Bonhams, Goodwood Revival, September 18, 2021

Cataloging auction cars is an art requiring the cataloger to accentuate the positive, eliminate the negative, latch on to the affirmative, a Harold Arlen refrain made famous by Bing Crosby and the Andrews Sisters, among many others.

There were some terrific cars in Bonhams Goodwood Revival auction in September, but a number of them had the kind of stories that drive catalogers crazy. There were the four Lagonda 2-Liter low chassis cars from the collection of Captain Ivan Forshaw that Lagonda entered in the 1929 Le Mans 24-Hours … except that only one of them actually raced there.

It took repeated readings of the catalog’s introduction to these four Lagondas and then a foray into Arnold Davey’s “Lagonda: 2, 3 & 3 ½ Litre” bible to figure out who did what with which and when, even though much of Davey’s text was cribbed shamelessly into the catalog.

There are others, like the Jaguar D-type XKD 570 which never left Coventry as a whole car but now is vintage raced regularly with an FIA Historic Technical Passport.

It made this report a bit of a challenge, even helped by Chris Sharpe’s on-site observations. It also took three months to finish it while a slew of later – and less convoluted – auction reports took precedence.

But here it is and there’s some good stuff.

Here are the numbers:

Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $ Exchange Rate
64/82 78.1% 57.8% 12.5% $232,535 $174,001

[74.8%]

$14,882,229 $1.3755

On-site observations and photos are by Chris Sharpe.


Lot # 212 1955 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports Saloon, Body by H.J. Mulliner; S/N BC59D; Engine # BCD26; Grey metallic/Red leather; Estimate $825,300 – $1,100,400; Older restoration 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $770,280 plus commission of 14.68%; Final Price $883,346. – RHD. 4,887/178hp straight-six Rolls-Royce engine, 4-speed, twin driving lights, steel wheels and painted trims, walnut veneer dashboard, modern air-conditioning. – Restored by P&A Wood from 2005-07 and part of the Stan West Collection since December 2009. UK-supplied new and spent a period in Australia in 2001. Up close and in good light the coachwork finish is exemplary with only a few tiny stone marks to the large frontal area. The chrome work and exterior trim are superb. The silver paint on the wheels is a little grey but the smart trims contrast well. The seat leather is top quality, and the walnut veneer dashboard simply gleams. All the steering and pedal controls look superb and the carpets are still very good. The rear parcel shelf detracts with modern speakers and a highline brake light on lambswool that is all wrong. Other than that, a simply beautiful carriage. – The second most valuable lot of the day but not a strong price for an R-Type Continental in condition that is impossible to fault in any meaningful way. It would not have been expensive at the low estimate.

Lot # 217 1928 Bentley 6 1/2 Liter Le Mans style Tourer, Body after Vanden Plas; S/N WB2567; Engine # WB2554; Green/Green Leather; Black leatherette top; Estimate $550,200 – $825,300; Older restoration 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $467,670 plus commission of 15.00%; Final Price $537,821. – RHD, 6,597/147hp straight-six, triple SU carbs, 4-speed ‘C’ gearbox, 4-wheel mechanical servo assisted drum brakes., headlight stoneguards, dual sidemounts, long wheelbase chassis, fabric covered body, cycle fenders, folding windshield, aeroscreens. – Another 6 1/2 litre Bentley with the Stan West Collection since 2012. This example was previously owned in 1980 by Steve O’Rourke (Pink Floyd’s manager), who sent the car to rebodied in its current Le Mans style by long-time marque specialist Tony Townsend. Older paint with small corrosion blips and stone chips on the rear wheel arches. The radiator looks smart as does the windscreen and surround. The chassis looks straight and strong if a little too shiny. The top fits well and looks excellent but there’s a vinyl hood boot that isn’t in keeping. The wheels look strong with some dust in the spokes. The knock-ons are in good order. The seats are of average quality and the carpets are due for a refresh. – Likely to be a very satisfying and even rewarding Bentley to own and drive and bought for a reasonable price for its quality and good provenance.

Lot # 219 1964 Aston Martin DB5 Coupe; S/N DB1365R; Blue metallic/Beige Connolly leather; Estimate $618,975 – $756,525; Older restoration 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $506,184 plus commission of 15.00%; Final Price $582,112. – RHD, 4.2-liter engine, 5-speed ZF gearbox, chromed wire wheels with three eared knock-ons, front seat belts, power steering, alternator electrics, Sundym glass, oil pressure gauge, tool roll, pushbutton radio and electric aerial. – Purchased for the Stan West Collection in 2009, this DB5 comes with a known local history. In 2005 £27,000 was spent mainly on upgrading the engine to 4.2 litre specification by marque specialist RS Williams. 1998 accident damage was repaired. Wearing an average respray with poor masking this DB5 deserves better. The exterior trim and front grille are slightly aged but well refitted. The wheels look in good original condition and only the knock-ons have slight dents. The Talbot mirrors on the wing tops are poorly placed. The exterior glass looks fresh with a dark tint. The interior has very good quality leather and slightly aging carpets. The controls and dash all look well-preserved. A driver-quality DB5. – Sold for £155,500 ($252,936 at time) at this sale in 2009. This price in 2021 reflects both the massive growth in value for thoroughbred classic cars like this and what a driver-quality DB5 commands in today’s market. It was realistically estimated and could have brought a few more bids without being expensive, but this is still a rational result.

Photo courtesy of Bonhams

Lot # 222 1963 Bentley S3 Continental Coupe, Body by H.J. Mulliner; S/N BC40XA; Red/Cream leather; Estimate $275,100 – $412,650; Visually maintained, largely original 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $302,610 plus commission of 15.00%; Final Price $348,002. – RHD. 6,230/185hp V-8, automatic gearbox, power steering, hubcaps, trim rings, narrow whitewalls, fog lights, quad headlights, – From the Stan West collection and being one of 68 cars bodied by H J Mulliner with known ownership history and serviced and maintained by P&A Wood. The paint work is to a high standard with only minor swirls to report. The wheels and trims look smart. Exterior chrome and trim are very good with again only fine swirls. The interior wood looks unblemished as do all the controls. The seat leather is of an excellent grade and is maturing nicely with light surface creasing. The carpets are a little used looking here and there. Rare and well-kept since new. – Superb, luxurious, beautiful automobiles when new and still embodying classic style and refined taste, the bidders at Goodwood appreciated this car from the Stan West collection and paid a respectable price for it.

Lot # 224 1923 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost 40/50hp Pall Mall Tourer, Body by R-RCCW; S/N 314XH; Black/Beige leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $275,100 – $412,650; Older restoration 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $165,060 plus commission of 15.00%; Final Price $189,819. – RHD. 7,428/70hp L-Head six, 4-speed manual gearbox, rear wheel mechanical drum brakes, black painted wire wheels, sidemount spare wheel on driver’s side, running board stowage wood boxes with tool kit, half split-fold windscreen, dual sidemounts with mirrors, Bausch & Lomb drum headlights. – Assembled at the US Rolls-Royce’s Springfield plant with an increasing number of American components and originally bodied with this Rolls-Royce Custom Coachworks Pall Mall coachwork. Supplied new in right-hand drive also adds to the oddity for a US model but will add to the appeal in the UK. With restoration by P&A Wood from 2011 and 2017 at a cost of approximately £163,000. Good paint and shut lines. The grille is proud and resplendent with its correct red-lettered badge. The chassis is well-preserved. The engine bay is very smart with no obvious leaks. The wheels are a little dusty from delivery on this dry field location. Good exterior chrome but the nickel surfaces would polish up smarter. Strangely the front seat leather is a lot newer than the rear. On a car of this quality it would’ve been better to do both. – A Silver Ghost rarely looks better than one with the American Pall Mall tourer coachwork. It is subtle, clean and refined with a sporting aspect that belies the luxury chassis and driveline underneath. This is a solid car with a respectable provenance that is a serious value for the money. The new owner should be very happy with it, and with the price paid.

Lot # 230 1930 Bentley 4/8-Litre Sports Tourer; S/N VF4014; Black/Black leather; Estimate $412,650 – $687,750; Older restoration 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $722,138 plus commission of 14.86%; Final Price $829,427. – RHD. Modified engine with 6 1/2 liter crankcase and 8-liter block, 7,983/220hp, 4-speed gearbox, dry sump, Speed Six radiator, fuel cell, pointed tail bodywork with cutaway suicide doors, painted wire wheels, road leaf springs and friction dampers, 4-spoke steering wheel, black painted dash panel, large bore exhaust, Luvax Bijur central lubrication, 4-litre front and mechanical rear drum brakes, instrumentation by Jaeger, Smiths, Western and Cambridge, cycle fenders, dual aeroscreens, Zeiss headlights. – Built from 2015-17 using an extensively modified and shortened 4-Litre chassis with a 6 1/2-liter crankcase and new 8-liter cylinder block. The front leaf springs were shortened to move the front axle forward to accommodate the large engine into the shorter chassis. Good older paint with some stone chips to the rear mudguards. Shiny paint on the chassis. The wheels and tyres are in good order. There’s surface corrosion on the exhaust but it is still fine. The dashboard and clocks look period and aged. The filler cap is incredible, a wonder in itself. A good showing from a driver quality car. – There’s a reason the Bentley club is called the Bentley Drivers’ Club and that’s because Bentleys are made to be driven, a distinction that remains to this day and is exemplified by this really fantastic, impressively built and thought-out 4/8-Liter bitsa. The price is brought is an exuberant rejection of its bitsa-ness and recognition of the effervescent performance which it promises. Low slung and purposeful, its performance could only be dreamed of in the 1930’s and the price it brought is a function of enthusiasm and contemplated endorphins. Expensive, but unique.

Lot # 237 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Pf Coupe, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N 0947GT; Nero Tropicale/Tan leather; Estimate $481,425 – $618,975; Recent restoration 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $396,144 plus commission of 15.00%; Final Price $455,566. – 2,953/240hp, three Weber two barrel carburettors, 4-speed, Borrani wire wheels, Nardi steering wheel, grille-mounted fog lights. – Represented with a known history and as matching numbers. One of only 353 built. Its wonderful Colombo V-12 engine was rebuilt in 2010 and the bodywork and paint were refreshed recently to a near-perfect standard and perfect panel fit. The chrome is excellent. The glass seals are new, which is always a good note. The wheels and tires are clean. The front grille is the only hint of originality, while everything else is so fresh. The interior follows suit with high-quality leather and carpets. A top-quality showing. – A singularly beautifully restored example of one of Pinin Farina’s finest designs. Sold by Bonhams at Gstaad in 2005 for $133,600 (SFr 172,304 at the time), then at Paris in 2015 for $631,046 (Euros 480,000). It was offered again by Bonhams at the Grand Palais in 2019 with a reported high bid of $623,611 (Euros 550,000). The unaccepted bid two years ago would have been $717,153 with commission and the result here is, by any standard, a bargain for a model and body style that has been on a long term upswing.

Lot # 249 1962 Repco Brabham-Climax BT3/4 Tasman Prototype Open Racer; S/N BT3F1262; Engine # FPF430171261; Red/Black; Estimate $412,650 – $550,200; Competition restoration 1- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $316,365. – 2,497/232hp Climax FPF, two twin-choke Weber carburettors, leather-wrapped steering wheel, coil-over suspension, black alloy wheels, braced rollbar, extensive but discontinuous documentation. – Started life as a BT3 and driven by Jack Brabham in the 1962 Australian Grand Prix, then sold to Australian team Scuderia Veloce and driven by Graham Hill in the 1964 Tasman Championship. Fresh from a two-year restoration by Tony Ditheridge’s highly respected Hawker Racing. Clean body with great paint. Polished and superb chassis and suspension. Freshly painted wheels. The seat and harnesses look new. The central floor panel is the only sign of originality with some minor scratches. A superb presentation, especially for a single-seater race car, and enticing history even if it is dated as a 1962-64 and there are inconsistencies regarding its chassis number. – It is not surprising that the consignor preferred this Repco Brabham to the money offered here. It is a significant (even if not rising to the stature of “important”) race car and it is restored to admirable condition with appropriate Climax FPF power. Driven with success by Graham Hill, Jack Brabham and a host of estimable Australian and New Zealand drivers it has history and stature, even if the history is a bit sketchy. It is what it is, and it would have been a good value at the reported high bid.

Lot # 250 1993 Jaguar XJ 220 Coupe; S/N SAJJEAEX8AX220778; Monza Red/Sand leather; Estimate $550,200 – $687,750; Unrestored original 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $550,200 plus commission of 15.00%; Final Price $632,730. – 3,498/542hp twin-turbo V-6, AP Racing ventilated and cross-drilled discs, Bridgestone tyres, Speedline Corse alloy wheels, cassette stereo. – Supplied new to Germany and showing only 613 km (390 miles) from new. Only about 275 cars were produced with a retail price of £470,000 in 1992. Many are clean and have low mileage, but this one is still a standout. It has been carefully stored and the lovely original colour has only the finest line swirls to show an owner that has wafted off some dust occasionally. The wheels are unmarked, too. The seat leather looks new and has clearly been conditioned to keep it supple. The engine shows no signs of age or use. A car perfectly frozen in time. Even better, it received a full (and expensive) engine-out service in 2019 by specialists Don Law Racing. – This is an exceptional car and it deserved an exceptional price, which it got. It’s a world auction record, in fact, for a road-spec XJ 220, surpassed only by racing versions. XJ220s have historically been undervalued relative to other early ’90s exotics, and there are some reasons for that. The V-12 engine and all-wheel drive system promised by the prototype made way for a V-6 and rear-wheel drive in the production car, and that disappointed people, including some who had already placed orders. Then there was the timing. The XJ220 came out just in time for an economic recession, and its world-beating 217-mph top speed was quickly overshadowed by the McLaren F1. XJ220s are also expensive to service, even by supercar standards. Maybe collectors are starting to truly appreciate the XJ 220 as the rare, high-tech, former world’s fastest road car that it is. Then again, maybe demand for analog supercars has gotten high enough that anything with a stick shift and a 200-mph speedometer is a hot commodity. Either way, this is the road-spec XJ 220’s new high-water mark. The all-in price in pounds, however, is £10,000 less than its sticker price in 1993: gorgeous car, bad investment.

Lot # 251 1958 Ferrari 250 GT Pf Coupe, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N 0959GT; Red/Grey leather; Estimate $343,875 – $412,650; Unrestored original 5+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $261,345. – Gearbox but no engine, Borrani wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel. – Originally sold in Italy but went to the US in the 1960s where it remained for a half century with an Alaskan ice road trucker. This 250 GT is a project car with good potential. The bodywork and panel fit is very good. The mediocre old repaint only shows minor chips here and there. The exterior trim has an even amount of minor corrosion but will clean up. The bumpers are re-chromed. Gauge bezel chrome is speckled. A piece of sill trim is missing. Scabrous unrestored engine compartment and chassis. There are no dash clocks and the passenger’s window is cracked. An honest car that could be a lower starting point into classic Ferrari ownership. – This 250 GT needs everything. The pre-sale estimate is frighteningly hopeful and even the reported high bid is optimistic. It is unlikely ever to have its original engine [although Ferrari Classiche will happily and expensively make one that is appropriate.] The consignor should have grabbed the reported high bid, if there was money behind it, in a heartbeat but at that bid the successful (?) bidder would have awakened the next morning with an acute case of buyer’s remorse.

Lot # 256 1955 Lancia Aurelia B24S Spider America, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N B24S1154; Blue/Red leather; Estimate $481,425 – $618,975; Incomplete restoration 5 condition; With Reserve; Post-block sale at $381,750 plus commission of 15.00%; Final Price $439,013. – LHD 2,451/118bhp, 4-speed, chromed wire wheels with two-eared knock-ons, wraparound windscreen, woodrim steering wheel, Veglia instruments, open glove box, tool roll, jack. – One of only 240 made this project car has been in the UK since 1958 and in current ownership since 1974. Supplied with a replacement engine not fitted yet. The body has rust damage in all areas. Big areas of the sills are missing or poorly plated over. There are no controls other than the steering wheel. The seats look like they could be saved. All the exterior trim that is present is badly corroded. The engine (on a wood pallet) has surface corrosion but the distributor and carburettor are present. A full, deep-pocket restoration is required. – Reported a no-sale by Bonhams in the online results, probably concluded at this result reported by HammerPrice as a post-block sale. And generous it is for a replacement engine tattered and rusty relic. It will take every bit of the financial headroom available to make it merely drivable and respectable. As a fully done concours restoration it will be fully underwater for the foreseeable future.

1929 Le Mans Entry Lagondas from the Captain Ivan Forshaw Collection, Lots 258-261

Lot # 258 1929 Lagonda 2-Litre Low Chassis Sports Tourer; S/N 9413; Green/Black; Estimate $412,650 – $550,200; Older restoration 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $275,100 plus commission of 15.00%; Final Price $316,365. – 1,954/70hp OHV straight-four, 4-speed gearbox, painted wire wheels, canvas body from the scuttle, rear-mounted spare, hinged windshield. – Registration PK 9203, the first of all four of the 1929 Lagonda team entries at Le Mans in this sale from the collection of Ivan Forshaw of Aston Service Dorset. Entered by Fox & Nicholl at Le Mans in 1929. Owned by Arthur Fox and driven by Tim Rose Richards and the Hon. Brian Lewis but was a dnf. Introduced in 1929 the Low Chassis was tuned to give 70 bhp by raising the compression ratio and with a lighter body was guaranteed to reach 80 mph. The restoration of these team cars is almost the same for each car, same panels, canvas body, and trim refresh, only minor details differentiate them. It’s uncanny. The chassis, wheels and front body are well painted. The knock-ons are unmarked. The headlights and sidelights are cloudy. The suspension and leaf springs are well greased. Good quality leather seating that’s nicely aging, with nylon carpets and vinyl hood cover. – Although four 2-Litre Lagondas were intended for Le Mans in 1929 only this one actually competed and succumbed to a blown head gasket on the 29th lap. According to period recollection of the cars’ restorations this was “always said to be the most original and complete.” Its history and condition are reflected in the price it brought, by far the highest of the set of four.

Lot # 259 1929 Lagonda 2-Litre Low Chassis Sports Tourer; S/N 9414; Green/Green Leather; Estimate $275,100 – $412,650; Older restoration 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $206,325. – 1,954/70hp OHV four, 4-speed gearbox, painted wire wheels, canvas body from the scuttle, tonneau cover, folding mesh windshield, dual aeroscreens, rear-mounted spare, cycle fenders. – Registration PK 9204, the second of all four of the 1929 Lagonda team entries at Le Mans in this sale from the collection of Ivan Forshaw of Aston Service Dorset. In 1927 Lagonda introduced the Speed model and then in 1929 the low chassis was announced. The engine was tuned to give 70 bhp by raising the compression ratio and with a lighter body was guaranteed to reach 80 mph. The restoration of these team cars is almost the same for each car, same panels, canvas body, and trim refresh, only minor details differentiate them. It’s uncanny. The chassis, wheels and front body are well painted. The knock-ons are unmarked. The headlights and sidelights are cloudy. The suspension and leaf springs are well greased. Good quality leather seating that’s nicely aging, with nylon carpets and vinyl hood cover. The green mesh windshield is a bit uneven. – Never raced at Le Mans but finished 3rd in class, 14th overall, at the Brooklands Double Twelve in 1929 driven by its owner Robin Jackson and C.A. Broomhall and 9th overall at the Irish GP in Dublin. The lackluster high bid reflects its lackluster race history if not the potential event invitations and experiences the car offers.

Lot # 260 1929 Lagonda 2-Litre Low Chassis Sports Tourer; S/N 9411; Cream, Black/Black leather; Estimate $275,100 – $412,650; Older restoration 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $213,203 plus commission of 15.00%; Final Price $245,183. – 1,954/70hp OHV four, 4-speed gearbox, painted wire wheels, alloy body from the scuttle. – From the Captain Ivan Forshaw Collection this Low Chassis is one of four 1929 Fox & Nicholl Le Mans team cars entered in this sale. Never raced at Le Mans but driven in the 1929 Brooklands Double 12-race by Tim Rose-Richards/Cecil Randall. This example having remained in the UK and went through some colour changes before being acquired by Forshaw to regroup the works team cars. Sympathetic restoration followed from 1985 onwards at Forshaw’s Aston Services Dorset. The restoration of these team cars is almost the same for each car, same panels, canvas body, and trim refresh, only minor details differentiate them. It’s uncanny. The chassis, wheels and front body are well painted. The knock-ons are unmarked. The headlights and sidelights are cloudy. The suspension and leaf springs are well greased. Good quality leather seating that’s nicely aging, with nylon carpets and vinyl hood cover. The chassis on this car has minor surface ripples that are painted and well protected. – The only one of the Lagonda set painted in the colors they wore in 1929 and presented in carefully researched, accurate condition with many original or meticulously reproduced parts copied from original bits in others of this set. In many ways this is an object lesson in how to return old cars to their original condition by following the examples of others in the same series, but in this case it’s all done together and by restoration professionals with all the time in the world. Only two cars in this set sold but the challenge of finding buyers for four essentially similar cars in one auction is a high bar to jump.

Lot # 261 1929 Lagonda 2-Litre Low Chassis Sports Tourer; S/N 9412; Green/Black leather; Black top; Estimate $275,100 – $412,650; Older restoration 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $206,325. – 1,954/70hp OHV four, 4-speed gearbox, painted wire wheels, canvas body from the scuttle. – Registration PK 9202. From the Captain Ivan Forshaw Collection this Low Chassis is one of four 1929 Fox & Nicholl team cars entered in this sale. Owned by the PERR Syndicate of Arthur Pollard, Bill Edmondson, George Roberts and Cecil Randall. Driven in the 1929 Brooklands Double 12-race by Bill Edmondson/George Roberts. This example having remained in the UK and went through some colour changes before being acquired by Forshaw to regroup the 1929 works-backed team cars. Sympathetic restoration followed from 1985 onwards at Forshaw’s Aston Services Dorset. The restoration of these team cars is almost the same for each car, same panels, canvas body, and trim refresh, only minor details differentiate them. It’s uncanny. The chassis, wheels and front body are well painted. The knock-ons are unmarked. The right headlight and sidelights are cloudy. The suspension and leaf springs are well greased. Good quality leather seating that’s nicely aging, with nylon carpets and vinyl hood cover. The wheels have minor surface pitting but still fine just not quite as good as the other cars. – It’s informative to comment on the engine layout of the Lagonda 2-Litre. It looks like a twin cam head but the camshafts are in the block at about the level of the head gasket and operate the 90-degree inclined valves in hemispherical combustion chambers through cylinder head mounted rocker arms. Think Mercer Type 35 Raceabout or Riley. The details are contemporary since regular cylinder head carbon buildup removal was needed at the time and with Lagonda’s design (by Arthur Davidson) the head could be removed without disturbing the cam timing. The compromise, however, is that the camshafts are where the ports should be: The intake and exhaust passages are a labyrinth. No particular race history but potentially an enthusiast’s value in event eligibility and provenance at a price like this.

Lot # 265 1992 Jaguar Replica XJ13 Roadster, Body by Proteus; S/N 002 (15B1415); Green/Black; Estimate $302,610 – $385,140; Older restoration 3 condition; With Reserve; Post-block sale at $192,815 plus commission of 15.00%; Final Price $221,737. – RHD. 5,343-cc Jaguar V-12, 5-speed, electronic fuel injection system, all alloy body, 5-spoke centerlock alloy modular wheels, woodrim steering wheel. – Constructed from the ground up in October 1992 by Proteus, this recreation has a great presence. It has older paint with signs of Bondo filler on the rear wing tops with quite a few chips on a few edges from panel removal and refitting. The general shape and proportion look right and certainly impress. The windscreen has delamination. The wheels look aged with surface corrosion on the split rim aero bolt heads. The seat and harnesses are soiled from use. The small steering wheel, clocks and dash all look period correct. The exposed engine looks aged and heat-cycled many times with the alloy of the FI throats darkened. Museum displayed since the late 90’s. Presentable and usable but aged and visibly used. – A no-sale on the block at £155,000, closed post-block with this result in Bonhams online results list. This is a big discount from the pre-sale estimate, and it deserved to be since it doesn’t appear to have had much if any use in two decades. The seller wasn’t sufficiently disappointed to hang on to it, though, a prudent decision.

Lot # 266 1930 Bentley 6 1/2 Liter Le Mans Team Car Replica Tourer; S/N SB2758; Black/Black leather; Estimate $825,300 – $1,100,400; Recent restoration 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $599,718 plus commission of 15.00%; Final Price $689,676. – RHD. 6,567/147hp straight six, 4-Speed ‘C’ manual transmission, semi-elliptic leaf spring suspension, cycle fenders, single sidemount, Bentley & Draper hydraulic shock absorbers, twin Klaxon horns, Carl Zeiss headlamps, brass fire extinguisher (not serviceable, display only), Blockley tyres, brake vacuum booster, three soft-top bows, glass windscreen, twine-wrapped steering wheel, Jaeger instrumentation. – This 6 1/2 litre works team replica is based on a shortened chassis with an 11-foot wheelbase and has seriously upgraded modern mechanical components. This chassis left Bentley’s Cricklewood factory in January 1930 bodied as a James Young saloon, then rebodied again within a year with Barker saloon coachwork. New 11-foot chassis side rails. More recently the ash frame has had inlaid aluminum panels for increased stiffness and longevity. The Le Mans style body was adopted with longer doors and canvas. The chassis and suspension presentation is excellent. The bonnet and wings have great paint work with no swirls at all. The canvas and hood cover are perfect. The radiator nickel looks nicely polished and fresh. The wheels look strong and well-preserved. The Carl Zeiss lamps are slightly dark. The dashboard, seat leather, steering, and pedals are all perfect. There are new rubber mats, too. Finished only thirteen months ago. A great showing from a strong contender. – This is a charismatic and exciting car, but not a real car, at least as it appears today. A fortune has been spent on its transformation and the bidders rewarded it with a result that reflects its event eligibility, style and performance, if not its history.

Lot # 268 1956 Jaguar D-type Roadster; S/N XKD570; Engine # E2078; Black/Black; Estimate $1,237,950 – $1,650,600; Competition restoration 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $962,850 plus commission of 14.14%; Final Price $1,099,025. – RHD, 3,442/275hp, with triple Webers, 4-speed, dry sump lubrication, Dunlop centerlock wheels, woodrim steering wheel, short nose body, tail fin. – No early race or even ownership history, parted out by Jaguar in 1957 with the engine E2078-9 and gearbox presumed used in the contemporaneous repair of XKD 403. The actual car sitting in the Bonhams tent at Goodwood was assembled in the 1980s from assorted original and reproduction D-Type parts. It was built with historic racing in mind, and it has been an active historic racer ever since, receiving restorative work in more recent years to make it as authentic as possible. Condition-wise the bodywork looks straight and true with a recent flashover respray. The wheels look smart in fresh grey paint, while the knock-ons look original and show their age proudly. The seat leather is stretched and worn and fitted with modern harnesses. The steering and pedal controls all aged superbly. It presents exactly like what it is, a well-used racer. – It was the highest priced lot of the Goodwood Revival sale this year but, being a bitsa, this D-Type didn’t have the star power of a more significant example with clearer, unbroken history. It sold quite a bit under its low estimate and it is the cheapest D-Type we’ve seen at auction in years by far. In fact, this result is closer to what good D-Type replicas sell for than it is to what real ones do. A factory D-Type continuation car actually sold for more ($1.325M) at auction last October. Unlike those cars, though, this one gets a pass from the FIA. And all concerns about its legitimacy should at least be somewhat alleviated by its acceptance to (and participation in) events like the Mille Miglia and Goodwood Revival. The new owner will now get to mix it up with prominent Ferraris, Maseratis, Astons and other Jags at such events, and for that alone the car seems like a great value at this price.

Lot # 275 1971 Iso Grifo GL Series II Coupe, Body by Bertone; S/N 7L1103339D; Engine # 1536T0303CZU; Yellow/Black leather; Estimate $275,100 – $343,875; Unrestored original 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $412,650 plus commission of 15.00%; Final Price $474,548. – RHD. 454/390hp Chevrolet “Can-Am” spec V-8, 5-speed, removable Targa top half panels, Campagnolo alloy wheels, penthouse bonnet scoop, leather-trimmed steering wheel, special order Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, power windows, air conditioning, heated rear screen with wiper. – Ordered new by a South African gentleman and collected from the factory then driven to the UK and used to tour Europe extensively with Kenlowe fans added for cooling. In 1974 he parked it in dry storage having covered 20,873 miles, and it has recently emerged from its nearly half century of dormancy. It has had a minor paint buff up for the sale and looks bright enough but there are chips and slight corrosion to some edges as well as some crazing. The chrome and exterior trim look aged and the wheels show some surface corrosion. The wonderfully original and preserved interior just perfect and has the aroma of the ’70s. A Bonhams rep remarked that they found a full box of cigars in the glovebox. This car is just so, so cool. – Represented as one of three big-block Iso Grifos in right-hand drive, and made even more desirable thanks to its 5-speed manual and removable Targa panels. Add to that the fact that it is a genuine single owner, original condition car and it’s easy to see why this was one of the most anticipated cars of this sale. Bidding soared past its high estimate and the final result is well over what even show-ready Grifos sell for. The premium for originality here was huge, but it isn’t barn find craziness. Sure, it won’t be cheap to get this Grifo back on the road, but it will be relatively straightforward. Nobody will need to cut away rust and go on a treasure hunt for hard to find trim pieces. And once it’s sorted, the factory fit and finish will still be there. That, and the unique specs, are what the new owner paid serious money for here.

Lot # 276 1937 SS Jaguar 100 2 1/2 Liter Roadster; S/N 18109; Black/Red leather; Estimate $440,160 – $522,690; Older restoration 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $440,160 plus commission of 15.00%; Final Price $506,184. – RHD. 2,663/102hp, added 5-speed (original 4-speed gearbox included), painted wire wheels with two eared knock-ons, rear-mounted spare, twin aero screens and a full folding windscreen, black painted dashboard. – One of a believed 191 2½-Litre models built. Used in the Scottish and Welsh rallies in period. Same owner from 1938 to 1994 and represented as a matching numbers car. Professionally restored in its original colours by Davenport Cars around 25 years ago. Bonhams states the car was “totally original apart from the addition of a pair of rear lights and replacement of the horn grilles” at the time of restoration. Superb, crisp gloss-black paint. The chassis and engine bay are clean. The wheels look as they should and are well-maintained. The seat leather is unmarked and superb. The carpets are nylon but still look very good. An impressive showing, especially given the restoration’s age. – Named for its top speed, the SS Jaguar 100 was William Lyons’ first serious performance car and the lithe, well-proportioned roadster was available with either a 2.5- or 3.5-litre version of SS’s overhead valve six. The 3.5-litre version, being both faster and nearly twice as rare (116 built), is worth significantly more but all SS 100s are high-dollar collector cars and have been highly coveted classics for some time. This one’s matching numbers engine makes it a standout, and in bidders’ eyes the quality of the restoration trumped its age. This is a deservedly strong result. Described on site as withdrawn but reported sold in Bonhams post-sale results.

Lot # 280 1966 Aston Martin DB6 Mk I Coupe; S/N DB63425LC; Dark Red Metallic/Beige leather; Estimate $302,610 – $343,875; Older restoration 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $244,839 plus commission of 15.00%; Final Price $281,565. – 3,995/325hp, triple Webers, ZF 5-speed gearbox, chromed wire wheels, Blaupunkt radio, woodrim steering wheel. – Originally ordered new in Oystershell with automatic transmission as a birthday present for the American buyer’s wife and used briefly while the couple was in the UK, then they brought it to California. Mechanically refurbished by the first owners, who removed the air conditioning system and replaced the automatic with a correct 5-speed. Cosmetically restored in the mid-2000s. Superb paint, very high quality finish with no flaws. The chrome work has minor swirls. The grille has slight pit marks. The chromed wire wheels look original and smart but the knock-ons have dents. The leather seat coverings are superb. The carpets and headlining are in good order. The rear window shelf has been recovered in vinyl but superbly trimmed. A very fine carriage for a refined city gent. – A strong but not unrealistic result for a car that doesn’t tick all the right boxes (non-original gearbox, colour change, left-hand drive, etc.).

Lot # 282 1924 Vauxhall 30-98 OE Type Velox Tourer; S/N OE250; Engine # OE224; Grey/Brown leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $275,100 – $343,875; Older restoration 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $233,835. – RHD. 4,224/112hp OHV four, all-wheel drum brakes, wire wheels, split windshield, dual sidemount spares, Bakelite steering wheel with centre brass ignition timing adjustment ring, Griffin radiator mascot. – Between 1923 and 1927 Vauxhall’s landmark 30/98 was the first production car to top 100 miles an hour. An estimated 120 examples survive. This one was bought by marque expert Arthur Archer in 1949 as a rolling chassis with an engine. He added a bulkhead and body and all the spare parts he had amassed to complete this 30/98. Fitted with a period original engine that has a performance camshaft. The differential has also been refreshed. Not portrayed as an original numbers car but accepted as a known car. The last restoration being some 28 years ago when a replica Velox body was added. With good two-pack paint and no chips, this car presents well. There are some uneven surfaces on the wings but nowhere else. The chassis is black paint and the suspension is also very clean and smart. The wheels are good with new tyres. The seat leather is of great quality but the buttons look wrong. The dashboard, steering wheel, pedals and controls all look to be in very pleasing condition. – While this result is well under Bonhams low estimate it is not an unreasonable offer for a 30-98 OE assembled from a rolling chassis with a replica Velox body and non-matching engine. With the buyer’s commission it would have been $268,900 all-in and right in line with recent 30-98 OE Velox Tourer transactions.

Lot # 283 1924 MG M-Type Midget Double Twelve Sports Tourer; S/N 2M1647; Green/Red leather; Estimate $103,163 – $137,550; Older restoration 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $94,910 plus commission of 15.00%; Final Price $109,146. – RHD. 847/27hp four, 3-speed gearbox, lowered suspension using half-elliptic springs and Hartford friction disk shock absorbers with rigid front and rear axles and wire wheels, cycle fenders, folding windshield, dual aeroscreens, single sidemount. – This little race car is one of two specially built by MG at Abingdon for the 1930 Le Mans 24 Hours and is one of the earliest works team cars known. Retired at Le Mans on the 28th lap thanks to a fractured oil pipe. Also finished 5th in class at the Spa 24 Hours. Unknown subsequent competition history. Restored by owner Dr. Stuart Milton to Le Mans spec in the mid-1960s to 1971 with a replica body, then in single-family ownership for almost 50 years. The black-painted chassis has surface pitting but is not an issue. All the exterior chrome is holding up well. The windscreen and cabin edge trim is a little aged. The vinyl canvas body is very good and true. The engine compartment is aged, dirty and oily. – A factory-built and -entered Le Mans car, even with a replica body and even if it didn’t finish, for this price cannot fail to be a good value. Of course, it is only 27 horsepower and on the basis of dollars per horsepower it is fairly expensive but it’s eligible for everything.

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