300,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $330,000. – RHD. T-head 4-cylinder/60hp, yellow artillery wheels, rear-mounted spares, luggage, electric headlamps and cowl lamps, friction shocks, blackwall tires, trunk, Warner speedometer, Phinney-Walker rim wind clock, monocle windshield. – Good but imperfect paint with chips and a small blister. Good nickel plated brightwork. The upholstery is in good condition. Clean and restored undercarriage. The dashboard and instrumentation are in good condition. An older restoration with paint that maintains a high gloss but has aged especially around panel edges. Discovered in 1982 in a shipping container in England with a 1920s body, this 1915 Stutz was rebodied to its original Bearcat specification. Restored in 2005 while under the ownership of Jim Bradley then purchased by John Muckel in 2010. It won Best in Class and Best of Show at the 2011 Ironstone Concours. – Sold by RM at Meadow Brook in 2006 for $368,500, then at the same venue in 2010 for $330,000. Its Warner odometer has added 155 miles since 2010 and they must have been fun ones even if it’s less than 20 miles per year. This is a real Bearcat, not a rebuilt Stutz, and is a sound value at this price even taking the age of the restoration into account.

Lot # 406 1908 Oldsmobile Limited Prototype Phaeton; S/N 14; Engine # 60014; Navy Blue/Maroon leather; Tan cloth top; Estimate $550,000 – $750,000; Rebodied or re-created, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $385,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $423,500. – RHD. 505/60hp T-head 6-cylinder, Maroon 42-inch artillery wheels, luggage rack with wicker basket, brass brightwork, driver’s side mounted spare, kerosene cowl lamps, acetylene headlights, Jones clock and speedometer,. – Very good paint but there are swirls on the fenders. Very good brightwork. The wood trim has a good varnish. The rear passenger’s carpet is stained. The top is crooked, as well as driver’s side wheel. One of only two 1908 prototypes built, the only one remaining, and one of just 13 of these enormous Olds Limiteds known to exist. Rebodied during its restoration. – A seriously spectacular automobile from John Muckel’s collection, once owned by Barney Pollard, with immense 42-inch wheels that give it a rare pre-SUV stance that was appropriate at a time when roads were wagon tracks and most driving would today be considered “off-roading”. It’s a sound if not economical value in this transaction.

Lot # 409 1936 Packard Super Eight-Series 1403 Phaeton; S/N 951207; Engine # 758334; Silver/Brown leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Unrestored original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $95,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $104,500. – Wind wings, silver wheels with chrome hubcaps and whitewall tires, dual enclosed spares with accessory mirrors, luggage rack with luggage, wind wings, spotlight, fog lights, original tools, side curtains, owner’s manual and Packard lap robes. – Dull, chipped, and scratched paint. Scratched and pitted exterior brightwork. The upholstery is covered in deep cracks. But it’s all forgivable for the most part since the car is almost totally original other than a Packard-Hartford accessory Tonneau Windshield and a new cloth top. Participated in the 2001 Pebble Beach Concours d Elegance in the Prewar Preservation class and has only 46,793 miles from new and a documented three-owner history following the original purchaser, Anna W. Dickinson of Santa Barbara, California and her son. – Luxurious, comfortable, fast and stylish, Packard built only 1,330 Super Eights in all body styles in 1938. This is a late example (engine numbers went only to 758499), the seventh Phaeton built and probably one of the last if not the final one. Its survival in such good, complete and unmolested condition is impressive and continued preservation is its best and highest use, something that is feasible at this moderate price.

Lot # 410 1937 Lincoln Model K Convertible Victoria, Body by Brunn & Co.; S/N K7524; Engine # K7524; Black/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $165,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $165,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $181,500. – Hub caps and trim rings, wide whitewalls, greyhound mascot. – Very good paint other than a minor blemish on the trunk. Very good interior other than a hole in passenger seat. Good chrome other than light tarnishing on the radiator mascot and the grille. Small age cracks in the whitewalls. A stunning example of a rare Victoria by Brunn in excellent condition. Five-year restoration completed in 2013, AACA and CCCA Senior awards and still gorgeous. – One of only 13 built, rarity that can be attributed to its factory price of $5,500 without accessories, and three known survivors. It has lovely, balanced, proportions and brought a realistic and sensible price.

Lot # 413 1934 Packard Twelve-Series 1107 Convertible Victoria, Body by Dietrich; S/N 7476525; Engine # 902209; Cream/Brown leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $350,000 – $450,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $260,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $286,000. – Luggage rack, Cormorant mascot, chrome wire wheels with red rims and whitewall tires, dual enclosed spares with accessory mirrors, Solar headlamps, accessory turn signals, factory radio. – Decent old repaint with touched up chips and a few scratches. Decent exterior brightwork with a few dull areas and scratches. The upholstery is usable but there are cracks on the driver’s seat. An older cosmetic restoration with aged paint, a new top, presentable but aged upholstery and imperfect brightwork. CCCA Premier #1082. – A seriously rare and distinctive automobile restored to very good standards, then used and carefully preserved for many miles and years. The restoration now has an attractive patina that makes it ideally suited for continuing to tour, something that is supported by the reasonable price it brought here.

Lot # 414 1935 Pierce-Arrow 1245 Silver Arrow Coupe; S/N 405002; Red, Maroon fenders and accent/Grey cloth; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Concours restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $180,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $198,000. – 462ci/175hp V12, 3-speed, freewheeling, dual enclosed sidemount spares, beige steel artillery wheels with whitewall tires, factory radio, driving lights. – Good paint but there are light swirls, a few masking errors, and a few scratches. Good brightwork all around except for the passenger’s side door handle. The interior is very good. Overall an older restoration with imperfect paint and chrome brightwork. Estimated that only four 12 cylinder 1245’s were built with only two known to exist. This one was restored in the 1990s while owned by collector Harris Laskey, participated in the 2009 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance and was awarded most elegant at the Silverado Concours d’Elegance. – Offered at Barrett-Jackson in 1995 when it was reported bid to $110,000. Reported sold by Mecum in Las Vegas eleven months ago for $214,500 from the Academy of Art University collection. The result here reflects the condition issues, but puts rather less emphasis on the design and rarity.

Lot # 415 1939 Packard Twelve Coupe; S/N 12382004; Engine # B602245; Dark Green/Grey cloth; Estimate $95,000 – $110,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $86,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $94,600. – Rumble seat, dual enclosed spares with accessory mirrors, luggage rack, green wheels with chrome hubcaps and whitewall tires, Trippe lights, grille guard, turn signals added. – Chipped, cracked, dull and scratched but largely original paint. Decent exterior brightwork with some faint pitting. The upholstery is dingy, torn, and there are pulled seams. There is surface rust in the wheel wells. The dashboard and instrument panel are in good condition. Wisely kept all original after being with the same owner (Paul Clancy) for 40 years, it is a remarkable preservation-class 12-cylinder Packard. – This is a rather extraordinary survivor with a well-known history with its long-term Packard enthusiast owner, Paul Clancy. The Hershey bidders gave some value for that provenance, but also valued its surprisingly good condition.

Lot # 417 1930 Cadillac 452 V-16 Sport Phaeton, Body by Fleetwood; S/N 702478; Engine # 702478; Red/Tan leather; Tan cloth top; Estimate $900,000 – $1,100,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,110,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,221,000. – Disappearing tonneau windshield, dual spotlights, dual sidemount enclosed spares with accessory mirrors, chrome wire wheels with whitewall tires, wind wings, dual Pilot-Ray lights, dual chrome horns, chrome radiator shield, luggage rack, metal luggage trunk, radiator stoneguard, dual spotlights. – Very good almost flawless paint with exception of a scratch and a chip on the trunk. Very good nearly flawless chrome exterior brightwork other than small dull areas on the Pilot-ray lights. Very good interior with exceptional brightwork. New leather upholstery and cloth top. Originally owned by Actor Richard Arlen, sold to the Bruckers at Movieworld featured in the movie “The Carpetbaggers” with several custom touches and restored to concours condition in 1990. Awarded Best of Class at Pebble Beach and Meadow Brook. – In 1993, as the collector car market was just beginning to emerge from its 1988-89 crater, this magnificent, storied Cadillac 452 V-16 Sport Phaeton in concours condition was bid to $410,000 at Barrett-Jackson, the highest bid of the entire auction. It had been so long since a significant car had sold that values were impossible to estimate. Only one of the ten highest bids at B-J in 1993 was hammered sold. Half of the top ten were built before World War II. How times have changed, but this Cadillac remains as one of the most attractive, rare and beautiful automobiles ever built. The Hershey bidders agreed.

Lot # 419 1911 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost 40/50hp Drophead Coupe, Body by Barker; S/N 1713; Engine # 1713; Ivory, Polished aluminum hood/Red leather; Tan cloth top; Estimate $500,000 – $700,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $350,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $385,000. – 50hp, 7.4L 6-cylinder, single sidemount spare, accessory cowl lights, artillery wheels, nickel headlamps. – Cracked and bent body panels. Poor paint with many chips and cracks. Dirty top cover and cracked upholstery. Dull and scratched brightwork. The mirror lens headlamps are in good condition. Displayed at the 1911 Olympia Motor show, featured in the Thrupp and Maberly coachwork exhibit. In 1920 it was rebodied from its prior Landaulet coachwork to its present Drophead form by Barker. Formerly owned by Canadian politician and member of British Parliament Joseph Martin. Restored at some point many years ago and now showing its age. – With its tired old restoration this Silver Ghost doesn’t make the best impression but it has highly unusual and adaptable period open coachwork, known ownership history and a nearly half century of continuous ownership and sympathetic preservation with the present owner. The price it brought here reflects the 1920’s body swap but its preservation is ideal for touring, a purpose for which it is particularly appropriate at this price.

Lot # 420 1935 Packard Eight-Series 1201 Dual Cowl Phaeton; S/N 1201206; Silver Mist/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $170,000. – Dual cowl with windshields and wind wings, red wire wheels, dual sidemounts with mirrors, luggage rack. – Very good paint and good newer interior. The brightwork is good but imperfect with areas or faint pitting, light indentions and scratches. A well restored 1935 Eight-Series Dual-Cowl Phaeton with very good paint, clean wheel wells, good interior, and imperfect exterior brightwork. Represented to be 51,308 miles from new. There is some discrepancy as to the origin of this 1935 Packard Eight-Series dual-cowl’s body style, since many believe this coachwork was reserved for the Super Eight and Twelve models, but its condition is undeniably very good. – An interesting and unusual car, particularly with this coachwork on the shorter 1201 chassis. That may have deterred bidders although the $30,000 difference between high bid and low estimate isn’t much and deserved to be compromised after it left the block.

Lot # 421 1929 Auburn 120 Eight Speedster; S/N 2950505; Engine # MD28801; Maroon, Red/Red leather; Estimate $275,000 – $350,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $310,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $341,000. – Lycoming 8 cylinder/120 hp, pedestal spotlight, wire wheels, sidemount spares with mirrors, Monogram headlights, Pilot-Rays, golf bag door. – Correct replacement engine and transmission. The paint maintains a good gloss, but there are chipped edges and small imperfections. Very good brightwork all around. Aged interior with light abrasions. Detailed engine compartment, and clean wheel wells. An aged restoration with exceptional brightwork, good but imperfect paint, and a usable lightly stretched interior. Purchased by Jack Dunning in 1984 and restored by Ed Cobb, this 1920 120 Auburn Speedster has received numerous ACD, CCCA, and AACA awards including ACD Category 1 certification. Jack Dunning Collection. – Sixty years in the seller’s collection, from a backyard find to a multitude of awards, the history alone of this Auburn Speedster (one of few surviving first generation Speedsters) is enough to endorse the price it brought.

Lot # 422 1935 Ford Model 48 Deluxe Roadster; S/N 181664495; Blue/Brown; Tan cloth top; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $52,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $57,200. – V8, rumble seat, Straw wire wheels with whitewall tires, banjo steering wheel, wind wings, rear-mounted spare, side curtains, oil filter, grille guard. – Decent paint with small scratches and cracks and under spray missed on the passenger’s fender. Very good interior other than cracked paint on the steering wheel. Good brightwork all around but the grille is dull and has imperfections. The rear spare tire has dings and scratches on the hubcaps. Presentable engine compartment with some oil on the intake manifold. Offered from the Jack Dunning collection, and a lightly used older restoration. – While this is an exceptionally good example the age of its restoration is evident and this result conservatively discounts it to a price that is a good deal for the new owner.

Lot # 425 1935 DeSoto Series SG Airflow 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 9603496; Engine # SG1397; Columbia Brown, Bellevue Beige/Checked cloth; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $31,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $34,100. – 242/100hp side valve six, fender skirts, hub caps, wide whitewalls, rear-mounted spare. – Good older paint with some surface scratching from cleaning. The interior is in good condition, but the carpet appears tired and the steering wheel is worn. Some minor pitting on the bumpers and windshield frame but all other chrome is great. The vent windows are delaminating. An older body-on restoration. Jack Dunning collection. – Sold by RM at Ft. Lauderdale in 2009 for $37,400, by Mecum at Kissimmee in 2012 for $30,740, At Barrett-Jackson WestWorld in 2016 for $35,200 before going over the moon at Kissimmee in 2017 where it was reported sold for $55,000. It returned to this planet at Ft. Lauderdale earlier this year, selling for $30,800 and this result is pretty much in line.

Lot # 426 1930 Cord Front Drive L-29 Cabriolet; S/N 2928415; Engine # FD3566; Navahoe Red, Black/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $225,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $250,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $275,000. – 299/125hp Lycoming eight, rumble seat, luggage rack with trunk, wire wheels with whitewall tires, sidemount spares with accessory mirrors, Woodlite headlamps. – Very good paint, but there are microblisters on the rumble seat and a chip on the trunk. The exterior brightwork is very good. Very good interior but there are light wrinkles on the driver’s side. Cracked and peeled weather stripping under the windshield. Yellowing whitewalls. Show history at ACD Club and CCCA events, ACD Category 1 certified. Restored in 1992 and showing its age but still very attractive. – As pretty as yesterday’s L-29 Brougham was, this Cabriolet is even prettier, a fact the bidders recognized with this price.

Lot # 427 1933 Lincoln Model KB 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N KB2366; Engine # KB2366; Light Grey, Dark Grey roof and accent/Grey cloth; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $71,500. – 448/150hp V12, wire wheels, luggage rack with Beals & Selkirk trunk with fitted luggage, dual sidemount spares, CM Hall headlamps, Trippe Safety lights, jump seats. – Decent paint with a few chipped edges, blistering and cracks on the passenger’s side front fender. Good exterior brightwork all around with the exception of the window trim, which has a few dull areas. Good interior with exception of a few small stains. Offered from the Jack Dunning collection. An older CCCA Senior Premier restoration from the 1990s. – The restoration may be old, but it is holding up extremely well and is more than good enough for touring with pride. The bidders lowballed it to an unusual extent and it is a good buy in this transaction.

Lot # 428 1921 Marmon Model 34B Speedster; S/N 2210003; Engine # 4314; Yellow/Black leather; Black vinyl top; Estimate $250,000 – $325,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $105,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $115,500. – 340 cid overhead valve six, dual carburetors, dual ignition, rear-mounted spare, yellow centerlock wire wheels with whitewall tires, bucket seats, wire wheels, Marmon MotoMeter. – Modified engine thought to have been done by the Marmon factory to the same specs as the Indy 500 Marmon Speedster Pacesetter. Very good paint with some imperfect edges and a few small chips. Very good interior. Very good brightwork all around. Restored engine compartment. Clean wheel wells. An exceptionally restored Marmon 34 B restored by Ed Cobb, awarded Best of Show at the 2011 Indianapolis Speedway Celebration of Automobiles. It has been featured in “Car Collector” magazine and author Dennis Adler’s “Speed and Luxury: The Great Cars” and “The Art of the Automobile.” – This exceptional Marmon is inexplicably inexpensive and a bargain for a performance-oriented collector.

Lot # 430 1931 Duesenberg Model J Limousine, Body by Willoughby; S/N 2438; Engine # J-430; Blue, Black fenders and roof/Black leather; Estimate $650,000 – $750,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $410,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $451,000. – Dual sidemount spares with chrome sleeves and mirrors, chrome wire wheels, wide whitewalls, sun visor, luggage rack with trunk, Trippe lights, rollup division window, jump seats – Represented with the original chassis, engine and body, 45,496 actual miles. Decent older paint with fisheyes on the hood, and the front fenders are chipped at the bottom. Original interior with one edge of the driver’s seat tattered, and saggy front seat bottoms; the back seat has been reupholstered. There is also a small moth hole in the headliner. Good brightwork mostly but with the inside door handles pitted and the wire wheels slightly corroded, especially at the centers. A largely original car having been repainted once in its well documented history. A neat time capsule of a chauffeured time gone by. In addition to Jack Dunning’s ownership its history includes Homer Fitterling, Ed Weaver and the Imperial Palace. – This has been a busy Duesy. It was reported sold at The Auction in Las Vegas in 1998 for $310,200 but failed to sell six months later at Auburn Fall where the reported bid was $340,000. In 2001 RM offered it at Meadow Brook where the reported bid was $240,000 and The Hershey Auction sold it two years later in 2003 for $269,500. In 2012 Gooding & Company sold it at Pebble Beach for $330,000. Its odometer has added 1,949 miles since 2001. Considering the preference collectors today have for unrestored cars it’s a little surprising it didn’t bring somewhat more here, but the final price is on a realistic trajectory from its most recent results and it is a sound result for both the buyer and the seller in this transaction.

Lot # 433 1931 Marmon Sixteen Coupe, Body by LeBaron; S/N 16141675; Engine # 16684; Maroon/Tan leather; Estimate $650,000 – $850,000; Older restoration, 1 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $500,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $550,000. – 491/200hp V-16, rumble seat, golf bag door, dual enclosed sidemount spares, chrome wire wheels, wide whitewalls. – Represented as a four-owner car with original body, chassis and engine. One of just six in this body style. Fully known ownership history. Stolen in the late ’70s while it was in the shop, recovered a few years later and then fully restored in the 1990s. 100-point scores at CCCA Senior Premier. Excellent paint, interior and chrome with zero signs of use or wear. An amazing car, the gem of the Jack Dunning collection and one of the stars of the auction thanks to its rarity, beauty, masterful engineering and fantastic condition. – Cadillacs of the early 30’s are Harley Earl beautiful, but the Walter Dorwin Teague, Jr.-designed Marmon Sixteens are on a higher plane. Their engines aren’t “styled” as Earl did with the Cadillacs, but the coachwork is sleek, refined and understated (to quote Teague’s observation years later to Jack Dunning). There is nothing pretentious about this elegant coupe, only tasteful, and while Marmon’s Sixteen isn’t as powerful as Cadillac’s it is a delicious experience. This superbly maintained and preserved old restoration deserves every penny of the price it brought.

Lot # 434 1927 Lincoln Model L Imperial Victoria, Body by Fleetwood; S/N 47064; Engine # 47064; Blue/Blue leather; Black leatherette top; Estimate $200,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $270,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $297,000. – 385/90hp V-8, blue wire wheels with whitewall tires, dual sidemount spares with mirrors, rear passenger windshield and wind wings, top-hinged windshield, removable rear tonneau, luggage rack and two trunks, Marchal headlamps and driving lights, jump seats, 24-karat gold pinstriping, Cape top over the rearmost seat, fabric top for the driver and jump seat passengers, nickel brightwork. – Good paint with some small chipped edges and some light cracks. The upholstery is free of any rips or tears but age is shown through surface cracks. The engine compartment has been restored but there is some paint loss. Good brightwork. This unique custom coachwork Lincoln Model L, one of only six delivered in 1927 without coachwork, has a unique history. The original owner is unknown and the car was reportedly hidden in France during World War II. What is however certain is that this Lincoln’s custom coachwork and quality of restoration has been appreciated by many judges across several different organizations given its AACA National First Prize and CCCA Senior Premier awards. It was a participant at Pebble Beach in 1990 and 1996, and was awarded Best of Class at the 2003 Greenwich and Meadowbrook Concours along with book and museum features. It is extraordinary. – Edsel Ford’s favored coachbuilders were Brunn, Willoughby, Dietrich, LeBaron, Holbrook, Judkins and Locke. Nowhere does Fleetwood appear, so this must be a very special, very personal order that took precedence over established Lincoln relationships. The result is something very special, and also idiosyncratic. Its Henry and Wilfred Leland-designed Model L drivetrain and chassis were among the best of their time for silence and power, befitting the stately edifice built upon them and the Hershey bidders recognized its exceptionality with this result.

Lot # 435 1935 Packard Twelve-Series 1207 Convertible Victoria, Body by Dietrich; S/N 903469; Engine # 903483; Maroon/Tan leather; Tan cloth top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $190,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $209,000. – 473/175hp V-12, Dual enclosed sidemount spares with mirrors, chrome wire wheels, wide whitewalls, luggage rack with tan canvas covered trunk, driving lights. – Very good paint other than a small chip on the cowl vent as well as another on the front valance panel. Very good interior other than a lightly worn and dirty driver’s seat. Excellent chrome and glass throughout, newer chrome wire wheels. An older restoration with some show history in the ’90s, it is an attractive car with great body style and colors even if it is showing its age a bit. AACA, Packard National (1992) and CCCA award winner. – This is a seriously elegant and practical Packard although it would be much better looking, not to mention handling better, without its big, pendulous trunk hanging off the rear bumper. Someone setting off to a long weekend at Saratoga in 1935 may have needed all that storage in addition to the car’s trunk compartment for days of costume changes but it’s no longer the case and the trunk is an uncomfortable anachronism that detracts from Ray Dietrich’s sublime convertible victoria coachwork with fully retracting top. The bidders recognized the quality of this Packard Twelve with this result.

Lot # 438 1925 Locomobile Model 48 Sportif; S/N 19112; Engine # 19107; Burgundy, Black fenders/Black leather; Black top; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $102,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $112,750. – 525/103hp T-head six, rear-mounted spare, MotoMeter, painted wire wheels, tools. – Late chassis with 4-wheel brakes, Ford truck transmission added. Excellent paint, interior and top, but the running board rubber is loose. Some corrosion on the centers of the wheels and windshield frame. An excellent preserved concours restoration with most work done in the late 1990s by Fran Roxas and the late 2000s. – The choice of aspirational automobiles built through 1929 is nearly endless, but at the end of the decade one stands out: this 1925 Locomobile Sportif with coachwork designed by J. Frank deCausse. It has just about everything, from svelte, low coachwork with room for four to a lusty 525 cubic inch 103hp smooth-running T-head dual ignition six and steering wheel and pedals where today’s drivers expect them to be. No longer fresh but well-maintained and preserved after restoration by some of the most expert specialists, this is a divine motor car. It was taken home here by an attentive and informed bidder at a modest price.

Lot # 440 1937 Cadillac V-16 Series 90 Limousine Brougham, Body by Fleetwood; S/N Engine No. 5130306; Engine # 5130306; Black/Pale Green leather; Estimate $50,000 – $60,000; Modified restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $132,000. – Custom 17-inch wire wheels, modified suspension, dual Holley four-barrels, amber fog lights, division window, banjo style steering wheel, rear passenger jump seats, and rear passenger curtains. – A rare late V16. Decent paint with swirls, chips and cracks. Good brightwork all around. Good upholstery other than a few small stains in the carpet. An older restoration with good brightwork, a pleasant interior, modern performance modifications, and failing paint. Offered from the William B. Ruger, Jr. collection. – This is a startling result, but it shows the respect that the Hershey bidders had for Bill Ruger, Jr.’s willingness to flirt with the boundaries separating restoration from driving enjoyment. By most accepted standards this is a ridiculous auto, except that it works and runs down the road like a modern SUV (but with less noise, vibration and harshness.) There were at least two people at Hershey who understood the concept and they rode it into the stratosphere of value, much to their credit. It would be informative to put the dual quad V-16 on a dyno.

Lot # 441 1937 Lincoln Model K Touring, Body by Willoughby; S/N K8349; Engine # K8878; Black/Black leather; Tan cloth top; Estimate $100,000 – $140,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $72,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $79,750. – Dual enclosed sidemounts, hub caps, wide whitewalls, boot cover, wind wings, jump seats, added turn signals. – Sold new to Russell Leffingwell, Chairman of J.P. Morgan, then owned by Curtis Blake, co-founder of Friendly’s Restaurants. The next owner, Sam Kingston, sold it to Bill Ruger, Jr. Good older paint with a small chip in the driver’s door. Windshield is delaminating in the corners. Pitted door handles and the top bows are severely tarnished. The taillight bezel is corroded but the bumper is in good condition. Very good upholstery with slight wear on the driver’s seat but the dash brightwork is corroded. The rear seat ashtrays are unrestored and the right rear interior door handle is missing. Fresh engine rebuild by Fran Roxas. An honest CCCA Full Classic (TM) ready to drive and enjoy and restore in the process. Known ownership since new and one of three known to exist. – Highly original, with a known ownership history and fresh (and very expensive) engine rebuild, this is an attractive, practical open Model K Lincoln V-12 bought for a modest price. It should have years of touring before it and is the antithesis of expensive at this result.

Lot # 446 1953 Buick Roadmaster Skylark Convertible; S/N 17142626; Mandarin Red Poly/Red, White leather; Tan top; Estimate $110,000 – $130,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $85,000. – 322/188hp, automatic, chrome wire wheels, power locks, power windows, power seat. – Despite being older, the paint is very good. Poor panel fit from the front fenders to the doors. Slightly dirty now older restored engine bay. Very good interior. Minor pitting on the dash chrome, especially on the ash tray. The exterior chrome is in great condition with only minor corrosion on the wheels. An iconic mid-century convertible in an eye catching color combination wearing a well-cared for older restoration. – Sold by Worldwide at Hilton Head in 2006 for $143,000 in much more freshly restored condition, then at Mecum Indy five months ago for $82,500, there’s little upside in Skylarks these day, as this result shows.

Lot # 449 1925 Marmon D-74 Roadster; S/N D25017; Light Green, Dark Green fenders, Orange accents/Brown leather; Brown cloth top; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $88,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $96,800. – 340/84hp ohv 6-cylinder, wind wings, rumble seat, golf bag doors, Marmon MotoMeter, top-hinged windshield, wind wings, drum headlights, varnished wood spoke wheels, dual rear-mounted spares. – Good paint with a few small panel edge chips. Good exterior brightwork. There are few nicks on the interior brightwork. Good upholstery and top. An older restoration with a few paint imperfections, chipped glass on the driver’s side wind wing, dry varnish on the artillery wheels. – A handsome and powerful automobile but with an aging restoration, the seller should be pleased to get this much for it.

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