Barrett-Jackson, Las Vegas, June 30-July2, 2022

Las Vegas has long seemed like Barrett-Jackson’s spiritual home, a place where glitz and gambling are part of the atmosphere, where Barrett-Jackson’s showmanship and promotion fits like a glove.

B-J’s clients have agreed, consigning 600-700 cars almost every year and seemingly effortlessly selling nearly everything that crossed the block even during the early 2010’s when a few cars with reserves made it onto B-J’s docket. It’s also been egalitarian with average transactions in the mid-five figures and cars selling under $35,000 making up half the result.

That is, until post-COVID when in 2021 and this year the median sale jumped over $50,000 for the first time in this venue’s fourteen year history.

As with the other Barrett-Jackson sales many of the lots offered were modified. Customs, rods, -mods and re-creations were common, in a proportion that seems higher than other auctions. But that, too, has become a Barrett-Jackson trait that carries over to its exhibitors and vendors.

It’s a deliberately, calculated, orchestrated setting that encourages bidder participation. But, as is seen in some of the cars reported here, some of the prices realized were softer than expected, softer even than some of these cars had been bid to in recent months. But a few were goofy expensive, which provides at least some balance and suggests a confused buyer universe.

With inflation concerns mounting (not yet characterized as “worries”, except to Jerome Powell of the Federal Reserve who have to come up with ways to overcome inflation) some pullback in purely discretionary spending is reasonable. More may be expected as liquidity built up over COVID is bled off, or husbanded as an inflation hedge.

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2022 662/662 100% $72,771 $55,000

[75.6%]

$48,174,290
2021 601/601 100% $76,381 $52,800

[69.1%]

$45,905,233
2019 677/677 100% $49,855 $35,200

[70.6%]

$33,752,060

66 of the 662 lots offered by B-J at Las Vegas were viewed on-site by Andrew Newton. They are sorted here in lot number order.


Lot # 58 1988 Avanti Convertible; S/N 12AAV2235J1000221; White/Red leather; Red cloth top; Unrestored original 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $6,200 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $6,820 – 305/155bp, floor shift automatic, wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, bucket seats, console, wood dash, Pioneer CD stereo. – Very faded paint and top, with cloudy plastic rear window. Worn leather and rough-looking wood dash. Dry and oxidized underneath. Engine sounds good on start up and it’s tidy under the hood. Showing just 27,696 miles but looks like a desert car that spent much of its life outside. – Studebaker dealers, some of them representing the South Bend company since its days making wagons, knew they had a showroom traffic magnet in the dramatically-designed Avanti and organized a new company to continue production after Studebaker closed South Bend in 1963. It muddled along under a succession of owners, amazingly, until 2006 retaining much of the original design but relying on bought-in components from GM. This is one of the final generation with Chevy Monte Carlo underpinnings and styling by Tom Kellogg. Other than being a highlight of an aspirational vehicle’s demise it is of little significance, which shows in its condition and the price is entirely appropriate.

Lot # 73 1993 Honda Civic Si Hatchback; S/N 2HGEH3383PH511694; Aztec Green Pearl/Dark Gray cloth; Unrestored original 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $8,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $9,350 – 1,590/125hp, 5-speed, wheel covers, sunroof, cruise control, factory cassette stereo, original jack, tools and books. – Represented as an all-original one-owner car and, despite the 171,904 miles showing on the odometer and nearly 30 years of age, it looks like it drove off the lot a few months ago. It’s unbelievably clean and, even more amazingly, all stock. The paint looks too good to be true but it is original, and only shows some age on the roof and a few scattered blemishes. The interior is gorgeous. The engine is clean, maintained, and recently detailed. That color isn’t for everyone but it is very `90s. An incredible car that will have Honda fanboys swarming it. – This EG-generation Civic Si has all the ingredients (one-owner, all-stock, well-preserved) of a car that sells for bonkers money on Bring a Trailer, all the ingredients except a low odometer reading. It’s easy to imagine a price twice this high if it did have that last key ingredient, but this is still a seriously impressive car that will let a Gen Xer relive their high school days for not much money. It will elicit memories from and get conversations started with any hot Honda enthusiast who sees it. And it is reasonably priced for its condition and mileage.

Lot # 80 1920 REO T-6 Convertible Sedan; S/N 20753; Beige,, Tan fenders/Brown leather; Dark Brown cloth top; Older restoration 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $10,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $11,000 – 239/50hp F-head six, 3-speed, wood artillery wheels, whitewalls, MotoMeter, woodrim steering wheel. – A basic old REO with rough, chipped, scratched paint all over. Paint chipping on the chassis as well, but the underbody all looks solid. Good upholstery and wheels. Restored a long time ago, likely in the 1980s, and showing its age. – While this isn’t a car in much more than barely acceptable condition it’s a big six with double the horsepower of a Model T and a commodious and comfortable convertible sedan body. It will hold its own on weekend tours, trips to the beach with a swarm of happy grandchildren and even a muddy dog without concern for scrapes and gouges, a lot of fun for the money and a way to teach those kids the basics of how a car works.

Lot # 84 1964 Fiat 500D Trasformabile 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N 647374; Azzurro Aquamarina/Beige vinyl, Brown cloth; Black vinyl top; Older restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $23,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $25,300 – 499/22hp, 4-speed, hub caps, whitewalls, folding sunroof. – Good shiny paint, although there is some orange peel in it and there is surface rust poking through the door hinges. A few very small scuffs in the retractable top. Tidy underneath. The tires look older. Small niggles take almost nothing away from the cute factor. Everybody loves a 500. – Everybody, including the folks at Barrett-Jackson who have garages full of trucks and muscle cars, falls for Fiat 500s. They were always popular in Europe, with several million sold, but they’re rare enough on our shores that they get a lot of attention despite their economy car origins. This price is about right for one. What it lacks in speed per dollar it makes up in charm per dollar. And with gas prices at an average of $5.12 per gallon in Nevada, a fuel-sipping classic like this makes even more sense. At about a third the cost of a Tesla Model 3 it will take a long time for the fuel cost to surpass the purchase price discount.

Lot # 106 1958 Buick Special 2-Dr. Hardtop Riviera; S/N 4E4005520; Green,, White roof/Two-tone Green vinyl with Dark Green cloth inserts; Older restoration 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $29,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $31,900 – 364/250hp, Dynaflow, wheel covers, whitewalls, power steering, power brakes, original Sonomatic radio. – Good older paint with a small run on the roof and two small chips on the bottom of the driver’s door. Good chrome, but the rear body side trim is dull-looking. Good restored interior with light discoloration on the vinyl. Tidy underneath. A sound but older restoration done to indifferent standards. – Buicks (or Oldsmobiles or Mercurys or DeSotos for that matter) don’t get collectors excited like Chevys, Fords, Plymouths or even Dodges. They weren’t on kids’ radar in 1958 and they are still overlooked six decades later when those kids have money to spend. The indifference shows not only in the mediocre attention this Special has received but also in the price it brought although the latter is generous for its presentation.

Lot # 112 1972 Ford Mustang Mach 1 SportsRoof; S/N 2F05H182734; Bright Lime,, Black/Dark Green vinyl; Older restoration 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $88,000 – 351/275hp 4-barrel, automatic, Magnum 500 wheels, BFG Radial T/A tires, spoilers, console, factory radio, Deluxe Marti Report. – A later Mach 1 that was big on bulk and low on power, but lovely paint as well as clean wheels and tires. Big scratches on the window frames. Some age on the console and switchgear but mostly very good interior. Restored underneath. Heavy, heavy tint on the windows, the kind of tint you’d find on a stretch limo. Restored to appropriate standards for what it is. – But sold like a different car entirely. Even half this price wouldn’t have been cheap. Originally a 2-barrel 351/163hp engine, now upgraded to something it wasn’t in 1972, it sold on a sharp color and its “Mach 1” badging. The buyer paid too much and, if memory and a shelf full of books serves me right, there never was a 351/275hp ’72 Mustang

Lot # 113 1983 Toyota SR5 Pickup 4×4; S/N JT4RN38S1D0055434; Creme,, Terracotta/Beige cloth; Truck restoration 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $23,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $25,850 – 2,366/97hp, 5-speed, BFG All Terrain T/A tires, chrome wheels, cassette stereo, power steering, power brakes, original manuals. – Body-off restored in 2019 and carburetor rebuilt in 2020. Still crazy clean and fresh with a straight body, gleaming paint, clean chassis, and great interior. Not taken apart and redone like a Duesenberg or Ferrari, but no obvious corners were cut on this Toyota. And although it surely wasn’t cheap, redoing it wasn’t financially unwise, either. Yes, these pocket pickups are now worth enough to fully restore. – But maybe these basic mass-produced workhorses have hit their ceiling. This one sold for $31,350 at B-J Westworld in 2020 and is in essentially the same condition today. Its colors are astoundingly 80’s, dull, earthy and muddy, like the vehicles of the period.

Lot # 122 1972 Datsun 240Z Coupe; S/N HLS3067615; Orange/Black leather; Modified restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $31,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $34,100 – 2,393cc, dual downdraft Weber carburetors, 4-speed, Nissan polished valve covers, electronic ignition, stainless steel exhaust, Eibach springs and Tokico shocks, Enkei wheels, rear spoiler, modern headlights, wood shift knob. – Thoroughly restored and tastefully upgraded Z. Lovely paint other than some odd circular cracking on the roof. Clean engine bay and underbody. Great interior with restored dash and light wrinkling in the upgraded leather seats. Mild scrape on the right rear wheel. Lightly driven and very cool. – This is one of the more surprisingly low results from Vegas this year. It sold for $40,700 at Westworld 2018 but declined to $36,850 at Palm Beach in 2019. T 240Z – a founding father of Japanese performance cars – has only gotten more valuable since then while this one shows minimal use from the ensuing years. The new owner here paid 2016 money in the 2022 Z-car market, and that means a serious value even taking the many modifications (great for usability but detracting from originality) and today’s influx of unmodified JDM cars into the U.S. market into account. This should be a rewarding weekend driver bought at a modest price.

Lot # 124.1 1954 Chrysler New Yorker Town & Country Station Wagon; S/N 76610185; Glacier/Blue, White leather; Older restoration 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $27,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $29,700 – 331/195hp Firepower Hemi, column shift automatic, power steering, wheel covers, whitewalls, pushbutton radio, dash clock, fold-down rear seats. – Ancient repaint that is dull all over and severely cracking in the drip rails. Heavily scratched bumpers with thin chrome. Pitted hood ornament and door handles. Oxidized and a bit dirty underneath. Good interior other than cracks in the steering wheel. The fold-down rear seats reveal lovely original mahogany decking. A rarely seen and rather handsome vintage Chrysler wagon, but it’s in scruffy driver condition. Paint and chrome would make all the difference. – At this price, though, the new owner doesn’t have money left over to throw at this Firepower wagon. It will at least make a neat driver with room for family and friends.

Lot # 128 1981 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 Sport Coupe; S/N 1G1AP87H2BL151247; White,, Red graphics/Red vinyl; Unrestored original 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $43,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $47,300 – 305/165hp, 4-speed, white wheels, BFG Radial T/A tires, glass T-tops, power windows, factory cassette, factory air conditioning. – Showing just 7,073 miles that are represented as actual. Chips and cracking on the nose but the rest of the paint looks great. Light scratches on the T-tops. Like-new interior. Clean underbody. A remarkable example of a mostly unremarkable car. The 4-speed is a plus, but the catch is that the 4-speed was only available with the lower output 305 engine on these cars rather than the 350. – Big money paid for originality, 4-speed, and T-tops – a rare combination. The same car sold for $24,380 at Mecum Kissimmee 2010, but such a car nearly doubling in price over 12 years isn’t all that surprising.

Lot # 138.1 1968 Ford Mustang California Special Coupe; S/N 8R01J154029; True Gold, White side stripe/Black vinyl; Older restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $66,000 – 302/230hp, 4-speed, American Racing wheels, BFG Radial T/A tires, Lucas fog lights, added air conditioning, modern radio, aluminum radiator. – Very good paint and chrome other than some runs around the drip rails and some blisters on the left front fender. Very clean engine. Interior looks fully restored other than the steering wheel. Fully redone Mustang to like-new condition without overdoing it, and a relatively rare California Special to boot. – Two subsets of ’68 Mustangs, California Special and High Country Special (Colorado), combined some GT features with Shelby-style sequential taillights, fog lights, non-functional rear fender intakes, and special wheel covers. They carry significant premiums to their more ordinary siblings and the engine and transmission of this one add even more. This result shows what kind of value collectors put on this combination, and it’s even stronger than the $55,000 final price the car sold for at Barrett-Jackson Houston only a few months ago in October.

Lot # 195 1975 Datsun 280Z Coupe; S/N HLS30214057; Gold/Black vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $15,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $16,500 – Dual Weber carburetors, Cannon intake manifolds, 4-speed, alloy wheels, tires, front air dam, roll cage, fire bottle, aftermarket steering wheel. – Cheap old repaint. Tired original bumpers, and the rear one is covered with caution tape pattern decals and a bunch of random stickers. The shifter boot is loose but the rest of the interior looks fine. A little dirty but not rusty underneath. The badge on the nose is missing but the holes where it screws in are still there. – Softer and heavier than the original 240Z, the 280 has always been the more affordable alternative but the explosion in prices for 240Zs has pulled up just about everything with a Z badge. That said, 280Zs were cheap for a long time and many of them are still in driver-quality condition like this car. It was a driver bought for driver money.

Friday

Lot # 353 1953 MG TD Roadster; S/N 20958; British Racing Green/Tan leather; Ran cloth top; Older restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $27,500 – 1,250/54hp, 4-speed, steel wheels with hub caps and trim rings, Kelly tires, wind wings, dual wing mirrors, Lucas driving lights. – Very well kept older paint, chrome and interior other than some chips and scratches on the rear of the car. The wood veneer on the dash is incorrect but looks nice. Tidy chassis and engine. A handsome TD, restored in 2003 in classic colors and well cared for since. – The T-Series is the original cheap and cheerful British sports car, and the middle series TD is both the most common and the least expensive. More expensive than they used to be, mind you, but not by much, and drivers can still be found in the teens while clean and fully restored ones like this stretch a bit past the 20 grand mark. Although it sold at WestWorld six months ago for an even more expensive $30,800 it brought 10% less here, a still generous price.

Lot # 357 1963 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N 3Y85Z160955; Bright Red/Black leather; White vinyl top; Visually maintained, largely original 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $30,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $33,000 – 390/300hp, automatic, power steering and brakes, wire wheels, fender skirts, power windows, pushbutton AM/FM radio, dealer installed Roadster package with fiberglass tonneau cover. – Good older paint and chrome with a touch up on the hood and a few light scratches. Some light scuffs on the top. Age on the steering wheel but mostly good restored interior. Aged wheels and tires. – Sport Roadster equipment and looks without the Sport Roadster premium, this is a sound value in an attractive and usable 4-seat T-bird.

Lot # 365 1974 Volkswagen Beetle Sun Bug Convertible; S/N 1542445813; Harvest Gold Metallic,, Black side graphics/Brown vinyl; Brown cloth top; Older restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $30,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $33,000 – 1600 with dual carbs, 4-speed, BFG Silvertown tires, wood shift knob, aftermarket radio, rear defrost. – Not to be confused with “slug bug,” this is a very rare “Sun Bug” built in 1973-74. Sources vary on production numbers, but the highest number is 300. Very good paint and chrome. Clean wheels. New weather stripping. Excellent interior. Light scuffs on the inside of the top and the top frame is fairly oxidized. A nifty, somewhat obscure and well-restored late Beetle. – The Beetle had life left in it in the mid-1970s, but it was nevertheless an old design and it was facing new competition from efficient, practical, well-built and cheap Japanese economy cars. Like Detroit, mid-’70s VW put out several appearance packages to at least make things look fresh. One of them was the Sun Bug, which dressed up the standard Beetle or Super Beetle with special gold paint, a special badge on the rear, black body side graphics, unique shift knob, and even a rosewood dash. The brochure reads “let a little sunshine into your life.” Even by classic VW standards, it’s a real charmer. Sun Bugs don’t often pop up for sale, but this one sold for $10,175 at Mecum Anaheim 2016, back when Beetles were still cheap entry-level classics. That was oh such a long time ago, though, and this result is in line with what other Beetle cabriolets are going for these days, with a notable but ultimately mild premium thrown in for the Sun Bug cachet.

Lot # 368 1998 Chevrolet Monte Carlo Dale Earnhardt Edition Coupe; S/N 2G1WX12KXW9230162; Black,, Red and Gray graphics/Black leather; Unrestored original 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $18,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $19,800 – 231/200hp, automatic, alloy wheels, Goodyear tires, power windows, air conditioning. – Represented as one of 25 built. Showing 670 miles and looks brand new. Bought as a collectible, kept as a collectible, and probably the only `98 Monte Carlo that will ever be considered collectible. – This car sold out of the American Muscle Car Museum collection in Palm Beach earlier this year for a reported $33,000. It’s hard to imagine a higher price anywhere any time soon, and the Vegas bidders weren’t smitten. Back in 2014 it sold for $17,280 at Mecum’s Dallas auction.

Lot # 370 1980 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Turbo Pace Car Edition Coupe; S/N 2X87TAN135935; White,, Gray pace car graphics/White vinyl with cloth inserts; Unrestored original 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000 – 301/210hp turbocharged, automatic, glass T-tops, power windows, factory air conditioning. – Showing 18,919 miles and all original. Some of the pinstripe decals are dry and cracking and there is some dirt in the edges of the decals on the hood, but the paint is in good shape aside from a few minor chips. The weather stripping is severely dry and cracked but the interior is in good shape. Collectible, well-preserved ’80s muscle. – And a solid value, too, with only a small IMS badge on the fender side instead of great in-your-face Pace Car graphics. It could have brought significantly more without being expensive.

Lot # 370.1 1979 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Coupe; S/N 2W87K9N122880; Solar Gold/Tan cloth; Visually maintained, largely original 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $30,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $33,000 – 403/185hp, automatic, shaker hood scoop, snowflake wheels, Uniroyal white letter tires, glass T-tops, console, power windows, original cassette stereo, factory air conditioning. – Showing 15,589 miles that are represented as actual, and represented with one repaint in the original color. The front bumper looks like the original finish, and the rest of the paint is on the older side but doesn’t show major flaws. Tidy underneath. Very good original interior. Never restored because it never needed to be. – This car sold for $35,200 at Westworld in 2019, and although these pieces of Pontiac mustache muscle have been selling higher since then, the Vegas bidders placed less value on originality. This is still a fair if somewhat modest result for it.

Lot # 376 1970 Dodge Coronet Super Bee 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N WM23N0G186671; Beige,, Black vinyl roof, White tail stripe/Tan vinyl; Unrestored original 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000 – 383/335hp, floor shift automatic, BFG Radial T/A tires, factory air conditioning, remote mirror, Tic-Toc-Tach, AM radio. – All original Super Bee with the 383 (the lowest output engine available), showing 49,871 miles that are represented as actual. The paint and chrome are dull and aged as you’d expect, but there are only minor blemishes. Light age on the dash and console, but the rest of the interior looks fantastic. Only light dirt and age underneath. Muted colors for a Super Bee, but that gives it some sleeper charm and it is a commendable survivor that should absolutely be left as-is. – Bright paint might have gotten bidders more excited about the originality, but the seller should still be plenty satisfied with this result and it was given a healthy but restrained premium for its preserved condition.

Lot # 390 1960 Willys Jeep Pickup 4×4; S/N 5526860026; Peacock Blue,, White/Gray vinyl; Recent restoration 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $41,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $45,100 – 226/115hp Super Hurricane six, 3-speed manual, white wheels, dual mirrors, windshield visor, spare wheel on the driver’s side, winch. – Gorgeous full restoration top to bottom. Perfect chassis. Fantastic paint and brightwork. The pickup bed is completely straight and free of dents or dings. The interior looks better than new. Uneven door gaps are the only real issue. – This is a 2021 Bantam Jeep Heritage Festival class winner and still looks spectacular from every angle. Even door gaps are probably a deduction in Bantam Jeep judging. While this is a breathtaking price it bought a breathtaking Jeepster that the new owner will be proud of.

Lot # 392 1992 Nissan Skyline GT-R Coupe; S/N BNR32217315; Spark Silver Metallic/Dark Gray, Light Gray cloth; Visually maintained, largely original 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $41,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $45,100 – 2,568/276hp twin-turbo inline six, 5-speed, Toyo tires, HKS Hipermax coilovers, later CD stereo. – Reportedly all stock other than the suspension, although the muffler is aftermarket, both pretty standard changes on these cars. Also reportedly imported to Southern California in 2017 and kept there since. Showing 140,846 km (87,518 miles). Good original paint with a handful of tiny chips. A few dings in the original wheels. Mostly good interior but all the trim around the rear quarter windows is coming loose. A bit dirty but mostly tidy and maintained underneath. A solid, used but not abused R32. – This is a surprisingly low price for a solid GT-R. Once these became eligible for import starting in 2014, there has been a steady stream of R32s making their way to American garages and prices continued to climb even as the supply of both R32s and later R33s increased. One sale doesn’t make a trend, but we would have expected another 15 grand or so. Maybe the demand for these pieces of JDM royalty is finally starting to soften but for the moment this looks like an astute and opportunistic purchase.

Lot # 404 1964 Buick Riviera Coupe; S/N 7K1221266; Desert Beige/Saddle Tan vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $22,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $24,200 – 425/340hp, floor shift, automatic, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, air conditioning, power windows, power tilt steering column, bucket seats, console. – Dull paint finish with some blistering on the hood. Dull wheels with paint coming off in a few spots. Very good upholstery. Light pitting on some interior trim and the controls for the air conditioning are a bit aged. Old, possibly original underneath. Mostly unrestored but a solid driver. – One of the most attractive automobile designs to come out of Detroit, the epitome of the concept of the “personal luxury car”. The result here is appropriate for the condition and age.

Lot # 406 1937 Ford Model 78 Deluxe Club Coupe; S/N 184124393; Bright Coach Maroon/Brown cloth; Older restoration 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $71,500 – 221/85hp Flathead, 3-speed, hub caps and trim rings, Firestone whitewalls, banjo steering wheel, AM radio, rear window curtain. – Nearly spotless, recently detailed engine, high quality but older paint. Lovely wheels and tires. Very good interior. A handsome, correctly redone club coupe. – Sold for $44,800 at Worldwide Scottsdale earlier this year and turned around here at a price that is a jackpot for the seller. Better than playing the slots and more than adequate compensation for the time spent on wet sanding and detailing.

Lot # 420 1963 Chevrolet Impala SS 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 31847A198454; Black,, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Older restoration 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $71,500 – 327/300hp, floor shift 4-speed, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, bucket seats, console, tach, factory radio, power steering, power brakes, factory air conditioning. – Represented as matching numbers with 34,690 miles from new. Good older paint and chrome. Clear glass. Even gaps. Perfect roof vinyl. Like new interior. Fully restored and lightly run underneath. Thoroughly redone to high standards and a sharp, handsome, well-equipped Impala. – The Impala constituted over half of Chevrolet’s total output for 1963, but this one stands out as a particularly handsome and well-equipped car. It deserves a top price and it got one. It also sold for a similarly strong $61,600 in Scottsdale two years ago.

Lot # 428 1988 BMW M3 Coupe; S/N WBSAK030XJ2195548; Salmon Silver Metallic/Black leather; Visually maintained, largely original 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000 – 2,302/192hp, 5-speed, Racing Dynamics alloy wheels, Toyo tires, sunroof, factory radio. – Major service in 2020-21, and showing 92,091 miles. Some chips and scratches on the nose, faded paint on the roof, and lots of small rock chips in the windshield. Some dirt and dust under the hood. Good, lightly worn interior. A used E30 M3 that’s good enough to scoot around in and not take too seriously. – This M3 was a $47,000 no-sale on Bring a Trailer about a year ago, and that listing revealed an odometer rollback under previous ownership that wasn’t apparent in Barrett-Jackson’s description. But high miles does at least mean it has been kept up with and never left wanting for anything. That mileage inconsistency is always going to be a blemish on this car, but for someone who wants an E30 M3 to drive and enjoy rather than park with the cool kids at Radwood, it doesn’t matter as much. This is a fair price for it all things considered, and for a driver it makes a lot more sense than the many six-figure show queen M3s out there.

Lot # 428.1 1958 Austin-Healey 100-6 BN4 Roadster; S/N BN4L036479; Green/Black piped in White; Black vinyl top; Older restoration 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $32,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $35,200 – 2,639/102hp, 4-speed, wire wheels, overdrive, aftermarket shift knob. – Represented with a professional restoration, but far from perfect. Bad pitting on the headlight bezels, and several small scratches in the paint. Small dent in the left rear and another on the right rear. Good newer upholstery but the steering wheel is original and the shift knob looks like the door knob in a 1970s hotel. A driver. – This Healey needs nothing to be a casual weekend driver. 35 grand for it is a straightforward, appropriate price and it has been for the past several years as Big Healeys have been rather quiet in the market after a brief period of high interest and inflated prices.

Lot # 431 1971 Ford Bronco Wagon 4×4; S/N U15GLK66887; Reams Red,, White hardtop/White vinyl; Truck restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $61,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $67,100 – 302/205hp, automatic, power brakes, wheel covers, 2.5-inch lift, Grant GT steering wheel, CD stereo. – Body-off restoration finished this year. Represented as the original engine. Gorgeous underbody with everything looking like new. Very good paint with a handful of minor flaws, including a bubble on the driver’s door. Restored interior. Solid, tasteful, attractive, mostly stock vintage Bronco. – We’ve become accustomed to early Broncos setting the auction block on fire, and any Bronco shopper was spoiled for choice in Vegas this year, with both early examples and brand new 2021-22 models in ample supply. Almost all of the vintage Broncos in Vegas, however, were custom builds with modern drivetrains, crazy wheels, etc. Most of those sold very well, while the only two mostly stock Broncos (this one included) were softer. Not cheap, just sensible compared to the ever-growing prices we’re used to. Maybe the Bronco market is softening?

Lot # 433 1969 Plymouth Road Runner Convertible; S/N RM27H9G131909; Red,, Black stripes/White vinyl; Black vinyl top; Cosmetic restoration 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000 – 383/335hp, 4-speed with Hurst T-handle shifter, Magnum wheels, BFG Radial T/A tires, power steering, console, original radio. – Very good recent repaint. The top looks new as well. Even gaps. A few paint chips in the matte finish around the headlights. Looks unrestored but maintained underneath. Original interior with some dirt and discoloration on the white seats as well as age on the console and worn switchgear, but nothing looks bad. – This result is a deserved premium for the 4-speed and neat presentation.

Lot # 434.1 1978 Ferrari 308 GTS Spider, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 26619; Rosso Corsa,, Black roof panel/Beige leather, Black accents; Unrestored original 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $66,000 – 2,927/255hp, 5-speed, Cromodora wheels, Michelin MXV tires, Momo steering wheel, Panasonic cassette. Comes with books, tools, service records. – Represented as 42,702 original miles and in condition appropriate to its odometer. Light scuffs and discoloration on both bumpers. Faded center caps on the wheels. Scuffs on the left A-pillar. Solid original paint with a handful of tiny blemishes spread throughout. The rear Ferrari badge is loose. The car card calls this early carbureted 308 “one of the best in the country!” It isn’t. But it isn’t bad, either, just a regularly enjoyed driver in classic colors. – The only vintage Ferrari in Vegas this year, it brought strong driver money and realistically it’s as much as the seller could have hoped for. A little attention to some of the cosmetic issues would enhance its curb appeal and it has the potential to bring a better price in a more Ferrari-aware setting.

Lot # 435 1971 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe; S/N 194371S111394; War Bonnet Yellow/Black vinyl; Unrestored original 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $39,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $42,900 – 454/365hp LS5, automatic, Rally wheels, Firestone Wide Oval tires, Positraction, luggage rack, body color T-tops, power steering, power brakes, factory air conditioning, tilt and telescopic steering column. – Completely original and represented as 55,756 actual miles with matching numbers. The paint is thin on the tops of the front fenders and there are quite a few sizable chips plus some mild cracking on the rear, but it is mostly sound. Tiny rock chips in the windshield. Solid chrome. Excellent interior. Remarkably clean engine bay and underbody. An ideal survivor class car. – Given an extra few bids for its originality but appropriately discounted for the automatic that’s mated to that LS5. It was a no-sale at a more generous $42,000 high bid (which would have been $46,200 all-in) at Mecum Glendale earlier this year, and that now looks like the seller missed an opportunity Hypermap although not by much.

Lot # 437 1967 Pontiac GTO 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 2421777121655; Regimental Red,, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Older restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000 – 400/335hp, automatic with Hurst His and Hers shifter, Rally I wheels, Firestone red line tires, bucket seats, original radio, added oil pressure and water temp gauges, power steering, power brakes, factory air conditioning, PHS documents. – Mostly good paint but there are two very large touch ups at the right edge of the hood as well as some scratches on the tail and trunk lid. Tidy underneath. Good, lightly worn interior with paint chipping off the tops of the door panels and some warping in the wood veneer on the console. A solid, older restored Goat represented to have its factory “R-code” engine. – It would not have been at all surprising to see this very presentable and usable GTO bring another $10,000 or so, even with the automatic. The reference chassis number is wrong; the 7th character should be a letter, probably a Z for Fremont, California.

Lot # 440.1 1957 Continental Mark II 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N C56K3416; Star Mist White/Blue vinyl; Older restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $43,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $47,300 – 368/300hp, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, power windows, pushbutton radio, factory air conditioning. – Represented as one of only 98 with factory air conditioning. Good older paint and chrome with some blemishes on the edges of the hood and light scratching on the bumpers. Small rips in the vinyl seats. Tidy underneath. Usable older restored Continental and from a short distance it looks perfect. – Sold seven years ago at Mecum’s sale of the Rogers collection for $27,000. It is a better car, even with its aging restoration, than indicated by the price it brought here in Las Vegas, a surprisingly modest result for a quality car but somewhat lost among the American muscle, Pony cars and customs. It won’t be a surprise to see it turn up at a different venue in the near future where it has a good chance of being more expensive.

Lot # 448 1957 Imperial Crown Southampton Hardtop; S/N C5732106; Saturn Blue,, White roof/Blue leather, White cloth; Older restoration 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $39,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $42,900 – 392/325hp Firepower Hemi, pushbutton TorqueFlite automatic, power steering and brakes, wheel covers, whitewalls, power windows, power seat. – Represented as matching numbers drivetrain. Good, lightly aged paint and chrome, but some light surface rust is poking through below the rear window frame. Lightly discolored upholstery and door handles, plus cracks in the steering wheel. Older restored underneath. An attractive and relatively rare car redone a while ago and showing plenty of age but still presentable. – This is a handsome Imperial with Virgil Exner Forward Look styling and warm ’50s colors, but there isn’t a huge demand for ’50s Imperials relative to the equivalent Cadillacs or Lincolns and values aren’t that high. That can be concerning for owners or restorers, but for someone who wants ’50s American opulence on more of a budget, these aren’t a bad value. This car was a $44,000 no-sale at Mecum Glendale earlier this year, and that offer should have been taken.

Lot # 465.1 1967 Ford Mustang GTA Convertible; S/N 7R03S115967; Springtime Yellow,, Black side stripe/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Older restoration 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $88,000 – 390/320hp, floor shift automatic, Magnum 500 wheels, Firestone narrow whitewalls, luggage rack, fog lights, rocker panel moldings, console, deluxe steering wheel, original AM 8-track, Marti Report. – Represented with awards from regional and national MCA shows. Extensively documented. Still gorgeous. A well-optioned Mustang clearly restored and enjoyed by someone who loves these cars. – Sold at the Kruse auction at Mandalay Bay in 2005 for $45,900 and for $110,000 at WestWorld 2009. It’s nearly as nice as it was in the 2000s and this is a solid, deservedly strong price for it in 2022.

Lot # 468 1968 Ford Mustang GT Coupe; S/N 8F01R187178; Wimbledon White,, Red accent, Black hood stripe/Burgundy vinyl; Cosmetic restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $110,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $121,000 – 428/335hp Cobra Jet, automatic, fog lights, Ram Air hood scoop, bucket seats, original radio. – Represented as matching numbers. Cosmetically restored with a few minor chips on the paint, particularly above the right headlight, and a few light scratches on the chrome. Lovely interior. Clean and tidy underneath. – People are waking up to the fact that the 428 Cobra Jet Mustang GT is a Shelby Mustang without the premium price for Shelby badging. The result here is, considering the C6 automatic, strong but the car is clean and well-maintained.

Lot # 471 1971 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 454 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 136371R104312; Green,, White stripes/Brown vinyl; Recent restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000 – 454/365hp LS5, automatic with horseshoe shifter, 3.31 Positraction, factory air conditioning, F41 suspension, BFG Radial T/A tires, hood pins, bucket seats, console, later radio. – Represented as matching numbers and with a body-off restoration finished last year. Dull, possibly original chrome but very good paint and new wheels, fully redone interior. Partially restored engine bay with orange paint flaking off and old-looking exhaust. Some corners cut, but that takes little away from this being an attractive, enjoyable muscle car. – It seems that this SS 454 is impossible to fault in any serious way, except in the price it brought which is by many thousand dollars too small. B-J has many well-informed, well-heeled muscle car fans, all but one of whom seemed to be at the bidders’ bar when this SS 454 crossed the block.

Lot # 478.1 1966 Sunbeam Tiger Mk I Convertible; S/N B382002092; Green/Black; Black top; Modified restoration 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $71,500 – 289 with 4-barrel carb under factory air cleaner, custom exhaust, aluminum radiator, 4-speed, Minilite-style wheels, Sumitomo tires, woodrim steering wheel. – Older metallic paint and chrome with a handful of chips and some light detail scratching. Dirt and dust under the hood. Lightly wrinkled seats and a few cracks in the wood steering wheel. Imperfect gaps. Restored a while ago and given extra grunt with the 4-barrel 289 and then enjoyed like a Tiger should be. – This somewhat haphazardly modified Tiger sold for $57,200 at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale three years ago. It’s in the same condition today as it was in 2019 and for the most part Sunbeam prices haven’t done much since then. The Vegas bidders were just more generous, or carefree, in what they were willing to put up for a Tiger with plenty to pick on.

Lot # 481 1948 Pontiac Streamliner Deluxe Station Wagon; S/N P8PB53399; Yellow,, Wood/Yellow leather; Recent restoration 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000 – 249/108hp eight, column shift 3-speed, wheel covers, BFG Silvertown wide whitewalls, fender skirts, modern roof rack, spotlight, factory radio, tissue box, dash clock. – Fresh paint and chrome. Gorgeous wood. Lovely wheels and tires. Fantastic interior with fresh wood in there, too. Beautiful car and a rare Pontiac-built woody that really draws attention in these colors. Represented as 22,000 miles from new. – Seriously rare, meticulously restored to car show standards and loaded with intriguing details, the bonus are the nearly negligible miles it has covered. The Las Vegas bidders completely overlooked it, missing a wonderful opportunity but providing the one bidder who was paying attention a marvelous opportunity to take home a showpiece for about 2/3 of what it should have brought.

Lot # 481.1 1948 Pontiac Torpedo Convertible; S/N C8PA3853; Yellow/Yellow, Black leather; Recent restoration 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $57,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $62,700 – 249/108hp eight, 3-speed, wheel covers, BFG Silvertown wide whitewalls, fog lights, spotlight, dual mirrors, fender skirts, power top, AM radio, dash clock, heat and defrost. – Recently restored, presumably as a pair with the yellow Pontiac woody next to it (Lot 481). Gorgeous on top with nothing to nitpick. Crisp, clean engine compartment. Fresh, gorgeous, and relatively rare. – Not as much of a value as the 1948 Pontiac station wagon that preceded it across the block, but still a sound value for a rare and eye-catching car. One of the final cars on day one of the auction.

Saturday

Lot # 654.1 1956 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N E56S003723; White,, Red coves, White hardtop/Red vinyl; Older restoration 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $48,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $52,800 – 265/240hp with dual quads, upgraded 4-speed, spinner wheel covers, whitewalls, hardtop and soft top, radio, two tops. – Represented as restored 15 years ago and driven just 800 miles since. Large paint crack on the hood and another large one behind the passenger’s door. Paint chips in the steel wheels as well. Damage to the right quarter window of the hardtop. The doors stick out at the bottom. Tidy interior and engine bay. A driver. – Although it is now in driver condition fifteen years after it was restored, it clearly has been driven during the past decade and a half only on to and off of show fields. The quality of the restoration shows in how well it has survived and the new owner should be very happy with its value in this transaction.

Lot # 655 2011 Porsche Boxster Spyder; S/N WP0CB2A83BS745727; Black,, Gray side stripes/Black leather; Black cloth top; Unrestored original 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $66,000 – 3,436/320hp, 6-speed, red calipers, Pirelli P Zero tires, Sport Chrono package, white face gauges. – Sold new in Quebec. Could use a detailing but shows no major flaws and it’s presentation corresponds with the 17,197 miles represented. A lightly used car. – Introduced for 2011 as a slightly spicier Boxster, the Spyder shed some of the standard car’s nonessentials like the power top mechanism, radio, door handles and air conditioning while swapping in aluminum doors and lightweight wheels as well as firmer suspension and more power than a Boxster S. In the Porsche tradition of charging more money for less car, the Spyder started at a little over $62,000 compared to $59,000 for the Boxster S; this one comes with an C$83,655 MSRP sticker (about US$84,600 at the time.) The Spyder does boast extra performance over other Boxsters, though, and unlike the standard cars these haven’t depreciated much. This one sold for $73,500 on Bring a Trailer last November but was a $73,000 no-sale on the same platform a few months later in May ’22. As this no reserve result from Vegas shows, BaT is a better place to sell a modern Porsche, and losing money in the current market can’t be fun for the seller.

Lot # 657 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air Nomad Station Wagon; S/N C57S241204; Light Blue,, White roof/Blue vinyl with Dark Blue cloth inserts; Older restoration 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $53,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $58,300 – 283/245hp, automatic, spinner wheel covers, whitewalls, later radio, dash clock, power steering, power brakes. – Good but older paint and chrome with a small blister on the roof. Scratching on some of the original body trim. The rocker trim also has a few small dings and doesn’t fit flush with the body. Unusual cluster of chips on the rear glass. Uneven gaps. Very good interior. Body-off restored a long time ago, probably before Nomads were worth much money, and with a few corners cut. – This Nomad sold at Barrett-Jackson Orange County way back in 2010, when its restoration was fresher, for $55,000. Prices for ’50s cars like this, even favorites like the ’57 Nomad, have been fairly sleepy since then and this price today is as reasonable as its price in 2010 was.

Lot # 662.1 1953 Buick Roadmaster Skylark Convertible; S/N 17074428; Majestic White/Maroon, White leather; Black cloth top; Older restoration 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $67,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $73,700 – 322/188hp, automatic, chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, boot cover, heat and defrost, factory radio, dash clock, power windows, power steering, power brakes, power top. – Aging but presentable paint and chrome. Erratic panel fit. Lightly scratched window frames. Heavily wrinkled leather up front, and lightly wrinkled in back. Tidy underneath. An attractive driver. Good event or tour car but its showcar days are behind it. – Skylarks were essentially hand-built and restoring them is not a task for the faint hearted or marginally skilled. They don’t tend to hold up well after restoration, either, and the people who lusted after them in the mid-Fifties have long ago given up adding to their collections. That is reflected in their values which now slumber in neglect. This is a modest result for an older restored ’53 Skylark, the model’s first year.

Lot # 678.1 1969 Dodge Coronet Super Bee Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N WM21J9G174252; Yellow,, Black tail band/Black vinyl; Older restoration 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $150,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $165,000 – 426/425hp Hemi, floor shift 4-speed, hub caps, Goodyear red line tires, bench seat, original radio, copy Broadcast Sheet documented. – Represented as matching numbers and restored from 2014-17. Invited to The Quail in 2019. Recently detailed and looks fresh with lovely paint, chrome, interior and engine. – Only a small fraction of Super Bees came with a Hemi during a 1968-70 model run, and some sources say just 38 of them got both a Hemi and a 4-speed in 1969. They’re not as expensive as you might think, however, and prices have only recently got up to where they were before the 2008-09 muscle car crash. This one sold for $121,000 at Mecum Monterey in 2018 and presents a little better now than it did then. This result for it in 2022 is a rational one and gives a fair premium to the stick shift and bright paint color.

Lot # 680 1970 Shelby Mustang GT500 SportsRoof; S/N 0F02R483230; Grabber Green,, White side stripes/Black vinyl; Older restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $87,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $95,700 – 428/335hp Cobra Jet, automatic, Cooper Cobra tires, air conditioning, power steering, power brakes, Marti Report. – Little history represented but it has been restored. Good paint and interior but the front chrome is a little rough. Tidy underneath, and otherwise a sound and lightly driven later Shelby. – The Hagerty Price Guide puts a GT500 like this over $100,000, but value guides significantly lag the changing hierarchies of collectors who waffle and energize with fickle tremors. Based on recent transactions this is a realistic price but one that suggests that a plateau has been reached and passed.

Lot # 681.1 1971 DeTomaso Pantera Coupe; S/N THPNLY01617; Red/Black vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $63,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $69,300 – 351/330hp, 5-speed, air conditioning, aftermarket AM/FM radio, Campagnolo wheels, Deluxe Marti Report documented. – Old repaint with some masking and prep issues. Original chrome and brightwork, and some minor stone chips in the original windshield. Original, significantly worn but complete interior as well. Tidy underneath. Mostly original and quite clean, and showing 24,775 miles that are represented as actual. Not perfect, but nice enough and never cut up or modified. – The Pantera debuted in 1970, and Ford contracted DeTomaso to import and sell the Italo-American supercar at Lincoln-Mercury dealerships. Ford pulled the plug on the program in 1974, and DeTomasos continued to improve and build the car for the European market until 1991. Among US spec cars, the later ones were screwed together better but the earlier ones came with more power and have cleaner styling while commanding similar money. This was a sensible price for a driver-quality car and, as always, a Pantera presents real performance value compared to the equivalent Ferrari, Lamborghini, or Maserati.

Lot # 686 1966 Vanden Plas Princess 4-Litre Landaulet; S/N 16252; Silver,, Black/Gray leather; Black cloth top; Older restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $110,000 – RHD. 3,909/175hp, 4-speed, hub caps and trim rings, fender skirts, dual wing mirrors, fog lights, sliding division window, air conditioning with front and rear controls, BMIHT certificate. – Ordered by the Crown Agents in preparation for Queen Elizabeth II’s arrival in Jamaica in 1966, her second visit to the island that gained independence in 1960. Period video shows the car painted in all-black at the time. It remained in Jamaica after her visit with Governor Sir Clifford Campbell (the Queen’s appointed representative) to be used as his official state limousine. Later restored but it is unclear when, where, or by whom. Some light scratches on the chrome as well as some blemishes on the brightwork/body trim. Good older paint with a few scratches, some blisters above the radiator, and some mild scrapes around the door edges since they aren’t perfectly aligned. Good interior wood and lightly worn upholstery. Maybe not quite fit for a queen today, but still a nifty and restored piece of royal history. – The royals have been in a lot of cars in both the front seat and the rear, so ex-royal cars aren’t an irregular sight at auction, especially in the UK. There’s typically a premium for a House of Windsor connection but, like the majority of ex-celebrity collector cars, it isn’t huge. Surprisingly, though, this was an exception where that connection helped the car sell very well. Even being a rare, restored coachbuilt limousine, a Vanden Plas Princess isn’t typically a $100,000 car, but the queen of England’s car isn’t typical, either.

Lot # 687 2014 Cadillac CTS-V Station Wagon; S/N 1G6DV8EP5E0174275; Mocha Steel Metallic/Black leather; Unrestored original 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $93,500 – 376/556hp supercharged LSA, 6-speed manual, black wheels, Bridgestone Potenza tires, sunroof delete, tinted windows. – From the Bryan Frank collection. Final year CTS-V wagon with 59,000 miles. Represented as one of one as equipped, and one of two in this color. Recently detailed and other than a small rock chip on the windshield, there aren’t any real signs of use. CARFAX Report shows damage to front in 2017, but there are no signs of damage or repair. – It’s hard not to love a fast wagon, especially when it’s brown and has a manual transmission. These Caddies are also serious performers, with 0-60 in about 4 seconds, advanced Magneride suspension, and big Brembo brakes. Only about 500 CTS-V wagons got a 6-speed before production ended in 2014, and they’ve been desirable enthusiast cars since they rolled out of the factory. They simply never got cheap, and they’ve been selling near or above their original MSRP almost no matter the condition. This result in Vegas seems like a lot for a car with miles and a minor accident that blemishes its history, but the same CTS-V sold for $99,000 at Kissimmee back in January, so in buyers’ eyes its rare combination of options is more important.

Lot # 687.2 1968 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 Sport Coupe; S/N 124378L341486; British Green,, White stripes/Black vinyl with houndstooth cloth inserts; Older restoration 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $155,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $170,500 – 302/290hp, M21 4-speed, 3.73 Positraction, Sun tach, Rally wheels, Goodyear Wide Tread GT tires, factory radio, tinted glass, console, power steering, console clock, California black plates. – Represented as matching numbers. Sold new in California. Jerry MacNeish certified. Gorgeous, blemish-free restoration to show-quality standards. – Loaded, absolutely loaded, with options and beautifully restored in beyond-perfect condition without going overboard, this is a stellar Z/28. The only things missing are cross-ram dual quads and 4-wheel disc brakes, but they would take away from its original condition. An exquisite Z/28 that brought a deserved over-the-top price.

Lot # 687.3 1969 Ford Mustang Convertible; S/N 9F03Q127782; Red/Red; White vinyl top; Older restoration 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $90,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $99,000 – 428/35hp Q-Code Cobra Jet, automatic, Magnum 500 wheels, Goodyear Polyglas tires, competition suspension, 9-inch rear end power top, tinted glass, radio delete, Elite Marti Report, comes with a set of steel wheels and hub caps. – Represented as matching numbers and one of one with this combination of equipment (not a distinction of major importance in the world of ’60s Mustangs). Very good paint and chrome aside from an odd spot of discoloration on the hood. Clean wheels and tires. Even gaps. Very good interior. Handsome car holding up well from an older restoration and an interesting combination of options. Not just another Mustang. – This well-optioned Mustang is a familiar auction veteran but only through a series of no sales including Mecum Kissimmee in 2015 at $80,000, Auburn Fall 2017 at $75,000, Mecum Indy in 2018 at a $100,000, and there again a year later at a $110,000 high bid. Third time wasn’t the charm at Kissimmee 2020 with another $100,000 no-sale. It came back to Kissimmee in 2021 and 2022 to $90,000 and $75,000 no-sales. There’s consistency for you. All of those bids save for the last one were perfectly appropriate, and four years of trying and ferrying the car around the country resulted in less than what the car would have sold for in 2018. It’s not a GT. It is a thrilling Mustang Cobra Jet convertible.

Lot # 688 1968 Mercury Cougar GT-E 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 8F91W533574; Cardinal Red/Black vinyl; Older restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $77,000 – 427/390hp, floor shift automatic, Firestone Wide Oval tires, column-mounted tach, bucket seats, Philco radio. – Fully restored in 2004, including a rebody, and not represented as matching numbers. Good paint and chrome with no major flaws, but both are showing their age a bit. Lightly scratched rear glass and some discoloration on the rear deck. Otherwise good interior, and tidy underbody. Straightforward older restoration, done when a Cougar (even a 427) was worth a lot less money. – Sold for $115,500 at Westworld back in January and a disappointing result here that reflects buyer reticence in the face of inflation, rising interest rates and declining consumer liquidity. Enthusiasm, much less ebullience, is in short supply in July 2022. Flipping cars for bigger prices has become a challenge in mid-2022 and there is a shortage of greater fools in collector cars as well as cryptocurrencies and NFTs. This is a realistic result for a Cougar GT-E.

Lot # 699 1999 Shelby Series 1 Convertible; S/N 5CXSA1813XL000054; Centennial Silver,, Maroon stripes/Black, Gray leather; Black cloth top; Unrestored original 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $145,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $159,500 – 244/500hp with factory Vortech supercharger, 6-speed, Monsoon stereo, includes two leather jackets, correspondence and factory documentation. – Just 1,805 miles. One of 249 built and represented as one of 30 factory-fitted with the Vortech blower. Shown at The Quail. Two minor chips on the nose. Otherwise just minor age and barely used. – This is an appropriate price for an obsessively maintained, nearly pristine low mileage Series 1, a rare piece that will stand out even in a field full of Shelby Mustangs and Cobras. It is perhaps sad that is low miles, however, since no one has had much of an opportunity to experience its performance, nor is anyone likely to. It is a car destined to be a long-term garage queen to preserve its condition and its sub-2,000 odometer reading.

Lot # 729 1969 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 Sport Coupe; S/N 124379N609965; Fathom Green/Black vinyl; Older restoration 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $145,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $159,500 – 427/425hp ZL1, column shift automatic, hub caps, Goodyear Wide Tread GT tires, spoilers, cowl induction hood, 4.10 Positraction. – One of 50 COPO cars purchased to qualify the engine and transmission for NHRA racing. Campaigned in period. Formerly in the Reggie Jackson collection. Overall lightly aged and used older restored condition. – Sold for $319,000 at WestWorld in 2009. Sold for $231,000 at Westworld 2019. $230,000 no-sale at Glendale 2019. What happened since 2019 is anyone’s guess but the world has apparently turned its back on this ZL1 and priced it like a lavishly equipped and meticulously restored Z/28.

[Photo on the way, I hope.]

Lot # 734 1970 Plymouth Road Runner Superbird Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N RM23R0A172589; Tor Red, Black vinyl roof, White graphics/Black vinyl; Older restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,500,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,650,000 – 426/425hp Hemi, automatic, Rallye wheels, Goodyear Polyglas GT tires, hood pins, 3.55 Sure Grip, power steering, power brakes, pushbutton AM radio. – Represented as matching numbers. There are a few blemishes and cracks on the nose as well as a few chips on the hood. Good, tight roof vinyl. Good interior. Nearly spotless detailed engine bay. Restored real deal Hemi Superbird and the star car of this auction. – It was also the most expensive car of this auction. And the most expensive Superbird sold at auction, in fact. Plymouth built nearly 2000 Superbirds, the most famous of the short-lived NASCAR aero cars, but just 135 of them got the 426 Hemi engine. That combo of rarity and performance is why Hemi Superbirds can command around twice as much as a 440/390hp car. But even that only goes part of the way in explaining this record price. For reference, B-J sold another automatic Hemi Superbird in the same colors but in lovely unrestored condition back in January for $990,000. Sure, the market has been hot, but million-dollar cars aren’t gaining 50 percent value in six months. Let’s also consider this – Mecum just sold a Charger Daytona for a record $1.32M in Indy. The Daytona, the Superbird’s Dodge-branded predecessor, is considerably rarer and more valuable, and the car in Indy was a well-documented genuine Hemi with a 4-speed. This sale therefore has us scratching our heads, and it’s safe to call it an attention-getting outlier.

Lot # 734.1 1970 Plymouth ‘Cuda Hemi Coupe; S/N BS23R0B236321; Limelight Green,, Black hockey stick stripe/Black vinyl; Older restoration 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $470,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $517,000 – 426/425hp Hemi, 4-speed with Hurst pistol grip shifter, hub caps, Goodyear Polyglas GT tires, shaker hood, hood pins, Rallye gauges, AM radio, console, power brakes, console, Rallye gauges, Shaker hood. – Represented as matching numbers drivetrain and original body. Restored to the standards a car like this deserves and still fresh. An awesome Hemi Mopar. – This Cuda ticks all the right Mopar boxes – matching numbers Hemi, 4-speed, high impact color. It’s still expensive at this price, but since both Hemi Cudas and the Hemi Superbird at the same auction brought hefty prices, it’s clear that there were Mopar men with money to spend in Vegas this year.

Lot # 752 1971 Plymouth Cuda 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N BS23R1B268384; Rally Red,, Black/Black vinyl; Older restoration 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $500,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $550,000 – 426/425hp Hemi, 4-speed with Hurst pistol grip shifter, 4.10 Super Track Pak, Rallye wheels, Goodyear Polyglas GT tires, shaker hood, hood pins. – Represented as matching numbers engine. Light scratches on the chrome but otherwise very attractive. Not restored yesterday but needs nothing. – This Cuda was a $400,000 no-sale at Mecum Indy 2020. It had also no-saled at the Kruse Scottsdale auction in 1992, a mere thirty years ago. If the Indy 2020 number was fair but unexceptional, this one is a jackpot and the seller should be thrilled. Vegas ’22 was a great place to be selling Hemi Mopars.

Lot # 757 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 454 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 136370A152250; Cranberry Red,, Black stripes, Black vinyl roof/Parchment vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $175,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $192,500 – 454/450hp LS6, M22 4-speed with Hurst shifter, SS wheels, Goodyear Polyglas tires, original radio, power steering, power brakes, bucket seats, hood pins. – Nearly all original and genuine LS6, inspected by Jerry MacNeish. Mostly original paint with fading and chips on the hood as well as cracking around the headlights. Dull but presentable chrome. Lightly faded but tight and well-preserved vinyl roof. Lovely interior. Remarkably clean and maintained engine. Represented as driven 64,410 miles, and well cared for the whole way. When entered for the auction it had 64,370 miles so the seller finally got some 40 miles to experience it before letting it go. LS6s were driven hard and raced a lot because they were so dang fast, so finding such a well-kept one is seriously rare. It should never, ever, ever be restored. – At Mecum Kansas City in 2019 this car was an $85,000 no-sale, a surprisingly lowball offer for such an impressive LS6 Chevelle. This result is much more appropriate to its equipment and unrepeatable originality.

Lot # 763 1992 Lamborghini Diablo Coupe; S/N ZA9DU07P6NLA12466; Purple/Black leather; Visually maintained, largely original 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $170,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $187,000 – 5707/485hp, 5-speed, older Pirelli P Zero tires, Blaupunkt CD stereo, Momo steering wheel. – This Diablo has a bad repaint, especially by exotic car standards, with imperfect masking and uneven finish around the edges. On top of that, there are several chips and touch ups. The engine cover and rear wing also don’t match the rest of the car. The rubber between the quarter window and roof is loose. The rest of the car looks OK, but there is little in the way of service represented. It’s impossible to miss a purple Lamborghini, but it’s also impossible to miss how disappointing this one’s paint actually is. – Pulled up by massive prices for its Countach predecessors and by growing interest in analog exotic cars generally, Diablos have appreciated big time and done so very quickly, in some cases more than doubling in value since the mid-2010s. The Vegas bidders didn’t, however, get ahead of themselves on this car, putting up condition #3 money for a condition #3 Diablo. That it had been owned by Danny Koker of Counts Kustoms (“Counting Cars” on the History Channel) didn’t seem to inspire any extra paddle waving.

Lot # 772 1970 Plymouth ‘Cuda Convertible; S/N BS27N0B221348; Lemon Twist, Black hockey stick stripe/Black vinyl; Black top; Recent restoration 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $125,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $137,500 – 383/330hp Commando, 4-speed, Goodyear Polyglas GT tires, shaker hood, hood pins, rear spoiler, Rallye gauges, console, added Shaker hood, power brakes, urethane front bumper. – Represented as matching numbers drivetrain. Like new paint, chrome, interior and engine bay. Fresh, professionally restored and gorgeous high-impact Cuda. – This result is all about the visual impact of the bright Lemon Twist paint with its black top, interior and details. It is a prime example of the effect High Impact colors can have, boosting the eye candy premium by 20%+. And it is entirely understandable, too.

Lot # 773 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air Convertible; S/N VC57B246915; Matador Red/Red, Silver vinyl; White vinyl top; Older restoration 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $110,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $121,000 – 283/283hp Fuelie, column shift 3-speed, dual antenna, boot cover, radio, dash clock. – Very good paint and chrome. Spotless fresh underbody and detailed engine. Gorgeous interior. Straight body. Fully restored in 2008 and reportedly driven just 50 miles since. Still show-ready. Represented as a “date-code correct” engine and transmission and “correct” fuel injection but nowhere does it say this is how it left Baltimore. – The trouble with Tri-Five Chevrolets is that there’s no way to tell from the VIN or the trim tag what engine was under the hood when it left the factory where it was initially assembled. The car card says there were only 68 Fuelie Bel Air convertibles built. Today there are many times that number. The bidders cared, but mostly voted with their bank accounts for its superb presentation and the thrill of driving a “Fuelie”. It would have brought more, a lot more, with documentation of its original configuration.

Lot # 775.1 1961 Mercedes-Benz 190SL Roadster; S/N 12104210015602; Ivory/Tan leather; Dark Cocoa cloth top; Older restoration 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $132,000 – 1897/120hp upgraded with twin Mikuni carbs, 4-speed, hub caps and trim rings, boot cover, pushbutton radio. Represented with hardtop but it isn’t presented with the car. – Represented as matching numbers. Duller chrome and brightwork but good paint. Clean older restored engine bay and underbody. Lightly wrinkled leather on both sides. An older restored 190 that’s better than an average driver, but not by a lot. – Less of a design tour de force than its larger 300SL sibling and always the budget alternative, the 190SL is nevertheless a very expensive car to restore, so it’s best to buy a finished one like this even if the work was done a while ago. Values have gone through some ups and downs, peaking in 2015, then trending in the negative direction before rebounding from 2021 to today. The price for this one in the current market reasonably takes into account the age of the restoration, and both parties should be happy.

Lot # 787 1957 Pontiac Star Chief Convertible; S/N W857H5733; Raven Black,, White/Black, White leather; Recent restoration 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $105,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $115,500 – 347/317hp with Tri-Power, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, boot cover, power windows, WonderBar radio, power seat, tissue dispenser, factory air conditioning, dash clock. – Body-off restoration finished this year and reportedly only test miles since completion. Very good interior with NOS steering wheel. Gleaming engine bay. Both doors stick out at the bottom, but otherwise fresh, gorgeous and well-optioned. Falls just short of concours condition. – It also falls just short of what it should have brought with the Tri-Power intake and factory air conditioning but is still a reasonable result at an auction where a fair number of cars were sold at historically weak prices.

Lot # 788 1958 Cadillac Eldorado Brougham 4-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 58P024754; Dark Blue/Dark Blue leather with Gray cloth inserts; Visually maintained, largely original 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000 – 365/335hp, automatic, air suspension converted to coil springs (a common change), six-way power seat. Comes with all the available vanities except the magnetic tumblers. – No history represented but clearly spent many years sitting, and is mostly unrestored. One of 304 built for 1958. Very dull paint and chrome, but the brushed stainless roof looks quite good by comparison. Tidy underneath. Good, complete interior but the cloth section of the seats is a bit discolored and has a popped button on the driver’s side. A solid, complete Brougham in need of what should be a straightforward, basic restoration. – A restoration might be straightforward, but on a hand-built limited-production Cadillac that was among the world’s most expensive cars when it was new (more than a Standard Steel Rolls-Royce, in fact) it won’t be cheap, easy, or quick. This wasn’t lost on the Vegas bidders, who cautiously stopped at a reasonably low price that should still work for both parties.

Lot # 793 1959 Chevrolet Impala 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N F59N100321; Snowcrest White,, Red/Red vinyl with pattern cloth inserts; Older restoration 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $67,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $73,700 – 283/185hp, Powerglide automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, bench seat, factory radio, rear seat speaker, power steering, power brakes. – Represented as matching numbers. Dull, scratched chrome and trim. Pitting on the front fender spears. Pitting on the window frames and door handles as well. Scratched rear Chevrolet badge. Dry weather stripping. Surprisingly good interior with what looks like a brand new dash. Older restored underneath with road dirt and tired-looking exhaust. Represented with a “comprehensive restoration,” but it either wasn’t that comprehensive or it happened a long time ago. – Or both? This is a generous price for any ’59 Impala hardtop and particularly for a base 2-barrel with Powerglide in this aged and superficially restored condition. For this much money the new owner should at least have gotten a 348 under the hood.

Lot # 797.1 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 396 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 136370L182383; Cranberry Red,, Black stripes/Black vinyl; Modified restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $88,000 – 396/350hp, Holley fuel injection, 5-speed with Hurst shifter, F41 suspension, BFG Radial T/A tires, 4.10 Positraction, air conditioning, hood pins, tilt steering column, cowl induction hood, later radio. – Represented as matching numbers engine. Fully restored to high but not over the top standards. Lightly scratched chrome is the only thing to nitpick other than the mods which, while obviously not factory correct, are all things you can’t see and make the car easier to live with and drive. – This is SS 396 money and while with the upgraded engine and 5-speed it may be a good bit faster it is impossible to argue with any vehemence over the bidders decision to pay this much. It will be a seriously fun car to drive.

Lot # 817 1958 BMW-Isetta 300 Coupe; S/N 510832; Red,, White/Red, White vinyl; White vinyl top; Older restoration 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000 – 298cc/13hp, 4-speed, hub caps, whitewalls, luggage rack. – Restored 23 miles ago. Comes with bike trailer dressed up to match the car. Scuffs on the folding roof and a small scrape on the right side of the body. Light scratches on the rear window. Otherwise very good paint, brightwork, and interior. Like any Isetta, it’s cute. – And Isettas have always been cute, not to mention the most well-known and popular microcar. They also have a broad appeal, from microcar specialists to BMW fans looking to round out a collection, so Isettas have long commanded strong prices relative to their size and performance. This one, for example, sold at RM Monterey way back in 2009, for $35,750 and it is reasonably priced here in a late Saturday evening transaction.

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Comments

    • JOHN K
    • July 16, 2022
    Reply

    “…a confused buyer universe.”
    Beautiful!

      • rickcarey1
      • July 16, 2022
      Reply

      I tried to find a more charitable way to describe the attitude, but this was as good as I could come up with.

      Rick

    • John Jeffries
    • July 17, 2022
    Reply

    Rick, I wonder if The Kount applied the Kooky Purple Kandy Kolor himself? Not a good look for a paint shop owner to sell a car with such issues.

    I rather liked the Imperial Crown Southampton Coupe.

    John in Tolland

      • rickcarey1
      • July 17, 2022
      Reply

      TV car. Rushed to make a deadline, or create some drama, and this is what happens.
      And, yes, the Crown Southampton is cool.

      Rick

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