Gooding & Company, Fashion Square, Scottsdale, January 17-18, 2020

Gooding & Company had the top sale of the Arizona auction week, Ferrari F50 sold for $3,222,500.

Gooding sold eight lots on hammer bids of $1 million or more and missed on only one 7-figure car.

That sounds impressive, but in fact the average and median sale values, not to mention the two-day total of $36.1 million, were substantially below the two prior years.

And that’s the way it was in Arizona this year.

Notably here, as well as at the other Arizona auctions, the best cars brought good money while cars with issues brought substantially less, a quest for quality abetted by plenty of inventory that gave buyers the flexibility to pick and choose.

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2020 124/138 89.8% 71% 11.3% $291,446 $131,600

[45.2%]

$36,139,290
2019 106/124 85.5% 78.3% 1.9% $456,853 $162,400

[35.69%]

$48,426,380
2018 110/129 85.3% 76.4% 7.3% $438,413 $137,500

[31.4%]

$48,225,400
2017 106/126 84.1% 67% 9.4% $315,047 $148,500

[47.1%]

$33,395,000

This report includes details on 57 of the 138 lots offered thanks to the efforts of Andrew Newton. They are sorted by Marque, Model, Body Style and Year.

Gooding’s Buyer’s Premium was 12% of the first $250,000 and 10% over that.


Lot # 37 1960 Alfa Romeo Giulietta SZ-1 Coupe, Body by Zagato; S/N AR1012600033; Engine # AR0054835328; Red/Red vinyl, Black piping; Estimate $500,000 – $600,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $390,000. – 1,779cc/120hp engine, 40DCOE Weber carbs, 5-speed, bolt-on alloy wheels, Cinturato CN36 tires, braced rollbar, leather rim steering wheel. – Raced when new in Italy without significant success. Later 1750 engine, last competed at the Monterey Historics in 1980 and ignored since then. Uninspired old repaint with some prep flaws visible. Dull aluminum trim, silver painted Alfa grille. Edge and other chips. Old undercoat in the wheel wells, The wheels have been repainted over scratches and hubcap chips. Poor fitting door seals. A desirable Alfa that deserved better treatment. – The reported high bid here is, if anything, generous for the undistinguished racing history, swapped engine and neglected condition of this SZ-1. If there was money at, or close to, the reported high bid the seller’s determination to keep it was misguided.

Lot # 123 1956 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Veloce Alleggerita Sprint; S/N AR149302258; Engine # AR131559056; Blue/Cream, Blue vinyl; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $165,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $184,800. – 4-speed, bolt-on alloy wheels, Michelin XAS tires, Carello headlights. – Poor old repaint, dull chrome and aluminum trim. Torn driver’s seat cushion. Aged but orderly engine compartment. Comes with the original engine block, 1315 30107. A desirable project but perhaps good enough to enter a Mille Miglia or two before restoring it. – The many needs of this lightweight Giulietta are fully recognized in the price it brought here at Fashion Square and leave the new owner with many possibilities, not least simply enjoying it as it is and taking advantage of its phenomenal handling. Restoration would cost a fortune, but is possible without going underwater with this cost basis.

Lot # 64 1973 Alfa Romeo Montreal Coupe, Body by Bertone; S/N AR1425633; Orange/Black leather, Tan suede; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $46,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $51,520. – 2593/227hp, ZF 5-speed, Campagnolo wheels, Michelin X tires, woodrim steering wheel, power windows. – Represented with a refurbishment in 2017-18, prior to which the engine had been rebuilt at some point. The paint is fresh, impossible to ignore and mostly good, but there are a few masking errors near the windows and a few runs on the headlight doors. Lightly scratched rear glass. Lightly pitted brightwork and door handles. Newer seat covers and the carpets look new, but the rest of the interior is original and showing its age. Unrestored but maintained underneath. A Montreal is a sweet car with a great soundtrack and this one will get the job done, especially given its recent mechanical sorting, but its condition is a little disappointing up close. – This is a modest price for a fundamentally good Montreal, but it’s yet another example of an imperfect car attracting mediocre money. Across town, RM Sotheby’s had another Montreal in slightly better but still imperfect shape, and it brought the slightly better but still modest price of $64,400. [Offered for $98,500 on 2/18/2020 by an East Coast dealer.]

Lot # 108 2003 Aston Martin DB AR1 Convertible; S/N SCFAE62313K800025; Titanium Grey/Pacific Blue leather; Estimate $275,000 – $350,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $227,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $254,800. – Full service history, Becker CD stereo. – The 25th of 99 built and represented with 3,250 miles. Other than very light wrinkling on the driver’s seat, it looks new and it looks fantastic. – For something with a production run of just 99 units, these distinctive Zagato roadsters pop up at auction with surprising regularity. None of them are high mileage cars per se, but the odometer reading seems to have a huge impact on values, with prices ranging from the low 200s to well over 300. The result for this example is realistic.

Lot # 69 1965 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III Phase 2 Convertible; S/N HBJ8L27938; Engine # 29KRUH2717; Silver Blue/Navy Blue leather; Blue top; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $66,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $73,920. – Chrome wire wheels, Dunlop SP Sport tires, cross-drilled rotors up front, drums in rear, boot cover, banjo steering wheel, overdrive, heater. – Matching numbers. Very good chrome. Excellent paint. New tires. Very good interior with negligible wrinkling on the driver’s seat. It’s an older restoration from 2009 but kept very clean and hardly ever driven. The work almost certainly cost more than the car will sell for, and it still needs absolutely nothing. – The Big Healey market is a bit soft, with even excellent cars like this failing to bring the prices they did only a few years ago. Now, they represent a good buying opportunity for people to get an attractive classic British convertible that has already had a ton spent on it.

Lot # 138 1961 Bentley S2 Continental Drophead Coupe, Body by Park Ward; S/N BC22LBY; Engine # BC21BC; Burgundy/Tan leather; Estimate $240,000 – $280,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $140,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $156,800. – Wheel covers, store brand all season tires, Flying B hood ornament, Lucas driving lights, dual wing mirrors, boot cover, column shift, air conditioning, Smiths dash clock. – One of 124 dropheads and 65 in left-hand drive. Sound older paint with a few very light scratches, lightly scratches radiator shell. Tired chrome. Mostly good interior but there is significant wear on the driver’s seat. Tidy underneath. This car got a high quality restoration but that was many years ago, and now it’s more suited for driving than showing. – Driving, all things considered, or at least boulevard cruising, is what the Continental should be doing and at this price it can be taken on the road with some confidence. The new owner has a Bentley to be proud of and at a modest price to be proud of, too.

Lot # 35 1937 BMW 328 Roadster; S/N 85059; Engine # 85059; Light Green/Green leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $350,000 – $450,000; Unrestored original, 4- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $750,000 plus commission of 10.67%; Final Price $830,000. – 1,971cc/80hp inline six, three Solex downdraft carbs, 4-speed, green centerlock disc wheels, Semperit tires, cowl-mounted trafficators, rear-mounted spare, folding windshield. – Acquired by Edward Giller, an Army Air Corps Squadron Commander, in Germany in 1945 and followed him and his family through various important assignments in the U.S. which eventually saw him promoted to Major General. It has remained with the Giller family until today, was regularly driven until this decade and was recently recommissioned by White Post Restorations but only to drive onto the auction podium standards. Represented as the original, matching numbers components, verified by BMW Group Classic. Scratched, chipped old cheap repaint, worn old upholstery. Dull brightwork. Unrestored, dirty and tired. The engine smokes badly. Sound, solid and complete but needs everything. – This is a breathtaking result for any BMW 328 without racing history, let alone one that has such extensive needs, and reflects a value based predominantly on its single family ownership for 3/4 of a century and preservation in complete, never taken apart, condition. It will have to make the most of Preservation class concours appearances to earn back some of its massive premium, and even that will require extensive mechanical work to be safely and reliably driven. Once restoration starts the added costs will sink it further underwater. It’s a car bought for the passion of owning it, not a rationally considered value decision and only if that is sufficiently rewarding to the new owner (and, it should be remarked, the underbidder) is its price a reflection of value. By any other standards this is a magnanimously expensive proposition.

Lot # 32 1967 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 194677S118069; Engine # 7118069V0322HT; Rally Red/Red vinyl; Black cloth top; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Unrestored original, 5+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $38,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $42,560. – 327/350hp L79, 4-speed, Rally wheels, red line tires, hardtop, Protect-O-Plate. – A barn find ’67 convertible used until the mid-1990s then stored until 2015. Cracked, crazed, rubbed through and faded original paint with some barn find dust sprinkled on for effect. The chrome is decent for original. Some surface rust on the wheels. Faded dash and gauges, and there are scratches on a lot of the trim, but the seats look remarkably good and may be replacements. A seemingly complete and reasonably solid project car. – While a dusty barn find certainly makes a statement in an otherwise glossy high-dollar auction environment like Gooding & Company, L79s Corvettes aren’t exactly rare. It isn’t a unique buying opportunity, and this car didn’t make the same kind of statement as something like a Ferrari would have. It’s for someone explicitly interested in a C2 project and the new owner didn’t get carried away with bidding. It’s a project car for project car money.

Lot # 46 1960 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet Series II, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N 2075GT; Engine # 2075GT; Red/Tan leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $1,300,000 – $1,500,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,325,000 plus commission of 10.38%; Final Price $1,462,500. – 2,953cc/240hp V-12, 4-speed, overdrive, Dunlop disc brakes, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin X tires, Pianola AM-FM radio, Marchal headlights, unrestored hardtop. – Represented as the matching numbers engine (internal # 498F) and documented with a copy of the Ferrari build sheet (but not Ferrari Classiche certified.) Restored in the early Naughts with very good paint, chrome and interior with only slight stretch and moderate creasing. Very good chrome. There are some paint flaws, particularly over the left headlight. The underbody is nearly like new. From the featured Ferrari Spider Collection. – Unlike the first series of 250 GT Pinin Farina cabriolets, which were competitive on track and a variation on the Tour de France, the later Series II Pinin Farina cabriolets were more sedate road cars based upon the series production 250 GT Pinin Farina coupe. They’re valued at a quarter or so of the Series I cabriolets which is borne out by this good but not outstanding example’s result, including a modest bump from the rare (but unrestored) hardtop.

Lot # 122 1981 Ferrari 308 GTSi Spider, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFAA02A7B0036683; Black/Black leather; Estimate $90,000 – $110,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $67,200. – 2927cc/205hp, Borletti air conditioning, power windows, Blaupunkt cassette stereo, 5-spoke alloy wheels, TRX tires. – Very good fresh repaint but they neglected to wet sand the front fender vents which are disgracefully orange peely. Cracked front bumper corners. Gorgeous new interior and bright, crisp engine compartment although the emission equipment label is lumpy, peeling and discolored, a curious oversight. Timing belt serviced two years ago. A beautiful Ferrari, but troublingly presented with oversights that call into question the attention to unseen details. – The bidders at Fashion Square didn’t like this Ferrari very much and it changed hands at a price that reflects its issues.

Lot # 45 1985 Ferrari 308 GTSi QV Spider, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFUA13AXF0054571; Red/Black leather; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $47,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $52,640. – 2,927cc/230hp, 5-speed, Borletti air conditioning, power windows, aftermarket stereo, 5-spoke alloy wheels, Pirelli tires. – A few tiny chips on the nose, more like sand than stones. Fresh unblemished upholstery. Clean gauges and interior controls. The odometer shows 34,014 miles, substantiated by CarFax and AutoCheck reports. Reportedly belt serviced late last year. Ferrari Spider Collection. – This QV is a better car than the price it brought gives it credit for, by a substantial margin. There is nothing sketchy about its presentation or history, an observation borne out by the recent belt service. The new owner got a solid value.

Lot # 117 1967 Ferrari 330 GTC Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 10639; Engine # 10639; Red/Black leather; Estimate $750,000 – $900,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $425,000. – 3967cc/300hp, centerlock alloy wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Blaupunkt multiband radio, power windows, Monza leather rim steering wheel, air conditioning. – Originally owned by Aristotle Onassis. Stored for some three decades after an old restoration. Poor repaint with flaws and prep work visible. Fair chrome. Chipped and scarred wheels. good newer upholstery. Dirty original undercoat in the wheelwells. Superficially recommissioned to run and drive across the auction block but big bills await the next owner. – Gooding & Company has enjoyed unrivalled success with long-stored and neglected cars, usually with an accretion of dust, dirt and other crud. The consignor cleaned this 330 GTC up and completely obviated the peculiar appeal of a scuzzy barn find. The bidders considered it as the rough GTC that it is, noted its voluminous needs and superficial old repaint and valued it appropriately as a neglected old restoration project.

Lot # 154 1967 Ferrari 330 GTS Spider, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 10111; Engine # 10111; Giallo/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $2,200,000 – $2,500,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,800,000 plus commission of 10.28%; Final Price $1,985,000. – 3967cc/300hp, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, power windows, Ferrari Red Book certification. – 2012 FCA Platinum Award winner. Very good paint, chrome and interior. The driver’s door closes slightly proud and has a touched up spot on the back edge. The underbody is orderly with a bit of road dust, but both are hardly worth mention. It is an outstanding, crisp, carefully restored 330 GTS. – Hammered sold for $400,000 under its historically reasonable low estimate, this 330 GTS isn’t – as it might otherwise appear – a good deal, just a realistic adjustment to prevailing market attitudes. Its Giallo paintwork is showy even though it does not compliment the Pininfarina coachwork as well as the Grigio Ferro of the 330 GTS offered at Bonhams yesterday which sold for $1,710,000.

Lot # 41 1990 Ferrari 348ts Spider, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFFG36A5L0087357; Red/Beige leather; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $72,800. – 3405cc/312hp, 5-speed, power windows, well-documented, tool kit, two sets of keys, shop manual. – 4,643 miles, unrestored, factory orange peel. Stretched driver’s seat cushion and scuffed bolster. Belt serviced in 2014 with under 100 miles since. Ferrari Spider Collection. – There is a modest, and fully understandable, premium for originality, low miles and careful preservation in the result here but not enough to make it expensive.

Lot # 5 1999 Ferrari 360 Modena Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFYR51A8X0119312; Black/Black leather; Estimate $120,000 – $150,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $82,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $92,400. – 6-speed manual, red calipers, Eagle F1 tires. – Represented with 13,000 miles. Some tiny stone chips on the nose, headlights and mirrors. No wear to speak of in the interior. Clean engine bay. Belt and fluid service last November. A lightly used 360, but the third pedal and that shifter between the seats automatically makes it a noteworthy car. – The later the Ferrari, the harder it is to find one with a manual, and although there are quite a few 6-speed 360s on the market to choose from at any given time, they’re coveted by buyers who are usually willing to pay a third more for a manual than an equivalent paddle-shifted car. This is an appropriate result for a consistently maintained, lightly used 6-speed car.

Lot # 42 1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 14779; Engine # B1316; Argento Metallizzato/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $2,000,000 – $2,400,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,750,000 plus commission of 10.29%; Final Price $1,930,000. – 4390cc/352hp, 5-speed, power windows, Becker Mexico cassette stereo, Veglia air conditioning, Marelli ignition modules. – Very good older paint, barely used upholstery, clean engine compartment showing some age but few miles. Represented as 39,747 miles from new, once owned by Hollywood director Sydney Pollack and the subject of a colorful expropriation in Mexico. Most recently restored in 2001 then cosmetically freshened in 2010. A quite exceptionally well-documented and meticulously maintained Daytona Spider – Sold by RM at Monterey in 1999 for $308,000, then offered by Christie’s at Monterey in 2004 where it was bid to a reported $450,000. Gooding sold it at Scottsdale in 2008 in a post-block transaction for $1,290,000 after its most recent restoration and it is still pristine after its most recent freshening. In 1999 it showed 38,814 miles, with less than 1,000 added in the last two decades, and it brought an appropriate result here.

Lot # 136 1984 Ferrari 400i 2-Dr. Sedan, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFEB07B000054119; Mahogany Brown/Tan leather; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $117,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $131,600. – 4,823cc/310hp, 5-speed, air conditioning, power windows, brakes and steering, Ferrari alloy wheels, Michelin TRX tires, Clifford alarm, removable radio, Momo leather rim steering wheel. – Gorgeous highly and accurately detailed engine compartment. Clearcoated original paint cracked at the hood opening corners and orange peel above the rear window. Good but aged original upholstery. Clean original undercoat. This may be the best 400i in the world. – The bidders were suitably impressed by the condition, originality and particularly the 5-speed of this 400i, a model that usually has an “a” appended to indicate an automatic transmission. They paid generously for it, exceeding even the usually optimistic pre-sale estimate range of $80,000-$100,000.

Lot # 57 2018 Ferrari 488 GTB Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFF79ALA3J0233579; Metallic Blue/Red cloth; Estimate $375,000 – $425,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $280,000. – 3902cc/661hp Twin Turbo. paddle shift, Red calipers, Michelin tires, SF shields, air conditioning, power windows. – 100-ish miles and like new. 70th Anniversary livery “The Heartthrob” – Apparently “The Heartthrob” didn’t get anyone’s heart throbbing as the reported high bid was ordinary 488 GTB money.

Lot # 124 2020 Ferrari 488 Pista Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFF90HLA9L0249378; Rosso Corsa, White, Metallic Blue stripes/Blu Scuro Alcantara, cloth, White stripe; Estimate $475,000 – $550,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $360,000. – SF shields, matte grey wheels, Yellow calipers, carbon fiber interior trim. – 50 miles and like new. – Dealers would have us believe these are $500,000 cars and optioned up on top of the base 488 Pista’s $350,000 MSRP they come close out the door of an accommodating dealer; this one had a sticker of $382,669. The bidders in Gooding’s marquee at Fashion Square didn’t agree and offered a small premium over the sticker price (after adding in the buyer’s premium), not enough to see it move on.

Lot # 158 2017 Ferrari 488 Spider Convertible, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFF80AMA6H0226326; Giallo Tre Strati/Black leather; Estimate $400,000 – $475,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $330,000 plus commission of 11.52%; Final Price $368,000. – 3902cc/660hp Twin Turbo, 7-speed paddle shift, Yellow calipers, carbon ceramic brakes, matte grey wheels, SF shields, various Ferrari documents and tchotchke. – Under 1,000 miles and unblemished. A 70th Anniversary livery patterned on the original Dino 206 (No. 41). $450,000 sticker price including $55,915 for the 70th Anniversary paint job. – Ferrari has plumbed the reaches of commemorative regalia with the 70th Anniversary models which are too numerous for anyone (except Cathy Roush at Ferrari Market Letter) to catalog and they continue to bring premium prices. Their appeal is limited, as manifested by the frequency with which they show up at auctions and in FML; people buy them to stay on Ferrari’s good list, then unload promptly to free up discretionary capital for the next “limited production” (read “specially configured and dressed-up”) show-off Ferrari. At $100,000 under sticker the seller took a hit.

Lot # 131 1965 Ferrari 500 Superfast SI Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 6305SF; Engine # 6305; Black/Tan leather; Estimate $2,500,000 – $3,000,000; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $2,250,000. – 4963cc/400hp, three Weber 40 DZC 6 carburetors, 5-speed, power windows, Blaupunkt AM-FM, Borrani chrome spoke wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Cibie halogen headlights. Ferrari Classiche Red Book certified, Talbot outside mirrors. – A late first series 500 Superfast with second series features like the triple Webers, 5-speed and fender side vents. Extensive mechanical overhaul by Motion Products 2015-16. Good older paint and chrome. Barely used upholstery, excellent interior wood trim. Clear, crisp gauges. Original undercoat in the wheelwells. Handsome, exclusive and fast. – This is a marvelous Ferrari with seductive Pininfarina coachwork and 400 horsepower to back up its sleek design with performance. The reported high bid is tantalizingly close to the pre-sale low estimate, not to mention being realistic, and it is disappointing that there wasn’t a way to make it happen with some compromise from the high bidder (if there was one), the auction company and the consignor.

Lot # 149 1983 Ferrari 512 BBi Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFJA09B000044391; Red/Tan leather, cloth bars; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $215,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $240,800. – 4,942cc/340hp, centerlock alloy wheels, Michelin TRX tires, Pioneer cassette stereo, Borletti air conditioning, power windows. – Attractive repaint but applied over flaws and minor chips. Good original interior in an unusual and attractive pattern with horizontal wide cloth bars. Clean original underbody. Represented as two owners from new, 5,748 miles and looks like it but the claim of “the vast majority of its original paint” is not supported by appearance. – A healthy result that places modest but material value on the representations of originality. The interior pattern and materials is definitely unusual and inviting and both the buyer and the seller should be pleased with this result.

Lot # 43 2001 Ferrari 550 Barchetta Pininfarina Convertible, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFZR52B000124119; Rosso Corsa/Black leather; Estimate $400,000 – $500,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $365,000 plus commission of 11.37%; Final Price $406,500. – 5474cc/485hp, 6-speed, Ferrari modular alloy wheels, Bridgestone tires, Ferrari CD changer, SF shields, books, tool kit, Ferrari car cover. – Polishing scuffed paint, nearly virgin upholstery. 684 miles and still in the factory carpet covers. A Euro-spec car, Federalized in 2004, belt serviced in 2017. – Beautiful to look at and lovely to drive (at least in the absence of precipitation) but impractical and so many are like this example: obsessively preserved and barely driven except for road testing after periodic service at a Ferrari specialist. It seems a shame to own a wonderful, powerful Ferrari and then let service technicians get all the driving enjoyment. There was a notable premium for originality, low miles and careful preservation included in this price.

Lot # 20 2007 Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFFC60A270153410; Yellow, Silver/Tan leather; Estimate $145,000 – $165,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $129,464 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $145,000. – Yellow calipers, P Zero tires, Daytona-style seats. – 8,000 miles from new. Other than a very light scratch on the nose there is no age or wear to speak of on this first-year 599. – The 599 cost about 280 grand when it was new. While other more limited-production, high-performance Ferrari models like the F12tdf essentially became instant collectibles with the prices to prove it, the 599 is still essentially a used exotic GT for now. This was a spot-on result in line with other recent transactions including here in Scottsdale where B-J sold one for $154,000 with about 4,000 more miles.

Lot # 113 1973 Ferrari Dino 246 GTS Spider, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 05534; Bianco Polo Park, Black roof panel/Black leather; Estimate $325,000 – $400,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Post-block sale at $270,000 plus commission of 11.85%; Final Price $302,000. – 2419cc/195hp, Cromodora alloy wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Borletti air conditioning, power windows, Becker Europa AM-FM. – Sound repaint, minor nose chips, mellow original interior. Repainted original undercoat in the wheelwells. Good major chrome, weak windshield molding and vent window frames. – Bid to $230,000 on the block, closed later at this all-in result which reflects its condition, style and the unconventional but intriguing colors.

Lot # 164 2017 Ferrari F12berlinetta Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFF74UFA9H0226318; Rosso Barchetta, Matte Black side skirts/Distressed Saddle leather, corduroy inserts; Estimate $375,000 – $450,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $310,000. – 6262cc/731hp, paddle shift, painted SF shields under the clearcoat, silver calipers, carbon ceramic brakes, hammertone interior trim, yellow tach face. – Represented as 80 miles from new. 70th anniversary livery “The Legendary Sixteen”. Flawless and like new. – Now Ferrari buyers get a “Ferrari Classiche Certification and Attestation” with a new car, although the Certification requires regular renewal at Ferrari’s designated inspection sites to remain valid. This is one of five Ferraris built in the 70th Anniversary year with this livery, the only F12berlinetta, and brought a suitably expensive price for its low miles and unique livery.

Lot # 151 2017 Ferrari F12tdf Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFF81BFA9H0224070; Bianco Avus, Blue, Black stripes/Medium Blue leather; Estimate $850,000 – $900,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $670,000. – Black wheels, yellow calipers, P Zero Corsa tires, fog lights, carbon fiber details. – Just 450 miles and like new. One of 799 built. – When new (and that was only in 2015) the F12tdf cost roughly $490,000 before options, but a quick search of the classifieds and a handful of recent auction results shows these to be $1M cars now, or at least very close to it. The reported high bid here was light by anybody’s definition.

Lot # 107 1998 Ferrari F355 Spider, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFXR48A5W0110576; Grigio Titanio Metallizzato/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $90,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $100,800. – 6-speed, P Zero tires, boot cover, books, tools, tire inflator, car cover. – Showing 15,492 believable miles and represented with full service history. Some very small stone chips at the bottom of the nose but mostly very good original paint. Very good, lightly worn interior. Clean underneath. A lightly used, honest 355. – While auction companies make hay about the 6-speed gearbox in the F355, the 6-speed was the standard transmission: the paddle shift F1 was an expensive option. That fact seems to make little impression upon bidders or writers of price guides, however, and is reflected in the appropriate result of this transaction.

Lot # 44 1995 Ferrari F50 Coupe; S/N ZFFTG46A5S0103922; Rosso Corsa/Black, Red cloth; Estimate $3,200,000 – $3,600,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,925,000 plus commission of 10.17%; Final Price $3,222,500. – P Zero Corsa tires, books, tools, suitcase. – One of 349 F50s built and 55 US market cars. Represented with two owners and 5,200 miles from new. No significant wear or age to speak of. Serviced in 2018. – The F50 hasn’t gotten the same respect as other Ferrari halo cars, but it’s rarer than the F40, the Enzo and the LaFerrari, and US-market F50s are especially scarce. This car sold here nine years ago for $814,000 and Ferrari prices started surging upwards not long after that transaction. Worldwide had a production prototype F50 in Scottsdale this year as well and it didn’t sell at a $2,500,000 high bid, which seemed like adequate money for that car until we saw this result, which was Arizona auction week 2020’s highest.

Lot # 60 1988 Ferrari Testarossa Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFSG17A7J0078058; White/White leather; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $92,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $103,040. – 4943cc/390hp, 5-speed, air conditioning, power windows, tool roll, jack, manuals, fitted luggage. – Excellent original paint, barely used upholstery, good interior controls and buttons. Clean engine compartment with minor paint loss but no seepage or dribbles. Well-preserved for the 32,116 miles showing. Belt serviced in December 2018 with less than 400 miles since. – “Miami Vice”? That connection is indelible at least among persons of a certain age and it enhances the otherwise odd Testarossa color choice of white over white. There is little if any preservation premium represented in the price of this Testarossa, a sound value for the new owner and a reasonable result for the seller

Lot # 28 1956 Fiat 1100/103 E TV Coupe, Body by Vignale; S/N 332266; Engine # 889882; Silver, Black/Black vinyl, Grey cloth; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $95,200. – 1,205/55hp, 4-speed, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Vredestein tires, Condor radio. – Good paint, some pitted aluminum bright trim. The engine compartment is orderly and not over-restored, just done close to like new, as is the underbody and chassis. Good upholstery, rusty headlight dip handle and faded nearly illegible speedometer face. – Worldwide offered this odd Fiat here in Scottsdale last year where they reported it was bid to $200,000. It came with a comparable estimate range at Gooding but sold at No Reserve at less than half the low estimate. It’s a strange and not particularly attractive little thing with only 55 horsepower but Vignale didn’t have much to work with in the underlying Fiat 1100. The frequently generous bidders here in the Gooding marquee were duly unimpressed and spoke with their checkbooks.

Lot # 17 2006 Ford GT Heritage Coupe; S/N 1FAFP90S26Y400119; Gulf Blue, Orange stripe/Black leather; Estimate $400,000 – $450,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $345,455 plus commission of 11.45%; Final Price $385,000. – All four options. – Signed by Carroll Shelby on the dash in silver Sharpie (he didn’t just sign Cobras). Represented with 5,500 miles, which is way high for a GT. Just like all of them, though, it still looks like a new car. – A post-block sale that exhibits the expected premium for the Heritage livery but is generous for the miles this one has covered. The successful bidder didn’t shop before making this commitment which is surprising in the post-block context.

Lot # 63 1993 Jaguar XJ 220 Coupe; S/N SAJJEAEX8AX220618; Le Mans Blue/Smoke Grey leather; Estimate $375,000 – $450,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $305,000 plus commission of 11.64%; Final Price $340,500. – Pilot Sport tires, books and tools. – Showing 1,925 believable km. Believed to be the second-to-last one built. Very good paint with a handful of tiny scratches. Light wear to the outer bolster of the driver’s seat. Nearly like new and very low mileage, but unclear when the last service was. – Somewhat underappreciated among ’90s supercars, the XJ220 is extremely fast and very attractive, but was also derided when new for not having the big V12 buyers initially expected. These Jags still haven’t had their moment, as suggested by this middle-of-the-road price for a mostly very good example.

Lot # 132 1956 Jaguar XK 140 Aerodyne Coupe, Body by John Toom; S/N A819039DH; Engine # RA1128-0; Blue/Grey leather; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Original, with non-original appearance items, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $250,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $280,000. – Jaguar XK 140 chassis, 3.8 liter engine, disc brakes, wheel discs, dash-mounted chronometer and stopwatch, Lucas headlights, small Marchal fog lights as front markers, skirts. – Cylinder head and block numbers are identical. Very good paint and chrome but the leather on the driver’s seat cushion is badly stretched and wrinkled. Orderly engine compartment with the usual exhaust manifold porcelain loss. An attractive one-off design. – It’s an imaginative way to make a Jaguar look like a Delahaye or Talbot-Lago and the bidders more than appreciated it with this result double the pre-sale low estimate. It’s bragging rights and singular style, a creative and thoughtfully executed custom car.

Lot # 59 1961 Jaguar XKE SI 3.8 Flat Floor Roadster; S/N 875180; Engine # R1270-9; Dark Green/Tan leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $275,000 – $350,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $240,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $268,800. – Flat floor car with outside bonnet latches and welded louvers, chrome wire wheels, Vredestein tires, woodrim steering wheel, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio. – Restored by Classic Showcase in the late 2000s. Clean, lightly used engine bay with paint flaking off the exhaust manifold. Good but older paint and chrome. Very good, very lightly worn interior. Dry and lightly cracking rubber on the taillight bezels. A few details aside, it’s an attractive restored car that ticks all the right boxes for collectible E-Types. – A quality car with all the right features and done to Classic Showcase’s usual high standards, it brought a result here that is right on the money.

Lot # 118 1997 Land Rover Defender 90 (Truck) Wagon 4×4; S/N SALDV3240VA126471; Willow Green, White roof/Gray cloth; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $147,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $165,200. – 3950/182hp V8, ZF automatic, alloy wheels, fog lights and roof lights, roof rack, winch, cassette stereo, air conditioning. – Represented as the very last NAS (North American Specification) Defender sold, but it also has 36,000 miles and was not treated as a collectible from new. The paint is good but has a few minor chips and scratches, and a long but light scratch on the right rear fender flare. The wheels and the exhaust are showing a little age. Very good interior. These are very desirable trucks, and this one’s late build date arguably more than makes up for the signs of use. – The NAS Defender market doesn’t make a lot of sense. These are loud, uncomfortable, unreliable and slow old trucks, and yet clean ones have commanded 100 grand or more at auction and on the private market for a few years now. Why? Well, there is the cool factor inherent in every Defender, and the NAS ones are the ultimate spec. They were also very expensive to buy when they were new, so Land Rover didn’t sell many of them here and enthusiasts/collectors are chasing a limited supply. Given this one’s build date it could have brought a few more bids without being a huge surprise, but its mileage and signs of use didn’t do it any favors and that was a big and recurring factor this week.

Lot # 50 1960 Maserati 3500GT Coupe; S/N AM101708; Engine # AM101708; Grigio Nembo/White leather; Estimate $275,000 – $350,000; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $220,000. – Triple Webers, 4-speed, Vredestein tires, hub caps and trim rings. – Represented with 41,457 believable miles and shown in the preservation class at Pebble Beach in 2013. Sound original paint with no major bare spots, but it’s certainly aged and tired. Small dent in the roof, another on the passenger’s door and another on the right rear fender. Straight body otherwise. Pitted chrome. Rough wheels but new tires. Oxidation underneath but nothing bad. The leather is heavily worn and cracked but it isn’t quite coming apart. Sound interior otherwise. Still a solid preservation class type of car with just the right amount of patina. – Both too good to restore and too aged to be shown. It also doesn’t seem to have been run much if any since 2013 so it should be considered to be due for major mechanical work before it can hit the road with any confidence. The bidders here seem to have taken that into account in their approach to value and it is hard to argue with their conclusion that the reported high bid is reasonable and includes a meaningful premium for originality. It probably would have sold better if it had been filthy.

Lot # 29 1990 Mercedes-Benz 190E 2.5-16 Evolution II Sedan; S/N WDB2010361F738417; Blue Black/Black leather; Estimate $340,000 – $380,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $390,000 plus commission of 11.28%; Final Price $434,000. – 2.5-liter Cosworth engine with AMG Power Pack, 5-speed, SP Sport tires, AMG power pack, Becker Grand Prix radio, books, tools, service records. – One of 500 homologation special Evo IIs with more power, more aero, and more cool factor than the Evo I and original 190E Cosworth. Showing 7,618 believable km and looks like it just rolled out of the factory. It’s gorgeous. – The Evo II is the fastest, most developed and most developed-looking of the 190 Cosworths, and was the only one of the series to clinch the DTM (Deutsche Tourenwagen Meisterschaft) championship, in 1992. Among modern Mercedes it’s also one of the most valuable. This one sold extremely well, more than its 380 grand high estimate, but it was deserved. Only one, a 1,723-mile car sold at a Silverstone auction in 2016 for £292,500 (about $408,000 at time time), has come close.

Lot # 6 1978 Mercedes-Benz 280SE 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 11602410120426; Engine # 11098810009374; Mimosa Yellow/Avocado plaid; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $78,400. – 2,746cc/182hp, 4-speed manual, wheel covers, Vredestein tires, sunroof, air conditioning, Becker Europa radio, Euro headlights. – A German market car imported here in 2017 and showing 52,810 believable km (32,815 miles) which are represented as being all it has covered since it was new. Excellent original brightwork with little age and no scratches. Good but not exquisite recent repaint. Mostly excellent interior with very cool plaid seats, but there are some cracks in the console trim. Pampered its whole life, finished in very loud (and very 1970s) colors, and fitted with a 4-speed. The low mileage is an added bonus, but it’s also high enough that it can be driven without pangs of guilt. The 4-speed is also very rare, although an automatic is arguably more appealing in an old luxury sedan like a W116 Mercedes. – Condition is important, and this is especially true for classic Benzes. While there were plenty of cars with needs that sold for cheap in Scottsdale this year, the best of the best examples (like this car) attracted a lot of attention and a lot of money. This is expensive for a six-cylinder car (3.5L, 4.5L and 6.9L V8 versions of the W116 were also available) but not a big surprise, and certainly not as surprising as the colors.

Lot # 140 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Coupe; S/N 1980405500553; Engine # 1989805500569; Silver/Black leather; Estimate $1,000,000 – $1,200,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $925,000. – Hub caps, new Michelin Symmetry tires. – Single ownership from 1962 until 2019. Used as a daily driver for a time and showing 88,670 miles. Old repaint with numerous chips and scratches. Good, possibly redone chrome. Dry, cracked weather stripping all around. Sound interior with good leather, clean switchgear and clean gauges, but the steering wheel has some severe cracking. Small dent on the trunk. Tidy underneath. A Gullwing that is both unrestored and fresh to market is exciting to see, and this one is fundamentally solid and complete, just quite rough around the edges. – The reported high bid is entirely reasonable considering the work this Gullwing will undoubtedly need before being trusted to driving and touring events. Its survival in a single owner’s hands for many years is a factor in its favor.

Lot # 168 1987 Mercedes-Benz 560SEC Coupe; S/N WDBCA45D1HA344180; Dark Gray, Gray/Gray leather; Estimate $45,000 – $65,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $33,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $36,960. – Alloy wheels, Continental tires, sunroof, books, tools, first aid kit. – Represented as a one-owner car with 23,147 believable miles. Whoever that owner is, he or she babied this car. There is a small scrape on the front bumper and the badges on the wheels look a little tired, but the rest of the exterior is near immaculate from the paint down to the door handles. The seats show the wear of a car with 2,300 miles, not 23,000. An amazingly well kept SEC. – Typically the plastic cladding on this generation of Mercs fares poorly with exposure to the sun, something this 560SEC seems to have avoided. It struck a chord with the Fashion Square bidders with this superior price, and it bought a superior car.

Lot # 167 1958 Porsche 356A 1600 Super Cabriolet, Body by Reutter; S/N 150727; Engine # 70313; Red, Red hardtop/Dark Red vinyl; Estimate $100,000 – $130,000; Unrestored original, 4- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $72,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $81,200. – 1582cc/60hp, Becker pushbutton radio, chrome wheels. – Barn find represented as the original engine. Dirty, dull old paint, rusty chrome, dilapidated interior. A complete restoration project but one that needs rust repair. – This cabriolet is worth more than the coupe that shared its static storage for four decades but the math is similar. It will be worth something like $250,000 (in today’s dollars) when it is in concours condition (maybe a little more with the hardtop) but unlike the coupe it has $170,000 to get there, a more realistic proposition that relies less on the physic income from the restoration process for its rationale.

Lot # 58 1956 Porsche 356A 1600 Super Speedster; S/N 82549; Engine # 62720; White/Red; Black cloth top; Estimate $300,000 – $400,000; Unrestored original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $305,000 plus commission of 11.64%; Final Price $340,500. – Mismatched old tires (Michelin up front, Dunlop in back), gold brightwork, period Becker radio, partial tool kit, jack. – Sold new in Germany then purchased by an American serviceman and shipped to North Dakota, where it remained until recently. Not currently running. Cracked, chipped, dirty original paint. Pitted original wheels and ancient tires. The interior is complete but it is worn. The carpets are badly fraying in spots and the seats, while remarkably clean with little wear, have a few split seams. Good older replacement top. Oxidized and dirty underneath but no major rust, which is important on a 356. Of the three barn find 356s in this sale, this is the cleanest and strongest, plus the most desirably configured. It’s still a total project, but not quite a basket case. – It has all the charm of a barn find, but it also won’t be a complete nightmare to restore. It’s one of several 356 Speedsters in similar condition to appear at auction over the past couple of years and, like all the rest, it commanded a significant premium for its originality and sold for a price that could buy a freshly redone car.

Lot # 166 1960 Porsche 356B Super 90 Coupe, Body by Reutter; S/N 111555; Engine # 800477; White/Dark Red leather; Estimate $65,000 – $85,000; Unrestored original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $56,000. – 1582cc/90hp, Blaupunkt radio, chrome wheels, hubcaps. – Barn find with cracked, crazing original paint, torn upholstery. Bad chrome. Dusty, dirty and grimy but not rotten. Stored since 1981, represented as the matching numbers engine. – This Porsche, freshly restored to concours condition, would be worth something like $150,000 and the question is, aside from the gratification of saving a hulk from being parted out, can it get from here to there for the $94,000 that’s available? The answer, unless the owner does much of the work at an hourly rate of about a buck, is no. But it’s the allure of the project and the prospect of the pride of completing it that’s at work here, and with the next lot.

Lot # 24 1965 Porsche 356C 1600 SC Coupe, Body by Karmann; S/N 219006; Engine # 812499; Dolphin Gray/Blue; Estimate $160,000 – $180,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $170,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $190,400. – Chromed steel wheels, Michelin XZX tires, gold brightwork, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, tools, jack, spare, books, Porsche CoA documented. – This matching numbers car is gorgeous with very good paint, brightwork and interior from a full restoration finished in 2017. Very clean underneath with only light superficial age from a little bit of driving. A great little car. – The SC isn’t the most valuable of the 356 series but it is the last, the quickest and the most developed of the pushrod cars and it has disc brakes, plus the SC is quite attractive. Even by Porsche standards this one is very well done, and it was yet another deservedly strong result at Gooding.

Lot # 106 1993 Porsche 911 America Roadster; S/N WP0CB2968PS460130; Amazon Green Metallic/Classic Gray leather; Gray cloth top; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $134,400. – Cup wheels, cross-drilled rotors, boot cover. – Showing 8,310 represented original and believable miles. A few very light scratches up front that may buff out, but otherwise fantastic original paint and the interior shows no age or wear to speak of. A rare America Roadster with low miles and careful ownership from new. Some colors are rare for a reason, but Amazon Green is one of those rare colors that also happens to look amazing. – This car ticked all the right boxes for Porsche aficionados and 964 fans in particular with its rare body style, great colors, low miles and complete documentation. While expensive, the price isn’t outrageous.

Lot # 165 2008 Porsche 911 GT2 Coupe; S/N WP0AD299X8S796150; Sinister Black/Black; Estimate $170,000 – $190,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $145,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $162,400. – Black wheels, Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires, yellow calipers, suede steering wheel and shift knob tinted glass. – 12 years old and 9,100 miles, but it still looks nearly showroom fresh and is still one of the quickest cars on the road. The only issue is an odd scratch in the windshield lamination on the passenger’s side. – The most powerful and fastest road-going 911 at the time, the 997 GT2 is lighter and more powerful than the equivalent 997 Turbo as well as more lively with rear-wheel drive. It also cost more than $65,000 more than the Turbo. Base price in 2008 was $192,560 and most examples still cost somewhere in that neighborhood. This was a soft price normally seen on GT2s with higher mileage.

Lot # 120 2004 Porsche 911 GT3 Coupe; S/N WP0AC29954S692372; Speed Yellow/Black leather; Estimate $140,000 – $160,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $125,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $140,000. – 3,600cc/380hp, 6-speed, yellow calipers, Pilot Sport tires, factory radio. – One of 1,018 cars built for North America. Good colors and just 750 miles. And they weren’t track miles. A like new 996 GT3. – Introduced on the 996 platform, these first generation GT3s stripped out weight, upgraded the suspension and brakes, and swapped in a naturally aspirated version of the engine used in the 911 Turbo, which didn’t suffer from the infamous IMS bearing issue. GT3s are very good, track capable cars that are somewhat underappreciated among modern 911s. Not this one, however, as its colors and miles brought it a top-of-the-market price that is about what it would have cost new, adjusted for inflation.

Lot # 134 1967 Porsche 911S Coupe; S/N 307785S; Engine # 961573; Polo Red/Black with houndstooth cloth inserts; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $175,000. – 1,991cc/160hp, 5-speed, Fuchs wheels, Michelin X tires, roof rack, gold brightwork, Webasto heater, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, optional Recaro sport seats, Porsche CofA, Kardex copy, owner’s manual, tools, jack. – Restored first year 911S. The paint looks great from a distance but there is a small run on the nose, a flew flecks in the finish, some blistering on the left rear and some uneven finish on the tail. Very good interior with fresh upholstery but original gauges and steering wheel. Clean and restored underneath. A good, attractive and desirable early 911, but a better paint job would make a huge difference to picky collectors and its 2001 restoration shows its age. – A fair offer for a car restored long before early 911s were worth a lot of money. This bid recognizes the cost of needed attention without the final product being excessively expensive.

Lot # 142 1973 Porsche 911T Coupe; S/N 9113102114; Engine # 6133982; Silver-Grey/Black leatherette; Estimate $180,000 – $220,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $135,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $151,200. – 2341cc/140hp, 5-speed, Fuchs wheels, Pirelli tires, Porsche AM-FM radio. – Excellent paint, chrome and interior. The wheelwells are silver undercoated and spotless. A thoroughly impressive 911T. – And a thoroughly impressive price for it, too. With many mediocre cars at the Arizona auctions one that is as good and carefully restored as this 911T stood out and the bidders reacted favorably to it with a premium price.

Lot # 33 1970 Porsche 914/6 GT Targa; S/N 9140431017; Yellow/Black; Estimate $1,000,000 – $1,300,000; Competition restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $900,000 plus commission of 10.56%; Final Price $995,000. – Carrera 6-spec engine with 210hp, 5-speed, Fuchs wheels in front, wide alloys in back, Toyo Proxes tires, Racemark steering wheel, driving and fog lights, braced rollbar – Very rare 914/6 GT, converted to GT specs before leaving the factory rather than being converted later. The GT added steel fender flares, fiberglass deck lids, rocker panels and bumpers, ventilated brakes from the 911S, antiroll bars at both ends, Plexiglas rear and side windows, an extra front oil cooler and a long-range fuel tank. This one sold new to Canadian journalist and racer Jacques Duval, won its class at Daytona, and finished 4th in class at Sebring. Also won at the 6 Hours of Saint Croix and won its class at the Carnival at Three Rivers. Autocrossed successfully in the 1980s. It’s one of the most desirable 914s in existence and has since been put back to the Sunoco of Canada livery it wore at Daytona. It has plenty of nicks, scratches and scrapes, plus the tires don’t have a ton of life left in them. Its condition isn’t particularly relevant as long as it’s still ready to race, and it looks like it is. Most of this car’s appeal is in its history, which also grants it access to many of the best vintage racing events in the world. – While it didn’t quite hit the million-dollar mark, this is still a world record price for a 914 by a factor of three and just shy of the Euros 928,000 (about $1,051,100 at the time) brought by an ultra-rare 916 in Paris last year. It isn’t particularly relevant to the 914 market in general since it was almost entirely about provenance and event eligibility. If you have a dusty 914/4 in the garage, don’t get your hopes up.

Lot # 67 1989 Porsche 944 S2 Coupe; S/N WP0AB2941KN452092; Black/Pattern cloth; Estimate $45,000 – $55,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $36,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $40,320. – Alloy wheels, Pilot Sport tires, sunroof, Blaupunkt Reno CD stereo, power windows, air conditioning, original books, tools, jack, spare and window sticker. – Showing 44,724 miles and represented with the all-important timing belt and water pump service done recently. Several small chips and light scratches throughout but nothing serious. Clean original interior. The sunroof is slightly misaligned. Tidy underneath. A lightly used but consistently maintained and very clean late 944. – Rarely seen but desirable, the 944 S2 coupe isn’t much less powerful than a 944 Turbo but doesn’t come with the same maintenance headaches or the turbo lag. While this one isn’t perfect, most 944s of all types out there have higher mileage and more wear. This would have seemed like a preposterous price not all that long ago, but the transaxle Porsches have come on in a big way in recent years. It should be noted, however, that an S2 cost a few grand more than this when new, and that’s in 1989 dollars.

Lot # 160 2004 Porsche Carrera GT Coupe; S/N WP0CA29864L001091; Black/Black leather; Estimate $750,000 – $825,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $700,000 plus commission of 10.71%; Final Price $775,000. – Yellow calipers, Pilot Sport tires, wood shift knob. – One of 664 US market cars and 4,700 miles from new. Some tiny rock chips on the nose and interior wear that corresponds with the mileage. Nearly like new. – The MSRP on this car’s window sticker says $448,300 (a little over 600 grand with inflation) but the Carrera GT, one of the last analog hypercars, has been quite collectible for a few years. This was a strong price for one with significant mileage and light wear (many of them out there still look like new cars), but it’s not excessive. Besides, how many are black?

Lot # 169 1973 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ40 Soft Top; S/N FJ40148180; Engine # 2F040657; Cadet Blue/Tan; Beige vinyl top; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $97,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $109,200. – 4.2 engine with single Weber carb, 135hp, Old Man Emu suspension, electric power steering, custom exhaust. – Fully restored in 2019 by a specialist with tasteful, minimal upgrades. Excellent paint. Spotless underbody. New interior. A fresh and gorgeous soft top FJ that is way too shiny to take it anywhere near mud and dirt. – After FJ40 prices started skyrocketing in 2014-15, it seemed like every catalog auction anywhere in the country had a shiny overrestored Land Cruiser, with the shiniest of them crossing over the six-figure mark. FJ40s are still a common sight at auction, but $100,000 FJs were a short-lived phenomenon and even Gooding put an 80 grand high estimate on this phenomenal soft top. This price was therefore a surprise, and gave us flashbacks to FJ-mania.

Lot # 157 1974 Volkswagen 181 Thing Acapulco Edition Convertible; S/N 1842542990; White, Blue/Blue, White; Blue, White vinyl top; Estimate $45,000 – $55,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $50,400. – 1835/75hp twin carb engine, steel wheels, modern stereo. – Good truck quality paint with a handful of light scratches. Faded, worn top. Some dull brightwork and dry gaskets. The Plating on the VW badge is flaking off. Clean and restored underneath. Decent interior. With the upgraded engine and flawed but attractive cosmetics, this is an Acapulco Thing that one wouldn’t be afraid to load up with family and take to the beach. – Then again, it’s a bit pricy for beach duty at this number. The Acapulco colors and the more powerful engine in this one are apparently a tempting combination, though, because it also sold at Gooding Amelia Island in 2015 for the similar sum of $52,800 and it has added 976 miles to the odometer since then.

Lot # 4 1962 Volkswagen Beetle Convertible; S/N 4466215; Engine # 6488747; Pacific Blue/White vinyl; Teal vinyl top; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $50,400. – 1,192cc/45hp, Judson supercharger, Abarth exhaust, hub caps and trim rings, whitewall tires, dual mirrors, Hella spotlight, halogen driving lights, EMPI woodrim steering wheel, Akkord picnic radio, Hazet tool kit. – Represented as matching numbers and with four owners from new. Good older paint and chrome, but there are some microblisters on the body sides and two scratches on the nose. Good top. Good, lightly worn interior. Tidy underneath. It has just about everything one could want from an old Beetle other than a show-quality presentation, but it still oozes charm and would be a highlight of any VW gathering. – This Beetle has just about every period accessory a VW fan would want, including the supercharged engine with a whopping 45 horses. Its colors look great and its restoration was high quality, but it didn’t add up to an especially huge price all things considered and is a good value at this price even within the reasonable $40,000-$60,000 pre-sale estimate range.

Lot # 66 1974 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia Coupe, Body by Karmann; S/N 1442726974; Orange/Brown vinyl; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $77,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $86,800. – Hub caps, Michelin XZX tires, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio. – A time-warp final year Karmann Ghia represented with 411 miles. Still has the original window sticker attached. The driver’s seat looks a little flat considering the miles but otherwise it looks showroom fresh. As close to a new off the lot Karmann Ghia we’re ever likely to see. – And, deservedly, the most expensive Karmann Ghia we’re likely to see for the foreseeable future. It’s a world record price and it will likely encourage other well-preserved Karmann Ghias to come to market, but it’s hard to imagine that any of them could be quite as pristine as this car.

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