Gooding & Company, Fashion Square, Scottsdale, Arizona, January 9-10, 2018

This auction report got tripped up by a trip to Paris for the Retromobile week auctions which then, to compensate for an operator error on my part, had to go to the head of the auction report queue.

Although not Gooding’s best Scottsdale auction (that was 2013’s $57.7 million followed by 2014’s $49.4 million) the total this year, even without the headline Jaguar D-type, was the runner up to perennial Scottsdale volume champ Barrett-Jackson.

Gooding’s top sale, 1965 Ferrari 275 GTB Speciale s/n 06437, was the top sale of the Scottsdale auctions. Ten lots were sold on hammer bids of $1 million or more, a third of all the million dollar lots in the Scottsdale auctions.

And, in a pattern in which Gooding has firmly established leadership, the Fashion Square auction was home to the premier collection of dusty, aged, original barn and semi-barn find cars. It is a category that continues to defy gravity and rationally-ordered concepts of value. In other words, wash or wipe at your peril when extracting a car from a dusty barn or out from under years of old magazines in a suburban garage.

Gooding will do it again in March at their Amelia Island sale with not one but two cars from a single automobile mausoleum, a long nose alloy-body Ferrari 275 GTB and a 427 Cobra that seem destined to set records and contend for a place in the Preservation Class at the 2018 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance.

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2018 110/129 85.3% 76.4% 7.3% $438,413 $137,500

[31.4%]

$48,225,400
2017 106/126 84.2% 67% 9.4% $315,047 $148,500

[47.1%]

$33,395,000
2016 97/113 85.8% 78.1% 6.2% $443,413 $178,750

[40.3%]

$43,011,050

The 64 cars that are reported here are sorted in Marque, Model, Body Style and Year order. On-site observations are by me and Andrew Newton, but I take sole responsibility for the final descriptions and comments.

Lot # 136 1951 Alfa Romeo 1900C Sprint, Body by Touring; S/N AR190000053; Engine # AR130600025; Champagne/Brown leather; Estimate $500,000 – $700,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $560,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $616,000. – 1884/90hp, 4-speed, chrome spoke wire wheels, Michelin Pilote X tires, includes a spare Alfa 2000 engine and gearbox – First delivered to Juan Manuel Fangio after winning the 1951 Driver’s Championship, described by Fangio as a gift from Alfa. Excellent clearcoat paint, chrome and interior. The glass windwings inside the rollup side windows are an interesting if impractical detail. The clearcoat paint is deep and flawless, but out of character. 2007 Pebble Beach class winner. – Any 1900C Sprint of this period is a significant car but when the Fangio history is added to it the combination becomes important. This is a superior restoration of a superior Alfa and it brought an appropriately superior price.

Lot # 29 1960 Alfa Romeo 2000 Spider, Body by Touring; S/N AR1020401140; Cobalt Blue/Red leather; Black top; Estimate $140,000 – $180,000; Recent restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $160,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $176,000. – Dual Solex carbs, Borrani wire wheels, red leather boot cover, wood shift knob, pushbutton radio. – Spotless engine bay. The right front rubber bumperette is a little beat up. Excellent paint. Gorgeous show-ready interior. Spotless underneath. A recent restoration in great colors. – Built on the same 2,500mm wheelbase as the 6-cylinder 2600 that succeeded it the Alfa 2000 has long been obscured by the Giulietta/Giulia series and the 2600. Its 115hp is more than adequate, if not scintillating. Its only drawback is that it’s off-center, an unproductive branch of the post-war Alfa tree. Someone spent all the money on the restoration of the 2000 Spider and was rewarded by a receptive audience looking for a standout Alfa willing to pay a premium price for a premium car.

Lot # 104 1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC Convertible, Body by Bertone; S/N AR755684; Bianco Spino/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $135,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $148,500. – 1570/108hp, dual Webers, 5-speed, hub caps, Vredestein tires, black cloth boot cover. – Erratic gaps. A handful of chips around the edges of the hood. Very good paint otherwise. Freshly restored underneath. Excellent fully restored interior. Light scratches on the windshield frame. Restored in Switzerland before coming here in 2012 and not perfect, but it has a lot of eyeball. – Whoa? Really? This is a desirable GTC, but … well … it is seriously expensive for a competently but not concours restored example. Even at a responsible price, say a Hundred Large, it is an expensive toy.

 

Lot # 30 1953 Allard J2X Roadster; S/N 3161; Red/Black leather; Estimate $350,000 – $450,000; Modified restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $260,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $286,000. – 354/455hp dual quad Hemi, 4-speed, chrome wire wheels, modern 185R15 Firestone Sport 200 tires, dual Plexiglas aeroscreens, braced chrome rollbar, leather rim Moto-Lita 4-spoke steering wheel, chrome side exhausts, halogen headlights with clear plastic covers, gas pressure shocks. – Very good fresh paint interior and chrome. The running gear is older but in good touring condition. The right front shock is badly scraped like it (or a wheel) came adrift. The Chrysler Hemi under the hood isn’t original, but the car was sold with one when it was new. The early race history isn’t known, but it was restored many years ago and has been an active vintage racer since. Restored to appropriate condition for its intended purpose, which involves a lot of wrestling with the steering wheel, serious chassis flex, and tons of fun. – A pretty modest price considering this J2X’s rarity, performance and the high-dollar setting in which it sold. There are more affordable ways to go vintage racing, sure, but all things considered this is a good value that came in way under Gooding’s reasonable presale estimate.

Lot # 41 1959 Aston Martin DB Mk III Drophead Coupe, Body by Tickford; S/N AM30031712; Engine # DBD1434; Elusive Blue/Gray leather; Estimate $650,000 – $750,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $565,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $621,500. – 180hp DBD engine, chrome centerlock wire wheels, Avon tires, dark blue vinyl boot cover, Smiths dash clock. – One of only 84 built. Phenomenal high quality paint aside from a few small chips at the right rear of the hood. Very good interior, although the glove compartment shelf is dusty. Not completely spotless underneath, but fully restored with only light signs of use. A very high quality restoration of a rare and gorgeous car. It just has a few miles on it since restoration and is still almost too good to use as an event car. – Realistically estimated, this DB Mk III sold for a bargain price inconsistent with its condition and history.

 

Lot # 48 1985 Audi Quattro Coupe; S/N WAUDC0859FA900260; White/Black; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $74,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $81,400. – 2,144cc/200hp turbocharged 5-cylinder, 5-speed, all-wheel drive, alloy wheels, sunroof, power windows, cassette stereo, air conditioning. – An Audi America show car with competition upgrades. One of just 75 US market cars for this year. Showing 31,252 miles, but there are no issues with the paint or underbody, and the seats look like they’ve only been sat in a few times. – Interest in rare 80s euro performance cars has nowhere to go but up, and this is a prime example even if it isn’t a mothballed delivery mile car. The money was strong, but so was the car, and it’s still good value if you compare it to something like an early BMW M3, which would cost about this much in this condition even though it’s more common and not as quick. Having seen Hans Stuck slalom a Quattro around the Meadowlands temporary race circuit in the 80’s, the appeal of this Ur-Quattro is palpable. It’s no Killer Bee WRC short wheelbase car, but more manageable for those with challenged reactions and still exhilarating.

Lot # 150 1985 BMW M635CSi Coupe; S/N WBAEE310X01051648; Diamond Schwarz Metallic/Black leather; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $77,000. – Alloy wheels, Continental tires, fender flares, sunroof, CD stereo, power windows, air conditioning, power seats. – Gorgeous new paint in original colors. Some discoloration around the front of the dash top. Excellent restored interior other than some fading on the switchgear. Restored underneath. Showing 92,850 miles, but likely one of the only ones in the world to have gotten a full restoration. – This was represented as a euro spec car with more power, and its fresh presentation helped bring this strong but not crazy price. The M6 was faster and more expensive than the E30 M3 when both cars were new, but the 3 has captured collectors’ fascination and values skyrocketed in early 2015. The M6 has started to catch on, however, and prices for them are currently growing faster than for their smaller cousins.

Lot # 112 2003 BMW Z8 Alpina Roadster; S/N WBAEJ13413AH62291; Silver, Silver Hardtop/Black; Estimate $275,000 – $325,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $200,000. – Alpina wheels. – Like new with 5,100 miles. – While most Z8s in either base or Alpina trim are this color, have low miles and are like new, this car deserved another handful of bids and refusing this offer was understandable.

Lot # 45 1949 Bristol 402 Drophead Coupe; S/N 402706; Blue/Beige leather piped in Blue; Beige top; Estimate $425,000 – $525,000; Concours restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $300,000. – Hub caps, Michelin X tires, cloth boot cover, semaphores, bucket seats, Smiths dash clock. – Excellent paint, chrome, interior and underneath. The driver’s side has clearly seen more seat time than the passenger’s seat, but there is essentially no significant wear. It is one detailing away from a show field. Rare and very interesting, but you’ll have to spend a lot of time explaining to people that this isn’t a BMW. Bought new by Thai Prince Varananda, who served in the Royal Air Force flying a Spitfire. One of only 26 built. Shown at Pebble Beach and did both the California Mille and the Quail Rally. – This is very likely the best of these 402 Cabriolets in the world. Bonhams sold one in barn find condition at Beaulieu three years ago for half the reported high bid here, and it would cost far more to restore that car to the caliber of this blue one. Such rare, proven tour and show car deserves a lot closer to Gooding’s low presale estimate. If it were a BMW it would be closer to that mark.

Lot # 122 1931 Bugatti Type 55 Roadster; S/N 55201; Engine # 1; Black, Claret/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $4,000,000 – $5,000,000; Concours restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $3,700,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $4,070,000. – RHD. Alloy wheels, dual rear spares, folding windshield, Scintilla headlights. – The first Type 55 built. Original frame, engine and rear axle, replacement 4-speed transmission. The coachwork was modified early in its life and now has been returned to its original Jean Bugatti Roadster design by Ray Jones and more recently by Scott Sargent. Concours cosmetics and finishes throughout. The seat coverings are lightly stretched and there are several small stone chips on the front fenders. Done a while ago and still impressive. – Sold from the collection of Dr. Peter and Susan Williamson at Gooding’s Pebble Beach auction in 2008 for $1,760,000 and updated since. A well-known and thoroughly documented Bugatti, it is an important piece of Bugatti and collecting history with proven reliability and performance and its result here is reasonable.

 

Lot # 60 1967 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 194677S110676; Engine # 7110676V0203HT; Lyndale Blue, Lyndale Blue hardtop/White vinyl; Estimate $100,000 – $120,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $92,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $101,750. – 327/350hp L79, 4-speed, Rally wheels, Silvertown red line tires, hardtop, includes a set of wheels with the original Uniroyal Laredo tires. – Bloomington Gold certified in 2000 and represented as the matching numbers engine. Excellent paint, chrome and wheels. Like new interior. Spotless restoration. Not the most desirable equipment, but got a top notch restoration of a caliber usually reserved for more valuable Vettes. – The least expensive Corvette to sell at Gooding Scottsdale, but nevertheless a solid price for a good car and a result that is favorable to the seller in a Big Block-centric Corvette market.

Lot # 154 1956 Deutsch-Bonnet HBR5 Coupe; S/N 852; Blue/Red leather; Estimate $100,000 – $130,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $43,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $47,300. – 848/65hp Panhard twin, Michelin X tires, woodrim steering wheel, side exhaust, roll bar. – Some light scratches and chips in the paint, which is so thin that the pattern of the fiberglass is visible underneath. The body is also a little wavy. Surface rust on the lug nuts and the wheels generally could stand to be restored. Some wear and discoloration on the seats, carpets and gauges, but the interior is sound. Owned by Brooks Stevens for many years after it raced Sebring in 1957, where it Dnfed. DB made lots of neat pint-sized long distance racers, but the HBR5 was their most prolific production model. This one has good history and provenance including Brooks Stevens, plus it’s quite well preserved. Rare enough that you’ll likely never come across another one in this country unless you’re looking hard. – Sold at less than half of Gooding’s ambitious presale estimate, this may have been the bargain of the sale in terms of provenance, exclusivity and fun per dollar, perhaps because DBs are on the obscure side in this country and are loud enough to bring tears to the eyes of those exposed to their aggressively-timed 2-cylinder exhaust.

Lot # 160 1989 Ferrari 208 GTB Turbo Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFZA27B000078174; Red/Black leatherette; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $115,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $126,500. – 1,990cc/254hp turbo engine, 5-spoke alloy wheels, Pirelli P7 tires, air conditioning, removable faceplate stereo. – Good repaint, musty original interior, chipped original undercoat in the wheelwells. Clean, orderly engine compartment. Usable as is, but strange. – A rare Ferrari in the U.S., for reasons apparent from its unusual Italian tax-avoidance specifications: a 1,990cc V-8 with a turbo giving it a reported 254hp, not different in quantity from a 308’s 255hp or a 328’s 260hp, but very different in driving performance. An ’89 328 GTB in comparable indifferent condition is worth $80,000 or so. This oddball’s rarity (in the U.S.) doesn’t make it worth 50% more. The bidder was head-faked by its rarity into paying a lot for a Ferrari compromised to conform to a tax regime.

Lot # 61 1972 Ferrari 246 GT Dino Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 03872; Engine # 135CS0000009684; Nocciola Metallizzato, Bronze/Tobacco leather; Estimate $375,000 – $450,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $420,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $462,000. – Cromodora wheels, Michelin X tires, Ansa exhaust, Becker Mexico stereo, power windows, air conditioning. – Three-owner car. The rub strips aren’t totally even on the bumpers. Excellent paint. Excellent fully restored interior with clean dash. Nearly spotless underneath. Not done yesterday, but restored to high standards and still gorgeous. Exhibited at the Cavallino Classic (Platinum Award), The Quail and the FCS Concours in Dallas. Dinos came in some unusual colors, but most of them still worked. This is one. – The buyer of this Dino got a competently restored Dino in an unusual color for barely more than was paid for a tired, unrestored car at RM Sotheby’s, the measure of collectors’ appreciation for somewhat tatty unrestored-ness. This car is a sound value.

Lot # 116 1954 Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N 0379GT; Engine # 0246C; Dark Red/Primrose leather; Estimate $1,600,000 – $2,000,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Withdrawn. Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin X tires, Marchal headlights. – Attractive repaint but cracked under both windshield posts and by both outside door handles. Pitted, tarnished aluminum vent window moldings. The hood sound deadening coating is flaking off. The underbody has old undercoat. Unnumbered replacement engine in a superficially repainted compartment. Fairly nasty despite the shiny paint and good upholstery. – Observed on-site but reported as Withdrawn by Hammerprice and Gooding.

Lot # 43 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet SI, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N 1079GT; Engine # 1079GT; Shell Grey/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $7,000,000 – $8,500,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $6,400,000. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Pirelli Cinturato tires, Marchal headlights with covers fog lights behind the grille. – Very good recent paint, chrome and upholstery. The chassis and underbody are original and clean. The left side wheel nuts are rusty but the ones on the right are beautiful. Attractively but erratically cosmetically restored following its long ownership by John Clinard. Ferrari Classiche certified. – The history of this SI Cab goes a long way toward overcoming its rather superficially presented condition. It’s difficult to call any SI Cab an “auction car”, but if pressed to do so this would be as good an example as any. If there was money in the tent the reported high bid should have been given careful consideration. It might have had more appeal to the preservation-minded if it had been left alone

Lot # 53 1961 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet SII, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 2341GT; Engine # 2341; Black/Crimson leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $1,500,000 – $1,800,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,350,000. – Becker Europa AM-FM, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Pirelli Cinturato tires, fog lights behind the grille, two tops. – It is difficult to do perfect black paint, but this is close. The interior is inviting and nearly unused. The chrome is brilliant and the engine compartment and chassis are like new. A beautiful example, Best Italian Car at the 2012 Greenwich Concours, and still in show-ready condition. – As seen here this week, the SII Cab is a lot less desirable than the SI, but this one is so well-presented it is, at least to the seller, worth more than the reported high bid. In this market Buyers rule and Sellers wait. Sellers do not have a position of strength and this was a reasonable, if wholesale, offer that could have been taken with only a little reservation.

Is the lady in the photo contemplating how well the color of this Ferrari coordinates with her outfit?

Lot # 24 1953 Ferrari 250 GT Europa Coupe, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N 0279EU; Engine # 0279EU; Light Blue, Light Grey roof/Grey leather; Estimate $900,000 – $1,300,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $970,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,067,000. – Condor radio, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, bias ply tires. – Freshly restored over a seven year period at Epifani’s, Ferrari Classiche certified. Excellent paint and interior. The chrome is generally excellent. The underbody is restored like new. The restoration is claimed to have cost $500,000 and it looks ready to go to Pebble Beach or Cavallino. – Sold by Christie’s at Pebble Beach back in 1996 for $107,000 with a previous restoration, this is a quality early Pinin Farina-bodied Ferrari bought at a realistic price.

Lot # 155 1962 Ferrari 250 GTE Coupe 2+2, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 3929GT; Engine # 3929; Gray/Red leather; Estimate $325,000 – $375,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $310,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $341,000. – Borrani wire wheels, Vredestein tires, woodrim steering wheel, dash clock, Series III headlights. – The wheels are pretty rough. Lots of cracking in the mostly original paint, even though it’s still shiny. Dull chrome. The upholstery is brand new and perfect, as are the carpets, while the rest of the interior is original and pretty well kept. Clean, orderly mostly original but cleaned up engine compartment with rebuilt carbs. Scratched up exhaust tips. Stored in Colorado for 39 years but recently got new upholstery replacing the destroyed original and a mechanical sorting so it runs and drives (well, according to the consignor.) A driver quality example of essentially the most affordable way to get into a 250-powered Ferrari. – The value of this 250 GTE got a boost from its preservation, although prior experience might have argued against cleaning it up and replacing the upholstery and carpets to capture the full ‘barn find’ premium. As it is its price represents a realistic compromise between preservation and restoration.

Lot # 134 1965 Ferrari 275 GTB Speciale Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 06437; Engine # 06437; Ice Blue/Ochre leather; Estimate $8,000,000 – $10,000,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $7,350,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $8,085,000. – Centerlock alloy wheels, Michelin XWX tires, two Heuer timers, halogen headlights, covered headlights, six Weber 40DCN carbs. – The second 275 GTB built by Pininfarina, retained as Battista Pininfarina’s personal car, with many unique details like bumperettes, a domed hood to clear the six Webers, exterior trunk hinges and rear underbody diffuser. Frankfurt, Paris, Torino and Brussels show car. Restored by Mike Sheehan for Brandon Wang in the early 90’s. Class second at Pebble Beach among other awards. One small chip in front of the left rear tire, another on the passenger’s door and one just behind the right front wheel. With those exceptions the paint is wonderful. The chassis and engine are like new, as are the upholstery and interior trim. – Without a standard 275 GTB beside it the myriad special details are obscure but their presence is enough to set this Ferrari apart. This was the top sale in Scottsdale this week, a car with history and presentation that deserved the achievement even if it’s triple the value of an ‘ordinary’ 275 GTB.

Lot # 138 1967 Ferrari 330 GTS Spider, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 10703; Engine # 10703; Black/Green leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $2,000,000 – $2,400,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,300,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $2,530,000. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, halogen headlights, chipguarded nose, tool roll, books – Very good paint, chrome and interior. Clean and orderly engine but the nether reaches and the chassis are oily and road grimy. Sharp, crisp gauges. An attractively and thoroughly restored GTS that has been carefully driven and maintained. – Even near the top of the pre-sale estimate range, the best part of this appropriately-priced transaction is that the purchaser was the son of an earlier owner who remembered it as triggering his love of cars while being driven in it as a child by his father. Now, it’s time to educate some grandkids.

Lot # 118 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 16447; Silver/Black leather; Estimate $600,000 – $700,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $540,000. – Painted nose panel, popup lights, Cromodora wheels, Michelin WXW tires, leather-wrapped steering wheel, power windows, Veglia air conditioning, Becker Mexico cassette stereo, Ansa exhaust. – Large blister on the right rear fender. The marker lenses are a little cloudy. Mostly good older paint. Lightly worn seats and faded switchgear. Light road wear underneath and recoated over old undercoat. These really aren’t the prettiest colors on a Daytona, and this one is in driver condition by classic Ferrari standards. – Sold by Gooding at Amelia in 2012 for $330,000, then at Gooding & Company’s Scottsdale auction three years ago for $698,500, a modest price that reflects the quality of this car. Based on other Daytonas in the Scottsdale auctions the decision to refuse the reported high bid was dubious.

Lot # 135 1972 Ferrari 365 GTC/4 Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 15189; Engine # 00250; Rosso Cherry/Black leather; Estimate $240,000 – $280,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $230,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $253,000. – Becker Mexico cassette, air conditioning, power windows, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, sale includes a set of alloy wheels, books, tools and documents. – Sound repaint but with orange peel left on the side window frames and a number of other defects that add up to shoddy, superficial work. The original leather has been dyed to try to cover up cracks. Old undercoat in the wheel wells. An auction car with two owners from new, showing 50,608 believable miles. – This is an honest car, if not the best in the world, and it brought an honest price appropriate to its history and somewhat erratic presentation.

Lot # 56 1999 Ferrari 456M GT Coupe 2+2, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFWP44A1X0113189; Rosso Barchetta/Tan leather; Estimate $120,000 – $140,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $96,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $105,600. – 6-speed, Pirelli tires, power windows, power seats, air conditioning. – Good but not like new original paint. Lots of plating coming off the left exhaust tip. Good, lightly worn interior. The 456 is known as being the Ferrari that came with an automatic but before paddle shifters. A number of them, though, had 6-speeds, and as far as 456s go they are the ones to have. This one is used and in driver condition, although it does come with a full service history including an August 2016 fluid flush and timing belt service. – A desirable car with its 6-speed and particularly with the fairly recent belt and fluid service this is a full retail result.

Lot # 127 2011 Ferrari 458 Challenge Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFF71NXX000179225; Red/Red cloth; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $112,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $123,750. – Updated with the Challenge Evo AeroKit in 2014, new engine in 2012, rebuilt gearbox in 2014, clutch in 2015. Full track equipment and fire system. – Dirty used car. Cracked, chipped nose, dirty driver’s seat, engine compartment and chassis. A Ferrari track day beater with a quick repaint. – Sold at Gooding’s Pebble Beach auction in 2016 for $187,000. It must have been in much the same condition then as it is now and how it brought that much is difficult to understand. It is, however, a lot of track day fun for the money, even if it is expensive to maintain. “Disappointing” barely begins to describe this 458 Challenge.

Lot # 34 1954 Ferrari 500 Mondial Spider, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N 0434MD; Engine # 0434MD; Red/Brown vinyl; Estimate $5,000,000 – $5,750,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $4,050,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $4,455,000. – Hard tonneau over the passenger’s seat, full width Plexiglas windscreen, Silver painted wire wheels, Englebert tires, Bosch halogen headlights, 45 DCOE Weber carbs. – Raced in the Netherlands for two years and subsequently owned by a laundry list of Ferrari collectors. Restored for Ed Niles in the late 70’s. Good paint and upholstery. Dirty, scratched right side wheels, especially on the rear. Orderly older restored chassis and engine. Not run in some time and will need recommissioning but carefully and consistently maintained through its recent history. – RM offered this car in Monterey in 2002 where it was in similar condition and bid to $590,000 but not sold. 7.5x that result in sixteen years is a strong move for a privately-raced Mondial, but no more than is reasonable. And it is a seductively pretty car that is eligible for pretty much anything desirable.

Lot # 13 1984 Ferrari 512 BBi Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFJA098000049805; Black/Cream leather; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $230,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $253,000. – Michelin TRX tires, Momo suede-wrapped steering wheel, power windows, air conditioning, Pioneer cassette stereo. – Scrape on the left front part of the front bumper. Light road wear underneath. Very lightly worn seats. Showing 13,470 miles. Mostly very well taken care of, plus it has maintenance records as well as all the import and federalizations papers in order, which is important (it’s easy forget that these were never imported here). – Sold right on the money and in Gooding’s realistic pre-auction estimate range. Prices for Berlinetta Boxers have retreated a bit after spiking in 2015, though, so if this car had sold only a year or two ago it might have brought a lot closer to 300 grand but today this is an appropriate price.

Lot # 157 2009 Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFFC60A390167772; Black/Tan leather piped in Black; Estimate $500,000 – $600,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $470,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $517,000. – 6-speed gearbox, Pirelli tires, 7-spoke alloy wheels, SF shields – There is an odd discoloration around each front wheel cap but not on the rears. Nearly like new interior with only light stretching on the driver’s seat. Those wheels are strange, but that’s a small issue. It’s one of the last Ferraris with a manual, so interest has nowhere to go but up, and it already has by quite a bit for these cars. – This 599 GTB has, for a late model, limited production Ferrari, accumulated some serious miles at 4,550. But that’s barely 500 miles a year since 2008-9 and begs the question, how does an owner resist driving such a marvelous car? Going to the airport? Drive it, by way of the North Shore of Oahu (it was in Hawaii until 2016). There are seven 599 GTBs in the current issue of FML, all with F1 gearboxes, but the most expensive of them is still less than $200K; this result is a $300K premium for the 6-speed manual. It hardly makes sense, but the low mileage may support the inference that the last of the 6-speed Ferraris shift like Ivecos.

Lot # 140 2005 Ferrari Superamerica Convertible, Body by Scaglietti; S/N ZFFGT61A550141915; Rosso Corsa/Beige leather; Estimate $325,000 – $375,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $310,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $341,000. – F1 gearbox, modular wheels, Potenza tires, carbon fiber interior trim, factory radio, prancing horse on the headrests. – US market car. 9,100 miles and like new. – Gazillions of horses may make for bragging rights, but 540hp from the Superamerica’s 5,748cc V12 is more than enough to stimulate endorphins, particularly when the Revocromico roof is retracted and the sky’s the limit. Depreciation is taking its toll on these cars which were worth more a while ago and this is a realistic price today even if it is probably going to look expensive in a year or so.

Lot # 132 1970 Iso Grifo 7 Liter Coupe, Body by Bertone; S/N 7L050326; Engine # 1532TO606LM; Grigio Reims Metallizzato/Beige leather; Estimate $600,000 – $700,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $520,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $572,000. – 427/400hp single 4-barrel, 5-speed ZF, Campagnolo wheels, Pirelli tires, Personal woodrim steering wheel, power windows, Becker Europa radio. – Obviously overshadowed by the prototype also in this auction, but this is still a fantastic and rare 7 litri car with the rare ZF 5-speed. Excellent paint and chrome. The interior looks great, but there are a few popped seams on the transmission tunnel and shifter boot. Light signs of use underneath. There are some flaws in the finish on the trunk lid, which doesn’t fit straight. Restored in 2010. A mostly great car let down by a few small details. – Grifos are hardly static automobiles with a variety of engines and equipment. They were, however, even in their most basic configurations worthy competitors with Ghiblis and Daytonas and their values today reflect that combination of style and performance. This is without doubt a very good Grifo with the 400hp 427 cubic inch lump under the hood, a ZF 5-speed to back it up and a concours-quality restoration that has little to explain. The result is fair to both the buyer and the seller.

Lot # 28 1963 Iso Grifo A3/L Prototype Coupe, Body by Bertone; S/N 420001; Engine # 291F05043P; Silver-Grey, Silver sills/Pumpkin leather; Estimate $1,100,000 – $1,500,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,600,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,760,000. – 327/340hp, 4-speed, alternator, power windows, centerlock alloy wheels, power brakes, chrome headers. – The Bertone prototype shown at Torino in 1963. Lower roof line and belt line, stainless roof band, show car interior, shown in New York in 1964. Restored in the late 80’s with its reconstructed original-design nose, Winner of the Gwenn Graham award at Pebble Beach in 1989. Sound paint badly blemished on the hood which has a significant crack by one of the louvers. The engine compartment is clean, orderly and nearly like new. The interior is very attractive and nearly new. The underbody and chassis are restored but now show age and some road dust. – This is an exceptional, important and distinctive Iso Grifo prototype with attributes that would be compromised in production versions for comfort and production economy. It is the purest expression of the Grifo’s concept and it is impossible to argue with the superior price it brought here.

Lot # 55 1956 Jaguar D-Type Sports Racer; S/N XKD518; Engine # E20289; Red/Dark Red vinyl; Estimate $10,000,000 – $12,000,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $8,850,000. – RHD. Polished Dunlop centerlock wheels, driver’s head fairing and fin, Lucas LeMans headlights, wraparound Plexiglas windscreen, white side exhaust. – First owned by Bernie Ecclestone, then in his early guise as a used car dealer. Raced in the U.K. by Peter Blond and Jonathan Sieff. Engine number matches the chassis plate and build record. Thick repaint over old paint, sound fully upholstered interior. Clean, orderly engine compartment and chassis. Not used recently. – This D-type was sold by RM in Monterey in 1998 for $1,018,961 in largely original condition, now repainted in its original color. A sound customer D-type that will be usable after thorough freshening and inspection but without significant international racing history, the amount offered is reasonable for its history and condition. But, a red D-type?

Lot # 9 1975 Jensen Interceptor III Convertible; S/N 23111745; Cerise Metallic/Black; Black vinyl top; Estimate $75,000 – $90,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $62,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $68,200. – 440/330hp, automatic, power windows, console, 8-track stereo, dash clock. – Single repaint in original color done in the mid-2000s. Big crack at each bottom edge of the hood and a blister in the middle. Chip in the driver’s door. A few light cracks in the dash but mostly very well preserved original interior. Unrestored but tidy underneath with no rust and newer exhaust. A lightly used, carefully maintained but never restored late Interceptor. Sold new in Ontario. Transmission rebuild, light mechanical upgrades and some cosmetic work was done about 10 years ago. – In the world of Jensen Interceptors, the old saying about the price going up when the top goes down certainly rings true. Soft top Interceptors are generally worth about twice as much as the coupes. This price was fair if somewhat favorable to the seller.

Lot # 25 1953 Kaiser Dragon 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 001894; Velvet Maroon, White vinyl roof/Maroon, Beige; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $34,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $37,400. – Automatic, chrome wire wheels with hub caps, wide whitewalls, dash clock, pushbutton radio, power steering, power brakes, spotlight, dual mirrors, hood ornament, amber fog lights. – Several chips in the nose and several more around the edges of the hood. The chrome is a little tired. The roof vinyl and the original interior are in great shape. Light road wear underneath. There is something appropriately reptilian about these cars thanks to the pattern of the roof and interior in addition to the shape. The eyebrow-shape of the windshield is superb. These had most any option you could ask for in the early ’50s, plus gold trim. This one was restored in the 1980s and is still presentable, but while it will draw a crowd, it won’t win any show trophies. – This Kaiser Dragon is a cool thing, but with one problem: It doesn’t sparkle. Bidders probably looked at it, appropriately, as a re-restoration project on a sound and complete base but even at that represents a sound value in an unusual and rare thing that will always have a story to tell.

Lot # 146 1948 Kurtis Kraft Midget Race Car; S/N 024848; Engine # 351; Black/Burgundy leather; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Competition restoration, 1 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $32,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $35,200. – Torsion bar suspension, 4-wheel disc brakes, in-out gearbox, radiator clod shaker, chromed suspension, Halibrand centerlock wheels. – Beautifully and meticulously restored with flawless paint, chrome, upholstery, engine and chassis. A work of art appropriate to its original engineering and construction when it was raced by 1961 USAC Midget champion Howard Linne, then by Bob Tattersall in this livery. – This is a simply gorgeous Midget and, unlike many of its kindred, it has history. It is a bargain at this price for that, and for its potential to light up a dirt track with its performance.

Lot # 126 1965 Lamborghini 350 GT Coupe, Body by Touring; S/N 0253; Engine # 0220; Grigio Medio/Tobacco leather; Estimate $750,000 – $825,000; Recent restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $670,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $737,000. – Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, engine-turned woodrim steering wheel, power windows, six Webers, ZF 5-speed. – The driver’s door sticks out very slightly. Cracks in the right marker light. Flawless show quality paint. Excellent chrome and brightwork, all of which was redone. Gorgeous like new interior. Spotless underbody. Originally delivered to Rhode Island. Original colors. Featured in Road &Track in period. Two small details keep this from being a real show car, but it’s gotten recent concours quality work for the most part. – Sold for $365,625 by RM in Monterey six years ago. Double the price today is barely inflation.

Lot # 129 1991 Lamborghini Diablo Coupe; S/N ZA9DU07P0MLA12185; White, Gray mirrors/White leather piped in Red; Estimate $180,000 – $220,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $197,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $217,250. – OZ Racing wheels, P Zero tires, special Breguet analog dash clock, power windows, air conditioning. – First year Diablo. Recent service. Special order interior. Excellent paint and interior. Looks like a new car, and with 602 miles on the clock it should. The rare $10,500 optional Breguet dash clock is a gorgeous piece, but it honestly is a little out of place in a car like this and looks almost tacked on. – While Countach prices have slipped in the past year, Diablos have gotten more expensive over the same period. Of five Diablos in Scottsdale this year, two were no-sales and the other three did quite well. That includes this one, which two or three years ago could have reasonably expected a price in the low 100s.

Lot # 49 1954 Lancia Aurelia B20 GT Series 4 Coupe, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N B20S1018; Engine # 3782; Navy Blue/Gray leather; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $185,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $203,500. – Single Weber, hub caps and trim rings, Michelin X tires, woodrim steering wheel, column shift. – Very good paint and chrome. Excellent interior. Very light signs of use underneath. Fully restored by a specialist and, while not super fresh, it has no needs and is a desirable spec B20 GT. – A great handling car with adequate power and, best of all, eligibility for a host of exclusive events, this is an excellent value for the new owner.

Lot # 6 1976 Land Rover Range Rover Wagon 4×4; S/N 35820075D; Tuscan Blue/Tan Ambla; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $62,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $68,200. – Alloy wheels, mud flaps, BMIHT certificate, tools, manuals, sales literature. – Very good new paint. Spotless underbody. Excellent interior. Recent restoration by specialists to much better than new condition. Sold new in Belgium. Of the two early Range Rovers this year, this one is slightly better than the other freshly restored example at Bonhams. – And it brought slightly more which shows that, at least among Range Rover buyers, there is a sense of balance.

Lot # 124 2012 Lexus LFA Nürburgring Coupe; S/N JTHHX8BH2C1000479; White/White, Red; Estimate $900,000 – $1,200,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $750,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $825,000. – 4,805cc/553hp V10, 6-speed paddle shift transmission, Potenza tires, carbon fiber wing. – Only 60 original delivery miles. The LFA was already crazy fast, but the Nürburgring version was recalibrated, had a little more power, featured more carbon fiber bits, and was of course more expensive. The race version set a lap record at the Nürburgring. This one is essentially still a new car with 60 miles and chipguarded all over. – This isn’t the first LFA at auction, but it is the first Nürburgring version, of which only 50 were built. The normal LFAs that have come up for auction have sold for between 300 and 400 grand, which is about what they cost new. The Nürburgring package added on another 100 grand to the base price. Simple math reveals this to be an excellent transaction for the seller.

Lot # 141 1966 Lotus Cortina Mk I Coupe; S/N BA74FT59391; White, Green/Black vinyl; Estimate $130,000 – $160,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $67,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $74,250. – 1588cc/ 115hp Lotus twincam four, hub caps, Pirelli tires, woodrim steering wheel, wood shift knob, pushbutton radio. – Sold new in Texas and One owner until 2013. Lots of recent mechanical sorting. Fading original paint with chips on the hood. The green bits of the paint are fading. Very light surface rust in the drip rails. Light surface rust poking through the wheels. Sorted but totally unrestored underneath. Very well preserved original interior, although it’s hard to believe the seats aren’t new. With the recent mechanical work, that takes a lot of the worries away from this otherwise aged but preserved genuine Mk I Cortina. It would make a neat driver or vintage rally car as it sits. – Most Cortinas are either restored or in much worse shape than this. The bidders appreciated the combination of reassuringly thorough mechanical work underneath and originality on top, and bid the car to a price that would ordinarily buy a fresh restoration. But it was sold by Gooding here four years ago in comparable condition for $107,250, a $30,000+ hit for the consignor … or someone along the way.

Lot # 102 1973 Lotus Elan Plus 2S 130 Coupe; S/N 0292N; Engine # W27142; Blue, Silver roof/Black vinyl; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Modified restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $34,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $37,400. – S-130 package, dual Webers, centerlock wheels, Vredestein tires, wood shift knob, power windows, dash clock, Clarion pushbutton radio, driving lights. – Two-owner car. Represented with 1720cc replacement engine recently built to race-spec 1,200 miles ago. The original engine is included. Small chip on the right side of the tail and a long scratch on the trunk lid. Crack on the driver’s door. The heavily metal flaked metallic paint on the roof doesn’t look right, and with the absence of stress cracks in the paint endemic to old Lotuses, this is likely a repaint. Even so, the body is great, the underbody is tidy and dry, and the interior is fantastic apart from the inevitable cracks in the dash. Represented as unrestored, and it must be one of the better Plus 2 Elans out there. – A monumental price for a good and sorted but imperfect and not totally correct car. Even with the premium for being an S-130 (Big Valve engine), this price would still be expensive even for a two-seater Elan Sprint.

Lot # 147 1959 Maserati 3500GT Coupe, Body by Touring; S/N AM101530; Engine # AM101530; Light Blue/Parchment leather; Estimate $300,000 – $400,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $240,000. – Body color wheel centers, polished alloy rims, Universal Sport tires, Audiovox radio, Cibie halogen headlights. – Sound repaint, chrome and upholstery. The underbody is covered in gloppy old undercoat. New water pump. Orderly engine in a superficially redone compartment. Described as sympathetically restored, a euphemism for quickly cosmetically restored to presentable driver condition. – The bidders didn’t like this Maserati very much, a judgment in which it is easy to concur. It’s a sound car with a driver-quality cosmetic restoration and some mechanical work for which the reported high bid should have been sufficient.

Lot # 143 1974 Maserati Bora 4.9L Coupe; S/N AM11749US700; Engine # AM1071149700; Silver, Brushed Steel roof/Red leather; Estimate $150,000 – $180,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $127,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $140,250. – Hub caps, Michelin XWX tires, leather-wrapped steering wheel, dash clock, power windows, Becker Mexico stereo, euro bumpers, Citroen hydraulics. – The trim below the windshield is dull and chipped. The rest of the brightwork is pretty dull as well. A few small scratches on the passenger’s door. Very well preserved original interior with nicely mellowed seats and clear instruments. Tidy underneath. A desirable 4.9-liter model that has been carefully maintained over the past 40 years. Never restored because it didn’t need to be. – This period is part of Maserati’s Purgatory while owned by Citroen and fitted with the marvelous, but also marvelously complicated, Citroen hydraulics that produced the Citroen SM, and before the benighted affiliation with Chrysler. This is a reasonable price for someone with a reliable and experience Citroen mechanic. For others is it a crap shoot.

Lot # 36 1970 Maserati Ghibli Spider, Body by Ghia; S/N AM115S1185; Engine # 1185; Ice Blue, Ice Blue hardtop/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $900,000 – $1,200,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $725,000. – 4.7/310hp, 5-speed. Campagnolo centerlock alloy wheels, Michelin XWX tires, two tops, fitted luggage, extra Borrani wire wheels, no-name radio. – Good repaint, chrome and interior. Three dash knobs are missing, ashtray cover is scuffed. The underbody is covered in old undercoat. – This is just a car, if that diminutive term can ever be applied to a Ghibli Spider. It’s had good care but has never been restored. It looks the part and the Fashion Square bidders weren’t impressed by it. They weren’t wrong.

Lot # 35 1977 Maserati Khamsin Coupe, Body by Bertone; S/N AM120US1140; Engine # AM1151049; Rosso Cordoba/Beige leather; Estimate $140,000 – $180,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $125,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $137,500. – 4.9/320hp, quadruple Webers, 5-speed, Campagnolo wheels, Blaupunkt cassette stereo, power windows, air conditioning. – One of 421 built and 155 US market examples, Euro bumpers and ‘floating’ taillights. Several chips on the nose and hood vents. Dull wheels. Unrestored but maintained underneath. The leather on the transmission tunnel is pretty worn and so is the steering wheel but the interior is mostly very well kept. A few light scratches on the rear glass. Represented as restored 10 years ago, but the work performed must have been very light because it presents like a lightly aged original car. A superficially redone example of the unusual Khamsin, one of those wedge-shaped cars from the ’70s that could be mid-engined has a long tapered hood. – Designed by Marcello Gandini, nearly as attractive as a Ghibli and attractively if not meticulously presented, this Khamsin brought a price that is realistic for both the buyer and the seller despite the exaggerated pre-sale estimate range.

Lot # 27 1970 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 901812003231; Midnight Blue/Parchment leather; Estimate $120,000 – $150,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $77,000. – Wheel covers, Continental tires, wood dash, power windows, Becker Mexico stereo, air conditioning. – Excellent paint and chrome. Straight body. Very good fully restored interior. Light road wear underneath but not bad. A desirable 6.3 model restored in 2014 to appropriately high standards. – With 300hp from their 4-cam V-8 the 300 SEL 6.3 was the unquestioned ruler of the Autobahns, a car that commanded respect in the 70’s from even high performance sports cars. For their day their suspension, brakes and interior appointments were steps above anything else. By today’s standards they are slow, sloppy handling and squishy gas-hogs. A late model Impala SS, not to mention a BMW 7-series or Mercedes S-Class, makes a 300SEL 6.3 irrelevant. Times have changed and the reasons for owning a 300 SEL 6.3 are thin. The seller here should be happy to get this much for it, even in this excellent condition.

Lot # 151 1954 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing; S/N 1980404500128; Engine # 1989804500143; Cream/Brown leather; Estimate $1,100,000 – $1,300,000; Unrestored original, 4- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,050,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,155,000. – Rudge centerlock wheels. – California Black Plate. Dented, dull, deteriorated, dilapidated, rusty. Numerous Bondo repairs. Parlous old repaint. Rotten, torn old upholstery (which isn’t original to the car.) Good for nothing except as the basis for a very expensive restoration. – This result is, to all intents and purposes, the price of an older concours-restored 1954 Gullwing with a few tour miles on it, a classification that is far, far from what this car is today: a relic of quick, thoughtless repairs a generation ago. It would have been a reasonable value at half this price and the purchaser is doomed to an expensive lesson in economics.

Lot # 22 1960 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster; S/N 19804210002520; Engine # 19898010002570; Silver-Grey, Silver-Grey hardtop/Tan leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $1,100,000 – $1,300,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,000,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,100,000. – Hubcaps, wide whitewalls, two tops, luggage. – Excellent fresh paint, chrome and upholstery. The right front wheel has several chips The engine compartment and chassis are clean, orderly and like new. – The dinged wheel is easily corrected and is not a flaw that reasonably affects the value of an otherwise impeccable two top 300SL Roadster in beautiful colors that highlight its distinctive design. The result here is appropriate in the current market.

Lot # 142 1963 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster; S/N 19804210003170; Engine # 19898210000088; Putty, Black hardtop/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $1,600,000 – $1,800,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,350,000. – Alloy block, disc brakes, Becker Mexico cassette, body color wheels with hubcaps and trim rings, Talbot outside mirror, Euro headlights, alloy block, disc brakes. – Represented as matching numbers. Beautiful fresh paint, major chrome and interior but with many troubling details: rusty trunk lock, missing hardtop C-pillar molding, cracked old rear window and windshield seals, thin trim chrome, primer overspray in the A-pillar rain channels, exterior overspray on old undercoat in the wheel wells. A premier 300SL presented in mildly disappointing condition. – Sold by Gooding & Company at Pebble Beach in 2014 for $1,512,500 ($1,375,000 hammer), its detail faults are indicative of less than assiduous passage through recent ownership and unrealistic expectations on the consignor’s part. It really could have been sold reasonably for the reported high bid.

Lot # 8 1972 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 3J57M2G115167; Engine # 32G115167; Black, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $43,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $47,300. – 350/180hp, automatic, air conditioning, power brakes and steering, Magnum wheels with trim rings, G70-14 Polyglas tires, pushbutton radio, factory underdash 8-track, sport steering wheel. – 2000 AACA National First Prize and Senior. Hammertone painted hood hinges. Very good older cosmetics and essentially like new just not fresh. – In 1972 horsepower ratings went from restrained to downright pessimistic, as this Cutlass Supreme shows, a car that a year before would have been makin’ waves with an advertised 260hp engine. It is superbly restored but brought a price that would be generous for convertible.

Lot # 52 1949 Oldsmobile Futuramic 88 Deluxe Station Wagon; S/N 498M12003; Ivy Green, Wood/Burgundy leather; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $87,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $96,250. – 303/135hp, 2-barrel, automatic, hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, windshield visor, fender skirts, pushbutton radio, dash clock. – Recent mechanical restoration. Light scratches on the headlight bezels but very good bumpers. Excellent paint. Erratic gaps. The wood is excellent. Very tidy underneath. Very good, mostly restored interior. Not a show car, but that doesn’t mean it’s not stunning. A fully restored, rare Olds woody with the Rocket V-8. – Woody wagons have impressive strength among collectors. They are rather immune to fluctuations whether the buyer is an old guy who was driven to grade school in one or a surfer looking to make a statement at Malibu. It’s all but impossible to critique this Olds in any significant way, an opinion endorsed by the Fashion Square bidders who paid a deserved premium for it.

Lot # 57 1953 Porsche 356 1500S Cabriolet, Body by Reutter; S/N 60036; Engine # 40231; Fashion Grey/Blue leather; Blue cloth top; Estimate $350,000 – $425,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $340,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $374,000. – Hub caps, finned wheel covers, Telefunken radio, Porsche CofA, tool bag, jack, Kardex. – Stored from 1965 until 2013, then restored and completed last year Represented as the matching numbers engine. Perfect tight-fitting top. Excellent paint, brightwork and interior. Light scratches on the glass. A wonderful pre-A cab that has gotten a top-notch restoration recently enough to land it on a show field. – With Gooding’s record of success with dirty, dusty barn find Porsches it’s intriguing to contemplate what this complete, preserved and well-equipped bent window 356 Cab would have brought it it’d been offered fresh out of its nearly 5 decades of hibernation as a resurrection project. As it is it brought all the money for its exceptional restoration.

Lot # 156 1962 Porsche 356B Cabriolet, Body by Reutter; S/N 156897; Engine # 715684; Light Ivory/Carmine Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $130,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $143,000. – Blaupunkt multiband radio, Porsche woodrim steering wheel, chrome wheels, Michelin XZX tires, Hella halogen headlights, tool kit, owner’s manual, jack and Porsche CofA. – Excellent fresh paint over a generously and generally filled body. Bright chrome, beautiful interior, clear glass, tight top. A lovely but suspect Porsche with abundant body filler. – Body filler is an essential part of Porsches, but not usually this much body filler, a qualification that is reflected in this price, even if not as much as it should have been.

Lot # 107 1961 Porsche 356B Super Coupe, Body by Reutter; S/N 115581; Engine # 89045; Royal Blue/Black; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Unrestored original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $56,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $61,600. – 1582cc/85hp, 4-speed, hub caps, gold brightwork, Blaupunkt pushbutton AM/FM radio. – Regularly used, then stored from about 1981 until 2015. Represented as the numbers-matching engine, Porsche CoA documented. Dull, chipped, scratched, dirty old paint. Sizable dent in the tail. Rusty wheels. Faded dirty original interior with rips in the seat. Obviously in barn find condition and said to have an engine that turns over but doesn’t run. At least it was left to sit in dry, warm, California and out of the sun. The underbody is rough but not all that rotten. A big, expensive project is ahead here but it’s worth saving. – This result is appropriate for a good restored Porsche of this specification. The buyer has a modest restoration project but one that will make the price paid here seem insignificant when it’s done. It’s a Project of Love, like adopting an abandoned, scroungy puppy at the local pound. It may, and probably will, return love and affection but it’s not without issues. At least it won’t attack the brown-clad UPS man.

Lot # 58 1973 Porsche 911 T Targa; S/N 9113112251; Engine # 6136008; Kelly Green/Beige; Estimate $220,000 – $260,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $285,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $313,500. – 2,341cc/140hp, 5-speed, Fuchs wheels, Dunlop tires, Blaupunkt AM/FM pushbutton radio, factory air conditioning. – 3,369 miles from new. Last registered in 1987 and carefully stored since. Comes with all books, tools and documents. Newer tires. Some scrapes around the edge of the right rear wheel. Phenomenal original paint in eye-grabbing and very ’70s Kelly Green. The interior looks 45 days old, not 45 years. Honestly described as a time capsule car, it’s too well preserved and the miles are too low to do anything with this car other than continue preservation. – The level of preservation on this car was a sight to behold, but that’s still not enough to explain this wacko price for what is after all a base model 911. This is the most expensive non-Carrera RS 1971-73 Porsche 911 at auction. Gooding consigned a very similarly preserved car from the same year with identical equipment last year for Pebble Beach, and it sold for $143,000. Preservation is commendable, but not at this price.

Lot # 18 1967 Porsche 911S Coupe; S/N 308283S; Engine # 961930; Slate Gray/Black leatherette with houndstooth cloth inserts; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $190,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $209,000. – Unpainted Fuchs wheels, Michelin XZX tires, gold brightwork, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, tools, jack, Porsche CoA and Kardex. – Excellent paint and brightwork. Spotless like new interior. The 911S badge on the tail doesn’t fit flush on the body, but this is otherwise a spectacular early S model done to appropriately meticulous standards. Restored recently with some mild engine upgrades. – For such a well and recently done genuine first-year S model, this was actually a solid buy. Classic 911 prices may have flattened, but this is still the kind of money that would ordinarily buy a more aged restoration.

 

Lot # 149 2015 Porsche 918 Spyder; S/N WP0CA2A17FS800322; Red/Dark Red leather; Estimate $1,800,000 – $2,200,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,550,000. – 20-21 inch wheels, carbon fiber interior trim. – Under 100 miles and like new. – The expectations for the 918 Spyder were, in a week when there were four on offer across the Valley of the Sun, far too high. It should have moved on, even with the negligible miles and given the unusual color.

Lot # 11 2004 Porsche Carrera GT Coupe; S/N WP0CA29864L001009; GT Silver/Ascot Brown; Estimate $650,000 – $800,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $650,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $715,000. – Luggage, Yellow calipers, front suspension lift, books, tools. – First owned by Tim Allen. Negligible wear to the driver’s seat. Has 2,900 miles and in these colors, is virtually indistinguishable from the other like-new Carrera GTs that have come to market. Serviced in November 2017. – It brought a similar price as well. Carrera GTs represent a decent value for what they are, with performance that approaches that of an Enzo but at a fraction of the price. Longer term prospects are also likely positive, since the Carrera GT is among the last of the top tier hypercars to come new with a manual transmission. More driver-focused performance cars are only going to get more rare.

Lot # 137 1983 Renault R5 Turbo 2 Hatchback; S/N VF1822000E0001077; Black, Red/Beige cloth; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $74,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $81,400. – Painted alloy wheels, Michelin X tires, boost gauge. – Restored in Japan. Very good fresh paint and restored underbody. Good like new seats and door panels, but the dash, instruments and switchgear are all original and lightly aged. Not fully redone top to bottom, but more than good enough for fun driving. – This is a competently if not meticulously restored Turbo 2, bought at a representative price for its ludicrous performance even from just 160 turbocharged horsepower.

Lot # 50 1967 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ45LV Wagon 4×4; S/N FJ4526110; Light Blue, White/Gray; Estimate $120,000 – $160,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $140,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $154,000. – Hub caps. – One of just 1,000 imported to the US. Restored with NOS parts. Excellent paint. Very clean underneath. Flawless interior. It doesn’t quite qualify as over-restored, but it is essentially perfect, and with old Land Cruisers it’s the rare body styles that get collectors excited. The FJ45 certainly fits the bill. – Among vintage Land Cruisers, the FJ45 is something of a different animal since they had bodywork by outside coachbuilder Gifu and are much rarer. This is the example that Colin Comer very carefully restored. He sold it in 2015 at Mecum Monterey at a final price of $198,000 and the whole process was detailed in a Road & Track article titled ‘How I Sold a Toyota Land Cruiser for Nearly $200,000 and Lost Money.’ It lost money this time, too, but the price itself was appropriate.

Lot # 117 1964 Triumph TR4 Roadster; S/N CT32818L; Engine # CT33171E; New White/Red leather; Black top; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $34,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $37,400. – Centerlock wire wheels, three Lucas driving lights, headlight stone guards, luggage rack, factory pushbutton radio, banjo steering wheel, microphone, rally timers, Lucas reverse light. – Original colors and represented as matching numbers. Set up for rallying. Tiny chip at the front of the hood. Good older paint otherwise. Light wrinkling to the seats but the dash and gauges have been restored. Tidy and lightly worn underneath. A neat, tasteful older restoration with fun period rally bits. Still usable and looks like tons of fun. – While better than most TR4s on the road, this isn’t perfect and the rally accessories don’t necessarily add to value. You wouldn’t know it by looking at this price, though, which is show car money.

Lot # 2 1963 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia Coupe; S/N 5287401; Engine # 739971; Light Blue, Ivory roof/Light Blue; White top; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $34,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $37,400. – Hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, luggage rack, dual mirrors, pushbutton AM/FM radio, bumper overriders. – Excellent chrome. Very good, lightly faded original paint with several small but deep chips on the nose and hood. Several more on the sides of the body. Excellent original interior. Good clean wheels. Tidy and dry underneath. A well preserved Southern California car in pretty colors. Unrestored but it looks to have plenty of life left in it with no apparent needs. Hilarious that they call a $35,000 – $45,000 estimate a ‘starter classic.’ – Sold for this exact amount in this exact condition at this exact sale three years ago. The only noted difference is 101 more miles showing on the odometer. Most people probably wouldn’t call nearly 40 grand a ‘starter classic’ like Gooding does in describing this Karmann Ghia, but it is nevertheless a remarkable survivor that deserves the strong price that it has now repeatedly commanded. It is worth noting that after paying a commission on the hammer price today the seller left the tent about $7,000 out of pocket on a transaction that seems to be static.

Lot # 158 1960 Volkswagen Type 2 Microbus, 23-Window; S/N 632504; Coral, White/Gray; Estimate $100,000 – $130,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $200,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $220,000. – Hub caps, vinyl sunroof, dash clock. – Original colors. Very good paint. Uneven gaps. Excellent fully restored interior. The front rub strips are a little dull. Not overrestored like so many of these are, but it’s a 23-window that’s been fully redone so it’s still pretty special. – This wasn’t the only 23-Window in Scottsdale this year, but it was by far the most expensive at this price that can only be described as staggering. Barrett-Jackson sold one that was in similar condition for $159,500. Freshly restored 23-Windows have been hitting the low-100s for a while now, but for one to suddenly jump to 200 grand is beyond explanation other than two determined bidders with deep enough pockets.

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