Gooding & Company, Fashion Square, Scottsdale, January 18-19, 2019

With two sessions, 124 lots, 106 sold, 85.5% sell through and $48.4 million changing hands, Gooding & Company’s Scottsdale auctions were a solid success.

Gooding did better than its counterparts, particularly Bonhams, at moving some of its seven-figure headline cars in Scottsdale. Of twelve lots with pre-sale low estimates of $1 million or more, seven were sold. That’s only a 58.3% sell-through, far below the 85.5% of the auction as a whole and but it is typical of the Scottsdale experience in 2019.

Here’s a little table of the sell through of $1 million plus estimated Scottsdale lots:

Low Est >$1MM Sold >$1MM Sell-Through Auction Sell-Through
Gooding 12 7 58.3% 85.5%
Bonhams 9 4 44.4% 90%
RM Sotheby’s 13 7 53.8% 84.5%

For comparison, this is the same table for Monterey last August:

Low Est >$1MM Sold >$1MM Sell-Through Auction Sell-Through
Gooding 22 12 54.5% 83.6%
Bonhams 16 11 68.8% 81.5%
RM Sotheby’s 33 23 69.7% 83.3%

Having started this train of thought, I though I’d look back at Scottsdale 2018:

Low Est >$1MM Sold >$1MM Sell-Through Auction Sell-Through
Gooding 16 11 68.8% 85.3%
Bonhams 7 6 85.7% 86.1%
RM Sotheby’s 11 8 72.7% 86.7%

The more difficult selling environment for $1 million plus lots in 2019 is immediately apparent and kudos to Gooding & Company for doing so well under the circumstances.

Here are the comparative Gooding Scottsdale numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2019 106/124 85.5% 78.3% 1.9% $456,853 $162,400

[35.6%]

$48,426,380
2018 110/129 85.3% 76.4% 7.3% $438,413 $137,500

[31.4%]

$48,225,400
2017 106/126 84.1% 67% 9.4% $315,047 $148,500

[47.1%]

$33,395,000
2016 97/113 85.8% 78.1% 6.3% $443,413 $178,750

[40.3%]

$43,011,050

On-site observations are by Andrew Newton, Chris Winslow, Jose Martinez and Rick Carey. The final copy and comments are my responsibility. We’re working with Jose to overcome his fixation with dead-on frontal photographs.

There are 69 reports here of the 124 lots offered, sorted by Marque, Model, Body Style and Year.


Lot # 22 1955 Alfa Romeo 1900C SS Coupe, Body by Touring; S/N AR1900C01879; Engine # AR130800987; Red, Black/Black; Estimate $275,000 – $350,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $187,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $210,000. – Chrome spoke wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, tool roll. – Excellent older paint, but the trim shows some age and the stainless needs polishing. The chrome is good shape, but the wheels need some polishing. The glass shows some age. The interior presents as new while the underbody appears older. Originally finished in Blue and sold new in California, then restored in the early 1990s for Yoshiyuki Hayashi in Japan. Today, it’s in sound but older restored condition. – The Black/Red (or “Red/Black” depending upon preferences) color scheme of this Alfa is gaudy. It would be prettier in the original Blu Scuro, which may help account for the moderate result in this transaction. At this price there’s enough money left to repaint it without going underwater.

Lot # 151 1956 Alfa Romeo 1900C SS Coupe, Body by Touring; S/N AR1900C10468; Engine # AR130810477; Verde Oceano/Beige, Pumpkin leather; Estimate $400,000 – $450,000; Modified restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $285,000. – 1975/115hp, centerlock chrome spoke wire wheels, Michelin X tires, upgraded floor shift Alfa 2600 5-speed, Nardi woodrim steering wheel, original manuals and tools. – Excellent, high quality, gleaming paint and chrome. Excellent fully restored interior with new leather, bright gauges, and new-looking steering wheel. A pretty spectacular car and finished in great colors, although it does have a later Alfa gearbox. The catalog says it’s ideal for tours and driving events, but it arguably looks more suited to the show field. – In shows it will be nit-picked to death, despite its marvelous presentation, and that shortcoming is reflected in the price it brought. It is a fabulous, beautifully-bodied car, but it is not how it started out and the result here reflected that aspect.

Lot # 127 2009 Alfa Romeo 8C Spider; S/N ZARJA281890049766; Red/Sienna leather; Black top; Estimate $350,000 – $400,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $310,000. – 4691/444hp, 6-speed automanual, Red calipers, P Zero tires, carbon fiber interior trim, clear bra on the nose, carbon brakes, Bose stereo, Quadrifoglio fender badges. – One of just 35 US market 8C Spiders and 500 worldwide. 759 miles from new. Like new on the outside. Very light wrinkling on the outer driver’s seat bolster, otherwise looks new, as it should. – It arguably looks better as a coupe, but the 8C is nevertheless one of the most attractive designs of the 2000s and it marked a welcome if not exactly affordable return of Alfa Romeo to the U.S. market. The reported high bid is about what the car would have cost new, but Gooding sold another one of these at Amelia Island two years ago for $390,500, so it’s not unreasonable for the consignor to expect a number closer to that here in Scottsdale. Still, the 8C has lost some of its luster to later Alfas, particularly the 4C, and this is a realistic bid.

Lot # 13 1954 Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk I Coupe, Body by Bertone; S/N LML765; Engine # VB6J213; Red/Black leather; Estimate $600,000 – $800,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $510,000 plus commission of 10.98%; Final Price $566,000. – Centerlock wire wheels, Smiths gauges. – The only coupe of the seven Bertone-bodied Aston DB2/4s commissioned by Stanley H. “Wacky” Arnolt. The paint is good other than a large scratch on the left hand rear quarter panel and chips at the door edges. The panel gaps are even, and the trim shows some light scratches, as does the chrome. The panels are flat and the paint is well polished. The interior was restored but shows some slight age. The driver’s vent window glass is scratched. The windshield has slight scratches as well. Displayed at Pebble Beach in 2007, but this restoration is quite a bit older and starting to show it as well as being unused for several years and in need of recommissioning. – This is a very attractive car that cleverly uses the arched top Aston Martin grille shape to raise the hood line to accommodate the tall Aston Martin six. The age of the restoration and its years in storage are a concern, which the bidders here have taken into account with this price, a good value in a unique and good looking Aston Martin.

Lot # 106 1954 Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk I Coupe; S/N LML551; Engine # VB6J120; Black/Beige leather; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $170,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $190,400. – Chrome centerlock wire wheels, Vredestein tires, Lucas driving lights, woodrim steering wheel, wood dash, 5-speed, BMIHT Certificate. – Cosmetically restored in the early 2000s and mechanically restored in 2009, including a newer 5-speed gearbox and front disc brakes. Several small cracks on the hood. Another crack below the drivers’ window, but otherwise good older paint. Significant wear to the seats. Light wear to the steering wheel. Lightly faded original gauges. Frayed weather stripping on the windows. Very clean underneath and nearly like new under the hood. It certainly has its flaws, but a very rare and still presentable early Aston that would be ideal for driving events. – Sold here seven years and 299 miles ago for $187,000. In theory, this DB2/4 should be a lot more expensive today than it was in 2012 since vintage Aston Martin prices have moved quite a bit in the positive direction. Its condition isn’t much different and Gooding assigned it a realistic quarter-million-dollar low estimate, so this was quite the bargain, even with the modifications which much improve its safety and drivability.

Lot # 117 1967 Aston Martin DB6 Mk I Volante; S/N DBVC3644LC; Engine # 4003127; Black/Tan leather; Tan top; Estimate $1,000,000 – $1,300,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $950,000. – ZF 5-speed added, wire wheels, tool roll and jack, clock, air conditioning, power steering, Bosch Koln radio, power antenna. – Originally equipped with an automatic and lefthand drive from new. The paint is excellent with a few small chips at bonnet edges. The panels are flat, the gaps are even, and the finish is well polished. The chrome is fair as it shows some age the front driver’s bumper appears slightly misaligned. The lamp lenses are fair. The rubber trim gaskets are aged and the driver’s seat is wrinkled from use. The seatbelts are aged as well. The gauges are clear and bright. A very rare left-hand drive Volante model with desirable options. Not restored but not totally original either. – Even taking the ZF 5-speed conversion into account the reported high bid here is entirely appropriate for a non-Vantage engined DB6 Volante and could have been sold without significant second thoughts.

Lot # 159 1960 Autobianchi Bianchina Trasformabile Convertible; S/N 110B026176; Engine # 1039981; Red, White roof/Red, White vinyl; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $28,000. – Hub caps, whitewalls, folding fabric sunroof. – Rare right-hand drive Bianchina. Delivered new to South Africa. Good but not exquisite paint and chrome with some detailing scratches. Very good interior. Clean and fully restored underneath. Redone to microcar standards in 2017 and the right-hand drive will be a good conversation starter, but it’s not a showstopper. – “Rare right-hand drive Bianchina”? Exactly who in Scottsdale 2019 cares? It was offered at Mecum Monterey five months ago where it brought a reported bid of just $16,000. The right-hand drive-ness has no value except to movie producers in the UK and this is a whopping big price for an impractical car.

Lot # 131 1936 Bugatti Type 57 Two-Light Ventoux Coupe; S/N 57469; Engine # 350; Black, Blue/Havana leather; Estimate $900,000 – $1,100,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $800,000 plus commission of 10.63%; Final Price $885,000. – RHD. Dip beam light, fender mirrors, skirts, centerlock wheels with wheel discs, covered rear-mounted spare. – One of six with this Jean Bugatti 2-light Ventoux Coupe coachwork, largely original. Never restored but cosmetically redone in the Naughts with an engine rebuild. The front seats have been reupholstered, but the rears are original and sound. The engine compartment is orderly, as is the tidy but unrestored chassis. Displayed at Pebble Beach in 2009. A charming, mostly original, Jean Bugatti coupe that has had years of exceptional care and preservation and just enough attention to keep it usable. – Offered at the World Classic auction at Danville in 1993 where it was reported bid to $145,000 and described thusly: “Light Blue/olive green leather. Ventoux coupe with blind rear quarters, skirts, new chrome spoke wires. Tired original interior. Awful reprehensible auction paint nearly nonskid in texture detracts from otherwise fine totally original and well-running car.” Some of that still applies a quarter century later, but it is now much more presentable and usable, a car that should never get more than loving, sympathetic attention from this point on. It is captivating and even a bit surprising that the bidders didn’t get carried away to own in.

Lot # 23 1967 Chevrolet Camaro SS 396 Convertible; S/N 124677N223399; Engine # T0516MQ 7N223399; Tuxedo Black, White nose band/Gold vinyl; Black vinyl top; Estimate $250,000 – $325,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $230,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $257,600. – 396/375hp, 4-speed, Hurst shifter, bucket seats, steel wheels with hub caps. – Very good paint with only very light detailing swirl. The panel gaps are better than factory and the chrome is fresh and better than new. The trim is excellent and the wheels look perfect. The engine bay is fresh and appears correct. The interior appears to be a combination of new and original. A class champion in the NHRA in period as “The Batcar”, featured in multiple magazine articles. Put back to its original configuration with the original numbers-matching engine many years ago and still looks fantastic despite the age of its restoration. Represented as just 1,503 miles from new. – This is quite clearly the most expensive ’67 SS 396 Camaro on the planet, even taking into account the original L78 engine under the hood, the NHRA Championship winning history and the 1,503 miles. It’s restored, it’s not original. This is a huge price.

Lot # 144 1966 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 194676S102228; Engine # T0922IP 6102228; Milano Maroon, Milano Maroon hardtop/Saddle leather; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $97,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $109,200. – 427/450hp L72, 4-speed, hardtop, side exhaust, M21 4-speed, power steering, power antenna, Positraction, gold line tires, centerlock alloy wheels. – The paint is very good other than light surface scratches and cracking on the hood. The engine compartment is clean and tidy but still appears original. The alignment of the driver’s side door is a little uneven. The brightwork is excellent, the polish and alignment is superb. The weather-stripping on the hardtop is loose. The interior is also very good with no real signs of wear and tear minus light wrinkles on the driver’s seat. Desirably equipped and featuring the earlier 450-horse rated L72 engine, a quality Corvette. – The lack of documentation or history is a bit concerning with this otherwise good and desirable C2, and that might explain the $66,780 price it brought at Mecum Indy in 2011. The bidders here didn’t seem to mind, however, bidding it to a price that any other genuine L72 in this condition would expect to bring. Its early 427/450hp configuration is a big bonus, even though it’s only a marketing hype feature.

Lot # 139 1969 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 194679S710170; Engine # T1202IT19S710170; Marlboro Maroon, Black vinyl hardtop/Black vinyl; Estimate $500,000 – $600,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $340,000. – 427/430hp L88, M22 4-speed, Positraction, Rally wheels, red line tires, J56 power brakes, transistor ignition, heater delete, hardtop, side exhaust, original tank sticker documented. – Represented as a genuine matching numbers L88, NCRS Top Flight, Bloomington Gold and more. Restored twice. Tidy engine bay. Good older paint and chrome. Very good, lightly worn interior. In solid but unexceptional condition overall. What’s exceptional is what’s under the hood. – Not sold at Auctions America Santa Monica in 2016 at a $450,000 high bid and at Bonhams Scottsdale two years ago at a $490,000 high bid, then once more at Mecum Indy last year at a $500,000 high bid. L88s are rare and desirable, but this one is getting a bit stale and it’s hard to get anyone excited about it, as this lowball high bid shows.

Lot # 123 1961 Chevrolet Corvette FI Convertible; S/N 10867S106409; White, White hardtop/Red vinyl; Estimate $275,000 – $350,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $220,000. – 283/315hp fuel injection, 4-speed, Firestone tires, hardtop, Fuelie, RPO 687 big brake, RPO 1625 big fuel tank, heater and defroster, radio delete. – Genuine Big Brake Tanker Fuelie with period race history. Bloomington Gold certified, Triple Crown Award and NCRS Duntov winner but not represented as the original drivetrain. Restored in 1993. Slightly delaminating windshield. Good older paint and chrome. Slightly uneven gaps. Two small cracks right below the passengers’ window. The hardtop is in very good shape. Restored and lightly used underneath. Fully restored interior. Restored to high standards a while ago and an inherently desirable C1 given the list of desirable equipment, but not a show car. – Offered by Mecum at Kissimmee in 2013 where it brought the same reported high bid as it did today. They were both reasonable offers.

Lot # 150 1956 Chrysler 300B Hardtop; S/N 3N561940; Regimental Red/Buckskin leather; Estimate $120,000 – $140,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $56,000. – 354/340hp, dual quads, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, Electro-touch signal-seeking radio, automatic, Benrus steering wheel hub clock. – From the second year for the 300 Letter Series. A few chips behind the headlights. Deep scratch on the front bumper. A few microblisters on the roof and general detail scratching. Light wear on the steering wheel and seats. Very clean and tidy underneath. A high quality older restoration and lightly enjoyed, but the work was done a decade ago and the freshness is gone. – There isn’t anything notably wrong with this 300B and it’s a better car than the price it brought, which ordinarily would buy a driver quality example. The new owner should be exulting in the style, performance and value.

Lot # 36 1956 Continental Mark II Sport Coupe; S/N C56C2303; Black/White, Red leather; Estimate $110,000 – $140,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $90,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $100,800. – Wheel covers, whitewalls, power windows, seats, steering and brakes, tachometer, tinted glass, Travel Master AM radio, clock. – Good paint other than very light scratches and a minor imperfections on the passenger’s fender. The trim is good but could use further polish work and there are a few minor scratches. Lightly scratched wheel covers, but the chrome and brightwork are mostly very good. The interior has a newer front seat with some use. The rear seat is aged, as are the gauges. Body-on restored in Sweden about a decade ago and mostly good, but it’s not a show car and probably never was. – This may be a mediocre old restoration, but it’s anything but a mediocre price for it. $75,000 would have been generous, this is magnanimous.

Lot # 129 1952 Ferrari 212 Europa Cabriolet, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N 0235EU; Engine # 0325EU; Azzurro Metallizzato/Beige leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $1,900,000 – $2,200,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,750,000 plus commission of 10.29%; Final Price $1,930,000. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Blue tinted translucent sun visors, Ferrari Classiche Red Book certified, engine internal number 154. – Restored by Ferrari Classiche 2010-12, Pebble Beach 2012, Cavallino cover story in 2013. One race when new, entered at the last minute in the 1953 Nürburgring 1000km by Tony Parravano driven by Vignolo/Gatsonides to 9th overall, 3rd in class. Later owned by Alec Ulman. Excellent paint, chrome and interior showing scant evidence of use. Impressive body panels and fits. The engine compartment is spotless and restored like new. – This is an exceptional example of a good looking car with an unusual history for a 212 Europa cabriolet and it deserved to bring every penny of this price.

Lot # 153 1959 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N 1315GT; Engine # 1315GT; White, Gold roof/Black leather; Estimate $600,000 – $700,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $540,000 plus commission of 10.93%; Final Price $599,000. – Borrani wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, original books and tools. – Two owners from new and represented as the matching-numbers engine. Rough older repaint with heavy cracking. Some major chip repair is evident and there are excessive unrepaired flakes on rear lower valance. The wheels are heavily oxidized. The front bumper was polished and shows well, as do the headlight surrounds. The other trim is notably oxidized. The original interior is aged but fair. The windshield glass is starting to delaminate in front of the driver. The underbody looks a little rusty and oxidized with some minor rot issues possible. The engine bay is dirty, but no excessive leaks or issues evident. Original other than a repaint, it’s a decent but not quite ideal candidate for restoration. – There was a time when these handsome Pinin Farina coupes were cut apart and turned into Testa Rossa replicas, but no more. The result here recognizes both the car’s condition and its desirability. It’s not going to be rebodied, that’s for sure, and unusually for a Gooding auction it doesn’t appear to have any originality premium despite its extensive preservation.

Lot # 121 1963 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta, Body by Scaglietti; S/N 4037GT; Engine # 4037; Rosso/Black leather; Estimate $6,000,000 – $8,000,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $6,900,000 plus commission of 10.07%; Final Price $7,595,000. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin WXW tires, steel body, driving light and fog light. – Restored in the 90’s. Ferrari Classiche Red Book certified. Cosmetically excellent, beautifully maintained and sublime in design, execution and presentation. It’s not fresh, the upholstery is lightly stretched and creased and the engine compartment is almost like new while showing some age, but it exudes quality care and attention. – This is the least expensive 250 GT SWB seen at auction in a long time. The steel body and street equipment is part of it: in the scheme of things the most interest is in alloy body competizione versions. This result well-exceeds the pre-sale low estimate but is still an exclusive, dynamic late 250 GT SWB bought for a realistic price.

Lot # 28 1958 Ferrari 250 GT TdF Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 1037GT; Engine # 1037GT; Red, White stripe and sills/Cream leather; Estimate $5,750,000 – $6,500,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $5,350,000 plus commission of 10.09%; Final Price $5,890,000. – Single sail panel louver, covered Marchal headlights and fog lights, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, bright front fender vents, outside fuel filler, engine internal # 036D, spare engine from 1027 GT (internal #020D) – Delivered new to Venezuela where first owner Julio Pola drove it to 2nd place in the 1958 GP of Venezuela. Restored in the 90’s, ultimately to John Siroonian in the U.S. Ferrari Classiche Red Book certified. Despite the age of the restoration its condition is nearly impeccable, with quality paint, flat panels, even gaps and flush fits. An outstanding Ferrari with a superbly maintained older restoration. – This is a complete, desirable, Classiche certified 250 GT TdF and even has a spare engine. It is a sterling value at this result.

Lot # 135 1963 Ferrari 250 GT/L Lusso Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 5141GT; Engine # 5141; Dark Blue/Beige leather; Estimate $1,600,000 – $1,800,000; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,725,000 plus commission of 10.29%; Final Price $1,902,500. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, tool roll and books. – FCA Gold in 2007, Ferrari Classiche certified in 2011. Exceptional paint, chrome, lightly stretched upholstery and crisp, orderly engine compartment. Meticulous panel fits and gaps. A sweet car, not overdone. – It’s probably not likely, but at this price it’s practical actually to drive this Lusso on tours and events. Some stone chips won’t help its value, but for a Lusso this isn’t a lot of money.

Lot # 42 1953 Ferrari 250 MM SII Spider, Body by Vignale; S/N 0348MM; Engine # 0348MM; Rosso Corsa/Brown leather; Estimate $5,500,000 – $6,500,000; Competition restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $4,900,000 plus commission of 10.10%; Final Price $5,395,000. – RHD. Dual wraparound Plexiglas windscreens, outside laced Borrani wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel with finger grip buttons, Carello headlights, electric cooling fan, aircraft-style belts – One of 31 250 MM of which 12 were Vignale Spiders on the 2.4 meter wheelbase. It is one of the prettiest and most compact Ferrari competition cars of the era, with a cutaway front valence for brake cooling, three oval portholes in the front fenders, rear fender air extractor vents and recessed taillights that would be called “Frenched” on a California Custom. Sold new to Momo Corporation, it was raced extensively, first by Phil Walters and John Fitch at MacDill AFB in 1954, then by Rich Lyeth in the Southeast SCCA, mostly on SAC airports, at Watkins Glen and Elkhart Lake and later to Charles and Audrey Saffell. It eventually passed through Ken Hutchison to Bill Jacobs for whom Motion Products restored it in 1988, then went to Erich Traber and David Sydorick. When Manny Del Arroz acquired it in the early Naughts it was re-restored in its present livery with aged but patinated older upholstery. Documented by Marcel Massini, but apparently not Ferrari Classiche certified, probably not a significant factor in a car with such a well-documented, if lengthy, history. It’s not pristine, but it is meticulously maintained in near-showroom condition, a wonderful time capsule car that has never lost its identity and is eligible for the most desirable and exclusive events. – Offered by Gooding at Pebble Beach in 2004 where it was reported bid to $1.6 million and sold later at an undisclosed price. There are eighteen documented owners in this 250 MM’s history, some of them for years, others for months, and it is a delectable, choice, thing, bought here for a price commensurate with its SCCA history, exemplary condition and eligibility for just about any exclusive tour or event its owner wants to experience.

Lot # 143 1964 Ferrari 275 GTB Berlinetta Prototype, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 06003; Engine # 06003; Yellow/Tan leather; Estimate $6,000,000 – $8,000,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $4,750,000. – Centerlock alloy wheels, driving and fog lights, covered headlights, cowl-vented hood, six Weber carbs, windshield header-mounted third windshield wiper, radio, dual inside rear view mirrors. – The Ferrari factory’s test and development 275 GTB prototype. Competed in the 1966 Monte Carlo Rally with factory support driven by Giorgio Pianta with factory test driver Roberto Lippi navigating (dnf). Several subsequent owners (including the infamous Consolidator Collection of Hans Thulin), still with its original engine, never restored and still largely as it was in the Monte Carlo Rally. Sound older repaint and road car interior. Old undercoat in the wheel wells. Orderly engine compartment with old paint and some minor leakage stains. Stored since the early 90’s and not refreshed or serviced before the auction nor submitted to Ferrari Classiche for certification. An intriguing Ferrari in refreshing largely original condition. – It’s not a typical rally car, that’s for sure, even in the Sixties. The prototype and Monte Carlo history is a definite value plus; its condition, not so much. The estimate range is highly ambitious, and even the reported high bid is optimistic in a model where it takes an alloy body and successful competition history to push values to the region of $5 million or beyond. The bid here was realistic for this car’s history while also recognizing that it’s not road-ready in the present condition. It’s a sweet Ferrari, but it should never have been brought to auction in this neglected and aged condition. The bidders said, “If I can steal it, with room to make it right”.

Lot # 52 1985 Ferrari 288 GTO Berlinetta, Body by Scaglietti; S/N ZFFPA16B000055713; Rosso Corsa/Black leather; Estimate $2,500,000 – $3,000,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,275,000 plus commission of 10.22%; Final Price $2,507,500. – Daytona-style seats, Classiche Red Book and Massini report, air conditioning, power windows. – Grey market car with 12,255 km. No blemishes in the quality older repaint but there is some discoloration on the Scuderia shields. A few marks on the wheel locks. Light but noticeable wear on the driver’s seat. Belt serviced with a new clutch and brakes three months ago. Ferrari Classiche certified, A low mile car, well maintained and obviously quite rare, but not pristine. – 288 GTOs didn’t become million dollar cars until 2013 and it was in 2015 that they become $2 million cars, where they have pretty much stayed since then putting this transaction firmly on the long term trend line.

Lot # 116 1989 Ferrari 328 GTS Spider, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFXA20AXK0081609; Engine # 16876; Azzurro Metallizzato Ferro, Matte Black roof panel/Red leather; Estimate $140,000 – $180,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $95,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $106,400. – 5-spoke alloy wheels, Eagle Sport tires, air conditioning, power windows, power mirrors, Sony cassette stereo, ABS. – Represented as 19,145 miles from new and nothing about this 328 GTS suggests that is anything but correct. Good original paint and barely used upholstery, like new underbody. Platinum at Cavallino Classic in 2015 and probably would be judged accordingly today. – Reported sold at Bonhams Quail Lodge in 2013 for $68,200, the result here reflects a material premium for originality and preservation, as well as the dramatic livery and bright, lipstick red, upholstery. It has eyeball appeal and originality, both of which contribute to the price it brought.

Lot # 49 1989 Ferrari 328 GTS Spider, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFXA20A5K0081887; Rosso Corsa/Tan leather; Estimate $130,000 – $160,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $110,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $123,200. – Blaupunkt Tucson radio, original spare, books and tools. – Excellent paint and trim with some very light detail scratches likely due to auction prep that should remove easily. There is one scuff under the passenger’s side mirror that may take more effort. Lenses and wheels are excellent. The interior presents as near new and the odometer reads 18,144 miles. The driver’s seat has very light signs of sitting, and the carpet has notable wear near the parking brake lever. Small things that take away very little from this very attractive low-mile 328 in classic colors. It was also serviced in 2016. – This is a strong price for a 328. Not as strong as the $165,000 it sold for at Gooding’s Pebble Beach auction in 2016, but prices have come down a bit since then and its most recent service (in 2016) is about due to be done again which will make up much of the difference between the two results.

Lot # 112 1964 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 SI Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 06077; Engine # 6077; Azzuro Metallizzato/Black leather; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $145,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $162,400. – Borrani wire wheels, Pirelli tires, Ansa exhaust, power windows, air conditioning, woodrim steering wheel, tool roll. – Recently serviced. Lightly scratched up bumpers. Large chip by the left edge of the hood. Small chip on the roof. Very good high quality paint otherwise. Lightly pitted door handles. A few scratches and dings on the wheels, plus light curb rash on the left rear. Mostly good interior with light wear on the seats. Light road wear underneath. The quad headlight 330 GT 2+2 is still one of the more affordable ways into V-12 Ferrari ownership even if it isn’t cheap. This one hasn’t gotten the royal treatment, but would be a good choice for somebody who wants one of these to drive and enjoy. – Not sold at a $310,000 high bid at Russo and Steele Monterey 2015 and $270,000 at Mecum Monterey in 2017. Exactly why it should be worth so little in 2019 is a mystery, but the new owner got a good, a very good, deal here in Scottsdale.

Lot # 60 1966 Ferrari 330 GT SII 2+2 Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 8627; Engine # 8627; Rosso Rubino Metallizzato/White leather; Estimate $300,000 – $375,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $240,000. – Borrani alloy wheels, Michelin X tires, Ansa exhaust, woodrim steering wheel, power windows, air conditioning, Ferrari Classiche red book, tool kit, manuals. – Later Series II car with the more conventional but prettier two headlights instead of four. FCA Platinum Award at Concours Italiano, but that was a while ago. Ferrari Classiche certified. Good but older paint and chrome. Scratch on the left A-pillar and a chip on the filler cap. Very good interior. Engine-out service and freshening in 2013. An attractive car, but older and at this point better for the long drives and tours for which it was designed than the show field. – The reassuring history of this 330 GT 2+2 is encouraging, but not sufficiently encouraging to make it worth much if any more than the reported high bid here.

Lot # 147 1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 15517; Engine # B1542; Rosso Corsa/Black leather; Estimate $600,000 – $750,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $470,000 plus commission of 11.06%; Final Price $522,000. – Cromodora alloy wheels, Cinturato tires, leather-wrapped steering wheel, power windows, air conditioning, Blaupunkt cassette stereo, painted nose panel, popup headlights. – Euro spec car. Delivered new in Grigio Ferro. Good older paint with a crack at the left bottom of the hood. Lightly scratched rear glass. Light wear to the seats. Lightly faded gauges and some wear to the mohair dash. Small chip on the left front wheel. Maintained but unrestored underneath. Showing 92,697 km, which is significant, and never restored but not totally original either. Stored since the 1990s and will require further work before use. It’s not a bad car, but standards for these cars are high and this is basically a driver quality Daytona. – Given this car’s several issues, it was never going to go for a strong price, but this is the lowest result for a Daytona at auction in over a year and presages the Daytona market, which is fading gracefully.

Lot # 64 1983 Ferrari 512 BBi Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFJA09B000043859; Rosso Corsa/Tan leather; Estimate $250,000 – $325,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $210,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $235,200. – Alloy wheels, Michelin TRX tires, leather-wrapped steering wheel, Pioneer CD stereo. – Showing 4,895 km and represented with a recent engine-out service. Subtle delamination on the left side of the windshield. Flawless, well-kept paint. Very good interior. All the plastic is bright. About as close to a new BBi as can be found. – The new owner should be happy with this 512 BBi as well as with the price paid for it, a modest one considering its low miles and careful preservation.

Lot # 25 2005 Ferrari 575 Superamerica Convertible, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFGT91A650143799; Rubino Micalizzato/Camel leather; Estimate $600,000 – $700,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $525,000 plus commission of 10.95%; Final Price $582,500. – 6-speed, modular wheels, Ferrari CD stereo, climate control, Daytona seats. – 8,740 miles, belt serviced over three years (but only 150 miles) ago. Unblemished upholstery and interior, spotless engine compartment. Ferrari Classiche Red Book certified. – The allure of old-school is apparent in this price for a decidedly “old-school” gated 6-speed in this modest mileage 575 Superamerica in rich, deep Rubino Micalizzato, although the premium is less than expected from some recent results. Buyers may be coming up to speed on the fact that the dual clutch 6-speed is a far better gearbox.

Lot # 154 2005 Ferrari 575 Superamerica Convertible, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFGT61A550143924; Black/Tan leather; Estimate $350,000 – $400,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $280,000. – Daytona-style seats, Scuderia shields, CD stereo, red calipers, modular wheels, climate control, original window sticker documented. – Excellent paint other than one notable chip on the lower edge of the splitter that needs attention. Clear lenses and excellent trim. Interior presents as new. Recent belt service. Represented with 2,600 miles and just about like new. – The only thing “wrong” about this 575 Superamerica is the amount of money the Gooding bidders were willing to pay for it. Maybe it was Superamerica fatigue after a week in Scottsdale.

Lot # 158 1973 Ferrari Dino 246 GTS Spider, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 05686; Rosso Chiaro/Tan, Black leather; Estimate $450,000 – $550,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $500,000 plus commission of 11.00%; Final Price $555,000. – Chairs and Flares, Campagnolo wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Ansa exhaust, Momo leather-wrapped steering wheel, Becker Mexico cassette stereo, air conditioning, power windows. – Full mechanical restoration with engine rebuild in 2017, and repaint in 2005. Older but very good cosmetics with no needs and a very good interior. This car ticks all the right boxes for a Dino. – A massive price for a Dino, even one with Chairs and Flares, but this result wasn’t just a fluke as RM Sotheby’s got half a million dollars for their own Chairs and Flares 246 GT over in Phoenix.

Lot # 156 2009 Ferrari Scuderia Spider 16M Spider, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFKW66A390169034; Giallo Modena, Silver stripe/Black Alcantara, cloth; Black cloth top; Estimate $350,000 – $400,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $340,000 plus commission of 11.47%; Final Price $379,000. – SF shields, 5-spoke black alloy wheels, P-Zero tires, Yellow calipers, carbon fiber splitter, diffuser, mirrors and interior trim, manettino steering wheel, carbon fiber brakes, paddle shift, fire bottle, climate control, Ferrari CD stereo, books, tools, keys and window sticker, Yellow tach face, Assembly #86702 – Represented as less than 800 miles and pristine. – This is the ultimate Ferrari 430 Spider, with 200 fewer pounds and F1-style aerodynamics. What is hard to comprehend is why its consignor could be restrained from driving it to the point of accumulating only 800 miles.

Lot # 32 1989 Ferrari Testarossa Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFSG17A5K0080179; Red/Beige leather; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $197,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $221,200. – Air conditioning, window sticker documented. – Stated to be <150 miles from new. Belt serviced in 2012. – Sold by RM at Monterey in 2012 for $264,000 when it was described: “As new in every possible way. Stored in a climate controlled collection from the day it was purchased the Ferrari retains all tools, books, and even the original paper mats used to protect the carpet.” It seems to have depreciated about $6,000 per year since then but is still a huge premium to pay for a Ferrari that is essentially undrivable without eating inexorably into its value.

Lot # 47 1965 Fiat-Abarth 1000 TC 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N 1965262; Engine # 2025431; White, Red/Red; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $72,800. – 982/68hp pushrod engine, single Weber, 5-speed, Campagnolo wheels, Toyo tires, roll cage, fire system, Momo woodrim steering wheel. – Genuine 1000 TC, raced in period by Arturo Merzario for the Abarth factory and regularly vintage raced in more recent years. The paint isn’t great, but it’s more than good enough for a race car. Track scratches in the windows. Maintained and clean engine bay. Lightly faded original gauges and lightly worn steering wheel, but the seats are newer. Looks like a blast for historic racing. Its current setup and condition make it perfect for that. – With exceptional early racing history and giant-killing performance this 1000 TC promises to be seriously enjoyable and a sound value at this price.

Lot # 118 1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 SportsRoof; S/N BME41971; School Bus Yellow, Black stripe/Black; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Competition restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $89,600. – 302/525hp, Jericho 4-speed, roll cage, racing harness, tachometer and gauges, fire system, history documented in a letter from Bud Moore. – Paint is good with some minor chips and scratches, but well detailed and bright. Glass has some minor scratches. The wheels are well painted. Well detailed engine bay that appears tidy and fully functional. Represented as the last Kar Kraft Mustang built for Bud Moore’s Trans Am team, not finished until 2011 under the supervision of Bud Moore and his son Greg. Engine rebuilt within the last few years and ready to race but with only one track appearance at a Targa Sixty Six event in 2018. – An important racing car with no racing history, but a potential top-notch competitor in historic racing and probably acceptable to even the most finicky race organizers on account of its original Bud Moore history. It represents a very good value for the money, despite never having had Parnelli Jones or George Follmer in the driver’s seat.

Lot # 27 1961 Jaguar XK 150 3.8 Drophead Coupe; S/N S838766DN; Engine # VA16628; Red/Red leather; Black top; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $190,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $212,800. – Centerlock chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, single Lucas driving light, dual wing mirrors, dealer-installed AM radio, tool roll, 5-speed upgrade (original 4-speed included). – The paint is OK with some blisters on the rear, chips on the passenger’s side door, and a few areas where the paint has buffed off. All four whitewall tires have slight yellowing. The brightwork, on the other hand, is very good. The interior is very good with only light wear on the seats. The interior trim, dashboard and instruments appear complete and are in good condition. The top is fading slightly. A desirable final-year Drophead 150 with the 3.8 engine, displayed at Pebble Beach in 2010 in the Preservation Class and all original other than the gearbox swap and new carpets. The only thing that would make it better if it was an S. – The bidders ignored the 5-speed swap and focused on this car’s desirable specs and pretty stupendous level of originality. This price would ordinarily buy you a freshly restored example, but that’s something that isn’t too hard to find. This car’s preservation, however, is something you just can’t replicate and that’s reflected, although modestly, in this result. The new owner has a comfy drophead for much less than a drafty roadster.

Lot # 140 1970 Jaguar XKE SII Roadster; S/N 2R14259; Engine # 7R134909; Sable, Black hardtop/Beige; Estimate $120,000 – $140,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $87,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $98,000. – Triple carb setup like an SI E-Type, hardtop, wire wheels, red line tires, woodrim steering wheel, original radio, JDHT certificate. – Represented as the matching numbers engine updated with three SU carbs. The possibly original paint is good other than some surface scratches and very small amount of peeling where the edges of panels and doors meet. The chrome wire wheels are excellent with a deep shine. The brightwork, though, is just decent with pitting on most of the surfaces as well as peeling specifically on the rear window trim. The interior upholstery is poor with cracks, fading and tears everywhere except the dashboard which, looks like new. Thoroughly serviced in recent years, but never fully restored. It’s a driver. – While better ergonomically than the SI, the open headlight SII E-Type lacks a lot of the grace of the original as well as a bit of the performance. This car at least remedies that with attention under the hood, but its condition leaves some things to be desired and its mixed presentation is a drag. The seller should be overjoyed to get this much for it.

Lot # 56 1960 Maserati 3500GT Prototype Spider, Body by Vignale; S/N 101505; Engine # 101505; Rosso Rubino/Tan leather; Estimate $1,000,000 – $1,200,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $800,000. – Chrome spoke outside laced Borrani wire wheels, triple Webers. – The paint is good with some minor chips at the door edges and one scratch at the boot cover. The gaps are excellent as is the chrome. The trim is fair and needs some polishing. The wheels are good and well-polished but lightly aged. The interior is excellent and appears new. The gauges show some slight age. One of three prototypes for the model and one of two shown at the Torino Motor Show. The design is similar to, but in detail different from, the production Vignale 3500GT Spiders. Restored in Italy in the 80’s and little used since. – The reported high bid represents little premium for this 3500GT’s stature as one of the Vignale Spider prototypes, which makes the decision not to accept the money more than reasonable. It’s really a very pretty car and deserves a good home where it will at least be shown so it gets some recognition.

Lot # 11 1971 Mercedes-Benz 280SE 3.5 Cabriolet; S/N 11102712001412; Engine # 11698010000699; Silver Grey Metallic/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $275,000 – $350,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $210,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $235,200. – Automatic, Becker Europa radio, air conditioning, clock, tach, wheel covers, power brakes and steering, center console, bucket seats and floor shift. – The paint is good other than some small chips and scratches. Good brightwork but the windshield frame has some light scratching. Wheel covers look new and the panel gaps are excellent. The glass has some very slight hazing. The bumpers are excellent. The interior has some wear, but is well cared for. Restored underneath, but the engine is not original to the car. – Although this car sold for $297,000 at Bonhams Scottsdale in 2017, this result is still appropriate given the age of the restoration and the lack of matching numbers.

Lot # 152 1970 Mercedes-Benz 280SE 3.5 Coupe; S/N 11102612000655; Silver Grey Metallic/Black leather; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $62,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $70,000. – 3499/230hp, automatic, floor shift, Euro headlights, fog lamps, Becker Mexico radio, air conditioning, power windows and sunroof. Includes spare, jack, data card, and service history. – Good paint, but there are a few semi deep scratches and some unevenness and wrinkles on the edges of panels and doors. The brightwork is very good, shiny and straight. The interior is good other than some deep wrinkles and even some cracks in the front seats and the rear passenger’s seat. The silver hubcaps and chrome wheel covers are in generally good condition with no scratches, peeling or fading. The lenses in the headlights and fog lamps are beginning to yellow. Supposedly owned originally by a Mercedes-Benz exec in Germany before going to Japan in 1979. Not totally original but never restored, either. – This car sold here two years ago for a fairly expensive $101,750. This no reserve result is pretty low. Its actual value is arguably somewhere in the middle, but there several other desirable Mercs of similar type and vintage in this sale, as well as elsewhere in Scottsdale, and this one failed to make an impression. It’s lavishly equipped and a good value at this price.

Lot # 6 1971 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 10901812004804; Blue Metallic/Blue; Estimate $140,000 – $180,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $92,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $103,600. – Power windows and locks, air conditioning, sunroof, Becker Europa radio, dash clock, floor shift, fog lights. – Three-owner car represented to have just 9,033 miles and mostly unrestored. Fully serviced late last year. The paint is good with some chips at the door edges. Slightly uneven gaps. The front bumper and some of the trim shows age but the rear bumper is excellent. The lenses are clear and bright. The grille is in excellent shape. The Interior presents as new, with only the driver’s seat showing slight wrinkles. The gauges are clear and bright. A remarkably well cared for SEL with the original 6.3 engine and attractive colors. – The pre-sale estimate range is staggering and even though the result is significantly less it represents a healthy premium for preservation and the 9,033 miles which leaves the new owner 867 more miles to enjoy it before it rolls over the fifth digit on the odometer and takes a huge value hit.

Lot # 39 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Coupe; S/N 1980405500378; Engine # 1989805500354; White Grey/Tan with Tartan cloth; Estimate $1,100,000 – $1,400,000; Older restoration, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,300,000 plus commission of 10.38%; Final Price $1,435,000. – Rudge wheels, blackwall tires, pushbutton radio, map nets in the doors, belly pans – The original paint is poor. The interior is good with no tears or significant wear shown. Does not have luggage or luggage straps. The brightwork is good with no pitting or scratches. Bought new by Austrian conductor Herbert von Karajan, then came to the U.S. in the 1960s. Restored to some degree in the 1970s, but the car is so aged now that it looks convincingly original. Recently pulled out storage and mechanically reawakened, but neither totally original nor all that well preserved and in need of further extensive service work (and new tires) before it can be driven. – Neither Preservation nor restored, just aged but sound and with a significant first owner history, the result is a bit generous for the condition, but within reason for the history.

Lot # 136 1977 Mercedes-Benz 450SEL 6.9 Sedan; S/N 11603612002619; Silver/Black; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $42,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $47,040. – 6834/250hp, automatic, air conditioning, Becker Mexico radio, power antenna, rear defrost, power windows, power brakes, sunroof, fog lights, manuals, alloy wheels, first aid kit. – Repainted recently with a small amount of overspray on the grille’s rubber gasket, but otherwise the paint is very good. Good panel gaps. The trim is fair and has some minor scratching, and the headlight trim lenses are aged. The rubber bumpers were detailed recently and the underbody is unrestored but well maintained. The wheels have some light scratches to the center caps. The interior is excellent. The upholstery appears recent with some minor wrinkling. Cosmetically freshened and lightly aged underneath, but a solid for the most part and very desirable 6.9. – 250hp isn’t much to propel a 4,400 pound luxury sedan down the road but in smog-regulation strangled 1977 the 450 SEL 6.9 was the king of the road among 4-door sedans with a top speed of 140 mph. It still has an exceptional reputation, which may account for the generous price it brought here.

Lot # 1 1979 Mercedes-Benz 450SLC Coupe; S/N 10702412027545; Grey Blue/Blue; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $31,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $34,720. – Tool roll, center console and floor shift, bucket seats, Becker Mexico radio, sunroof, air conditioning, cruise control, original books. – The factory paint is well cared for and presents very well. The trim is good with some scuffs on the rubber bumpers. The wheels are well detailed but with some minor chips and nicks. The interior looks practically new with only light wear to the driver’s seat. The underbody and wheel wells look undercoated. Never restored, just very well maintained and showing 31,731 believable miles. – The SLC isn’t as commonly seen as the two-seater convertible SLs, but of course its roof doesn’t go down so it’s worth less. This one’s very impressive level of preservation attracted a lot of attention, and it brought top dollar for a 450, even more than the $28,600 it sold for at Bonhams Greenwich in 2017.

Lot # 157 1986 Mercedes-Benz 560SL Roadster; S/N WDBBA48D2GA043911; Black/Black leather; Estimate $45,000 – $55,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $33,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $37,520. – Fog lights, manuals, tools, Becker Grand Prix radio, both tops, factory storage rack and cover. – Represented as 38,751 miles from new with three owners. Good paint. The original weather stripping is a bit dry. The brightwork is good, but there is some wear in the common areas like where the roof meets the windshield. The original interior is good and lightly worn on the seats. The wheels show their age with some scratches, but the tires look new. Mechanically refreshed and detailed in 2016 and showing 38,751 miles, this is a very solid and well equipped 560. – After a spike in 2015-16, 560 SL prices have started to drop but the best examples still command strong money, and this car counts. It’s a result that both parties can be happy with, although the seller probably could have gotten more for it a couple of years ago.

Lot # 65 1951 MG TD Roadster; S/N TD8672; Engine # XPAGTDLHX9120; Primrose, Red grille/Red leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $17,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $19,040. – Steel wheels with hub caps, luggage rack with rear-mounted spare, banjo steering wheel, Lucas driving lights. – Good older paint with some chipping at the doors. The wheels are excellent. The convertible top frame has chipped paint. The interior is excellent other than a lightly wrinkled seat. The engine bay is well detailed with some chipped surfaces. Restored in the late 1980s and today in better than average driver condition. – A spot-on result for a professionally restored but aged TD. It will be a rewarding car for weekend drives, and didn’t set back the new owner much in the grand scheme of things.

Lot # 114 1949 Packard Custom Eight Victoria Convertible; S/N 225993113; Engine # G609570C; White/Red leather, Beige cloth; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $72,800. – 356/160hp, 3-speed, overdrive, fender skirts, Cormorant mascot, power windows, clock, wheel covers, – The paint is fair with several chips and some overspray in spots. The panel gaps are even and most of the brightwork is good, but smaller items like door handles are not. Polished bits like trim at the top of the doors are oxidized and have scratches. The carpet and seats appear new, but the gauges are aged, and the glass vent windows are starting to delaminate. The convertible top has seam issues, and appears to be slowly coming loose from the frame. Cosmetically restored and not a great example, but this car’s main appeal in that it was used as Doc Brown’s car in all three Back to the Future movies. – It may have had a fair bit of screen time, but this isn’t the car from Back to the Future that everybody remembers. Even so, the bidders were taken enough with it to afford this Packard about twice the price any other example in this mediocre condition would expect to bring.

Lot # 104 1934 Packard Twelve 1108 Tourer, Body by Rollston; S/N 1108527; Engine # 901985; Black/Red leather; Brown top; Estimate $300,000 – $350,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $180,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $201,600. – Artillery wheels with hub caps and trim rings, wide whitewalls, Trippe safety lights, dual enclosed sidemount spares with mirrors, luggage trunk, wood dash, wind wings. – Well done older restoration showing a little age. The paint is good but has light detail scratches and some chips around the gaps. The wheels are excellent. The chrome is well polished but shows some oxidation on the front bumper. The front left-hand driver’s light has a fallen logo. And the interior shows some slight age with a few slightly loose pieces but is excellent overall. Inherently collectible as a rare Rollston-bodied V-12, but there isn’t much in the way of history represented and it shows age in plenty of spots. – A handsome and unusual Packard Twelve with touring coachwork, increasingly supplanted in the mid-Thirties by coachwork with better weather protection. It has been well-maintained since restoration and is a very sound value at this price.

Lot # 128 1939 Packard Twelve 1708 Convertible Sedan; S/N 12532015; Engine # B602102; Light Green, Green fenders/Brown leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $95,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $106,400. – 3-speed with added overdrive, hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemount spares with mirrors, luggage trunk, Lalique Tete d’Aigle radiator mascot, column shift, division window, Trippe lights, radio. – Replacement engine. Paint is fair with chipping at gaps, some scratches and wear through from polishing. Hood hinges look worn. Grille surround is hazed. Other chrome is starting to show light pitting. Bumpers are good with only light aging. The top shows light aging. The paint on the wheels has some chipping. Interior is good with only light wrinkling to the seats. The gauges are clear and bright. Replacement engine and not as much history represented as would and should be expected with a Packard of this type. – While this quality Packard Twelve Convertible Sedan would have been seriously expensive at the pre-sale low estimate, it is equally an unexpected value at the result it brought here. The replacement engine weighs upon its value, but not enough to account for a hammer bid under $100K. This is a very good value in a prime example of a Classic Packard.

Lot # 132 1959 Porsche 356A Convertible D, Body by Drauz; S/N 86501; Engine # 74655; Meissen Blue/Tan; Tan top; Estimate $220,000 – $260,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $200,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $224,000. – Kardex, Abarth exhaust, Marchal driving lights, woodrim steering wheel, radio, tonneau cover, tool kit, extra transaxle and numbers matching engine included with the sale but not fitted currently. – Excellent paint with only a few minor imperfections on the hood. The trim is good with a few minor scratches and the windshield surround is hazed. The gaps are excellent, as are the wheels. Rubber floor mats show age but the seats look new. Rarer than a Speedster but not more valuable, this car has been cosmetically restored to good driving standards. – The clever Maine license place “IIIVVI” is not as good as “CCCLVI” but someone probably already had that registration. This is a generous but understandable price for a sound and usable Convertible D.

Lot # 107 1958 Porsche 356A Speedster, Body by Reutter; S/N 84348; Engine # 68159; Elfenbein/Cashmere leather with corduroy inserts; Estimate $350,000 – $425,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $290,000 plus commission of 11.72%; Final Price $324,000. – Hub caps, Vredestein tires, gold brightwork, Glasspar hardtop, Nardi woodrim steering wheel, books, tools, jack, spare, luggage, Porsche CofA and original delivery paper. – Final year Speedster with four owners from new. Represented as a European delivery example with the matching numbers engine. Very good older paint in Elfenbein, a Mercedes-Benz color. Very good chrome. There is a scratch on the steering wheel and a little discoloration on the drivers’ seat. A really neat car, desirably equipped and in attractive if not quite the original colors. But it was restored in the early 1990s and doesn’t look fresh. – This price is a fair balance between the age of the car’s restoration and its desirable features and it’s a result both parties should be satisfied with.

Lot # 45 1961 Porsche 356B Super 90 Roadster, Body by d’Ieteren Freres; S/N 89229; Engine # 802123; Condor Yellow/Black; Black top; Estimate $190,000 – $220,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $180,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $201,600. – Vredestein tires, boot cover, gold brightwork, books, tools, jack, luggage rack (not fitted), Kardex and CofA. – Same owner from 1962 to last year, and restored in 2012. Nearly spotless fully redone engine bay. Some chips in front of the passenger’s door but otherwise very good older paint in attractive Condor Yellow. Very good interior that looks fresh and the gauges are bright and clear, but there is a paint crack on the dash. Not a show car, but close. – This is a generous result but the new owner can be reassured by the quality of the work and thorough presentation that it is full value for the considerable amount of money spent.

Lot # 53 1968 Porsche 911 Coupe; S/N 11835019; Engine # 3380124; Silver Metallic/Black leatherette; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $90,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $100,800. – Sportomatic, Vredestein tires, manuals and tools, Kardex, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, gold brightwork, tinted glass, 911 S instruments and oil tank. – Very rare Sportomatic. Represented as highly original but looks better than many restored cars. Spotless and maintained underneath. Excellent paint and brightwork. Only the front bumper has been repainted. Incredibly good original interior. It’s something of a standout already with its semi-automatic transmission, but the level of preservation also really sets it apart and it has been an award winner at several events. – Sportomatics are a rare sight, in large part because they were never popular when Porsche built them. This car brought an extremely expensive $286,000 at RM Amelia Island in 2017, then hammered not sold at a $190,000 high bid at RM’s Porsche 70th Anniversary sale back in October. It crossed the block here at no reserve and with a much more realistic presale estimate. The seller was surely hoping for more, but the car’s notoriety has worn off with one too many auction appearances and the Scottsdale bidders were fair.

Lot # 160 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe; S/N WP0AB0912KS120917; Black/Black; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $82,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $92,400. – Fuchs wheels, tool roll, manuals. – The black paint has some light scratching but is quite good for original. The wheels are well polished, but the bumpers have some slight aging. The interior is excellent and shows very minimal wear. A three-owner car showing 18,191 believable miles. – This car isn’t exactly a standout in terms of its equipment or its colors, but the miles are low, it has every piece of literature and tool you’d want, and it has been babied since new. That all matters to Porsche folks, and despite being the last car of the sale it brought a very strong price, although not as strong as the $105,600 it brought here two years ago.

Lot # 130 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe; S/N WP0AB096XKS450171; Guards Red/Black leather; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $67,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $75,600. – Alloy wheels, power windows, air conditioning, aftermarket cassette stereo, sunroof. – The paint is very good, but the weather stripping is misaligned and warped, especially around the sunroof. The interior is good other than some wear on the shifter and seats. Showing age commensurate with the 47,932 miles represented as from new. – From the first year of the 964, and the first 911 model to have the all-wheel drive system developed on the 959. Naturally aspirated 964s rarely cost this much. This was surprisingly expensive especially for a car with age and mileage. Plus, this sale was not without other better and more interesting Porsches to choose from. A win for the seller.

Lot # 137 2008 Porsche 911 GT2 Coupe; S/N WP0AD29908S796206; Black/Grey leather; Estimate $300,000 – $375,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $267,500 plus commission of 11.87%; Final Price $299,250. – Yellow calipers, carbon fiber interior trim, Sport Chrono package, Bose surround sound, aluminum pedals, yellow interior stitching, tool kit, books. – 400 miles and like new. – This car started at a little less than 200 grand when it was new, or about two-and-a-half times a standard 911 at the time. But limited-production late model high-performance Porsches like the GT2 tend never to get less expensive and in a lot of cases just get pricier. This was a fair, appropriate result.

Lot # 126 1987 Porsche 911 Turbo 930 Coupe Slantnose; S/N WP0JB0931HS051499; Engine # 68H01625; Black/Black leather; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $192,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $215,600. – Factory slant nose, black painted Fuchs wheels, sunroof, limited-slip, tool roll, jack, spare, air conditioning Porsche CofA and original window sticker documented. – Represented as just 7,003 miles. Very good paint. The wheels are excellent and the tires look new. All of the weather-stripping is very good as well, with only the stripping around the sunroof showing any wear. The bumpers and their rubber impact absorbers are very good. The interior is very god with only some light wrinkles on both front seats. A well maintained original with desirable options. – Low miles, very good condition, full maintenance records and factory slant nose came together here to result in a very high price for an ’87 930, but it was no more than the car deserves. It is a rare survivor and brought to auction reflecting meticulous preparation that should give its new owner great confidence in its care and attention.

Lot # 59 1976 Porsche 911S Coupe; S/N 9116200180; Engine # 6460090; Platinum Metallic/Tan vinyl with pattern cloth inserts; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $72,800. – 2687/165hp, 5-speed, Signature Edition package, Pirelli tires, sunroof, Blaupunkt cassette stereo, air conditioning. – One of 200 ‘Signature Edition’ 911s built in 1976 with special paint, wheels, trim and interior color. Fully disassembled at some point. Excellent paint and interior. Spotless wheels. Fresh engine bay. A ’76 911S isn’t really anything special, but this car’s condition plus the Special Edition package make it a standout even at a sale like this. – It was a standout two years and 70 miles ago as well, when it sold for $93,500. The 911 frenzy has settled down a bit since then, and this is still a very strong result for a ’76 911, again with most of the value coming from the Signature Edition features.

Lot # 124 1969 Porsche 911T Coupe; S/N 119121620; Engine # 6195953; Sand Beige/Black leatherette; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $95,200. – 1992/110hp, Weber carbs, 5-speed, Fuchs wheels, gold brightwork, Blaupunkt Frankfurt radio, books, tools, jack, window sticker. – The paint is very good, although there are a few chips on the hood. Hood repair or replacement is evident, as there’s is a high amount of orange peel that is not visible on any of the other panels. The Fuchs wheels are decent with some scarring and the paint is fading through the entirety of all four wheels. The driver’s side mirror is showing a small amount of surface corrosion or oxidation. The brightwork is very good with no pitting or scratches. The interior is very good, with the only signs of wear being a slight indentation on the driver’s seat. A mostly well maintained original early 911 with one owner until last year, <47,000 miles and recently brought back to running order after a few years of storage. – Although the 911T was the base model in 1969 and therefore worth the least today, this car’s very impressive level of originality that you just can’t duplicate plus its fairly unusual and attractive colors brought it an appropriately strong price.

Lot # 41 1973 Porsche 911T Targa; S/N 9113110614; Engine # 6131588; Light Ivory/Black; Estimate $130,000 – $160,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $105,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $117,600. – 2341/134hp, 5-speed, Fuchs wheels, Pirelli tires, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, factory air conditioning, tools and books, Porsche CofA. – The original paint is good with a few spots on the hood that appear to be touched up and are starting to blister. The wheels are pretty scratched up. Under the wheel wells there is quite a bit of surface rust and oxidation. The black front bucket seats are in good shape with hardly any signs of wear. Same goes for the rest of the interior. A highly original, well-equipped and complete 911 with 21,435 miles from new, but not a time capsule car and looks like it could use some attention underneath. – This is the base-model 911 T that, while original, is far from a time-capsule example. The air conditioning and 5-speed add to its appeal, but this is a huge price for its originality.

Lot # 4 1973 Porsche 914 2.0 Targa; S/N 4732923664; Delphi Green Metallic/Brown vinyl; Estimate $45,000 – $65,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $52,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $58,240. – Alloy wheels, tinted glass, fog lights, dealer installed AM radio, Porsche CofA, manuals, jack. – One respray in the original color presents very well. The lenses are clear. The trim and bumpers are well detailed. The interior is excellent and original but there is some scuffing at the top of the B-pillar. The wheels show oxidization but could detail out. In storage from 1989 to 2018 and represented as 32,743 original miles. – A lot of money for a 95-horsepower Volkswagen-powered two-seater, but well preserved four-cylinder 914s have been commanding big prices lately. RM and Gooding have each sold a lower mile car for $93,500 within the past couple of years, so with that in mind this price doesn’t seem as out of line.

Lot # 155 1938 Rolls-Royce 25/30 Open Tourer, Body by Park Ward; S/N GGR54; Engine # J26Y; Cream, Chocolate Brown fenders/Parchment leather; Parchment cloth top; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Older restoration, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $89,600. – RHD. Body color wheel discs, cutaway fender skirts, suicide front doors, dual sidemount spares, wing mirrors, dual horns, dip beam light, division window. – Fair paint that presents well from a distance but close inspection shows some bubbling and grainy areas. Some chipping at the doors, which are starting to sag slightly. The wheels show notable chipping, the top is faded and there are loose window seals. The interior shows age and the wood finish is peeling. The horns do not match and the chrome bumpers are flaking. Recently pulled out of storage and needs quite a bit, both on top and underneath, as well as mechanically. – Not sold at a $57,000 high bid at RM Boca Raton in 2004. A stately and elegant car, but needing pretty much comprehensive mechanical attention, the result here shows that someone still sees the potential in this 25/30, which is easy to agree with. It’s an outstanding automobile, just old and neglected.

Lot # 50 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Convertible Coupe Regent, Body by Brewster; S/N S109PR; Engine # 300090; Putty Brown, Green fenders/Tan leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $250,000 – $325,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Post-block sale at $167,411 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $187,500. – Polished wheel discs, Lester tires, dual sidemount spares, suicide doors, luggage trunk, wood dash, rumble seat, golf bag door. – Very good paint, brightwork and top. Very good interior but the steering wheel is unfortunately quite worn. An older concours restoration that earned a class third at Pebble Beach in 1997 and still showing well including an AACA Grand National award in 2002. No longer a winner, but very good for driving events. – This car sold for an appropriate $236,500 at Bonhams Scottsdale last year and the result here is quite a surprise, even closed post-block on unspecified terms. It’s a good car and could have brought what it did last year without being either expensive or a surprise.

Lot # 19 1961 Rolls-Royce Phantom V Coupe, Body by James Young; S/N 5LBV69; Engine # PV34B; Maroon, Silver/Tan leather; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $185,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $207,200. – Wheel covers, whitewalls, amber fog lights, column shift, original pushbutton radio, air conditioning. – One of two James Young-bodied coupes. The paint is good other than one large chip on the passenger’s door. The white parts of the tires are beginning to yellow. The front wheel covers are duller than the rears and have a few scratches. Elegant and very rare, but any restoration work was carried out many years ago and according to Gooding it will need further sorting before regular use. – The coachwork on this Phantom V is one of only two such built by James Young and it is a visual surprise, unexpectedly missing two rear doors on an otherwise capacious notchback design. It’s a “double-take” car, and effectively, too. The condition and needed further service is an issue, but its distinctive design and luxury make it a sold value at this price.

Lot # 145 1957 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud I Drophead Coupe, Body by H.J. Mulliner; S/N LSDD146; Engine # SD73; Black/Beige leather; Beige top; Estimate $450,000 – $600,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $375,000 plus commission of 11.33%; Final Price $417,500. – Automatic, wheel covers, Goodyear whitewalls, dual wing mirrors, badge bar, Lucas fog lights, boot cover, factory air conditioning, original Motorola radio, rear seat tables. – Three-owner car and one of a dozen original left-hand drive examples. Very good older paint and chrome. Even door gaps, the fit on the trunk lid is a little erratic. The RR badge on the rear bumper is scratched up. The trunk handle is scratched up as well. Very good interior with excellent wood. Ordered new by an East Coast socialite and spent many years on display at the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum. A few small flaws aside, this is a mostly fantastic older restoration of a very rare and desirably configured classic Rolls. – Very rare, desirable and valuable, this car was appropriately discounted for its age and flaws. It previously hammered not sold at a $525,000 high bid at RM Sotheby’s Monterey in 2017.

Lot # 61 1965 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III LWB Sedan, Body by Mulliner Park Ward; S/N LCGL1; Engine # CL1G; Masons Black/Beige leather; Estimate $100,000 – $130,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $84,000. – Power windows and antenna, tinted glass, power division window, Lucas fog lights, later cassette stereo, original tools. – An older well done restoration now showing some age. The paint is fair with some cracking as well as chips from driving. The cracking is heavy at the C pillar joint and between the rear window and trunk. The chrome is fair. It has polishing swirl, some chipping and small rubs. Some of the lamp lenses are aged and the wheel pin striping is worn randomly. The leather is a bit aged. A desirable U.S. delivery car and inherently elegant, but aged and not particularly striking in its condition. – While stately and imposing as any long-wheelbase Silver Cloud is, this car failed to impress despite its unusual equipment and it brought an unexpectedly low price.

Lot # 63 1959 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia Coupe, Body by Karmann; S/N 2168745; Red, Black roof/Black vinyl with Red cloth inserts; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $57,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $64,400. – Wheel covers, whitewalls, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, Denzel-tuned high-performance 65hp engine, owner’s manual, jack and tool roll, dash clock. – Some tiny blisters on the front bumper and a small dent in the windshield frame. Small chip on the passenger’s door. Small crack on the tail. A few light scratches on the windows. Some cracks on the steering wheel rim but otherwise very good fully restored interior. Very clean restored underbody. Quite a bit of quality work was put into this car and from only a few feet away it’s a showstopper. Up close, however, there are a fair number of flaws. At the end of the day, it’s a very good car by Karmann-Ghia standards that also has desirable accessories and a rare hotter engine. – This is an extremely expensive Karmann Ghia, especially considering that it’s a coupe, but given all the rare accessories, the Denzel engine and the quality of its restoration, this isn’t an entirely unreasonable result.

Lot # 101 1959 Volkswagen Type 2 Kombi Mail Van; S/N 494959; Engine # 5504153; Red, Gold Royal Mail graphics/Grey vinyl; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Truck restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $37,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $41,440. – Painted hub caps and bumpers – Formerly a Canadian Royal Mail vehicle, found in the woods and restored to its original specs. The paint is good, although there is some orange peel as well as small imperfections in the usual place where the roof meets the side panels. The Royal Mail graphics have been painted on and look very good. A neat, unusual and well restored Transporter. – This will probably start more conversations at any VW show than a shiny 23-Window, even though at this result it’s a fraction of the price.

Lot # 146 1951 Willys Jeepster Station Wagon; S/N 651AA111906; Engine # 1S18345; Brown, Tan/Dark Brown vinyl; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $30,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $33,600. – 161/75hp six, 3-speed, overdrive, hub caps, blackwalls, column-shift, three-row seating, radio, spare, chrome bumpers and grille bars. – Some paint masking issues where color change happens but the finish is mostly good. The windshield is delaminating. The chrome is excellent. The interior is very good. Restored about 20 years ago and not perfect, but it still has a lot of eyeball and doesn’t really need anything before taking it out to enjoy. – Like a Jeepster Phaeton this Station Wagon is a great family weekend car. Load it up with kids, dogs, beach gear, coolers and picnic baskets, take it off on an excursion and have a memorable experience. The detritus on the way home (sand, leaves, ants and trash) are easily swept clean, leaving great memories. It will sell for this much next time, even if there are some dog treats left under the seats.

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