Bonhams, Scottsdale, January 17, 2019

Bonhams assembled an attractive and diverse docket to their Scottsdale auction at the Westin Kierland.

There were plenty of lots that even the most jaded onlookers found intriguing and, as the numbers below account, they weren’t for the most part exotic or expensive.

But it also proved to foreshadow an issue that would be recounted in subsequent Scottsdale auctions: Big Money Cars found it hard to find new owners. Of nine Bonhams lots estimated at $1 million or more only four sold, a 44.4% sell through, far below the auction’s overall sale rate of 90%. Even those that sold were hammered at bids below their low estimates.

Had even some of those Big Money misses sold, even if only the Ferrari 500 Mondial had sold, the sale total would have looked much different.

This was not exclusively a Bonhams problem, either, with hints of it coming from Worldwide yesterday and being confirmed at RM Sotheby’s where 5 of 12 $1 million low estimate lots (41.7%) sold. Only Gooding & Company bucked the trend where 7 of 12 $1 million low estimate lots (58.3%) sold, the best of the bunch, but itself not suggestive of any particular enthusiasm for laying out chunks of cash on premier cars.

Here are the Bonhams numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2019 108/120 90% 75.9% 3.7% $149,068 $72,800

[48.8%%]

$16,099,320
2018 93/108 86.1% 67.7% 11.8% $269,499 $84,700

[31.4%]

$25,063,450
2017 86/106 81.1% 77.9% 2.3% $422,494 $90,750

[21.5%]

$36,334,520

Andrew Newton did a fabulous job taking informative, insightful notes on the vast majority of the Bonhams cars while I was at Worldwide on Wednesday. As always, the final copy is my responsibility.

The cars that follow are sorted by Marque, Year and Model for easier searching. Some of the cars are seriously intriguing. We enjoyed writing them up and hope you will enjoy reading about them.


Lot # 40 1957 AC Ace Bristol Roadster; S/N BEX385; Engine # 100D2941; Green/Black; Estimate $300,000 – $375,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $240,000. – 100D2 Bristol engine, painted centerlock wire wheels, tonneau cover, front disc brakes, full weather equipment including tonneau cover. – Originally blue over beige. Replacement engine. No big blemishes in the paint, but it’s older and has been buffed a few too many times. Tidy and lightly used underneath. Good older chrome and interior. A straightforward older restoration of an Ace-Bristol, a car that is eligible for all kinds of driving events and this one would be perfect for that given its current condition and non-original powertrain. – Ace-Bristols would be highly collectible cars even if it had never spawned the Cobra, and even rough examples carry a price tag well into six figures these days. The reported high bid here was project car money, but it isn’t matching numbers and is in less than stellar condition. The high bid was a reasonable but ultimately unsuccessful attempt by the bidders to balance its inherent appeal, the replacement engine and the aged condition of its restoration.

Lot # 79 1958 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint, Body by Bertone; S/N AR149307867; Engine # AR0053616316; Metallic Light Blue/Dark Red vinyl; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $57,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $64,400. – 1570/150hp Giulia engine with dual 40DCOE Weber carbs, 5-speed, two bucket seats, competition 4-point belts, braced rollbar, alloy wheels, Hoosier slicks, no windshield wipers, disc front brakes. – Good cosmetics throughout. Tidy, professional preparation and engine compartment. Tech stickers through 2017 from many West Coast track events. – This Alfa promises to be a great multi-purpose car, as it has been used in the past several years, on the road, at track events and on long distance tours. The build is said to have cost over $100,000, a believable figure when looking at how much has been done, and how well it is executed. It is a great value for the money at this result.

Lot # 109 1960 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Veloce Spider, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N 1495F07553; Engine # 131531847; Grigio Grafite/Red Elvezio vinyl; Black cloth top; Estimate $100,000 – $130,000; Recent Restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $95,200. – Steel wheels, hubcaps, Vredestein tires, dual outside mirrors, heater, no radio. – Very good paint, bright lipstick red upholstery, good chrome and glass. The engine compartment is complete, clean and authentically detailed. One of the Webers is covered in fuel residue and there’s some oily residue on the crankcase and frame but overall this Alfa is difficult to fault in any meaningful way. – The prices of these delightful little cars continues to go up as more and more people recognize the joys of owning a Giulietta or Giulia, particularly with the Veloce engine. The result here is neither more nor less than this handsomely presented Giulietta Veloce Spider deserved.

Lot # 57 1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1300TI 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N AR584945; Engine # AR0053909742; Grigio Graffite/Red; Estimate $40,000 – $55,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $32,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $36,400. – 1290/78hp, single carb, 5-speed, hub caps, Vredestein tires, Autovox pushbutton radio, yellow headlights. – Good paint and chrome. The wheels are a little rough. Light wear and dirt underneath. Slightly uneven gaps. There is a small rip in the driver’s seat and light wear on the switchgear, but mostly well preserved original interior. Not restored, but got major attention when needed. A fun driver. – While an Alfa GT purports to have room for four the ones in the back have to sit on their folded legs. This Giulia TI really does accommodate four full-size humans while still giving the same marvelous handling and responsiveness. The 1,290cc 78hp single carb engine is a performance handicap but one that is largely offset by the marvelous care and attention the car has received over the past fifty-three years and is a sound value at this price.

 

Lot # 67 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Coupe; S/N DB51998R; Engine # 4001987; Silver Birch/Blue leather; Estimate $700,000 – $800,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $550,000 plus commission of 10.91%; Final Price $610,000. – RHD. Chrome centerlock wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, modern Alpine stereo, power steering and air conditioning, 5-speed. – Very good paint and chrome. Very clean underneath. Very good interior. Fresh and very attractive car, but given the modern convenience features and all-synchro 5-speed, it’s a car for a driver and not for purists. – Drivers there must have been in Scottsdale and someone snapped up this comfortable, luxurious DB5 for a moderate price that borders on a bargain.

Lot # 18 1956 Austin-Healey 100 M Le Mans Roadster; S/N BN2L232949; Engine # 1B232949M; White, Black/Blue piped in White; Estimate $180,000 – $220,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $160,000. – Chrome centerlock wire wheels, Dunlop tires, Lucas driving lights, tonneau cover, heater, BMIHT certificate. – Erratic trunk gaps and mild cracking in the headlight bezels, but otherwise this is a gorgeous and relatively fresh car with high quality paint, chrome, interior and underneath. And it’s a genuine, documented factory M Le Mans. Its early history isn’t known, but it was originally finished in Black and Reno Red then restored in the 1990s. – The Le Mans equipment on a Healey 100 makes for a major improvement in terms of both looks and performance over a standard car, and the prices reflect that. This car is also eligible for some great events, but given the age of the restoration the reported high bid was perfectly reasonable and could have been taken.

Lot # 21 1996 Bentley Azure Convertible Coupe; S/N SCBZK14C4TCX53631; Black/Grey leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $72,800. – Alloy wheels, Pirelli tires, cassette stereo, power seats, climate control. – Just 15,926 miles, represented with a full service history and looks like it has been pampered from new. To buy a used modern Bentley is to throw caution to the wind, but to buy a low-mile car with a service history like this is the best way to do it. – (For anything but Porsches) Nineties vehicles are nearing the nadir of their value curves. This is a modest price for a quality vehicle with the service history to back it up and it will be that until the next time it visits the Bentley specialist for a fluid change and tune-up.

Lot # 47 1956 BMW Isetta 300 Coupe; S/N 494210; Engine # 494116; Red, Gray/Gray, Red vinyl; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $22,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $25,200. – Hub caps, luggage rack, RCA radio, bubble window, Z-bar trim. – A few small dents on the tail. Dry, cracked rubber. Mildly discolored but decent foldable top. Lightly scratched rear windows. Worn steering wheel but mostly good interior. Faded paint with lots of chips and scratches. Tidy underneath. Older tires on refinished wheels. An all original Isetta 300, which isn’t something you often see. Certainly used and showing its age, but has the right level of patina where it looks old but doesn’t look rotten. – People do pay a huge premium for originality and patina, but that’s not a universal truth and sometimes a tired old car sells for a tired old car price. That’s what happened here, but at least at this number the new owner has room to embark on a fairly straightforward restoration or refurbishment.

Lot # 20 1987 BMW M6 Coupe; S/N WBAEE1409H2560605; Cinnabar Red/Beige leather; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $72,800. – BBS alloy wheels, Michelin TRX tires, power seats, factory cassette stereo. – Showing 31,949 believable miles. Well-kept original paint. The wheels are a bit dull. Very tidy underneath. All the rubber and plastic looks good. Mild wrinkling on the driver’s seat. Some of the switchgear is a little dull and the seat belt buckles are heavily faded to pink. A mostly babied original M6. Not quite a like-new time warp example, but close. – Not sold at a $50,000 high bid at Mecum Monterey two years and 224 miles ago. That was a fair offer at time, but interest in anything with an M badge is quite a bit up since then and this certainly includes the first gen M6. This price is ahead of the curve for a car with imperfections, but then again maybe it won’t be too long before the market catches up to this number. Malcolm Pray said, “You can’t pay too much, only too early.”

Lot # 86 1991 BMW Z1 Alpina Convertible; S/N WAPRLE0001C260063; Red, Gold graphics/Black, Camouflage; Black cloth top; Estimate $140,000 – $180,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $95,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $106,400. – Alpina alloy wheels, Pilot Sport tires, Alpina steering wheel and shift knob, Sony stereo. – One of 66 built. Showing 12,187 believable km, represented as all it’s covered from new. The driver’s seat is a little flat but otherwise no real sign of age. The Z1 is weird and rare enough in its own right, but the Alpina is even more special, plus it has more power and mildly beefed up suspension. This example also has the nifty optional camo seats, and it is nearly like new. – The Z1 was never sold here. Now, it’s old enough that imports have started to trickle in, but we’ve never seen one of the rarer, faster Alpina versions at auction before. This result is comfortably above what a normal BMW model in this condition would expect to bring, and that seems about right.

Lot # 34 2002 BMW M Coupe Hatchback; S/N 5UMCN93442LK61081; Imola Red/Black, Red leather; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $56,000. – S54 3,256/315hp engine, 5-speed, alloy wheels, Potenza tires, factory CD stereo, power windows, air conditioning, window sticker. – Service records and 23,500 miles. Like new paint. Very clean wheels and underbody. No significant wear to the interior. Comes with a full service history and the original window sticker. – The Z3 M Coupe is a fast, rear-drive, funky-looking six-cylinder hatchback and there just isn’t really anything else like it, which has endeared it to BMW fans and beyond. We haven’t seen one of these ‘clown shoe’ M coupes at a high profile auction before, but the interest on the private market is certainly there, and this is a top notch example. Adjusted for inflation, this price is still a bit short of what this car cost new, but it’s close and we shouldn’t be surprised if we start to see more of these pop up at auction after this healthy result.

Lot # 23 2003 BMW Z8 Alpina Roadster; S/N WBAEJ13403AH62184; Silver/Red, Black leather; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $128,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $143,360. – Alpina wheels, hardtop, Pilot Super Sport tires. – 18,000 miles and like new. – This car sold here three years ago for $253,000, which was a high but not crazy price. If anything, Z8 Alpinas have gotten more expensive since then, so this was a great buy for the new owner and a rough one for the seller who had three expensive years of styling around.

 

Lot # 84 1931 Bugatti Type 46 ‘Superprofilee’ Coupe, Body after Gangloff; S/N 46491; Engine # 345; Dark Blue, Blue body sides/Tan leather; Estimate $750,000 – $1,000,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $620,000. – RHD. 5359/140hp single overhead cam eight, 3-speed, alloy wheels, Dunlop tires, 4-spoke woodrim steering wheel, Scintilla headlights. – Bodied in the Nineties on a Type 46 chassis from Molsheim bought from Ettore Bugatti’s son, Roland. Good older paint and fresh upholstery. Good chrome but the radiator nickel is thin and coolant stained. The chassis is aged, used and has some surface corrosion. A beautiful Bugatti for tours and events recreating one of Jean Bugatti’s and Joseph Walter’s most extravagant coachwork designs. – Skeptics might characterize this Superprofilee as a rebody, but that’s unduly harsh, as it never had a body until this one was created in the UK. The age showing on the chassis is honest patina. It’s a unique exercise mimicking the surviving Superprofilee in the Schlumpf museum, which would bring millions if the French would ever allow it to come to the market. It’s also incredibly difficult to value and the Bonhams bidders were more conservative than the consignor, but at least it now has been tested in public.

Lot # 64 1993 Bugatti EB110 GT Coupe; S/N ZA9AB01E0PCD39033; Blue/Grey leather; Estimate $800,000 – $1,000,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $760,000. – BBS wheels, Pilot Sport tires, wood dash, power windows, air conditioning, cassette stereo. – Some scratches and dings on the right side wheels, which aren’t exactly the kind of thing you can find on eBay to replace. A handful of chips on the nose but mostly good original paint. Very good like-new interior and clean engine bay. Small crack in the left vent on the nose. The Frankfurt Motor Show car and had a recent $30,000 service, but despite that and the 17,192 km showing, it’s far from perfect. Given what this car is, it really should be better. – With only about 130 EB110s built, you can’t be too picky if you have your heart set on one, but the Scottsdale bidders gave this one a fair offer considering its imperfections It sold for $721,542 at Bonhams Monaco in 2018 (Euros 603,750 at the time, the high bid here is Euros 668,900) and it really should have changed hands at this higher offer, especially considering its condition issues.

Lot # 73 2018 Bugatti Chiron Coupe; S/N VF9SP3V3XJM795072; Nocturne, Sprint Blue accents/Black leather; Estimate $2,800,000 – $3,300,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $2,550,000. – Clear bra on most of the body, blue wheels. – 365 miles. Looks new, which it should, since it is. Serviced in November last year. – People who are seriously considering a Chiron can afford to buy a new one, which starts at over $3M. While this one is in essentially new condition, it’s still technically a second-hand car and the reported high bid was enough to have been considered.

Lot # 110 1937 Cadillac Series 60 Convertible Sedan, Body by Fisher; S/N 6B2337; Dark Blue/Grey leather; Dark Blue cloth top; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $38,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $42,560. – Hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemount spares, dash clock, robe rail, suicide rear doors. – Recently serviced. Older restored underneath with tired-looking exhaust. No big blemishes in the paint but it’s older. The window frames are lightly pitted and the weather stripping is pretty rough. Very good top and frame. Very good fresh-looking interior. A stately looking automobile, but restored way back in the 1980s and starting to show its age despite recent mechanical servicing. – There is a lot of value in a classic convertible sedan with the power of Cadillac’s L-head V-8. There is room for family, friends and luggage. It’s a great parade car with the top down, but if the weather nasties up the rollup windows, removable B-pillar and weatherproof convertible top keep everyone secure and comfortable. This is a CCCA Full Classic ™ and therefore eligible for many events and tours where those attributes make it particularly appropriate, and it is in this transaction a solid value.

Lot # 69 1960 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz Convertible; S/N 60E061134; Rose Metallic/White leather; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $78,400. – Wheel covers, whitewalls, fender skirts, Continental kit, power windows, air conditioning, Autronic Eye, pushbutton radio, rear seat speaker, parade boot. – One tiny chip behind each headlight. A lot of the brightwork is original and showing its age. Some peeling and waviness on the dash top. Wrinkled and discolored but sound front seats, while the upholstery in the rear is fantastic. The carpets could use a cleaning. Looks like it got undercoating at some point. Never restored because it never really needed to be, but not totally original either. A very attractive driver in appropriately eye-catching colors. – This result should not have been enough to buy this Eldorado Biarritz, but it was and the new owner can be satisfied with both the car and the price paid for it. It is a very good value needing nothing more than some cosmetic attention to make it present even better.

Lot # 97 1976 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible; S/N 6L67S6Q258404; Engine # 402803; Greenbrier Firemist/White leather; White vinyl top; Estimate $35,000 – $50,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $52,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $58,240. – Wheel covers, whitewalls, power windows, climate control, parade boot, original window sticker. – Just 2,184 miles, clearly stored carefully and the embodiment of the term ‘time capsule’. – Sold at Auburn Fall in 2013 for $33,000, this example of “the last American convertible” found a more welcoming reception here in Scottsdale, bringing a seriously healthy price including a major premium for originality and low miles. Many of these were put away when new as “instant collectibles”, but few have fared as well as this essentially pristine one.

Lot # 93 1959 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N J59S100875; Roman Red, White coves/Black vinyl; White vinyl top; Estimate $110,000 – $130,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $67,200. – 283/230hp, 4-speed, spinner wheel covers, whitewalls, WonderBar radio, heat and defrost. – Three-owner car. Not represented as matching numbers. Good but older paint and chrome. Light pitting on the door handles and window frames. Lightly worn interior with light pitting on the steering wheel. Restored but a little dirty underneath. An older restoration resulting in an attractive driver. – An unremarkable car in terms of both equipment and condition, but not bad and reasonably priced here for what it is. The pre-sale estimate range is unfortunately optimistic for the base engine under the hood.

Lot # 15 1963 Chevrolet Corvette FI Coupe; S/N 30837S102254; Engine # 3102254F1009RF; Sebring Silver/Black vinyl; Estimate $130,000 – $160,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $115,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $128,800. – 327/360hp fuel injection, 4-speed, spinner wheel covers, narrow whitewalls. – Light pitting on the wheel covers. Light scratches on the rocker trim. A few very small cracks and scratches on the driver’s door, but the paint is mostly very good. Very good interior. Represented as a very desirable matching numbers engine and a restored car, but it is starting to show its age in a few spots. – A few more miles or years and this Fuelie Split Window will mellow from a 2- to a 3+ but at this point in time and condition it is a sound value in one of the most desired of all Corvettes.

Lot # 100 1965 Chevrolet Corvette FI Convertible; S/N 194675S109990; Engine # S109990F0206HN; Glen Green/Saddle leather; Estimate $115,000 – $135,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $97,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $109,200. – 327/375hp fuel injection, 4-speed, centerlock alloy wheels, Michelin Defender tires, hardtop, Positraction. – Represented as matching numbers. Small blister on the nose and a few light cracks around the headlight doors. Good older paint otherwise. Very good chrome. Clean underbody and lightly used, maintained engine bay. The rear window on the hardtop is a little cloudy. Mostly well-kept original interior, but the leather is showing its age and there are a few popped seams on the driver’s side. NCRS Top Flight in 1989. A desirably equipped and fully documented C2, mostly original other than a repaint. – The ’65 Fuelie, which is the last year for fuel injection, is worth less than the equivalent big-block car even though it handles better and certainly isn’t lacking for power. 1965 also introduced disc brakes, so these cars are decent value in the world of collectible C2 Corvettes. This was a high result, but the car deserved it given its level of preservation and desirable extra options like hardtop and leather seats.

Lot # 6 1956 Continental Mark II Sport Coupe; S/N C56S3913; Cobalt Blue Metallic/Dark Blue, White leather; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $52,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $58,240. – Wheel covers, Firestone whitewalls, power windows, pushbutton radio. – Good older paint and chrome, but there is a large crack on the driver’s door and some small cracks around the drip rails. Another long crack on the hood. Clean and tidy underneath. Very good seats, but the dash and gauges are original and look a bit tired. An older restoration, never done to show car standards but it’s an attractive car. – This car sold for a reasonable $60,500 at Mecum Las Vegas in 2017, then again for an inexplicably high $95,700 at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale last year, then no-saled at a $55,000 high bid at Mecum Portland last year. One of those is not like the others, and the lower ones are realistic figures for a good but flawed Continental Mk II. This result is the most realistic of all.

Lot # 90 1951 Crosley CD Super Convertible; S/N DC304956; Engine # 118505; Red/Black; Black cloth top; Estimate $15,000 – $25,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $8,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $8,960. – Hub caps, hood ornament, original Crosley radio. – Cracked headlight gaskets. Decent older paint, good brightwork. Very good newer top. Quickly resprayed steel wheels. Very good fully restored interior. Clean engine that was rebuilt in 2001. Inherently cute and charming, especially with the spinning propeller badge on the nose, and it has been restored to more than good enough standards for what it is and what it’s worth. – Given the relatively high value of the average car at a Bonhams sale like this, people can sometimes overpay for a cute, lower-priced toy of a car like this because a few extra thousand doesn’t seem like such a big deal. That’s not what happened here, however, as this Crosley flew under the radar to a very modest result.

Lot # 63 1959 Devin Special Roadster; S/N 22; Red, Wide Silver stripe/Black vinyl; No top; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Competition restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $36,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $40,320. – 389 Tri-Power Pontiac, 4-speed, Nardi woodrim steering wheel, American Racing kidney bean bolt-on wheels, Dunlop G/T Qualifier tires, Wilwood disc brakes, Austin-Healey frame and rear axle, ChassisWorks rack and pinion front suspension. – Good paint over the somewhat wavy and lumpy Devin fiberglass. Good upholstery and a very good aluminum panel interior. The underbody isn’t as good and is dusty and dirty but the engine compartment displays well. Recently built to quality standards of fit, finish and function. – This is one of the better values in Scottsdale this year, a sexy-looking sports car with booming Pontiac power that couldn’t be duplicated for the price it brought even if most of the parts were free.

Lot # 83 1983 Dodge Shelby Charger Hatchback; S/N 1B3BZ6485DD170629; Blue, Grey/White vinyl, Blue cloth; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $24,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $26,880. – Alloy wheels, Dunlop tires, sunroof, factory radio. – Owned by Carroll Shelby from new. Represented as just 3,007 miles but not a time capsule car. The wheels are dirty. There are chips on the nose. There is a small dent on the right front fender and another on the hood. There is some light discoloration on the seats but the interior is mostly good. Light road wear and dirt underneath. Notable for being Shelby’s personal car and Shelby Chargers are fairly rare, but this one really could be better. – A car of little importance aside from the fact it was owned by Mr. Shelby and retained by him until his death, probably as a memento of his renewed association with Lee Iacocca at Chrysler/Dodge. It is valued more for its Shelby connection than for any intrinsic attraction as a Shelby Charger and brought more than the $23,920 Bonhams got for the Shelby Charger prototype from the Shelby collection at Greenwich last June.

Lot # 120 1961 Elva Courier Roadster; S/N 100155; Engine # 16GCUH3693; Red, Gold stripe/Black leatherette; Estimate $45,000 – $55,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $18,480. – Race prepared, modern gauges, Superior woodrim steering wheel, brass door knob shift knob, Gold center Minilite style alloy wheels, Hoosier slicks, full width Plexiglas windscreen, braced rollbar, two seats, fire system. – Good older paint with stone chips and small cracks. Orderly and done well and thoroughly. Raced on the West Coast since 1966, meticulously prepared and presented. – Sold by Mecum at Monterey in 2016 for $35,200, this result indicates the hazards of going last at any auction, let alone without a reserve. The bidders had gone to dinner, there was no money left in the marquee and the successful bidder faced little opposing interest, going home with a vintage race-ready highly-competitive E/P Elva Courier for a true bargain price. An engine rebuild would cost as much as the price paid here for the complete car.

Lot # 44 1954 Ferrari 500 Mondial Series I Spider, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N 0438MD; Engine # 110 [Ferrari Classiche]; Dark Blue/Red leather; Estimate $5,000,000 – $6,000,000; Competition restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $4,000,000. – RHD. Painted Borrani wire wheels, Excelsior tires, full racing screen, covered headlights, low air intake, center rear fuel filler, spare tire clearance hump on the rear deck, hard passenger’s seat tonneau cover, Ferrari Classiche Red Book certified, internal engine number 50MD. – Originally to Porfirio Rubirosa in California then sold to John von Neumann and raced by him, Ginther, Hill and others with good results including being photographed with James Dean at Santa Barbara in 1955. Subsequently owned by Dick Merritt, Ed Niles and others. Engine pulled for a Chevy, later with 3 liter 750 Monza engine. Restored by Ferrari Classiche in 2013-2015 with a reproduction of the original 500 Mondial engine with the original gearbox, rear axle and suspension. Excellent paint and interior. The chassis and engine compartment are like new. Above reproach in all respects. – Offered by Poulain-Sotheby’s at Monaco in 2001 with a 750 Monza engine where it was a no-sale at $653,774, the character of this Mondial has been completely changed by the Ferrari Classiche restoration and the new-old-style 2-liter engine. The obvious comparable is Admiral Phillips’ 500 Mondial Series II (s/n 0556MD/0446MD) last August at Gooding’s Pebble Beach auction at $5.005 million, but that had its original engine. The result here reflects a dichotomy between s/n 0438MD’s superb presentation and its compromised restoration by Ferrari Classiche. The offer here was modest; the estimate range was ambitious. Somewhere in the middle lies a compromise.

Lot # 101 1965 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 SI Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 5401; Engine # 5401; Blue Sera/Tan leather; Estimate $230,000 – $280,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $180,000. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Pirelli tires, overdrive. – Decent old repaint and chrome, Sound surface cracked upholstery. Orderly but oily engine compartment. Old undercoat in the wheel wells. More than good enough to be enjoyed as is and appears never to have fallen into neglect. – The Bonhams bidders didn’t get very excited about this 330 GT 2+2, nor should they, but with 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupes bringing high six figures this might be a good time to step up for a 300hp 330 GT.

Lot # 26 1970 Ferrari 365 GT 2+2 Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 13139; Engine # 13139GT; Amaranto/Black leather; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $177,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $198,800. – Borrani wire wheels, Eagle GT tires, Ansa exhaust, woodrim steering wheel, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, air conditioning, power windows, tools, jack, Massini documented. – Mostly original paint with several small cracks below the left A-pillar and another at the bottom of the hood. Good chrome. Very good older original interior. Slight dullness to the wheels. The exhaust looks a little rough but the car is mostly tidy underneath. An unrestored but maintained and attractive ‘queen mother’ Ferrari. – Purchased by the seller for $144,500 at Bonhams Quail Lodge in 2007. This isn’t much of a return, especially given the changes in the vintage Ferrari market since 2007. From the perspective of the seller, though, project car money was paid for a commendably preserved mostly original example.

Lot # 43 1987 Ferrari 328 GTB Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFXA19A0H0068647; White/Crema leather; Estimate $140,000 – $180,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $95,200. – Blaupunkt cassette stereo, air conditioning, BFG tires, power windows. – Represented as 15,061 miles from new with documentation from service records and CarFax. Worn and lightly soiled original upholstery. Good original paint. Orderly unrestored engine compartment. A quality, gently used driver said to have a belt service 1,000 miles ago (but not how many years ago that was.) – Bought here with a moderate but significant premium on the order of $10,000 for its originality and preservation, this 328 GTB promises to be a rewarding car to own and drive as long as the thousand miles since its belt service doesn’t mean it has been five years of sitting largely dormant since the belts were replaced. Details, details.

Lot # 85 1988 Ferrari Testarossa Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFSG17AXJ0076899; Engine # F113A04012138; Black/Beige leather; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $77,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $86,800. – Air conditioning, Ferrari alloy wheels, Goodyear Eagle tires. – Good original paint and lightly stretched original interior. Clean, tidy engine compartment. Represented as 19,793 miles from new. 2016 Ferrari Classiche Red Book certified and represented to have a Ferrari dealer’s major service scant weeks ago. – Sold at Auburn Fall in 2015 for $112,750, showing 275 more miles on the odometer than it did then. This result is super-wholesale and has no premium at all for the originality and moderate miles, a good value.

Lot # 113 1998 Ferrari 456 GTA Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFWP50A7W0110808; Blu Pozzi/Tan leather; Estimate $45,000 – $65,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $44,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $49,280. – Automatic, Ferrari stereo, black calipers, Ferrari 5-spoke alloy wheels, Michelin Pilot Sport tires, air conditioning. – Other than a few little nose stone chips and some wear on the driver’s seat this is a clean, orderly used car with only 19,114 miles but without any service history offered. – A quick, practical, front-engined V12 with 442 horsepower and an original price of a quarter million dollars, depreciation (and subsequent more powerful and sophisticated models from Ferrari) have depressed prices to this level, a Ferrari for the masses, with room for kids in the back. The automatic? Well, it’s electronically controlled and as quick as the 6-speed, not to mention being ideal for commuting in heavy traffic. This result is reasonable, if a little generous considering the lack of service data.

Lot # 98 1999 Ferrari 360 Modena Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFYS51A4X0116590; Rosso Corsa/Tan leather; Estimate $60,000 – $90,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $78,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $87,360. – Clear bra on the nose, Michelin tires, 6-Speed, factory stereo, books, tools, car cover. – First year 360. Several small chips behind the clear bra on the nose. Several more on the mirrors. Some discoloration on the transmission tunnel and some wear to the driver’s seat. Light curb rash on the right front wheel. Originally sold in Canada, but soon went to the States and had its speedo changed to miles. Now represented with 9,400 miles. Desirable gearbox and good colors, but this is a used car with no recent service represented. – A very modest result given the huge premium that a 6-speed carries on late-model Ferraris and this car’s low mileage, but its condition, history and lack of service records really worked against it here. The new owner got it at a price that leaves room for a major service, as it should have.

Lot # 49 2003 Ferrari 575M Maranello Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFBV55A730133420; Grigio Ingrid/Tan leather; Estimate $110,000 – $130,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $112,000. – Paddle shift, alloy wheels, Potenza tires, all the bells and whistles. – Rare Grigio Ingrid paint. A handful of chips on the nose and mirrors but mostly very good paint. Very good interior. Not perfect and could be better given the 5,900 miles represented, but a pretty car. – The Grigio Ingrid paint on this car may be rare, but some colors are rare for a reason and it’s not to everyone’s taste, which may partly explain the price here and the similarly modest $110,000 it brought at Mecum Monterey in 2015.

Lot # 58 1946 Fiat 1100C Spider, Body by Frua; S/N 279906; Engine # 306135; Silver-Green/Green leather; Estimate $650,000 – $850,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $520,000 plus commission of 10.96%; Final Price $577,000. – Trafficators, wheel covers, ivory steering wheel rim, Pirelli tires. – An early Frua prototype displayed at Villa d’Este in 1947, after restoration in 2017 and Pebble Beach in 2018. Sleek envelope design with a central tail fin, typical Frua grille with five horizontal bars and headlights set low in the front of the fenders. Excellent paint, brilliant chrome, inviting fresh upholstery. The engine compartment and chassis are like new. – One of the more pleasing aspects of this singular Frua-Fiat is the sympathy of its restoration that has retained factory-style finishes while still qualifying it for top level concours d’elegance presentation. It is what it is, and it’s the only one like it which makes the Bonhams bidders judgment of its value definitive.

Lot # 82 1959 Fiat-Abarth 750 Derivazione 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N 737815; White/Brown vinyl, Beige cloth; Estimate $15,000 – $25,000; Competition restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $22,400. – Fiat 903cc engine, steel wheels, racing bucket on driver’s side, roll bar, fire bottle, Jaeger tach, close ratio gearbox. – Comes with a letter of authenticity from Dr. Steven Knee. Set up as a competition car and restored in 2001, but raced plenty since. The doors don’t fit straight, and the headlight bezels are pitted. Small dents in the nose. Average quality paint overall. The interior is heavily used. The engine bay is tidy with a fresh engine. A rarely seen Abarth variant that is far from perfect but still looks like a ton of fun for the occasional race or vintage rally. – Accepting the attestation of the cited “expert” and the commendable level of presentation and preparation, this is a lot of Abarth for not much money, even in the middle of Bonhams pre-sale estimate range.

Lot # 105 1969 Fiat-Moretti 500 Coupe; S/N 110F0972235; Blue/Red vinyl, cloth; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $17,920. – Alloy wheels, leather-wrapped steering wheel, 650cc 50hp engine with Abarth sump and exhaust. – Dinged up wheels with curb rash. Two fine cracks in the windshield. Average quality old paint with a long scratch on the right rear. Good lightly used engine bay. Lightly scratched up rear window. Very good interior. Represented as one of less than 50 built. Rare and very cute, but not necessarily worth very much and only given a basic driver quality restoration. – How different from the other Moretti offered today, basically a standard Fiat 500 with a few performance bits and Moretti identification. The seller should be happy with this result.

Lot # 28 1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 SportsRoof; S/N 0T02G126865; School Bus Yellow, Black stripes/Black vinyl; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $50,400. – 302/290hp, 4-speed, Magnum 500 wheels, Radial T/A tires, window slats, shaker hood, Hurst T-handle shifter, pushbutton radio, Traction-Lok. – Tiny chip on the driver’s mirror but very good paint and chrome. Factory gaps. Very good fully restored interior. Restored underneath. A fully and correctly redone Boss 302, although it’s no longer very fresh. – This car wasn’t represented as matching numbers and it is color changed to Bud Moore’s characteristic Trans Am Mustang School Bus Yellow. That is reflected in the low price here, a realistic compromise between seller and the successful bidder.

Lot # 17 1950 Jaguar XK 120 Roadster; S/N 670748; Engine # W21128; Silver/Red; Estimate $120,000 – $150,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $95,200. – Chrome centerlock wire wheels, Cinturato tires, JDHT Certificate, original tools. – Represented as a matching numbers three-owner car. Excellent fresh paint and chrome. Spotless and fresh underneath. Very good fresh interior other than good original gauges. Slightly imperfect gaps are the only thing to nitpick. Body-off restored about 10 years ago but still presents as a fresh and gorgeous 120. – There were bargains to be had at Bonhams Scottsdale this year, and this was one of the best. It’s driver money paid for a fully restored and shiny car. Even after another 30 grand it would not have been expensive and it is surprising it didn’t attract more bidding.

Lot # 53 1957 Jaguar XK 140MC Drophead Coupe; S/N A819231; Engine # G93578; Black/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $84,000. – Chrome centerlock wire wheels, Firestone wide whitewalls, Lucas driving lights, overdrive, Moto-Lita woodrim steering wheel, Becker Europa radio, dual mirrors, XK120 bumpers, tool roll, JDHT Certificate. – Very good paint, chrome and top. A few light scuffs on the whitewalls. Slightly uneven gaps. Very good interior. Some dirt underneath and a clean, lightly used restored engine bay. Originally green over tan. Well restored, but it looks like that was a very long time ago. – RM sold this car 20 years ago in Monterey for $44,000. It’s done 13,227 miles since then but is in essentially the same condition. Quality restoration work and careful ownership count for a lot. This car benefitted from both, and that’s reflected in the price here.

Lot # 74 1963 Jaguar XKE SI Roadster; S/N 880027; Engine # RA74069; Opalescent Silver Blue/Dark Blue leather; Black top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $115,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $128,800. – Chrome centerlock wire wheels, whitewalls, woodrim steering wheel, Motorola radio, synchromesh gearbox, JDHT Certificate, tool kit, service manual. – Very good paint and chrome for the most part, although the left taillight bezel has some odd discoloration. Very good, tight top. Very good fresh interior. Freshly restored and mostly gorgeous, but not an over the top concours car. Replacement engine block and synchro gearbox, although that objectively makes it a better car to drive. – This car seems to make a yearly auction appearance, with a no-sale at a $140,000 high bid at Mecum Monterey in 2016 and one more at a $140,000 high bid at Russo and Steele Monterey in 2017 before selling for $115,500 at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale last year. The two no-sales were more realistic to the car’s very good overall presentation, but the last two results put more emphasis on the replacement block and gearbox.

Lot # 119 1990 Jaguar XJ-S Classic Collection Convertible; S/N SAJTW484XLC175032; Diamond Blue Metallic/Beige leather piped in Dark Blue; Dark Blue top; Estimate $25,000 – $42,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $44,800. – Chrome alloy wheels, Radial T/A tires, boot cover, power windows, air conditioning, Alpine CD stereo, wood dash and door trim. – Represented as 24,861 miles from new. The paint is fantastic. Light but noticeable wear on the seats. Much better than most XJ-Ss, this is a two-owner car with very mild use. – Given the big, complicated, expensive-to-fix V-12 under the hood and low purchase price of the XJ-S, most of the ones out have suffered from some form of deferred maintenance and neglect. Good ones are hard to find and this example certainly qualifies, but this price is very expensive.

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Lot # 66 1971 Lamborghini Miura P400 SV Coupe, Body by Bertone; S/N 4976; Engine # 30692; Blue, Silver sills/Black leather; Estimate $1,700,000 – $2,100,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,500,000. – US market car with alloy wheels, split-sump engine, Cinturato tires, mirrors, cassette stereo, air conditioning, leather-wrapped steering wheel. – The finish on the older repaint looks mostly good, but there are a few chips on the nose. The exhaust tips and wheels are a little beat up. Original interior, just showing light general age. It’s an SV, it’s a US market car, it’s mostly original and it is represented to have just 18,201 miles, so it ticks a lot of the right boxes, but the engine was replaced in period (from Miura SV s/n 4992), and it is showing its age. – Both the car’s condition and its period engine replacement are reflected in Bonhams pre-sale estimate range which the bidding didn’t endorse. The consignor took it home, a not unreasonable decision. A little creative sleuthing and trading might find the original engine (perhaps in s/n 4992?)

Lot # 70 1988 Lamborghini Jalpa P350 GTS Coupe, Body by Bertone; S/N ZA9JB00A8JLA12381; Engine # L3537112379; Black/Beige leather piped in Black; Estimate $65,000 – $85,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $61,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $68,320. – OZ wheels, Continental tires up front, Yokohama on back, later stereo, power windows, air conditioning. – Long crack on the engine cover and a few small chips under the driver’s side door sills but mostly good original paint. The plastic bumpers are a little tired and the wheels are a little dirty. Very good interior. A mostly well-kept but flawed and used Jalpa, from the final year of production and the same color as the one in Rocky IV, if that’s your thing. – This car sold in Fort Lauderdale in 2015 for $88,000, then didn’t sell at an $85,000 high bid there last year and again at an $82,500 high bid at Mecum Monterey a few months later. It should have sold in Florida, it should have sold in Monterey, and the only reason it sold here in Scottsdale is that it went at no reserve with a realistic estimate range as if the consignor decided it really was time to see it go away. It deserves more, and this result is massively favorable to the buyer, who bought a neat and drivable vintage Lambo at a near rock-bottom price.

 

Lot # 80 1965 Land Rover Series IIA 88 Wagon 4×4; S/N 24425054C; Blue, White hardtop/Grey leatherette; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $28,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $31,360. – Locking hubs, single wing mirror, comes with used overdrive unit and some (but presumably not all) original tools – All original with paint coming off all over. Rusty mirror. The left front turn signal lens is broken and the right one is missing altogether. Dirty but surprisingly solid frame, having benefitted from a Southern California climate. The wheels are pretty filthy. The right rear bumperette is slightly bent. Dirty, tired interior with cloudy gauges. A used up early Land Rover, but it is not without its charm, has had some recent mechanical sorting, and for people who like patina, it’s kind of neat. – Most of the wear and tear on this early Land Rover is superficial and it’s pretty sound underneath, but over 30 grand for a beat up old truck with 77 horsepower and no amenities just seems strange.

Lot # 24 1959 Lister-Jaguar Sports Racer, Body by Costin; S/N BHL123; Engine # LB21188; White, Blue stripes/Black duct tape; Estimate $2,000,000 – $2,600,000; Competition restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,450,000. – RHD. Halibrand centerlock alloy wheels, braced driver’s rollbar, clear plastic hood bubble, wraparound driver’s windscreen, fire system. – Briggs Cunningham’s Costin-bodied 1959 SCCA C-Modified championship car driven by Walt Hansgen after a dnf at Sebring driven by Ivor Bueb and Stirling Moss. Later raced by Bob Grossman. Restored several times and most recently historic raced. Missing the headlight covers and one threaded insert is pulled out. Hood NACA duct has no inner ducting. Transparent tape over Stirling Moss’s fading signature on the right rear fender. Good paint, clean orderly engine compartment, cockpit and chassis. An important, fast, sleek car with legendary racing history. – Offered at Coys London auction in December 1992 where it was reported bid to $150,576 before subsequent restorations. Gooding sold it here in Scottsdale nine years ago for $1.1 million. It’s an important car with an important history although not the more evocative “Knobbly” Lister body and it is easy to understand the consignor’s reluctance to part with it at this bid.

Lot # 54 1951 Maserati A6G/2000 Spider, Body by Frua; S/N 2017; Engine # 2013; Dark Blue/Red leather; Red cloth top; Estimate $2,800,000 – $3,400,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,500,000 plus commission of 10.20%; Final Price $2,755,000. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Dunlop Racing tires, Marchal headlights and grille-mounted center driving light. – Restored in 2006 in Italy under the supervision of Adolfo Orsi, Jr. using the engine from another A6G/2000, itself renumbered from a previous chassis, 2004. Excellent fresh paint, chrome and interior. Only the driver’s seat cushion is nearly imperceptibly stretched. The chassis, underbody and engine compartment are like new. Displayed in all the right places since the restoration but apparently driven only on and off show fields to the extent that its odometer shows just 278 km. – This Maserati is one of the highlights of the 2019 Scottsdale auctions, a magnificent example restored at great expense and attention to detail, then meticulously maintained to retain its beauty and crispness. It is hard to accept that this restoration is now some thirteen years old, but reasonable to accept the bidders’ enthusiasm for it and the price it brought here.

Lot # 41 1971 Maserati Indy 4.9 Coupe, Body by Vignale; S/N AM116491208; Engine # 116491208; Gunmetal Grey/Red leather; Estimate $90,000 – $110,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $84,000. – 4,930/320hp, 5-speed ZF, Borrani alloy wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, woodrim steering wheel, power steering and windows, air conditioning. – Rare 4.9-liter Indy represented as the matching numbers engine. Cosmetically restored in 2016. Clean wheels and tires. The bumper rub strip doesn’t fit straight. Restored and lightly used underneath. Gorgeous all red interior. Very good paint. Some discoloration on the windshield wipers. Old undercoat in the wheel wells. Not a show car, but very pretty and fairly rare. – This car has several no-sales to its name, with a $160,000 high bid at Mecum Monterey in 2017, a $95,000 high bid at Mecum Los Angeles last year, and a $100,000 high bid at RM Fort Lauderdale last year. It’s arguably a six-figure car, but not much higher than the low-100s as bidders across the country have shown repeatedly. The high bidder here in Scottsdale snagged it at a serious bargain and now has money left over to address any issues.

Lot # 35 1972 Maserati Ghibli SS Coupe, Body by Ghia; S/N AM115492126; Engine # 115492126; Giallo/Black leather; Estimate $260,000 – $300,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $205,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $229,600. – 4,930/335hp, 5-speed, chrome spoke Borrani centerlock wire wheels, Vredestein tires, woodrim steering wheel, later stereo, power windows, power steering, air conditioning. – Desirable 4.9 SS and represented as matching numbers. Very good paint and chrome. Mostly very well kept original interior. Most the upholstery is fantastic, but the driver’s seat has some serious cracking. Original other than a 2016 repaint but thoroughly maintained and documented. – This is a better car than the price it brought here in Scottsdale. It might even be a better, largely original and carefully preserved, car than its low estimate. The successful bidder went home with a superlative bright yellow Italian gran turismo for an advantageous price.

Lot # 32 1934 Mercedes-Benz 500K 4-Passenger Tourer, Body by Mayfair; S/N 123689; Engine # 123689; Dark Green/Parchment leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $1,000,000 – $1,400,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $750,000 plus commission of 10.67%; Final Price $830,000. – RHD. Stainless steel spoke wire wheels, Michelin blackwall tires, dual rear spares, Raydyot dual spotlights, dip beam light. – Kommission #207792. Recognizable British coachwork by Mayfair Carriage Works with cutdown doors and occasional rear seats. Ex-Paul and Barbara Karassik, Don Williams and Bill Lassiter. Good older paint, chrome and sound interior. Underbody is older with small undercoat chips. Good interior wood. Done to very good touring standards and showing age but consistent care. – Sold by Christie’s from the Lassiter collection in 1999 for $266,500, then by RM at Monterey in 2014 for $825,000 and offered by Bonhams at Amelia in 2015 with a high bid of $800,000, it has been consistently maintained throughout its auction history and has stayed, at least to judge from the odometer reading, on display without being enjoyed on the road for more than a block or two at a time. Its value has been consistent over the past five years, as has its condition, and is much less valuable even though more rare than a Sindelfingen 500K giving the new owner selective bragging rights at a moderate cost.

Lot # 89 1938 Mercedes-Benz 230 Cabriolet B; S/N 405661; Engine # 405661; White, Blue/Red leather; Dark Blue cloth top; Estimate $100,000 – $150,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $72,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $81,200. – Hub caps, whitewalls, VDO gauges, wood dash. – Restored in Germany in the Naughts. Paint chipping off the wheels and the spare tires are dry and cracked. Scratch on the right front fender. Sound but older paint otherwise. Sound top with good frame. Good upholstery, but the steering wheel is worn and the gauges are very faded. Clean and restored underneath. An attractive rare car that was restored in the early 2000s, but the work was done a while ago and probably before the car was worth very much. It’s a driver. – Not sold at a $77,500 high bid at Russo and Steele Monterey 2016. It would appear to be no worse now than it was then, a classic M-B albeit with only 6 cylinders, 2.2 liters and 55 horsepower to push along 3,500 pounds. It will be popular at Teutonic events and should tour well enough to keep up with traffic.

Lot # 36 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Coupe; S/N 1980405500548; Engine # 1989805500575; Silver Metallic/Red leather; Estimate $1,150,000 – $1,350,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,004,545 plus commission of 10.50%; Final Price $1,110,000. – Hub caps, Michelin XAS tires, Talbot outside mirror, extensively documented from new. – Ex-Lothar Motschenbacher and represented to be the matching numbers original engine. Recent fuel injection rebuild and brake adjustment. Small blister at the front of the hood and a chip behind the left headlight. A few more chips at the back as well. The finish on the older repaint is also just generally a bit dull. Dry, cracking windshield gaskets. Significant wear to the seats and lightly faded gauges, but it’s all sound and original. Aged, largely original engine compartment including factory tags. Well maintained underneath. Mostly original other than a repaint. – Sold by RM here in Arizona in 2016 for $1,155,000, then by Russo & Steele in Monterey for the same number seven months later. It has hardly aged since then, showing 141 more miles on its odometer, and is in essentially the same condition. Its result in this post-block concluded transaction is appropriate.

Lot # 108 1970 Mercedes-Benz 280SE Cabriolet; S/N 11102512004122; Grey/Tan leather; Brown cloth top; Estimate $180,000 – $220,000; Facsimile restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $173,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $193,760. – Wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, Becker Europa radio, VDO dash clock, power windows, Behr air conditioning, leather boot cover. – Small chip at the left edge of the hood. Excellent paint and chrome otherwise. Fully restored and gorgeous underneath. Excellent fully redone interior with gleaming wood and soft leather. Not a genuine 3.5 but restored to 3.5 specs and standards with the original six going to a 280SE 3.5 coupe that was the donor of the 3.5-specific factory parts. – The amount of work and effort that went into converting this 280 SE into a 3.5 is staggering but at the end of the process what remains is not what it purports to be and it brought a price here that is even less than if the work had been confined to restoring the original car with six-cylinder power. Like cutting the roof off a Daytona, the soul [sic] is less than the sum of its parts.

Lot # 107 1987 Mercedes-Benz 190E 2.3 16v 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N WDBDA34D9HF275693; Gray/Gray leather; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $34,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $38,080. – Pirelli tires, sunroof, Becker cassette stereo. – Very small chip at the bottom of the windshield. A handful of touch ups on the hood. Otherwise very good original paint. The interior shows hardly any wear and the underbody is clean and maintained. Showing 62,698 miles but looks like a car with a fraction of that. – These Cosworth-engined, DTM-inspired sedans competed with the original BMW M3 when both were new. But while the M3 became a pretty expensive modern classic for what it is, the 190E Cosworth has been slower to come onto collectors’ radar. Prices have started to climb but they are still nowhere near the BMW. This price is at the very top end for the Mercedes despite its mileage and flaws, so there seems to be plenty of room for these cars to grow.

Lot # 51 1994 Mercedes-Benz 500E 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N WDBEA36E6RC154682; Black Pearl Metallic/Grey leather; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $76,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $85,120. – 4,973/322hp, automatic, c\Chromed wheels, Continental tires, sunroof, factory cassette stereo, power windows, air conditioning, tool roll, spare. – The Mercedes that Porsche built. Two tiny chips on the nose and another on the driver’s mirror, all forgivable given the 22,498 miles showing and the paint is otherwise gorgeous. Very clean underneath and the interior looks practically showroom fresh. Not bought and put away, but lightly used and clearly pampered between drives. Comes with a full service history, including a recent full service. – Bonhams sold a slightly lower-mile 500E at Quail Lodge for the rather expensive sum of $100,800. This result is more realistic. In the end, who really cares?

Lot # 2 1960 MG A 1600 Mk I Roadster; S/N GHNL86569; Iris Blue/Navy Blue piped in White; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $29,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $32,480. – Chrome centerlock wire wheels, Kelley tires, dual wing mirrors, BMIHT Certificate. – Two tiny chips at the front of the hood but otherwise gorgeous Iris Blue paint. Relatively fresh chrome. Very clean and restored underneath. Very good interior. A very pretty MGA in good colors with nothing serious to knock it for. – While the restoration was done in the early 2000s, this result speaks to the quality of the work and the careful ownership since. It also speaks well of the willingness of the Bonhams bidders to recognize its quality and pampering with a generous price.

Lot # 46 1969 MG C Roadster; S/N GCN1U8041G; Engine # 3491; British Racing Green/Black leather; Black top; Estimate $25,000 – $40,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $22,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $25,200. – Chrome centerlock wire wheels, pushbutton radio, banjo steering wheel, tonneau cover. – Dry and cracked headlight gaskets. Well-kept original chrome other than some light scratches on the front bumper. A little dirty but maintained and original underneath. Some condensation in the gauges and some wrinkling on the seats. Unrestored other than a very old but sound repaint, still gorgeous and too good to restore now. Has enjoyed single family ownership, not single family neglect. – The MGC was intended to take MG upscale a bit and take up the mantle after the end of Austin-Healey production, but it never caught on. They’re faster but less lively than the good-old four-cylinder ‘B. They’re also considerably more valuable due to their rarity (about 9,000 built) but aren’t exactly expensive, either. This is a spot-on result for one in this condition, which means it’s still a lot of style and rarity per dollar.

Lot # 61 1955 Moretti 1200 Sport Spider, Body by Michelotti; S/N 5007; Engine # 5007; Light Blue/Black leather; Estimate $750,000 – $850,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $570,000. – 1204cc dual overhead cam 4-cylinder, Borrani wire wheels, side exhaust, woodrim steering wheel, FIVA passport. – Unique Michelotti coachwork. Very good paint and brightwork. Clean underneath. Very good interior. Shown at the Brussels Motor Show in 1957 then sold to a Belgian collector and entered into a rally the same year. Restoration started in the 1990s, then finished in the 2000s and the car was reunited with its original Moretti twin-cam engine. A gorgeous, special piece of etceterini restored to essentially perfect standards. Eligible for great events and shows, and you’ll never see yourself coming the other way. – Like the Frua-bodied Fiat 1100C sold a few lots before, this is an essentially unique car (there was another, with the steering wheel on the right) that is widely eligible for historic events and stands out among contemporaries by virtue of its prominent outside exhaust. The current radiator opening appears to be larger and a slightly different shape from the 1955 Brussels Motor Show photograph. It was offered by Artcurial at Retromobile in 2015 with a much lower estimate of $400-500,000, a range the Bonhams bidders seemed to be more comfortable with.

Lot # 77 1953 Morgan Plus 4 Roadster; S/N P2693; Engine # V591ME; Yellow, Green Fenders/Tan; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $39,200. – Hub caps, whitewalls, dual rear-mounted spares, dual wing mirrors, single Lucas driving light, wood dash, 4-spoke Brooklands steering wheel, 5-Speed gearbox, tools. – Excellent interior. Freshly restored underneath. Very good paint and chrome. Freshly restored without overdoing it. Gorgeous and finished in colors that are flattering to the flat rad body style. – 1953 was the last full year before Morgan moved from the ‘flat rad’ to the more familiar cowl radiator cars. Which one is better looking is up for debate, but prices don’t vary widely even though flat rad cars are a bit rare. This result was on the modest side considering how fresh and gorgeous the restoration is, but the bidders may have discounted it for the 5-speed gearbox from an unknown source.

Lot # 115 1965 Morris Minor 1000 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N D1125203; Engine # KAR19208; White/Red; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Enthusiast restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $5,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $5,600. – Hub caps, 12-volt electrics. – A few small chips and scratches on the hood. Paint run on the right B-pillar. Very good restored interior. Clean underneath with a lightly run but restored engine bay. Restored by its owner over several years to good enough standards for a Morris Minor, but no show car. – This was one of the biggest steals anywhere in Scottsdale this year. This car isn’t perfect, but it’s cute and usable and there are plenty of Morris Minors out there in this condition listed for over 10 grand. The sixth from the last car at Bonhams, it attracted just one bidder who was thrilled both with the car and the price she paid for it, as she should be.

Lot # 95 1989 Nissan Skyline GT-R Coupe; S/N BNR32002354; Gunmetal Grey Metallic/Grey cloth; Estimate $65,000 – $85,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $78,400. – RHD. 2568/276hp twin turbo engine, 5-speed, Potenza tires, Kenwood CD stereo. – All stock aside from maybe the radio and the strut tower brace. Showing just 23,962 believable km. Light road wear and dirt underneath but otherwise great original paint and no wear to the interior. – Thanks to video games and a greater interest in Japanese cars in general, a lot of people have an R32 Skyline GT-R on their wish list. But racing, drifting, and general hard driving along with the fact that we couldn’t get them over here until they turned 25 years old means that there isn’t a whole lot of supply. Cars with some mileage or light mods are still fairly affordable, but good unmolested ones are in high demand. This one sold for $60,500 at the RM Sotheby’s Arizona sale two years and 295 km ago, so it looks like demand is still on the rise.

Lot # 39 1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Series 903 Coupe Roadster; S/N 193829; Engine # 193823; Black/Black leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $182,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $204,400. – 385/135hp, 4-speed, body color wire wheels, wide whitewall tires, hub caps, dual enclosed sidemount spares with mirrors, Cormorant mascot, dual chrome horns, Pilot Ray lights, golf bag door, luggage rack, Jaeger dash clock. – Owned for 75 years by C.T. Rykken in Musselshell, Montana, restored by him and his son in the 70’s. Older paint with lots of cracking on the front fenders. Light road wear underneath. Very good older chrome. Long scratch on the passenger’s door. Good top. Very good interior. A 1970s restoration out of single family ownership. It’s an inherently attractive car, but could use another round of restoration work before it touches a show field. – In the meantime it’s more than good enough to be driven with some pride and enthusiasm and is a sound value at the price it brought here.

Lot # 37 1932 Packard Twin Six-Series 905 Coupe Roadster; S/N 900371; Engine # 900377; Cream, Beige fenders/Tan leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $300,000 – $400,000; Rebodied or re-created, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $190,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $212,800. – Wire wheels, hub caps, wide whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemount spares with mirrors, fog lights, spotlight, dual chrome horns, Goddess of Speed mascot, golf bag door, rumble seat, luggage trunk, Waltham dash clock, spotlight. – 2006 restoration with a 903 Super Eight Coupe Roadster body. Very good older paint and chrome. Some paint flaws on the right A-pillars and spare wheel covers. Light folds in the top. Some wear and dirt underneath. The trunk is original and pretty beat up. Very good interior. Light discoloration on the tires. An older restoration, and probably never done to concours standards, but an inherently handsome and desirable car that is eligible for plenty of good events. – Beautifully done, but the restoration/rebody was done thirteen years ago and hasn’t been maintained well in its intervening history. Prior owners’ neglect is apparent and it deserved the dismissive price it brought even though the CCCA has recognized it as a “Full Classic” ™ and it is eligible for the panoply of events that designation implies. The result here reflects its condition and its rebody.

Lot # 27 1956 Porsche 356A Speedster, Body by Reutter; S/N 82789; Engine # 63620; Ivory/Red; Estimate $375,000 – $450,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $325,000 plus commission of 11.54%; Final Price $362,500. – Hub caps, Michelin XZX tires, boot cover, owner’s manual, tool kit, Porsche CofA. – Represented as the numbers-matching engine and body panels. Very good paint, chrome, interior and underneath. Freshly painted top frame. Redone to like new standards late last year and presented in its gorgeous original colors. A very good Speedster. – A spot-on result for a fresh-from-restoration 356A Speedster.

Lot # 72 1958 Porsche 356A T2 1600 Speedster, Body by Reutter; S/N 84082; Engine # P67551; Silver/Lime Green leatherette; Black cloth top; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Post-block sale at $198,929 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $222,800. – Chrome wheels, Vredestein tires, fog lights, Porsche CofA. – Orderly engine compartment missing one air filter and with what appears to be a restamped engine number. Very good paint and interior but erratic trim chrome. The underbody is covered with resprayed old undercoat. A handsome car in good driver condition. – A post-block transaction put together at a price appropriate to this Speedster’s condition and the engine number concern.

Lot # 10 1962 Porsche 356B Coupe; S/N 118685; Engine # 607619; Ivory/Bordeaux leatherette with corduroy cloth inserts; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $89,600. – Kumho tires, sunroof. – Rare sunroof coupe. Represented as matching numbers. Good older paint and brightwork. Light scratch on the left side of the windshield and track scratches on the windows. Very good older restored interior. Clean and tidy underneath. A straightforward older restoration of a desirably configured 356B, and the corduroy interior is a neat feature. – The bidders got moderately carried away with this Porsche, even with the sunroof. It may have sold to someone who wears shorts and leaves the sunroof open when parked in the bright sunshine. The cool corduroy seat inserts will earn their keep in that situation.

Lot # 88 1963 Porsche 356B Carrera 2 GS Cabriolet, Body by Reutter; S/N 158183; Engine # P97243; Red/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $1,100,000 – $1,300,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $905,000 plus commission of 10.55%; Final Price $1,000,500. – Porsche woodrim steering wheel, Blaupunkt multiband radio, chrome wheels, hubcaps. – Represented as the original engine, restored to this chassis in 2017. Good older repaint, erratic chrome, good upholstery with abundant patina. The chassis and wheel wells are thoroughly treated with globs of old undercoat. The engine compartment is clean and orderly. It has all the earmarks of 30 years of continuous ownership by a conscientious enthusiast who gave it what it needed, when needed. – The meticulous, sympathetic preservation of this Carrera 2 GS Cab is both impressive and encouraging. It would not have been expensive at the pre-sale low estimate and at this result is a sound value.

Lot # 114 1966 Porsche 912 Coupe; S/N 352644; Engine # 832532; Irish Green/Black leatherette; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $44,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $49,280. – Hub caps, Kumho tires, woodrim steering wheel, wood shift knob, Blaupunkt stereo, 5-speed, tool roll, books, spare. – Very good fresh paint and brightwork other than a small scratch on the left front. Slightly imperfect gaps. Restored and lightly used underneath. Very good fresh interior. Not a concours car, but it’s a 912 and for what it is, it’s fantastic. – Good colors, great condition and a desirable 5-speed led this car to a strong but deserved result. Porsche hedged its bets on the 6-cylinder 911 by continuing to build the 4-cylinder 912 in the 901 chassis but quickly realized the 911 was a smash hit and the 912 wasn’t necessary (although it came back as the 1976 912E with 2-liter 4-cylinder 914 power during the gas crisis.) This is a solid result for a solid example.

Lot # 48 1973 Porsche 911S Coupe; S/N 9113300714; Engine # 6331113; Light Yellow/Brown leatherette; Estimate $140,000 – $180,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $117,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $131,600. – Fuchs wheels, Yokohama tires, power sunroof, limited slip, rear window wiper, later stereo, leather-wrapped steering wheel, manuals and tools. – Represented as the matching numbers engine and transmission. Small scuff and crack on the left front bumper rub strip. Lightly scratched window frames. Very good paint. The fabric around the sunroof is loose. There are some small dents in the door panel trim and a small crack in the dash top but the interior is mostly good. Attractive, good colors and desirable equipment, but essentially just a nice driver wearing a 2012 restoration. – This car has a lot of eyeball in these colors, but it’s not a show car and the Scottsdale bidders recognized that with a perfectly appropriate price.

Lot # 31 1989 Porsche 911 Turbo 930 Cabriolet Slant Nose; S/N WP0EB0939KS070407; Engine # 68K00819; Black/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $175,000 – $250,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $205,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $229,600. – 3299/282hp turbo, 5-speed, limited slip, black painted Fuchs wheels, Michelin tires, snorkely brake light, Blaupunkt Reno cassette stereo, factory slant nose. – Desirable ‘89 model with the G-50 5-Speed, plus it has a factory slant nose. Showing 23,631 claimed original miles. Very good paint, interior and top. Babied like most other 911 Turbos, and still gorgeous even though it turns 30 this year. – A factory slant nose can carry a 30% premium over a standard 930, and although 930 Cabriolets tend to command less than the equivalent coupe or Targa, this one brought a very high number reflecting its low miles and commendable preservation.

Lot # 106 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Cabriolet; S/N WP0CB2963MS461844; Grand Prix White/Dark Blue leather; Dark Blue cloth top; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $36,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $40,320. – Potenza tires, snorkely brake light, factory CD stereo, Tiptronic, power seats. – Showing 51,364 believable miles that are represented as all it has covered from new. Very good original paint. Clean top. Light road wear underneath. A few chips around the edge of the driver’s door. Very good interior with hardly any wear. Some cracking in the taillight lens. A good 20-foot car, but the Tiptronic is a huge handicap and it’s essentially just a lightly used 964. – This price could have bought a better car with lower miles and a 5-speed.

Lot # 13 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe; S/N WP0AA2961MS480273; Grand Prix White/Black leather; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $110,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $123,200. – Sunroof, power windows, air conditioning, Alpine CD stereo, tool roll. – Small scuff on the left rear fender but the paint is mostly pretty good. The finish on the wheels, especially the left rear, is also pretty rough. Very good interior. California car since new. Not without its flaws, but an attractive 964 Turbo that looks very lightly used despite its 54,909 miles. – Earlier 964 Turbos are worth less than later ones because of their smaller 3.3-liter engines carried over from the 930. This one sold for the serious bargain sum of $91,300 at RM Santa Monica in 2017 and its odometer indicates only 250 more miles since then, but even this result is modest given the solid, honest condition and full service history.

Lot # 87 1993 Porsche 928 GTS Coupe; S/N WP0AA2929PS820156; Metallic Wimbledon Green/Olive Green leather piped in Red; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $90,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $100,800. – 5-speed, Michelin tires, sunroof, special order green upholstery, heated power seats, rear window wiper, factory cassette stereo, rear air conditioning. – Represented as the only North American 928 GTS in this one-year-only color and with a special order interior and manual gearbox to boot. Small flaw in the clear coat above the right rear quarter window. Light bit visible wrinkling on the driver’s seat. Spotless underneath. New brakes. It is represented to have 52,980 miles but looks like a car with far fewer thanks to careful ownership. – Good 928 GTSs have been getting stronger and stronger prices, and the best ones are six-figure cars now. This one’s relatively high mileage was offset by its very good condition, special order features (hopefully the new owner likes green) and transmission choice.

Lot # 118 1994 Porsche 968 Coupe; S/N WP0AA2961RS820075; Guards Red/Black leather; Estimate $55,000 – $75,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $54,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $61,040. – Alloy wheels, Hankook tires, sunroof, rear window wiper, Sony stereo, tools and manuals. – Showing 4,165 miles which are represented as all it has covered in the last quarter century. Recent full service. A like-new collector-grade 968. – The 968 was the last, most developed and arguably the best-looking of the four-cylinder water-cooled Porsches that went back to the 924 in the 1970s. They’re also more rare and desirable than the 944s that they replaced, but really good low-mile 968s have been largely absent from high profile collector car auctions. The demand was clearly there, though, because this result was preceded by the same car’s sale at Auctions America Ft. Lauderdale in 2016 for $55,000. It’s about what the car cost new, but that’s not counting for inflation.

Lot # 45 1964 Sabra Sports GT Coupe; S/N GT4819; Engine # S305658; Light Blue/Blue vinyl, cloth; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $78,400. – Ford Consul engine, chrome centerlock wire wheels, Firestone tires, woodrim steering wheel, fire bottle, Smiths gauges. – Very good paint, chrome and interior. Nearly spotless restored engine bay and underbody. Originally owned by the wife of the Belgian Consul General to Israel and restored to like new condition but aging.. – Israel and sports cars don’t usually go together, but for a brief period in the 1960s the Sabra was the country’s distinctive if not exactly pretty contribution to the sports car market. Actually, it was largely designed and constructed by Reliant in the UK, but regardless fewer than 400 were built and they’re a rare sight in this country. Bonhams has sold this one before, back in 2016 at Amelia Island for $93,500. That seemed expensive for a fiberglass Consul-powered coupe no matter how rare, especially with this lower result as a reference.

Lot # 94 1999 Shelby Series 1 Convertible; S/N 5CXSA1819XL000043; Centennial Silver, Garnet Red stripes/Black; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $112,000. – Modular wheels, Pilot Sport tires, roll bar, racing belts, Monsoon CD/cassette stereo, roll bar, 600-horse supercharged engine. – Gifted new to the CEO of Carroll Shelby Licensing. The wheels are dirty. There is a large touch up on the right front, a small crack on the passenger’s door and a few scratches on the mirror. Tons of chips on the roll bar. Scratches on the tail. The gel coat on the carbon fiber dash is yellowing. Lightly worn seats. Most of these were put away and seldom driven, but this one has been used quite a bit and driven hard over its 15,000 miles. This is the worst one I’ve ever seen, but if you want one to drive and enjoy it’s a good example for that. – The Shelby Series 1 is mostly remembered for not being as fast as it should have been, but a small number of them were fitted with superchargers and beefed up brakes. This one’s even more highly tuned engine, roll bar and just the rarity of the Series 1 itself (less than 250 built) were offset by the fairly worn out condition to come to a realistic price.

Lot # 29 1967 Simca 1000 Coupe, Body by Bertone; S/N 154970; Blue Louisiane/Orange vinyl; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $22,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $24,640. – 944/52hp, 4-speed, hub caps, Michelin tires, driving lights. – 22,286km from new, three owners. Decent original paint with some light scratches on the hood, a few chips around the edges of the engine cover and a respray of the left rear quarter. Several big touch ups on the left rear. Very good interior. A cloudy steering wheel cap is the only real sign of age. Scratched up hub caps. Maintained but original underneath. All original and won a FIVA preservation award at the Quail Concours in 2013. Pretty rare in any country and hardly ever seen here, it’s a charming little car with Giugiaro-penned bodywork. – Sold by Gooding & Company in Scottsdale in 2013 for $28,600 and by Bonhams a year later in 2014 for $24,200. The only difference in today’s final price is the 2% additional BP, and that applies as much to the car as to the price.

Lot # 76 1937 SS Jaguar 100 2 1/2 Liter Roadster; S/N 18072; Engine # 252608; Old English White/Burgundy leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $330,000 – $370,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $295,000 plus commission of 11.69%; Final Price $329,500. – RHD. 2663/102hp, painted centerlock wire wheels, Dunlop tires, dual rear-mounted spares, dual mirrors, boot cover, Lucas driving lights, engine-turned dash, JDHT certificate. – Represented as the original engine and body. Numerous small dents in the nose and front fenders. Lots of scratches and cracks. Surface rust poking through the wheel spokes and pitted wheel caps. Lots of holes in the carpets but pretty good seats. Tidy and original underneath. Dry sidewalls on the tires. Unknown early history and mostly all original. All the battle scars add to this car’s charm, and giving it a few more on a vintage rally won’t hurt its value. – The result here is appropriate for a 2 1/2 liter SS 100, even in this aged and used condition, that has no bad stories and appears to be well-maintained in sound, usable condition.

Lot # 65 1963 Volkswagen Type 2 Microbus, 23-Window; S/N 995774; Engine # 7043990; Coral, White/White vinyl; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $170,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $190,400. – Hub caps and trim rings, pushbutton radio, VDO dash clock, full length folding sunroof, three-row seating – Genuine 23-Window restored from 2012-16 with fresh paint and brightwork. Straight body. Immaculate interior. All good, soft rubber. Spotless underneath. These are six-figure vehicles these days, so seeing an overrestored one like this isn’t as special as it used to be, but this is a phenomenal Bus nevertheless. – Not the most expensive 23-Window to sell at auction, but it’s close and only a couple of other ones have cracked 200 grand. It previously hammered not sold at a $110,000 high bid at Russo and Steele Monterey 2017, but found a much more receptive audience in Scottsdale.

Lot # 1 1972 Volvo 1800E Coupe; S/N 1826353039092; Cypress Green/Beige vinyl; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $82,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $91,840. – 4-speed, Potenza tires, pushbutton radio, dash clock, wood dash, original tool kit and manuals. – Tiny chip behind the left headlight. Otherwise excellent original paint and chrome. Tidy and maintained but unrestored underneath. Excellent original interior. Represented as a time capsule car and looks practically new. Also showing just 59,856 miles, which is barely broken in when it comes to these old Volvos, and it has been babied the whole way. – Perfect hatchback ES models have sold for a bit more, but this is a record price for an 1800E that comfortably topped even Bonhams’ ambitious presale estimate. It’s a huge price, but the new owner can probably claim with confidence to have the best unrestored 1800 coupe around.

Lot # 50 1946 Willys CJ-2A Jeep Universal; S/N CJ2A63684; Green/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $18,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $20,160. – Firestone tires, vinyl top and doors. – Very early civilian Jeep. Excellent paint. Straight bodywork, which is all new. Spotless fully restored frame. Very good brand new top with restored frame. Fresh, clean gauges. Far better than it ever was new with reportedly 50 grand worth of work put into it, and arguably too nice now to do anything other than look at it. – The Jeep (GPW) arose to nearly sanctified status in WWII, immortalized in Bill Mauldin’s “Willy and Joe” cartoons. It was not a surprise that GIs migrated back to the reliable, rugged, utilitarian Jeep when they got back home to their farms and ranches. Willys capitalized on the Jeep’s reputation with civilian models that were snapped up in the postwar years, like this ’46 CJ-2A. In its present condition it is unlikely ever to see the mud of the Battle of the Bulge or the sand of North Africa, but it’s a willing mount for parades or touring a ranch or farm and at this price something of a bargain.

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Comments

    • John Fieldston
    • February 3, 2019
    Reply

    Love your commentary. A minor point about Lot 110: The CCCA does not list the Series 60 cars from 1937 as Full Classics.

    From the CCCA website:
    Cadillac
    1915-1935- All 12 and 16;
    1936-1948 -Series 63, 65, 67, 70, 72, 75, 80, 85, 90;
    1938-1947 -60 Special;
    1940-1947 -62 Series

      • rickcarey1
      • February 5, 2019
      Reply

      Apologies.
      I get that stuff wrong sometimes.
      Other times I rely on my extended family, which is I think the case this time. I’ll correct it.

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