Mecum Auctions, Spring Classic State Fairgrounds, Indianapolis, May 15-19, 2019 Part II: Ford Thunderbird through Volkswagen

Let the introduction to Part I suffice, these are the rest of the cars, including the ’57 Ford F-birds.

But a comment is in order. Mecum loaded the Spring Classic with ’57 T-birds, 24 of them in all, not to mention ’55 and ’56 T-birds. The sell-through was disappointing, just 14 of the 24 57’s, 58.3%, well below the Spring Classic’s overall sell-through of 65.3%.

Mecum’s experiment in loading the Spring Classic docket with Baby Birds, and particularly ‘57s, tested the market’s depth. It came up short and exhausted bidders’ tolerance with car after beautifully restored car crossing the block. The ennui was tangible in the auction room as the last of them crossed the block.

But, hey, if you don’t try you’ll never discover the appetite of bidders for similar cars in a single auction. Sometimes it works, drawing buyers of particular cars to a single sale where everything they could possibly want is on offer. Sometimes – as in this case – it doesn’t. The appetite for ’57 T-birds was over-saturated at this year’s Spring Classic.

There’s one presentation change from Part I. These reports are sorted by Marque, Model, Year and Body Style which results in a better grouping of similar cars.

Oh, if you go back to Part I I’ve cleaned up the No Sale data presentation.


Lot # S142 1955 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N P5FH100157; Turquoise, Turquoise hardtop/Turquoise, Green vinyl; White vinyl top; Estimate $100,000 – $135,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; Hammered Sold at $69,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $75,900. – 292/193hp, automatic, pushbutton radio, chrome wire wheels, power steering, brakes, windows and seat, wide whitewalls, two tops, engine dressup. – Minter Collection. Restored better than new. Excellent paint, chrome, interior. The underbody is factory fresh. An early production T-bird built in 1954. – Sold by Barrett-Jackson in Palm Beach in 2004 for $66,960, by Mecum at Kissimmee in 2012 for $47,170 and by Barrett-Jackson at Scottsdale in 2013 for $154,000. The last result makes it look like a remarkable deal at this price, even if it’s just a realistic price.

Lot # S130.1 1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N F7FH394888; Azure Blue, Azure Blue hardtop/White vinyl; Estimate $300,000 – $400,000; Recent restoration, 1 condition; Not sold at Hammer bid of $235,000. – 312/300hp, automatic, Town & Country radio, heater, wheel covers, whitewalls, blind quarter hardtop only. – Minter Collection. Excellent paint, chrome and interior. Flat panels and even gaps. The engine compartment and chassis are better than new. Represented as the only known F-bird in Azure Blue – Azure Blue may be a big deal, but is it really enough of a deal to elevate the price beyond this healthy amount? The Minters may think so, but bidder exhaustion was a factor among ’57 T-bird buyers, and F-bird buyers in particular, at Indy this year with seven F-birds on the docket. This is a reasonable bid and could have been accepted with pleasure.

Lot # S131 1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N F7FH395617; Sun Gold/White vinyl; Black cloth top; Estimate $300,000 – $400,000; Recent restoration, 1 condition; Hammered Sold at $270,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $297,000. – 312/300hp, automatic, power brakes, Town & Country radio, heater, wheel covers, whitewalls, original invoice documented. – Minter Collection. 2015 AACA National First Prize #29724 and Senior. Excellent paint, chrome, top and interior. The only known F-bird in Sun Gold – This is the top seller of the Minters F-birds, edged along by the rare and attractive color. It isn’t Gunmetal Grey, but it is close to being as effective in accenting the ’57 T-bird’s lines and much more rare.

Lot # S132 1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N F7FH340013; Dusk Rose/Colonial White; Black cloth top; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Concours restoration, 1 condition; Not sold at Hammer bid of $230,000. – 312/300hp, 3-speed, no power accessories, wheel covers, whitewalls, Town & Country radio, heater, factory invoice documented. – Minter Collection. 2010 AACA National First Prize #W24792. Excellent cosmetics, engine compartment and chassis. Better than new and one of five known F-birds in this excellent color. – What sets this F-bird apart from the others, aside from its superb Amos Minter restoration, is the close ratio 3-speed gearbox (oddly missing an overdrive.) Someone had the right idea when it was specified and it was reasonably estimated. It could have been sold without regret if there was money at the reported high bid.

Lot # S135 1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N F7FH342051; Willow Green/Green vinyl; Beige cloth top; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; Hammered Sold at $240,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $264,000. – 312/300hp, automatic, Town & Country radio, heater, chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, power steering, memory power seat, factory invoice documented. – Minter Collection. Excellent paint, chrome, interior and top. One of three known F-birds in Willow Green. – This should have been the pre-sale estimate range for all the Minter family F-birds at Indianapolis, a logical compromise among rarity, restoration quality and specifications. It proved to be accurate and found a new home at a price that should be gratifying to both the buyer and the seller.

Lot # S135.1 1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N F7FH337991; Colonial White/Red vinyl; Black cloth top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Concours restoration, 1 condition; Not sold at Hammer bid of $145,000. – 312/300hp, automatic, power steering, brakes and windows, Town & Country radio, heater, chrome wire wheels, whitewalls. – Minter Collection. Freshly restored and better than when it came off the truck from the factory. – By now Minter F-bird fatigue had set in, the seventh of nine Amos and Justin Minter restored F-birds to cross the block in succession. Bank accounts were emptied, glazed eyes and ennui were prevalent and there were still two more to come. It was poor docket construction, let alone that there were more than a dozen other ’57 T-birds at Indy. This bid means nothing except that the bidders were worn out of F-bird excitement.

Lot # S136 1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N F7FH342055; Thunderbird Bronze, Thunderbird Bronze hardtop/Copper vinyl; Tan cloth top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; Not sold at Hammer bid of $155,000. – 312/300hp, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, Town & Country radio, heater, two tops. – Minter Collection. Stone chipped nose, aged chassis. Very good upholstery and top. Aged and blemished older paint, excellent chrome. – Even I, possessed of nonstop gibberish, am challenged by yet another Minter collection ’57 F-bird. This one is charmingly original and an excellent candidate to pour money into Amos and Justin Minter’s pockets to make it beyond perfect. Better yet, just drive and enjoy it, although a better value at 2/3 this bid.

Lot # S137 1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N F7FH394802; Raven Black/White vinyl; Black cloth top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; Hammered Sold at $162,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $178,750. – 312/300hp, automatic, power steering, chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, Town & Country radio, heater. – Minter Collection. Excellent but polishing swirled paint. Excellent interior, chrome and top. Very good, just not fresh. – Offered at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale in 1999 where it was reported bid to $95,500 but didn’t sell. It’s the last of the Minter family’s F-birds in Indy and it brought a reasonable price considering its older restoration. Whew! The last of at least the F-birds. This was not a successful experiment. There were nine F-birds in the Minter collection. Only four of them sold, a disappointing 44% sell-through aggravated by seriously optimistic estimates that put bidders on their back feet.

Lot # S139 1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N E7FH215269; Dusk Rose/Colonial White vinyl; Black cloth top; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $132,000. – 312/270hp, automatic, power steering, brakes, windows and seat, chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, Town & Country radio, rear antenna. – Minter Collection. Excellent paint, chrome, upholstery and top. Flat panels, flush fits, even gaps. Gunmetal Grey may be the best color for a ’57 T-bird, but Dusk Rose is a low-key close second. – This is serious money for a serious ’57 T-bird notable for its dual quad engine but not much else except for a sterling restoration by the Minter family.

[Wow, a D-Bird. Its rarity at the Spring Classic apparently scrambled the camera’s autofocus.]

Lot # S140.1 1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N D7FH390906; Gunmetal Gray, Gunmetal Gray hardtop/Red vinyl; Black vinyl top; Estimate $100,000 – $135,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $93,500. – 312/245hp, automatic, chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, Town & Country radio, power steering and brakes, two tops. – Minter Collection. Excellent paint, chrome and interior. Nearly spotless chassis and underbody needing only a little dusting. – Gunmetal Grey is absolutely the best color to highlight the ’57 T-bird’s lines and details. This D-bird was sold at Barrett-Jackson in 2008 for $143,000 and doesn’t appear to have turned a wheel since then. It is better than pristine and a sound value at this result.

Lot # S183 1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N E7FH281008; Colonial White/Red vinyl; Black cloth top; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; Not sold at Hammer bid of $90,000. – 312/270hp dual quads, automatic, Town & Country radio, chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, power brakes – An Amos Minter restoration that is excellent in all respects. – Sold here in 2012 for $108,650, then at Worldwide Auburn four months later for $104,500, it is a choice T-bird that would not have been expensive at the pre-sale low estimate and illustrates the hazards of filling an auction with similar marque/model/equipment cars with impeccable restoration credentials. There were 24 ’57 T-birds at Indy this year, overload made more apparent by the fact there were only 14 ’67 Corvettes which usually swarm Mecum Indy like army ants.

Lot # F252 1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N E7FH211173; Thunderbird Bronze, White hardtop/Bronze; Estimate $90,000 – $110,000; Concours restoration, 1 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $75,000. – 312/270hp E-Code, Cruise-o-Matic transmission, power steering and brakes, Town and Country radio, porthole hardtop, Kelsey Hayes wire wheels, whitewalls. – Factory E-Code car that comes with original California title. Numerous concours awards after a professional restoration. The paint is free of any imperfections. The removable hardtop and its weather stripping rests perfectly level on the body. The interior is flawless. The engine bay is neat tidy and all the glass has perfect clarity. A treasure of a car restored to concours standards and still showable. – It definitely deserves more than the reported high bid, but there were 35 Baby Birds in Indy this year including other show-quality E-Code cars. The place was saturated, and this fantastic car shouldn’t have much trouble getting the money it deserves elsewhere.

Lot # S61 1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N E7FH395476; Azure Blue/White vinyl; Lite Blue top; Estimate $75,000 – $90,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $51,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $56,100. – 312/270hp dual quads, automatic, porthole hardtop, no soft top, power steering, power brakes, wire wheels, whitewalls, fender skirts, Town and Country radio. – Good older paint but the base coat shows scratches. Good chrome. Original trim. Painted over frame. Good, lightly worn interior and lightly run engine bay. – Sold by Mecum out of the Salmon Brothers Collection in Little Rock in 2012 for $87,500. While Baby Bird prices have softened a bit since then and this example isn’t quite as fresh, that doesn’t justify a 30 grand difference. This was a solid bargain.

Lot # F179 1969 Ford Torino GT SportsRoof; S/N 9H42R164618; Raven Black, Red/Red vinyl; Estimate $120,000 – $135,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $110,000. – 428/335hp Cobra Jet, 4-speed, hub caps, red line tires, 4.30 rear, bucket seats, console, Marti Report documented. – Featured in Hemmings Muscle Machines and shown at a few concours events. Very good paint, chrome, interior and underneath. Nothing major to nitpick, just an older but barely used full but not over-the-top restoration on a very cool muscle car with desirable equipment. Represented as one of just 170 built with the 428 SCJ engine. – This Torino GT is unusual to say the least and brought a result much higher than the better-known Torino Cobra with the same engine. Is it worth it? Mecum Indy bidders aren’t easily mislead and wouldn’t have bought it without knowing what it is.

Lot # F32 1972 GMC C1500 1/2 Ton Pickup; S/N TCS142A502459; Red, White/Black vinyl, Red houndstooth cloth; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Truck restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $19,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $21,450. – 350/295hp, automatic, 12-bolt rear end, power steering, power brakes, dual exhaust, in-dash tach, Rally wheels with Mickey Thompson tires. – Lightly scratched bumpers and a few scratches on the hood. Overspray around the doors and tailgate. A lot of dirt in the paint in the bed. Overspray on tailgate. Masking errors between the red and white parts of the paint. Dented trim on the passenger’s side. Light scratches on the wheels. Represented as a fresh body-off restoration, but nobody spent much time or money on it. – Competently restored, the best thing about this C1500 is that it’s been dropped down on its springs so the wheels are centered in the body’s wheel arches. It’s not good for hauling much, but it looks great and considering that a truck like this is unlikely to be tasked with carrying much more than two passengers and a few 2x4s it makes sense, as does the price it brought.

Lot # S113 1980 GMC K1500 Jimmy Sierra Sport Utility Vehicle 4×4; S/N TKL18AF523607; Red, Black top/Red, vinyl, Red houndstooth cloth; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Modified restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $38,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $41,800. – Lift kit with Fox shocks, 350 crate engine, dual exhaust, power steering, power brakes, bucket seats, console, power windows, factory radio, metric instruments. – Clean restored underbody and engine bay with new engine. Several chips in the nose and small scratches on the bumpers. Straight body. Even gaps. Very good redone interior other than scratches on the console. Tasteful mods and redone to high enough standards. – This isn’t U13 Bronco money, but it’s close and portends a market shift as FJs and Broncos saturate their markets. Watch this space.

Lot # T269 1958 GMC Series 100 1/2 Ton Pickup; S/N 101PS1866A; Turquoise, White/White vinyl, Gray cloth; Truck restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,550. – 270/130hp six, column-shift 3-Speed, hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, wood bed sides and floor, windshield visor, rear window louvers, period radio. – Thick, quick undercoating on the chassis. Good, relatively new wood but there is paint cracking around it. Good and shiny but truck quality paint with a few runs and chips here and there. Uneven gaps. Good redone interior. Never taken fully apart and it was clearly done on a budget, but it’s more than good enough to drive around with confidence. – Sold for $14,980 at Mecum Dallas in 2013, then $24,300 at Kissimmee 2015. Pickups are strong these days and this is a realistic price to pay for a decent one that will do double duty in weekend cruises or on light duty chores.

Lot # U71 1957 Heinkel 153 Kabinenroller; S/N 1534867; Light Blue/Plaid cloth; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $22,000. – Steel wheels, reverse gear, front-opening door (like an Isetta), folding sunroof, bubble side windows. – Tired old paint. Dry window rubber. A bit grubby underneath. Decent seats but the upholstery in the back is coming apart. Like an Isetta but more obscure and more bulbous. This one isn’t so bad that it isn’t cute and attention-grabbing (it belongs in a Jetsons episode), but it’s fairly rough. – Just a few weeks ago at Mecum Houston, this car inexplicably hammered not sold at a $28,600 high bid, a generous number especially with this still realistic offer as a reference. It may be more unusual than an Isetta, but it’s not necessarily worth more and either of these high bids could have easily seen it off to a new home.

Lot # S196 1932 Hupp Comet #4 Indy Car; S/N 12R601704; Engine # HC001; Blue/Black leather; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; No Result or VIN, Probably no-show $0 plus commission of; Final Price. – Black wire wheels, rear wheel hydraulic brakes, 2-seat body. – Represented to be Russ Snowberger’s 1932 Indy 500 5th place finisher, restored by his son, John, with the 1932 Indy engine. Good cosmetics, lightly worn upholstery Clean, orderly engine and chassis. A competent older competition car restoration with some age and track miles. – Offered by Mecum at Monterey in 2013 and reported bid to $310,000. The same result at Mecum Monterey in 2016. Offered at Kissimmee in 2017 where it was reported bid to $270,000, then reported sold at Mecum’s Spring Classic in Indy in 2017 for $205,000 all-in. It was on-site during the preview here and unsold on the block but has disappeared from Mecum’s results list and website so it is reasonable to infer that something happened and it’s now on its way back to Walworth, WI.

Lot # S188 1953 Jaguar XK 120 Drophead Coupe; S/N 677377; Engine # RA3504-9; Black/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Modified restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $115,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $126,500. – 3.8 liter XK 150S 265hp engine, 4-speed, drum brakes, black wire wheels, blackwall tires, fender mirrors, Lucas fog lights and tri-bar headlights, tool roll. – LA6223 block number. Thoughtfully modified and nearly indistinguishable from stock, until it starts up. Excellent paint, chrome and interior, particularly the interior wood which is so well varnished it is almost liquid. The engine compartment is aged and dusty with a little fluid leakage. A clean, orderly and well-maintained enjoyable tour car. Academy of Art University collection. – Sold by Christie’s at Pebble Beach in 1996 for $74,000 with its original engine, then $154,000 at Gooding Amelia in 2013 with the 3.8 3-carb engine. The ensuing six years have not been kind to it although the interior wood is wondrous to behold. The price it brought is remarkable for a modified XK 120 DHC and assumes it will be driven, not presented to the judges at JCNA to be nit-picked.

Lot # S246 1963 Jaguar XKE SI Roadster; S/N 8782385; Engine # R8282-9; White/Dark Red; Black cloth top; Estimate $140,000 – $160,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; Hammered Sold at $87,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $95,700. – 3781/265hp, chrome wire wheels, Vredestein blackwall tires, AM-FM, JDHT documented. – Passenger’s door doesn’t close flush and the driver’s door sticks out at the bottom. Paint and chrome are very good The driver’s seat has a cigarette burn on the cushion. The engine compartment has been restored like new but has aged, showing the thousand miles it is represented to have covered since the restoration. It should have gotten more attention before coming to the auction. – It’s amusing when consignors claim a “frame-off” restoration for a monocoque body E-type which adds no credibility to their other representations. The estimate is ridiculous, but the final transaction is a good value in a shiny if used Series 1 E-Type.

Lot # G127.1 1951 Jowett Jupiter Convertible; S/N E1SA61; Red/Black leather; Black cloth top; Older restoration, 3- condition; Not sold at Hammer bid of $19,000. – 1,486 flat four, 62 hp, 4-speed, hubcaps, bias ply blackwall tires, trafficators, multi-band pushbutton radio, Lucas tri-bar headlights. – Eighties restoration with expected wear and touched up chips. Sound but aged and creased upholstery. Top boot liner is peeling off the panels. Surprisingly good chrome aside from some pitted trim bits. Good dash wood. The chassis is orderly but aged. Rather grubby engine compartment. Not bad, just not cared for. – Fairly nasty in presentation but exceptionally unusual and characterized by bizarre early Fifties British body design, not to mention the front-mounted boxer four engine. If there’s a money buyer out there for this Jowett Jupiter any offer over $17,000 should be accepted. Wait! This offer was over $17,000.

[We were standing in this tent on Thursday when one of those violent Midwest storms in the headlines blew through Indy, ripping it from its stakes and straps than throwing it (but not us) into 38th Street.]

Lot # W75.1 1952 Kaiser Manhattan 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N K5221210079; Dove Grey, Grey roof/Grey cloth; Estimate $8,000 – $12,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; Hammered Sold at $7,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $7,700. – Hydramatic, pushbutton radio, heater, wheel covers, wide whitewalls, dual outside mirrors, skirts. – Quick old repaint while assembled with plenty of masking misses and chips. Worn, threadbare original upholstery. Crazed taillight lenses. Dented, wavy body side trim. Sound but nasty. – And away it went, as it should on any money bid. Originality is completely lost on this Kaiser. This price is a gift to the seller.

Lot # S120 1952 Kurtis Kraft 4000 Indy Car; S/N 356-52; Engine # 135; Red, John Zink Spl./Black; Estimate $275,000 – $350,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; Hammered Sold at $300,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $330,000. – 270 Offy, Hilborn fuel injection, 2-speed gearbox, 4-wheel spot disc brakes, transverse leaf spring live front axle, torsion bar rear axle, lever and tube shocks, chrome suspension, centerlock magnesium wheels. – A classic Frank Kurtis “Champ Car” built to race pretty much everywhere in the early 50’s. 7th at Indy in 1952 driven by Jimmy Reece, Jerry Hoyt drove it there in 1953 and Gene Hartley in 1954. Driven by Bobby Unser to three consecutive Pikes Pike hillclimb victories 1959-1961 with Pontiac V-8 power. This is a handsome but used older restoration to good historic racing condition and 1954 Indy 500 livery with recent historic appearances at the Speedway, Milwaukee and the Miller Meet. – An historic Kurtis-built car with documented Indy 500 provenance and probably a much longer record in AAA competition at the time. It’s a little misleading to mention its Pikes Peak victories since they were achieved in a completely different configuration, but it does add to the car’s history and highlights the versatility of these old Champ Cars. If this is what the Indy bidders were willing to pay for it, and the consignor was willing to accept it’s safe to conclude it is appropriate.

Lot # T41 1951 Kurtis Kraft Replica Indy Car Replica; S/N BILL OF SALE; Red, White/Black leatherette; Competition car, original as-raced, 3 condition; Hammered Sold at $26,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $28,600. – 2-litre Pinto engine, 4-speed, Hilborn fuel injection, spot disc front brakes. Kreitz 4-piston inboard rear brakes, torsion bar suspension, tube shocks, Frankland quick change center section, Schroeder 4-spoke steering wheel, polished Kreizer alloy wheels, quick change rear axle. – Not the real deal but professionally built. Good cosmetics and orderly but used, although not recently. – This is a tenth the price of the real Kurtis Champ Car sold here this week, but at least as much fun to drive, more adaptable to both oval and road courses and without the nagging concern for damaging an historic old car. In terms of enjoyment per dollar spent it is hard to argue with this choice.

Lot # S119 1941 Lincoln Continental Cabriolet; S/N H125985; Burgundy/Burgundy leather; Black top; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $97,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $107,250. – Hub caps and trim rings, Firestone wide whitewalls, fender skirts, boot cover, column shift, radio, dash clock. – CCCA First Prize winner. Sizable scratch on the right rear, but otherwise gorgeous older paint and chrome. Minuscule wrinkling to the seats and the rest of the interior is gorgeous. Tidy underneath. A major detailing away from being showable again, but it’s a gorgeous car as it sits, not to mention very rare. – Sold by RM out of the Cappy Collection in 2006 for $176,000 in concours-ready condition, then hammered not sold at a $100,000 high bid at Mecum Monterey last year and again at a $95,000 high bid at Kissimmee this January. The three most recent numbers are both consistent and fair, which the seller finally realized and decided to finally let the car go.

Lot # S187 1948 Lincoln Continental Cabriolet; S/N 8H182054; Black/Burgundy leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000. – Skirts, wide hubcaps, trim rings, wide whitewalls, 3-speed, power windows and top, radio, heater. – Sound old paint and interior. Thin grille and trim chrome. An older cosmetic restoration that has held up well and will be a decent driver. Academy of Art University collection. – Sold at the Kruse Arizona sale in 2001 for $51,940, passed on the block at Mecum Las Vegas six months ago at a totally unrealistic $70,000 and sold here for a price that’s fair to both the buyer and the seller.

Lot # T121 2012 Local Motors Rally Fighter Coupe; S/N AZ336306; Blue, Orange/Black piped in Orange; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $71,500. – LS3, automatic, cross-drilled and slotted rotors, Momo steering wheel, Pioneer stereo. – 2012 SEMA car in Gulf colors. No mileage represented, but it has clearly never gotten into the rough and tumble that these things were designed for. No wear to speak of. – Rally Fighters are a bit of a gimmick, but they’re a cool, fast gimmick that started new at around $100,000. This one sold for $66,000 at Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas in 2017, which seemed like a deal at the time. And although this is a higher result, it’s still less than other ones on the market right now are asking and seems like a solid value.

Lot # F292 1988 Lola T88/00 Cosworth Indy Car; S/N T880005; Black, Gold “Provimi Veal”/Black cloth; Competition car, original as-raced, 3+ condition; Not sold at Hammer bid of $22,000. – Road course wing, 2.65 Liter Ford Cosworth DFX V-8, Hewland 6-speed, new wheels and tires, comes with 3 set of wheels, speedway wing and suspension, extra gears and springs. – Stone chipped paint, good upholstery and belts, orderly chassis and engine but showing use and age. Driven by Arie Luyendyk at Indy in 1988 for Dick Simon in this livery, qualified 6th at 213.611 mph, ran as high as 2nd but finished 10th after an accident that took four laps to repair. – It will cost a fortune to get this Lola back on track in safe condition, it’s all here and the bid is not even the sum of its parts. No wonder it didn’t sell.

Lot # F11 1978 Mercury Bobcat Station Wagon; S/N 8T22Z500713; White, Woodgrain/Blue vinyl, Plaid cloth; Visually maintained, largely original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $11,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $12,650. – 2.8 Litre/80hp V6 engine, automatic, narrow whitewall tires, roof rack. – Older repaint peeling on the front fender, and there is a fisheye in the left mirror. Pitting on the window trim. Scratches on the rear window trim. Pitting on the roof rack. Very clean interior. The 22,680 miles showing are represented as actual. – The Pinto-based Mercury Bobcat was only available for a few years, and when was the last time you saw one in any kind of condition, let alone with barely 20,000 miles? Anything over 10 grand seems like a strangely high price for this car, but consider that Gooding & Company sold an even more immaculately preserved ’74 LTD Wagon back in March for $45,920, and this Bobcat doesn’t seem quite so ridiculous.

Lot # F116 1969 Mercury Cougar Eliminator 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 9F91R570868; Bright Blue, White/Blue vinyl; Estimate $85,000 – $100,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $77,000. – 428/335hp Ram Air Cobra Jet, automatic, hood pins, Traction-Lok, power steering, factory air conditioning, bucket seats, floor shift, factory radio. – Very good relatively fresh paint and chrome apart from a few particles in the paint on the nose and hood. Factory gaps. Clean wheels and newer tires. Fresh and clean underneath. Very good restored interior. Rare and desirable equipment, plus attractive colors. – Mercurys are often overlooked by collectors focused on Mustangs and that seems to have been the fate of this rare and distinctive Eliminator at Indy which brought a price more appropriate to a 390 Eliminator than this 428 CJ. It’s a good value for the new owner who should be proud of the car and of the modest price paid for it.

Lot # S166.1 1970 Mercury Cougar XR-7 Convertible; S/N 0F94Q501197; Medium Lime Metallic/White leather; White vinyl top; Estimate $165,000 – $185,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $135,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $148,500. – Polyglas tires, 428/335hp Cobra Jet engine, 4-speed, Ram Air, Hurst T-handle shifter, pushbutton radio, Marti Report. – Lightly scratched window frames and side glass, and the gaps are a little uneven. Very good chrome. Fantastic older paint. Very good interior. Tidy detailed engine bay and underbody. Restored to high standards in 2005 then gone through last year. Very rare options and good colors. It’s an easy car to like. – And the Indy bidders liked it a lot, paying a generous full retail price for it.

Lot # T54 1966 MG B Convertible; S/N GHN3L86850; Green/Black leather; Black vinyl top; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; Hammered Sold at $17,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,700. – Chrome wire wheels, General tires, fender mirrors, speaker but no radio, Black tonneau cover. – Good older repaint, new upholstery. Good chrome but dull windshield frame aluminum and some pitted trim bits. Decent older restored engine compartment. Old undercoat in the wheel wells. A usable driver with mellowed attention to its cosmetics. – A reassuring example that appears to have led a protected life and brought a generous retail price.

Lot # T276 1952 MG TD Roadster; S/N TD19433; Red/Red leatherette; Beige cloth top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; Hammered Sold at $12,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $13,750. – Silver steel wheels, no-name radial blackwalls, badge bar, seat belts, side curtains. – Passenger’s door doesn’t latch. Adequate repaint, chrome and upholstery, aged and faded top. Water spotted hood, Clean restored underbody and chassis, orderly engine compartment. A usable driver in single ownership for the past 35 years. – The three decades of consistent ownership and attention shows and while it needs some attention what it needs is easily accomplished by the new owner, who also bought the car with plenty of headroom for modest expenditures.

Lot # T52 1970 Morris Minor 1000 Estate; S/N MAW5D1275080; Green, Wood/Green vinyl; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Cosmetic restoration, 4+ condition; Hammered Sold at $13,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $14,850. – 1275 engine, single SU carb, Ford Sierra 5-speed, power front disc brakes, cream wheels, Kumho tires, fender mirrors, heater, headlight eyebrows. – Quick repaint while assembled, poorly masked at the wood framing. Front seats are built for headrests, which are missing. The engine has been out and rebuilt but the engine compartment and chassis are grubby. Engine number plate is missing. Wiring is old and frayed. Water stained, mismatched wood. Barely more than disreputable. – The car card says it’s a “Multiple local show winner” and they must have been very local or judged simply on the basis of cuteness. It’s pretty awful and the seller should be happy to get this much for it. Now the new owner has to decide where to start, which is a problem because the answer is “anywhere.”

Lot # T277 1991 Nissan Figaro Convertible; S/N FK1002932; Grey, Parchment roof/Parchment vinyl; Parchment folding roof top; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; Hammered Sold at $9,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $10,450. – RHD. 988/76hp turbo four, 3-speed automatic, multiband radio. – Represented as 83,901 km from new. Decent repaint with some fisheyes and good masking. Stretched and surface cracked original upholstery, Good dash and cute gauges and radio. Dry, aged original engine compartment. – Nissan made something like 20,000 Figaros and they were so popular that prospective buyers had to enter a lottery to get one. They’re distinguished by their conspicuously retro design. Now eligible for import into the U.S., there’s a seemingly inexhaustible supply of them in storage in Virginia, now reduced by the five offered here at Mecum Indy. Some have sold for over $20,000, but low- to mid-teens is where they generally change hands.

Lot # T280 1991 Nissan Figaro Convertible; S/N FK10011232; Purple, White roof/Parchment vinyl; Parchment folding roof top; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; Hammered Sold at $7,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $8,250. – RHD. 988/76hp turbo four, 3-speed automatic, multiband radio. – 183,768 on the odometer and on the car. Terrible dull repaint with bad masking. Worn and stretched but sound original upholstery. Seriously cute dash, gauges, radio and steering wheel. Dirty original engine compartment. A novelty that shouldn’t have been afflicted with this miserable repaint. – Considering that this Figaro should go straight from the auction floor to the paint shop the price it brought is generous.

Lot # S252 2016 Norwood 330 P4 Replica Sports Racer, Body by Norwood; S/N TEX114248; Red/Red leather; Estimate $600,000 – $800,000; Facsimile restoration, 2 condition; Hammered Sold at $425,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $467,500. – Gold painted Campagnolo alloy wheels, Dunlop Racing tires, 575 Maranello engine with 610 hp, Porsche G50 transaxle, Wilwood brakes, aluminum body panels. – Very good paint and interior. Clean, orderly chassis and engine compartment. The dashtop covering is just starting to peel but otherwise it is pristine and barely if at all used. – The 330 P4 is one of the most beautiful racing cars ever created. There aren’t many real ones, just 3 were built along with several earlier 330 Ps rebodied in P4 style, and two zeroes can be added to this result to own one of them. It’s a sexy car with a Ferrari V12 although more baritone than tenor with 5.7 liters now against 4 liters for the 330. An immense amount of work went into building it and the price it brought is reasonable even if it’s not the exaggerated pre-sale estimate.

Lot # F50 1970 Oldsmobile 4-4-2 Convertible; S/N 344670M145559; Red, White side stripe/White vinyl; White top; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Modified restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $43,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $47,300. – 455/365hp, 4-speed, limited slip axle, Edelbrock carburetor, aftermarket Summit Racing tachometer, armrest, factory radio, aftermarket speakers, power steering, power brakes with front discs, Radial T/A tires. – The paint and interior are very good other than a lightly worn driver’s seat. The wheel wells, engine bay and underbody are restored, clean and rust free. An executive’s muscle car finished in good equipment and restored a while ago. – There is no apparent reason other than the Edelbrock carb and the nagging omission of representing it as the original driveline that this shouldn’t be a $70,000 4-4-2, and those omissions have been overlooked so many times this week that they should have disappeared in the mists of auction car overload. On its face, this is a huge value, even if undocumented.

Lot # F176 1969 Oldsmobile 4-4-2 Hurst Holiday Coupe; S/N 344879M352920; Cameo White, Firefrost Gold/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $66,000. – 455/380hp, automatic, 3.23 limited-slip, dual gate shifter, power steering, power brakes, bucket seats, dual mirrors, rear spoiler, pushbutton radio. – Represented as matching numbers. Very good older paint and chrome, but there is pitting on the mirrors and the rear window is lightly scratched. Very good older restored interior. Light use and dirt on a fully redone engine bay and underbody. Body-off restored to mostly high standards, but showing some age here and there. – Sold by Mecum at Portland in 2017 for $60,500 and turned over here in the same value ballpark, a sound and usable 4-4-2 that hasn’t been priced out of the market yet.

Lot # F189 1970 Oldsmobile 4-4-2 W-30 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 344870M277907; Blue metallic, White hood stripes/Black vinyl; Estimate $135,000 – $150,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; Hammered Sold at $122,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $134,750. – 455/370hp, ram air hood, 4-speed, Red fenderwells, sport steering wheel, no power steering or brakes, Super Stock II wheels with trim rings, Wide Oval tires, pushbutton radio, heater, bench seat, documented with its Protect-o-Plate, build sheet and dealer pouch. – Known history from new. Excellent paint, chrome, interior and engine compartment. A fresh restoration to showroom condition. – The combination of unusually thorough documentation, known ownership history, good equipment and a meticulous and thorough restoration brought a superior price but one that is fully deserved by this 4-4-2.

Lot # T206 1970 Oldsmobile 4-4-2 W-30 2-Dr. Hardtop Holiday; S/N 344870M228866; Sebring Yellow, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $70,000. – 455/370hp, automatic, 3.31 Anti-Spin, dual gate shifter, air conditioning, sport steering wheel, AM-FM, underdash 8-track, dual outside sport mirrors, power steering and brakes, ram air hood, Red fenderwells, Rally wheels with hubcaps and trim rings, Wide Oval tires, chrome alternator, air filter housing and radiator support, documented with the original build sheet, warranty book, Protect-o-Plate and dealer’s copy of the Olds shipping order. – Working 8-track. Good older repaint, otherwise original and thoroughly detailed with very good chrome and interior. Clean, dry engine compartment. For its age the presentation is impressive. Represented as the matching numbers drivetrain, special order paint. – This was a parsimonious offer for an automatic W-30 hardtop. It should have been at least bid to Mecum’s pre-sale low estimate.

Lot # F38 1972 Oldsmobile Cutlass 4-4-2 Convertible; S/N 3J67K2M227066; Viking Blue, White stripes/Parchment leatherette; Parchment vinyl top; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $43,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $47,300. – 350/180hp, 4-speed, Ram Air hood, power brakes and steering, air conditioning control panel but no compressor or condenser, Magnum wheels, Radial T/A tires, Sony CD stereo, Hurst shifter. – Sound clearcoat repaint while assembled with sanding scratches on trim and masking misses. Decent interior and top. The engine compartment has been superficially redone, but the chassis hasn’t. A usable driver from the Dallas and Ammie Hawkins collection. – The low estimate is a reasonable approximation of the current value of this car in this condition. The price it brought is magnanimously expensive.

Lot # F173 1972 Oldsmobile Cutlass 4-4-2 W-30 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 3G87X2M193889; Viking Blue, White side stripe/Blue vinyl; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $70,000. – 455/300hp W-30 Ram air induction, 4-speed, floor shift with Hurst shifter, buttoned bucket seats, center console, blue wheels with chrome trim rings. – The paint and brightwork are both very good. The rear window has a fair amount of scratches but the rest of the glass has great clarity. The upholstery on the seats has begun to wrinkle. The wheels and tires are in good condition. Restored by Garner Customs, it won best Oldsmobile at MCACN. Desirable, attractive and professionally restored to the standards it deserves. – The 4-4-2 W-30 was down about 50 horsepower in 1972, but it still had an even 300 ponies to work with and that was more than most of the last of the classic muscle cars. 4-speeds also carry a big premium on these since they’re particularly rare, but this car will always be worth significantly less than the equivalent ’71 or ’70 model and the reported high bid here should have been plenty to take this one home.

Lot # W83 1983 Oldsmobile Cutlass Hurst Coupe; S/N 1G3AK4798DM433879; Black, Gray, Red Hurst graphics/Gray cloth; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $21,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $23,100. – 307/180hp, automatic, Eagle ST tires, rear spoiler, power windows, Kenwood cassette stereo. – Showing 41,425 believable miles. Represented with original tires, which all look great. Very good blemish-free original paint. Tidy underneath. Like new interior. Presents like a delivery mile time warp car, but because it’s actually been driven over the years, it’s reasonable to expect that everything actually works. – Sold here last year for $20,900, it got more love this time around and brought a spot-on price even if didn’t command the same kind of crazy-high premium that a time-warp delivery mile example might bring.

Lot # T138 1960 Oldsmobile Super 88 Holiday Coupe; S/N 608T7202; White/Green, White vinyl with Green cloth; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $28,050. – 394/315hp, automatic, limited slip, hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, power steering, power brakes, power windows, power front bench seat, WonderBar radio. – Dry weather stripping. The body isn’t totally straight. The paint mostly looks good but it’s a little flat and there are lots of small chips on the nose. A few small dents in the body side trim. Discoloration and fading behind the rear seats, but otherwise a very good restored interior. Very clean underneath. Never fully restored, but got serious work when necessary, and this isn’t the kind of car you see often in any condition. Neat, but just a driver. – A surprisingly strong price for a not exactly great example of a not very collectible car. Enough Oldsmobile fans must have converged on Indianapolis this year, though, so the seller should be thrilled.

Lot # F129 1975 Opel Manta Coupe; S/N 5755078287; Engine # 19E0011478; White, Matte Black hood/Red leatherette; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; Hammered Sold at $21,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $23,100. – Cassette stereo, automatic, styled wheels with trim rings, Sumitomo tires. – All original and nearly like new with only 4,007 miles. Steven Juliano Collection. – This is a curve-setting price for a Manta, particularly with an automatic, but it has two things going for it: 1) incredible originality and negligible miles; and 2) being part of the featured Steven Juliano Collection. He had sought a choice Manta, which was the first car he owned, and he couldn’t have gotten one more choice than this. The Juliano Collection hype won’t outlast this auction, however, and looking forward this is a lot to pay for a 4,007 mile Manta with an automatic without it.

Lot # S191 1933 Packard 1005 Twelve Touring; S/N 100514; Engine # 901317; Dark Blue, Cream sides/Dark Blue leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $225,000 – $250,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $222,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $244,750. – Blue wheels with chrome spokes, wide whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemounts, dual C.M. Hall spotlights, jump seats, luggage rack, Solar headlights, dual horns, radiator stoneguard. – Excellent paint, chrome, upholstery and top with a smattering of chips. Clean, orderly engine compartment. The chassis is well-lubricated (i.e., a little oily) with some road grit. CCCA National First Prize #1126. A well-maintained old restoration that still has presence. Academy of Art University collection. – Sold by Gooding & Co. at Scottsdale in 2009 for $275,000 where it displayed exactly the same 61,094 miles that it does today. The intervening decade has taken a toll, but it is still a sound, attractive CCCA Full Classic ™ ready to go on tour with the while family inside and is a solid value at this result.

Lot # F291 1935 Packard Eight 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 813248; Black/Gray cloth; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $17,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,700. – 257/110hp eight, black wire wheels with hubcaps and wide whitewalls, CM Hall headlights, luggage rack, rear footrests, dual sidemount spares, cormorant mascot. – The paint is old and fair. The interior fabric is in poor condition with many tears. The wheels are dull and losing paint. Dirty but complete engine bay and reasonably solid underbody. Represented as a totally unrestored car out of Long Island with 7,718 original miles. A solid platform for a straightforward restoration. – This is less than a Ford V-8 of the period and has wonderful possibilities for weekend drive and parades, not to mention Preservation class judging, and this is a realistic price for it.

Lot # F133 1969 Plymouth Barracuda 2-Dr. Hardtop Mod Top; S/N BH23P9B141277; Sunfire Yellow, Black accent, Mod Top floral roof/Sunfire Yellow Mod pattern; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; Hammered Sold at $400,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $440,000. – 340/275hp, automatic, power steering and brakes, Formula S equipment, factory air conditioning, wheel covers, red line tires, documented with a copy of the original window sticker. – Good original paint with some small edge chips. Excellent original vinyl roof and upholstery. Good chrome, scuffed window sill trim. Pitted taillight surrounds. Scratched trunk lid. Right door accent doesn’t line up. Steven Juliano Collection. – 937 built and looks like it should have been on a Beatles album cover. Why it was in Steven Juliano’s collection is a bit of a mystery, but his estate was glad it was today when it reached this eye-watering result about an order of magnitude more than it reasonably could have been thought to bring. The other 936 Mod Tops will now come out of the woodwork looking to repeat this success, and they don’t have a chance.

Lot # F170 1970 Plymouth ‘Cuda Convertible; S/N BS27H0B302200; Blue Fire metallic/White vinyl; White vinyl top; Estimate $145,000 – $165,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $125,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $137,500. – 340/275hp, 4-speed, power brakes and steering, Argent shaker hood, air conditioning (modern compressor), buckets and console, pushbutton radio with 8-track. – Represented as the original engine and transmission. Very good paint and interior. Sharp chrome. The engine compartment and chassis are old and dusty from storage. A good car that needs some attention. – Reported sold at Russo and Steele in Scottsdale in 2011 for $68,200, then at Mecum Kissimmee in 2014 for $97,200. It appears to have about five years of storage dust on the chassis. In a marketplace dominated by Hemis and 440s this is a driveline combination that’s not seen very often. In a highly desirable color, it should prove to be rewarding to drive, especially at about half the price of a 440 Magnum 4-speed ‘Cuda convertible.

Lot # F142 1971 Plymouth ‘Cuda Convertible; S/N BS27V1B361945; Red/Black vinyl; Black leatherette top; Estimate $1,000,000 – $1,100,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; Hammered Sold at $1,050,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,155,000. – 440/385hp, Six Barrel, automatic, 4.1 Sure Grip Super Track Pak, power driver’s seat, tach, AM-FM, factory chrome wheels, Polyglas tires, power brakes, original broadcast sheet documented. – Good paint and interior, erratic chrome. Flat panels with even gaps. A quality older restoration. Represented as the original drivetrain and sheet metal. Formerly part of the featured Steven Juliano collection, restored to consistently high standards of appearance and correctness. From the Dana Mecum collection. – This is a gorgeous, rare ‘Cuda with impressive options. It brought an even more impressive price.

Lot # S99.1 1970 Plymouth ‘Cuda Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N BS23R0B157143; Red/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; Hammered Sold at $125,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $137,500. – 426/425hp Hemi, 4-speed, Hurst pistol grip shifter, power dual circuit brakes, Red shaker hood, elastomeric bumpers, pushbutton radio. – Clean but lightly run engine bay. No big chips or scratches in the paint but it does look older. The window frames are all scratched. Very good interior. The engine is oily and dirty with a superficial attempt to wipe it down. Restored in the late 80s and doesn’t exactly need another round of major work, but it is showing the restoration’s age. – It was offered at Mecum’s Houston auction last month where it was reported bid to $165,000 and it went away here in Indy for even less. Even if the engine came out of a junkyard it still has an R in its VIN and is a good buy at this price.

Lot # S115 1971 Plymouth ‘Cuda Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N BS23R1B109833; Rallye Red/Black vinyl, cloth inserts; Estimate $375,000 – $400,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $340,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $374,000. – 426/425hp Hemi, automatic, shaker hood, hub caps, Polyglas GT tires, pushbutton radio, hood pins, Tic-Toc-Tach, power steering, power brakes, console. – Not matching numbers but represented as a genuine Hemi. Very good and fully restored but not overly detailed engine bay. Good older paint and chrome. Light wear on the door handles. Even gaps. Good older restored interior. An attractive and inherently collectible Hemi ‘Cuda with just a few strikes against it. – Not at all overshadowed by the ’70 Hemi Cuda Convertible (Lot F120) that sold the day before, this car defied its lack of matching numbers and handful of flaws to reach a surprisingly high price, especially when S99.1, a 1970 Red Hemi ‘Cuda hardtop, when for $137,500.

Lot # T83 1970 Plymouth Road Runner 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N RM23N0G164832; Sublime, Black stripe, White vinyl roof/White vinyl; Enthusiast restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $54,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $59,400. – 383/335hp, air grabber hood, bucket seats, 4-speed with Hurst pistol grip shifter, Tic-Toc-Tach. – Cracks in the paint near the cowl. Discolored and lightly worn seats. Rusty screws in the trim pieces and under them. Peeling vinyl stripes. Scratched glass. Visible old glue in the windshield. Scratches on the wheels. A quick and superficial restoration that only looks great from a distance. – Sold for $44,000 at Mecum Kansas City last year, and that was a much more realistic result. In Indy, it’s on the expensive side by quite a bit.

Lot # S229 1970 Plymouth Road Runner Superbird 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N RM23V0A180655; Lemon Twist, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Estimate $120,000 – $160,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; Not sold at Hammer bid of $90,000. – 440/390hp Six Barrel, automatic, buckets and console, power steering and brakes, Magnum wheels with trim rings, narrow whitewalls, pushbutton radio, heater. – Represented as the matching numbers engine. Recent fisheye repaint, clear gauges and good new upholstery. Filthy, grimy engine compartment and chassis. New front shocks. Ratty front fender scoops and headlight doors. Cracked steering wheel rim. – Described as an “Unrestored barn find”, but then it got new paint and upholstery, effectively destroying its originality. Now it needs everything, a factor the consignor didn’t take into account in setting expectations. The reported high bid is reasonable in view of the car’s needs and their expense.

Lot # F221 1957 Pontiac Bonneville Convertible; S/N P857H21839; Red, White/Red, White vinyl; White top; Estimate $130,000 – $150,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $100,000. – Fuel injected 347/317hp, automatic, power steering, power windows, power brakes, power top, power seat, Continental kit, WonderBar radio, factory air conditioning, spinner wheel covers, whitewalls. – The paint is excellent. The brightwork is very good. The driver’s side of the seat shows very light creasing but the rest of the interior looks fantastic. The top appears new. The engine bay is neat and tidy, as is the chassis. Loaded with options and restored to the standards it deserves. – This car appeared at Ford Lauderdale in 2006 fresh from a $100,000 restoration, when it hammered not sold at a $128,500 high bid. It then sold at a $180,000 bid ($190,800 all-in) at Kissimmee in 2010. It’s been carefully kept since then, its restoration presents like it’s fresher than it is having added only 332 miles to its odometer in 13 years, and it’s worth more than the reported high bid here. Another 30 or 40 grand would be a reasonable expectation.

Lot # S205 1961 Pontiac Catalina 2-Dr. Hardtop Bubble Top; S/N 361P10735; Richmond Gray/Burgundy vinyl, cloth; Estimate $110,000 – $125,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; Not sold at Hammer bid of $80,000. – 389/348hp Tri-Power, 4-speed, 3.90 Saf-T-Track, radio and heater delete, 8-lug wheels, bias ply whitewall tires, clear steering wheel rim, bench seat, PHS documented with a copy of the original manifest. – No engine number. Very good paint, chrome and interior. The engine compartment was restored like new but has aged and the car is changed from its original configuration which included steel wheels, wheel covers, radio and heater. Period drag racing documented with window decals including some from Connecticut Dragway (the present home of Consumer Reports.) 2017 POCI Gold winner. – No-saled at Worldwide’s Scottsdale auction four months ago at the same reported high bid. The consignor is looking for Super Duty money and while this is a quality Pontiac with wonderful specs it’s not a Super Duty. The market has now spoken twice in a short period of time and with two different auctions, a statement the consignor needs to hear.

Lot # T185 1956 Pontiac Chieftain 860 Station Wagon; S/N C756H2593; Sun Beige Yellow, White/Black, White vinyl; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $38,500. – 370 Tri-Power Strato Steak engine from a `58 Pontiac, automatic, power steering, hood ornament, wheel covers, whitewalls, sun visor, pushbutton radio, dash clock. – Light orange peel on the right headlight bezel and a tiny chip at the back of the passenger’s door but otherwise very good paint and chrome. Very good interior. Fully restored underneath. The engine is incorrect, but adds quite a bit of performance. There are several tacky surf stickers on the windows, but those will peel off. It’s a high quality restoration on a rare Pontiac wagon, and it’s very cool. – After hammering not sold here in 2010 at a $27,500 high bid and again the following year at a $29,000 high bid, it sold in 2019 at an even stronger price. Absolutely no discount here for the incorrect powertrain. In fact, it arguably added a few bucks and makes this an even more attractive station wagon.

Lot # F285.1 1995 Pontiac Firebird SLP Firehawk Coupe; S/N 2G2FV22P6S2252715; Black/Black leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $17,000. – LT1, automatic, store brand tires, CD stereo, T-tops. – Represented with 33,024 miles and showing age that matches that figure with a few tiny chips on the nose. Part of the front Firehawk decal is peeled off. The paint and exterior otherwise look very good. Clean wheels. Original brakes. Nearly no wear to the seats or switchgear. An attractive, usable and collectible Firehawk with plenty of life left in it. – Interest has grown in the SLP-modified Firebirds and (to a lesser degree) Camaros over the past couple of years, but what collectors really clamor for are the lowest possible mile examples of later LS-powered cars. This car just seemed to be a little too early and a little too used for the Indy bidders, who put up a lowball offer that was understandably refused.

Lot # S8 1970 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Coupe; S/N 228870N117486; Polar White, Blue/Blue vinyl; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000. – 400/345hp Ram Air III, automatic, Rally II wheels, Radial T/A tires, aftermarket stereo, power steering, power brakes. – Very clean lightly run engine bay. Chips on the side of the hood and dirt in the paint. Clean restored interior. Repainted wheels. Track scratches in the side glass. Small scratches on the bumpers. Restored, but not particularly well and the car is not represented with anything in the way of documents or history. – With inconsistent presentation, lack of documentation and crossing the block at no reserve, this car was lucky to get as much as it did and both parties can be satisfied with this result.

Lot # T165.1 1999 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Convertible; S/N 2G2FV32G6X2228699; Arctic White, Blue stripes/White leather; Blue top; Estimate $40,000 – $45,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000. – 6-speed, Hurst shifter, CD stereo. – Represented as a one-owner car with 2,635 miles. Carefully stored and treated as a collectible from new. – Quite a few people tucked these 30th Anniversary cars away as collectibles, but only over the last few years have fourth gen F-Body prices really started to take off and the seller here fully capitalized on the trend. It’s top dollar, but it’s also a top-notch car.

Lot # F2.1 1999 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Coupe; S/N 2G2FV22G7X2211209; Black/Gray leather; Unrestored original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $6,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $6,600. – 346/305hp, automatic, aftermarket wheels, aftermarket stereo. – Showing 80,951 miles and age to match. A lot of surface scratches on the hood and the B-pillar. Visible wear to the seats. Plenty of road dirt underneath. A used late Trans Am. – This isn’t a very good car, but it’s not the beater that this very low price would suggest. A usable, fun muscle car for cheap. It’s $38,000 less than the 2,635 mile white ’99 Trans Am 6-speed that sold here yesterday.

Lot # T130 1964 Pontiac Grand Prix 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 894D34921; Dark Blue/Dark Blue vinyl; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $28,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $31,350. – 389/303hp, automatic, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, bucket seats, floor shift, power steering, power brakes, tilt steering column, factor air conditioning. – Older paint and fading trim, and the bodywork is a bit wavy. Touched up chips on the rear fenders. Paint peel around some of the trim. Restored but aged interior. Cracked signal lenses. Tidy restored engine bay. Redone, but showing its age everywhere and currently in driver condition. – A dramatic change in GM’s design philosophy in the early 60’s produced some of the most attractive, subtle America coachwork since the Classic era and the Grand Prix was at the cutting edge of it. This isn’t the best example around but it’s more than good enough, although the price might be a little rich for its condition and equipment.

Lot # F287 1966 Pontiac GTO 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 242176P326780; Starlight Black, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Unrestored original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $82,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $90,750. – 389/360hp Tri-Power, 4-speed, 3.55 Safe-T-Track, center console, power steering and brakes, bucket seats, hub caps, red line tires, power windows, original Protect-o-Plate, title and PHS documented. – Remarkably good original paint and interior. The black vinyl roof is in good condition as well. Some pitting around the rear window trim, but the rest of the brightwork is in good condition. Some paint chipping and oxidation under the hood, but nothing is rotten and the 35,115 miles showing are represented as original as is the engine, transmission, differential, top and even the spare. The engine compartment is aged with some exhaust burn and surface oxidation but remarkably good. The wheel wells are in good condition. A mostly good, gracefully aged survivor with desirable equipment and too good to restore. – Something is only original once, and that fact really resonated with the bidders here because this price would be expensive even for a concours restored ’66 GTO hardtop.

Lot # S195 1967 Pontiac GTO 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 242177B123703; Engine # 420033 YZ; Black/Black vinyl; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; Not sold at Hammer bid of $65,000. – 400/360hp, 4-barrel, Ram Air hood, automatic, dual gate shifter, power steering and brakes, air conditioning, ram air hood, Hurst wheels, red line Wide Oval tires, AM-FM, underdash 8-track, more. – Represented as all original except for a three decade old repaint which is very good aside from minor shrinkage at the base of the right windshield post. Represented as 59,552 miles. The interior and chrome are like new. The engine compartment is clean on top but aged and dusty down deep. An extraordinary and miraculously preserved example. – This is an appropriate offer for a Ram Air GTO in this condition, but gives no credence at all to its known miles and originality, qualities that should have brought $10-15,000 more.

Lot # F48 1967 Pontiac GTO 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 242177P236772; Signet Gold Poly, Black vinyl roof/Gold vinyl; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $36,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $39,600 don’t use. – 400/255hp two-barrel, automatic with His & Hers shifter, 8-track stereo, power steering, power brakes, red line tires, PHS documents. – A few particles in the paint and a blister on the hood as well as surface scratches on both trim pieces and wheels. The trunk is not aligned properly. Tidy fully restored engine bay. A mostly solid car redone to decent standards considering the base powertrain. – Talk about rare, this is seriously rare even though it’s not for the best reason. Until seeing this car I thought all GTOs had at least 4-barrel engines. Now I am disabused of that false notion. How many 2-barrel GTOs have been seen on the loose? Maybe, “This one”? It will be looked upon with awe at GTOAA meetings, definitely one of the most rare 1967 GTOs on the planet and if for showoff rights alone this is a reasonable price.

Lot # S6.1 1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible; S/N 242677B126688; Tyrol Blue/Black vinyl; White vinyl top; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $42,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $46,200. – 400/360hp, 4-speed, power steering, power windows, power top, bucket seats, console, Hurst shifter, Rally II wheels, red line tires, PHS documents. – Rough engine bay with paint flaking, oxidation and rusty bolts. Scratches and dirt in the exterior paint. Lightly scratched original trim. Small tear in the driver’s seat and the interior trim is scratched. A rough example that deserves better. – Seriously discounted in recognition of its myriad problems, not the least of which is any representation that this is the engine that left the factory under this hood. It is a pretty GTO in Tyrol Blue, however, and the top goes down which in sum makes it a solid value at this result.

Lot # S46 1969 Pontiac GTO Judge 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 242379A123303; Carousel Red, Judge graphics/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $110,000. – 400/366hp Ram Air III, 4-speed, red line tires, hood tach, Hurst T-handle shifter, aftermarket stereo, PHS documents. – Represented as matching numbers and 94,600 miles from new. Nearly spotless mostly restored engine bay. Polished trim. New interior vinyl. Good paint other than very light orange peel, and the body is a little wavy. Lightly scratched rear glass. New bumpers. Body-off restored to high enough standards, but there are a few things to nitpick. – For a Judge that has the right paperwork, matching numbers and a desirable 4-speed this is an appropriately strong number, but for a car with as many flaws as this one it’s favorable to the seller.

Lot # F209 1971 Pontiac GTO Judge 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 242371P110732; Lucerne Blue, Judge graphics/Black vinyl; Estimate $140,000 – $160,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $115,000. – 455/335hp, automatic, Rally wheels, Polyglas tires, hood tach, Rally gauges, factory 8-track, tilt steering column, power steering, power brakes, Protect-O-Plate, PHS documents. – The paint is very good. There are some very light surface scratches on the windshield trim, but the rest of the brightwork looks great. The interior carpet and upholstery are in very good condition as well. The engine bay is very clean. A rare final-year Judge, represented as matching numbers, restored to very high standards, and barely used since. – Yes, the restoration on this car was probably very expensive, but the reported high bid here was good enough that Mecum should have been able to put together a “Bid Goes On” deal for it.

Lot # T295 1964 Pontiac LeMans GTO 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 824826492; Engine # 552679 11H; Silver-Grey, Black vinyl roof/Red vinyl; Original, modified for competition or performance, 3- condition; Hammered Sold at $34,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $37,400. – 389 with Tri-Power induction, Doug’s headers, 4-speed, Hurst shifter, buckets and console, power steering and brakes, aftermarket radio, Sunpro auxiliary gauges, woodgrain sport steering wheel, spinner wheel covers, red line tires, MSD distributor. – Block double stamped as above and E8306 CH, neither meaning Tri-Power. No PHS documentation offered. Claimed to be “a frame-off restoration” but no visible evidence of such treatment could be discerned. Good roof vinyl but the seams below the back window are separating. Fair clearcoat repaint. Erratically fit dull aluminum window sill moldings. Used engine compartment is mostly original with a coat of chassis black. Fun driver but not worth much. – A modified car with no representation of the driveline’s provenance in mediocre condition that’s never been restored and has a laundry list of performance bits, the seller should be supremely happy with this result.

Lot # S176 2009 Pontiac Solstice GXP Coupe; S/N 1G2MG25X99Y107095; Silver/Black leather; Estimate $45,000 – $70,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $38,500. – GXP, Eagle F1 tires. – 7,266 miles and looks like a new car other than a tiny scratch on the filler cap. One of the last cars to wear a Pontiac badge, and the GXP Coupes are quite rare even if they aren’t pretty. – A $31,000 car when it was new, this GXP coupe may not have met Mecum’s ambitious low estimate, but it’s a strong number that the seller should be happy with.

Lot # T227 1961 Pontiac Ventura Sport Coupe; S/N 561P4534; Bristol Blue/Blue vinyl; Estimate $90,000 – $110,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $77,500. – 389/348hp Tri-Power, 4-Speed, eight-lug wheels, power steering, power driver’s seat, tinted glass, WonderBar radio, PHS documents. – AACA Senior. Tiny ding above the right headlight and a small scratch on the left front fender. Good paint and chrome otherwise, but the brightwork is mostly original. Very good fully restored interior. Lots of desirable equipment and a mostly solid redo with a few corners cut and a few flaws. – A frequent sight at Mecum auctions, this car hammered not sold at a $90,000 high bid here last year, again at a $95,000 high bid at Mecum Dallas a few months later, and one more time at a $75,000 high bid at Kissimmee this January. It’s been driven about 6 miles since Kissimmee on and off the transporter and around the parking lot and is still a great car sure to excite any Pontiac fan who sees it. With two strong offers and two reasonable ones now on the record, however, the people have spoken reasonably to this car’s value and it’s time for the consignor to reset expectations before continuing to chase the market downward while adding entry fees and shipping bills to what is already a money-losing history.

Lot # S212 1974 Porsche 911 Coupe; S/N 9114101035; White, Pink/Black; Estimate $450,000 – $500,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $160,000. – Carrillo rods, dry sump, 24-gallon fuel cell, fire system, whale tail rear spoiler, BBS wheels, AutoMeter gauges, carbureted engine. – The Newman/Freeman car raced at Sebring in `77, then embarked on a long, long career in IMSA GTO and GTU as well as Camel GT. Restored from 2006 to 2009, then more recently refurbished and set up for competition. Not a super successful car and Newman had minimal seat time in it. There’s also no telling how much of what Newman raced is even left after years of top level competition. Even so, it’s an awesome widebody 911 race car with some neat history to set it apart from other racing 911s. – This car hammered not sold at a $325,000 high bid at Mecum Houston in 2014, before receiving a repaint in its current ’77 Sebring livery. Given that number and what has happened to Porsche prices in the meantime, refusing the reported high bid was an obvious choice. Porsche people apparently don’t come to Indianapolis in the week before the 500.

Lot # U86.1 1977 Porsche 911 S Coupe; S/N 9117202417; Black/Black; Unrestored original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $40,000. – Black Fuchs wheels, whale tail, Momo steering wheel, chromed gauge bezels, aftermarket CD stereo, sunroof. – Quite a few stone chips on the nose and hood, good seats, but the rest of the interior looks a little tired. The engine bay is pretty dirty but it’s correct and unmodified. Tidy underneath. Showing 162,479 miles and a heavily used 911. Could be worse to be sure, but `77s are among the least desirable in the 911 family, and this one borders on being clapped out. – It’s hard to believe there was actual money close to the reported high bid here, because for somebody to refuse a 40 grand bid on a rough ’77 911 with 160k miles would be pure lunacy. For reference, that kind of money usually buys a prime low-mile car or a restoration.

Lot # S251 1988 Porsche 911 Turbo 930 Coupe; S/N WP0JB0931JS50410; Black/Black leather; Estimate $140,000 – $170,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $132,000. – 3.3/282hp, 4-speed, factory slant nose, aftermarket exhaust, polished chrome Fuchs wheels, air conditioning, Alpine CD stereo, rear defrost, power seats. – The body looks clean and good, but the wheels are beginning to lose their black paint. The weatherstripping is still soft and dark, as is the rear spoiler. The engine bay has been detailed. The driver’s seat has some large cracks but is free of any tears. Represented as a three-owner factory slant nose with 29,721 actual miles. – A factory slant nose can add a 30 percent premium over a regular 930, so this is a relatively modest result. Only the best, cleanest lowest-mile 930s have been getting strong prices lately, however, and this one is unfortunately none of those things even if it shows all the signs of a conscientiously and consistently maintained Porsche. It’s not a bargain, but it is good value for this money.

Lot # S155 2015 Porsche 918 Spyder Weissach Roadster; S/N WP0CA2A19FS800712; Matte Black wrap/Garnet Red leather; Estimate $1,600,000 – $1,800,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,800,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,980,000. – Weissach package, Burmester stereo, front axle lift, Acid Green calipers, aftermarket wheels (original included). – 999 miles and like new. – The Weissach package subtracted about 100 pounds from the 918’s weight, added over 80 grand to its original price, and currently carries a premium of about 100 grand over a base 918. Even so, this is a very strong number for a Weissach car, especially one with aftermarket wheels and a wrap. It’s the most expensive 918 we’ve seen all year.

Lot # F166 1965 Shelby Cobra 289 Roadster; S/N CSX2588; Rouge Iris/Black leather; Black top; Estimate $1,100,000 – $1,300,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $875,000. – Chrome wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, wind wings, tinted visors, grille and trunk guards. – Represented as the second to last 289 built and the last sold to the public. Good single repaint done in 2006 in its original and unusual but attractive color. Decent original interior with good seats, but there is a big crease in the vinyl-covered glovebox and the gauge faces are pretty dull. The carpets are new. Sound and unrestored underneath as well. – Sold by RM at Boca Raton back in 2006 for $342,400 in pretty much the same condition as it is today and 1,835 fewer miles on the odometer than it shows today (<80 miles per year.) It crossed the block at Mecum Monterey in 2017 where the reported bid was $950,000, at Kissimmee in 2018 where it was bid to $1 million, Monterey in 2018 with a $1.1 million bid and Kissimmee four months ago with a bid for $1,050,000. It seems to be chasing its tail a bit and the consignor must be truly disappointed by the bid here in Indianapolis, but there it is and neither the car nor the market in general are getting any better.

Lot # F175 1963 Shelby Cobra 289 Dragonsnake Roadster; S/N CSX2093; Fuscia Metalflake, Fuscia Metalflake hardtop/Black; Estimate $800,000 – $1,000,000; Competition restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; No Result or VIN, Probably no-show $0 plus commission of; Final Price. – 289 V-8, four Webers, aluminum radiator, hardtop, chrome paperclip rollbar, silver painted wire front wheels, wide centerlock alloy rear wheels with drag slicks, long tube headers ending in short side-mounted pipes, M&H slicks. – Good but unimpressive orange peely paint. Sound chrome, good interior. An older restoration to nearly like new condition that appears to have been static displayed since. AACA Senior winner, restored to like new condition (and better than it ever was when making dragstrip passes in the mid-11’s.) Dragged for years, a consistent winner driven by Bruce Larson when owned by Jim Costilow and later for Ed Hedrick. “The winningest competition Cobra in history.” – Sold by Mecum at Kissimmee in 2011 for $927,500 with commission, then offered at Monterey in August 2011 with a reported $825,000 high bid. At Kissimmee in 2012 it was reported sold for $901,000, then failed to sell on a suspect reported bid of $1.1 million at Mecum Houston in April 2014. RM sold it in Arizona in 2016 for $990,000 and it was reported bid to $825,000 at Worldwide’s Dallas sale in 2017 and bid to just $550,000 at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale in 2018. Thoroughly shopped around for years, aging in front of our eyes and not old enough (yet) to be written down into the 3 condition range, but the bidders apparently think it is. It was previewed here in Indy but no result was reported for it nor does it appear in Mecum’s online results. Things happen but it would be good to know how it went upside down in Indy.

Lot # F140 1965 Shelby Cobra 289 Factory Stage III Dragonsnake Roadster; S/N CSX2427; Yellow, White nose band/Black leather; Black leatherette top; Estimate $1,750,000 – $2,250,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,400,000. – 289 with factory 4-Weber intake, chrome braced paperclip rollbar, 5-spoke centerlock alloy wheels, AC 2-lobe nuts, Goodyear Super Cushion front tires, 8-7.60-15 M&H slicks – One of five factory-built Dragonsnake drag cars and the only one built to customer order for Don Reimer in Gettysburg, PA. Special order paint to match his T-Bird tow car. Excellent paint, chrome and lightly creased upholstery. Restored like new with better cosmetics. Steven Juliano Collection. – Sold for $209,000 at RM’s Arizona auction in 2001 before Steven Juliano’s meticulous, accurate restoration. Dragonsnakes have a marvelous history of drag racing success but the value of this one and its original drag racing configuration makes it difficult to use as anything but a display car; even a road tour is unlikely to be much fun and it’s sitting on 1965-era tires, including M&H slicks, that need to be preserved to retain its window in time restoration. In short, the other Stage III (CSX2416) in street car guise is more versatile and the reported high bid here is a realistic offer for a piece of auto collection decor.

Lot # F132 1964 Shelby Cobra 289 Stage III Roadster; S/N CSX2416; Rangoon Red, Black leatherette covered hardtop/Black leather; Estimate $1,750,000 – $2,250,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; Hammered Sold at $1,600,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,760,000. – Factory Stage III 289 with four Weber carbs and a cold air box, 4-speed, 5-spoke centerlock alloy wheels with AC 2-ear nuts, period Goodyear Blue Streak tires, wind wings, hardtop only, grille and trunk guards, AM radio, Lucas headlights. – One of the stars of Steven Juliano’s collection, reputedly the only factory-built Stage III 289 street Cobra and powered by its original engine. Excellent paint, chrome, upholstery and hardtop. Spotless engine compartment. Restored better than new. – Freshly and meticulously restored, this is a landmark Cobra and it brought a landmark price. It is breathtakingly expensive, but it deserves to be.

Lot # F136 1966 Shelby Cobra 427 Roadster; S/N CSX3173; Silver Mink/Black leather; Black top; Estimate $2,000,000 – $2,500,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; Hammered Sold at $2,200,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $2,420,000. – 427/425hp, dual quads, 4-speed, centerlock alloy wheels, period Goodyear Blue Dot tires, wind wings, grille and trunk guards, Lucas headlights, tinted visors, documented with the original window sticker. – Steven Juliano collection. Original engine. Several owners over time with many repaints and other work. Bought by Juliano in 2010 and restored with minute attention to originality, down to period tires, spark plugs and filters. Excellent clearcoat paint, lightly creased original upholstery. The engine compartment and chassis are like new but the alloy wheels are oxidized with cracked old tires, great for authenticity but not for driving. – This is bound to be treated as a relic, particularly at this price, displayed proudly but rarely driven. Its authenticity and history support the premium it earned from the assembled multitudes of Cobra buyers in Indy this week for a chance at Steve Juliano’s cars.

Lot # F168 1967 Shelby Mustang GT350 Fastback; S/N 67200F50016; Dark Moss Green/Black vinyl; Estimate $200,000 – $225,000; Concours restoration, 1 condition; Hammered Sold at $172,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $189,750. – 289/306hp, 4-speed, power steering and brakes, 5-spoke Magstar wheels, Goodyear Speedway tires, pushbutton radio, underdash Rally-Pak gauges, grille-mounted high beams, functional rear brake scoops. – Shelby show car when new, thoroughly documented and obsessively restored with deep, rich clearcoat paint, perfect chrome and excellent interior. The engine compartment is better than new and the engine and transmission are represented to be the original units. – The quest for the best is a continuing theme among car collectors and sometimes it takes a serious wad of money to get it, as in this case. This is as close to flawless, and even over-restored, as most cars get and this price is reasonable compensation to the seller for a dedicated effort to create the best possible ’67 GT350. The buyer got everything he or she paid for.

Lot # S201 1968 Shelby Mustang GT350 Convertible; S/N 8T3J192409-02092; Black/Black vinyl; White vinyl top; Estimate $100,000 – $130,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $105,000. – 302/250hp, 4-speed, power brakes and steering, 10-spoke Shelby wheels, Goodyear tires, pushbutton radio, console gauges, tilt steering column. – Marti Report documented. Clean engine compartment with minor surface rust on the exhaust manifolds. Good but inconsistent paint. Good chrome. Doors close well and line up precisely. A handsome car that will be a delightful driver. – The reported bid here is $5,000 over Mecum’s low estimate and if for that reason alone it should have been sold, not to mention that the reported bid is more than fair for this car’s condition and equipment.

Lot # S169 1966 Shelby Mustang GT350H Fastback; S/N SFM6S1005; Candyapple Red, Gold stipes/Black stripes; Estimate $115,000 – $130,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $112,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $123,750. – 4-speed (originally an automatic), Radial T/A tires, hood pins, factory radio. – Some light scratching on the bumpers but they’re still shiny. Sound older paint. Erratic panel fit. Very good interior. Lightly used but restored engine bay and underbody. Desirable 4-Speed Hertz rent-a-racer and noteworthy for not being painted black, as most of them were. Restored well but showing some age. – This car looked a lot fresher at Mecum Glendale a few months ago, when it was reported sold for $121,000. Once out of the Hertz inventory many GT350Hs were quickly converted to 4-speeds and while that technically detracts from their value it makes them more fun. The Candyapple Red and Gold livery is a desirable feature that offsets some of the value knock of the 4-speed conversion and this result is as appropriate as the slightly smaller one was in March.

Lot # T182 1968 Shelby Mustang GT500 Convertible; S/N 8T3S115999-00141; Lime Gold Metallic/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Estimate $100,000 – $150,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $107,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $118,250. – 428/335hp, automatic, power steering and brakes, pushbutton radio, mag wheel covers, Goodyear tires, car card for awards. – Excellent recent paint, chrome, top and interior. Bright, shiny engine compartment. The underbody is like new right down to the exterior overspray. Done right without being overdone and recognized with 2016 MCA Gold at Regional in Myrtle Beach, SC, 2017 Mid-America Gold at All Ford Show in Tulsa, OK, 2017 SAAC-42 Gold at Indianapolis, IN, 2017 MCA Grand Nationals Gold in Overland Park, KS, MCA Triple Crown Award for reaching the Gold level at three different venues with different judges, all within a single show season. – It doesn’t get much more fresh or satisfying than this GT500 convertible with multiple recent specialist awards and the Indy bidders recognized it for what it is with this healthy price that should satisfy both the consignor and the new owner.

Lot # F157 1968 Shelby Mustang GT500 Fastback; S/N 8T2S134448-00889; Raven Black/Black vinyl; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Original, with major mechanical repairs, 3- condition; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $77,000. – 428/360hp Police Interceptor engine, 4-speed, power steering and front disc brakes, Philco radio, 10-spoke Shelby wheels, grille-mounted fog lights. – Amos Minter collection. Dusty, dilapidated, neglected and as-found in a Texas barn, until the hood is opened and it becomes apparent that Amos and Justin Minter have completely gone through its mechanical components to make it run and drive like new. It’s an alternative reality that is impossible to drive as it is because the windows are still covered in years of dust, dirt and the droppings of trees (and other things) and the upholstery may be infectious. – The new owner is faced with a quandary which is reflected in the price this Shelby brought. Clean it up so it can be driven and the “barn-find” is lost. Leave it as it is and there’s no way to drive it safely or comfortably. That dichotomy is inherent in its price and it will make for some spirited discussion with fellow GT500 fans.

Lot # S98 1969 Shelby Mustang GT500 Convertible; S/N 9F3R480642; Red/White vinyl; Black vinyl top; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; Not sold at Hammer bid of $115,000. – 428/335hp, Ram-Air hood, 4-speed, power steering and brakes 5-spoke alloy center chrome rim wheels, Polyglas GT tires. rear-mounted antenna, pushbutton radio. – Worn old top with folding cracks on the binding. Sound repaint with minor but troubling ripples. Replacement engine block. Represented as 34,070 miles and two owners. Good restored engine compartment with some old wiring. They should have replaced the top. – Offered at Auburn Fall eight months ago where it was reported bid to $125,000. Either that offer or this one are responsible bids for this car’s equipment and its somewhat erratic presentation, despite the known miles and two owner history. This is not some irreplaceable relic that should carry a generous premium for preservation.

Lot # S276 1969 Shelby Mustang GT500 SportsRoof; S/N 9F2R480609; Red, Orange side stripe/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $80,000. – 428/335hp, C6 Cruise-o-Matic transmission, sport deck rear seat, power front disc brakes, power steering, tilt steering column, air conditioning, tinted glass, Marti Report documented. – Represented as numbers matching. The paint is good, but there is a chip missing where the rear quarter meets the rear clip. The engine bay is not detailed but looks presentable. The interior is very good. The wheels and tires are in good condition as well. An older restoration. – A modest but not unreasonable offer was on the table given the car’s transmission choice. It was sold at Auburn Fall in 2005 for $131,220, a year later at $108,000, and at Mecum Indy in 2012 for $71,550. It’s not that great and could have been sold for the reported high bid.

Lot # W270 1953 Singer SM 4AD Roadster; S/N L4AD1717V; Red/Beige; Black top; Enthusiast restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $13,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $14,850. – 1497/58hp, hub caps, Firestone blackwalls, wood dash, floor shift, dash clock. – Tired, flat old paint with numerous deep and long scratches. Dull but presentable chrome and brightwork. Older undercoated chassis with light oxidation. Uneven gaps. Good interior with sound upholstery, although the dash, while attractive, isn’t real wood. A rare, interesting, charming little car, but it’s a bit rough and not all the details are right. – Like an uglier T-Series MG with two extra seats and hard to find parts, a Singer is for someone who wants something a little bit different and is willing to explain the difference between this Singer and the Singer that makes tuned 911s. This price is about what an MG TD in this condition could expect to bring, but all things considered it’s hard to call this car, which has definite needs, a deal.

Lot # G65 1966 Skoda Velorex Autocycle; S/N 5723003500; Brown leatherette, Red/Red vinyl; Black cloth top; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; Hammered Sold at $3,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $3,300. – 350cc Jawa inline 2-cylinder, cycle fenders, silver painted wire wheels, H4 halogen headlights, trailing arm front suspension, chain drive. – Leatherette body panels that are in good condition. Worn, faded but tight fitting top, sound upholstery. Mostly original, usable as is but a modest restoration project. – There just isn’t much to “restore” on this Skoda, or Velorex, or whatever it is and with tiny little 3-wheeled vehicles (it’s misleading to call them “cars”) bringing handsome prices for their cuteness this may turn out to be something of a find. Maybe the only vehicle in the world that can get a cosmetic restoration at the local auto top shop.

Lot # W297 1951 Studebaker Champion Regal Convertible; S/N G1060021; Maui Blue/Red; Black cloth top; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $31,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $34,100. – 170/85hp six, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, column shift, power top, pushbutton radio. – Faded front bumper and lightly pitted chrome in other spots. Good older paint other than some chips near the trunk. Supposedly rebuilt power top and the top itself is good, but the frame looks rough. Good newer seat upholstery, but the carpets are worn. Good colors and inherently interesting, but its early 2000s restoration wasn’t done to super high standards and it’s starting to show its age. – Champion convertibles are relatively rare, but there also aren’t a ton of Studebaker fanatics in 2019 and prices for them and indeed most early postwar domestics have been slipping lately. Somebody forgot to tell the buyer of this car, however, because this is an expensive result for any ’51 Champion, let alone one with as many issues as this one has.

Lot # F138 1963 Thomas Cheetah Race Car Coupe; S/N 4; Red, White stripes/Black vinyl; Estimate $500,000 – $750,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3 condition; Not sold at Hammer bid of $250,000. – 327/485hp modified L84 Corvette, fuel injection, M21 4-speed, 5-lug 5-spoke alloy wheels, Goodyear Blue Streak tires, dual outside mirrors, NASCAR drum brakes, fiberglass body. – Steven Juliano Collection. The fourth Cheetah built. Bought new and raced by Bud Clusserath, later by Sam Goins who owned it for 53 years before selling it to Steven Juliano in 2018. Scratched, chipped, worn and all-original. – Bill Thomas built the Cheetah as a Cobra-killer on America’s race tracks. Lightweight and using cost-effective, reliable Corvette parts it was all of that, but was never developed enough to be successful. Steve Juliano, Cobra aficionado to the core, bought this one as the counterpoint to his peerless Cobra collection. It is wonderfully original, complete, and has credible racing history not lost in a careless restoration or corrupted by modifications to keep it competitive in historic racing. It is a marvelous piece of history. Three years ago Bonhams had Cheetah 003 at Quail Lodge, a modern historic race prepared car, where it was passed on exactly the same $250,000 bid and that puts this car, with its originality and preservation, in perspective. This highly original Cheetah is worth more, but not close to the half million dollar low estimate.

Lot # U68 1985 Toyota FJ45 Land Cruiser Pickup; S/N FJ4594603; Blue/Blue; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $28,050. – 4230/125hp 2F engine, 4-speed, Pioneer cassette stereo, metric gauges. – Unrestored and used but maintained engine bay. Very clean unrestored frame. Original paint with chips and scratches here and there, plus all the paint is rubbed off at the back of the left front wheel well, but it’s still presentable. The bed isn’t beat up at all. The interior is in remarkable condition. Most old Land Cruisers are either beat to hell or have been restored by now. It’s really unusual to see one like this that has been very well preserved and totally unrestored. That it’s a rare FJ-45 pickup version makes it even more noteworthy. – This pickup hammered not sold at a $33,000 high bid this year in Kissimmee, where there were nearly 50 other vintage Land Cruisers to distract the bidders. Here in Indy, there were only about a dozen, but the consignor decided to cut losses and be rid of it. For the buyer, meanwhile, this is a solid deal since this price normally buys a typical, less valuable hardtop FJ40 in this condition.

Lot # F263 1949 Triumph 2000 Roadster; S/N TRA1081; Ivory/Tan leatherette; Tan cloth top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $38,500. – RHD. 2088/68hp, 3-speed, hubcaps, trim rings, whitewalls, Lucas headlights, fender mirrors, trafficators. – Passenger’s door closes hard. Beautiful varnished wood dashboard. Good paint with a few minor chips, good chrome except for the rear windshield hinges. Orderly but aged engine compartment. Lightly stretched upholstery with at least seven cigarette burns. Much better than most of its counterparts. – A distinctive and attractive British car from just after WWII with leisurely performance but the distinctive and comfortable feature of a second windshield built into the rumble seat cover for the (minimal) protection of its occupants. As Triumph 2000s of the period go this is a relatively good one and brought a better than usual price.

Lot # T318 1973 Triumph Stag Convertible; S/N LE23738UBW; Yellow/Black vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $14,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $15,400. – 2,997/145hp V-8, automatic, Goodyear tires, power windows, factory cassette stereo, tools and books. – Used but tidy and maintained engine bay. Good original chrome. Dull, possibly original paint with numerous touch ups and scratches, particularly on the front. Beat up exhaust tips. Tidy and maintained but unrestored underneath. Good interior other than worn switchgear and seatbelts. Used, but well-kept considering how little these cars are worth and that most of them rotted away long ago. – The Stag was a cool idea meant to take Triumph upmarket, but it just didn’t work. Early cars broke a lot even by Triumph standards, and the reputation never recovered. Triumph should have put a Rover V8 in it rather than its own finnicky proprietary unit, and many owners have swapped a Rover unit in after the fact. This mostly original and quite well kept example is therefore something of an oddity, but it did not bring an out of the ordinary price.

Lot # G283 1965 Triumph TR4A Roadster; S/N CT68671; White, Red nose stripe/Red piped in White; Older restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $12,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $13,750. – Hub caps and trim rings, luggage rack, hardtop, banjo spoke steering wheel, original radio, two tops. – Older paint that looks great from a short distance but reveals plenty of small scratches and nicks up close. Uneven panel gaps. Tired chrome with light pitting in places. Tidy restored underbody. Tires look ancient. Good upholstery and gauges but the dashboard wood is cracked and the steering wheel is worn. The gaskets around the glass on the hardtop are dry and cracking. Restored in 1996 and driven a lot since, not that there’s anything wrong with that. It’s still a usable driver. – This is a better car than the price suggests. The work may be old, the car may be used and it may be a less desirable solid rear axle car, but this result is favorable to the buyer by a few bids.

Lot # W94 1973 Volkswagen 181 Thing Convertible; S/N 1832653140; White, Blue/White, Blue vinyl; White, Blue top; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Facsimile restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $42,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $46,200. – Acapulco Edition clone. – Decent older paint. Surface rust on the door hinges. Light wear to the seats and lightly scratched brightwork. Clean glass. Very clean engine. Good enough for casual enjoyment. – Perhaps the high bidder here didn’t realize this was an Acapulco recreation or didn’t even look at the car up close. This is an outrageously high price for a clone that even soared past Mecum’s ambitious presale estimate. For reference, it sold for $22,000 at B-J’s Orange County auction in 2011 and $18,700 at Barrett-Jackson Palm Beach six years ago, about what a base 181 Thing in this condition is worth and therefore perfectly appropriate. Resto-Mods are hot, but this result is cross-eyed.

Lot # T47 1967 Volkswagen Beetle 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N 117777588; Blue/Black vinyl; Estimate $20,000 – $25,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $17,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $19,250. – Whitewalls, roof rack, 12-volt electrics, 1300 engine. – Average quality respray with dirt and a scratch on the hood as well as chips around the fitment of the roof rack. Scratches and dents on the window trim. Track scratches in the side glass. Grimy but maintained engine bay. New vinyl seats. Visible rust on the backs of the bumpers. Lightly scratched wheels. A driver quality Beetle, no more and no less. – At any given moment there are tons of classic Beetles on the classic car market, and one wouldn’t have to look far to find a better example than this for the money. It’s not an over-the-top result, but the seller should be quite pleased.

Lot # G267 1973 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia Coupe; S/N 1432622097; Green/Brown vinyl; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $6,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $6,600. – 1585/46hp, hubcaps and trim rings, aftermarket stereo, upgraded electrics. – Dirty engine bay with old-looking belts and hoses. Surface rust on the exhaust. Decent older respray with some masking issues around the headlights. Thick old undercoating. Light track scratches in the side glass. Good interior other than some cracks in the dash top. A 20-footer. Pretty from a distance but here are lots of issues up close. – This is better than a project car, but that’s the kind of price it brought, and that leaves the new owner with quite a bit of cash to freshen it up. It could have brought a lot closer to 10 grand without being expensive.

Lot # F18 1978 Volkswagen Type 2 Westfalia Campmobile Van; S/N 2382051238; Sage, White/Green plaid; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $32,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $35,200. – Sink and ice box, two beds, swivel front seat, pop-up camper, side window shades, hub caps, factory radio. – Chip on the front bumper. The top is poorly painted, as is the rear bumper. Scratches on the door handles. Pitted window frames. Solid with no rust, and looks very ’70s with the green on green plaid. – The second generation of Volkswagen’s Type 2/Transporter was a significant improvement over the first generation which had been introduced in 1950 (with characteristic German logic, Type 2 meant VW’s second production model). They had bigger engines, much better rear suspension and redesigned bodies with curved windshields. To collectors, however, all the improvements have yet to filter into values and first generation Type 2s command vastly better prices. This is a sound and usable 2nd generation example Campmobile bought at a realistic price that makes it ideal for its intended purpose: a weekend in the forest, at the lake or surfing at Doheny.

Tags: , ,
Previous Post
Next Post

Comments

    • Chris Sharpe
    • June 7, 2019
    Reply

    Rick and the team,
    What a great job you and the guys did at this auction. You can’t under estimate the time and dedication it takes to compile a huge report like this.
    Your subscribers get the biggest bargain ever!
    You know I very much appreciate what it takes to achieve these reports.
    A big thumbs up from over the pond.
    Regards
    Chris.

    • Packard Guy
    • June 11, 2019
    Reply

    Re your entry, “Lot # F291 1935 Packard One Twenty 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 813248; Black/Gray cloth.”

    That is not a 120, it is a 1201 — the Senior Series Eight, a CCCA car.

    Love your site, just thought I would add the correction.

      • rickcarey1
      • June 13, 2019
      Reply

      I stand corrected, and am happy you noticed and brought it to my attention. I have corrected the post.
      Rick

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *