Bonhams, Tupelo Automobile Museum, April 26-27, 2019

Collectors have been “aging-out” of collecting for decades.

Sometimes it is voluntary, other times it is not. Occasionally there are sequential dispositions (viz., Dick Burdick, Larry Klairmont and Michael Dingman, as in, “sell, collect anew, sell again.”)

On April 26-27 in Tupelo, MS (“Birthplace of Elvis Presley”) Bonhams dispersed Frank and Jane Spain’s Tupelo Automobile Museum in a No Reserve sale with all the proceeds going to an educational trust established by the Spains.

It was clearly an auto collection built by an engineer: most of the cars were technically significant or occupied a place in automobile history that created a teachable moment. Many were rarely (if ever) seen marques and Bonhams’ catalog did a great job of explaining some of the cars’ features and the histories of obscure marques.

Frank Spain had died thirteen years ago and his wife Jane had kept the Museum open but eventually upkeep became too big a burden resulting in the decision to clear it out to the bare walls, including a vast collection of automobilia and memorabilia. Many of the bidders were local, come to see the collection for the last time and perhaps to take home one of the cars, or at least a sign or two, as part of its legacy.

Much of the collection traced its Tupelo history back to the Eighties and early Nineties when Frank Spain had been most prolific in his acquisitions. Six or seven had provenance that included the fabled Harrah’s collection. Little had been done to them since they joined the collection; they were “museum cars” with all the issues that vaguely pejorative term implies.

It made the comments that follow some of the most difficult I’ve every composed. It’s inaccurate to focus entirely on grungy engines and old pimply paint. More important are the preservation aspects, the technical insights the cars offered and the prospects for continued preservation or the restorations many of them richly deserve.

And, finally, there is the positive provenance that will accrue to all of them for meeting Frank Spain’s discerning engineer’s eye and his preservation of them in the Tupelo Automobile Museum. These are distinctive, and in many cases nearly unique, survivors about to add a new chapter to their histories and educate new generations.

Here are the numbers for the automobile lots only:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2019 176/176 100% 47.1% 18% $54,775 $31,360

[57.3%]

$9,640,432

There were 176 vehicles in Frank and Jane Spain’s Tupelo Automobile Museum auction. 74 are described in detail here, sorted (because it seems to make sense in view of the collection’s composition) in order of year of manufacture.

 

Lot # 424 1899 Knox Model A 5hp Single-Cylinder Three-Wheel Runabout; S/N Engine No. 14; Engine # 14; Black, Brown woven side panel/Black vinyl; Estimate $140,000 – $170,000; Unrestored original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $180,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $201,600. – 95cid/5 ALAM hp air-cooled single, 2-speed planetary gearbox, lefthand tiller steering, chrome bicycle style wheels. – Mostly original and aged. Later upholstery, peeling painted. Curdled original leather dashboard. A charming highly original buggy in Frank Spain’s collection since the 90’s, in running condition. – An exceptionally-preserved highly original nineteenth century motor vehicle, easily VCC dated to earn it an early departure on the London to Brighton Veteran Car Run. Ingenious speed control using a tapered camshaft to vary intake valve lift instead of carburetor throttle control. A delightful and successful example of early innovation pursued enthusiastically by the bidders in Tupelo to this expensive but realistic result. It’s more than good enough to be used as is and unlike many vehicles of its age the new owner doesn’t contemplate extensive restoration costs helping make the price paid even more appropriate.

Lot # 422 1902 Oldsmobile Model R Curved Dash Runabout; S/N 17087; Black, Carmine accent/Black leather; Estimate $35,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $39,200. – RHD. Tiller steering, white tires, brass brightwork. – Sound but aged paint with some chips and cracks. Sound older mildew spotted upholstery. Dusty older restored engine and chassis. – Arguably the founder of the automobile industry in America, the Curved Dash Oldsmobile is historic and respected, as well as being Brighton Run eligible in this 1902 model. Its buckboard design was familiar to horse and buggy drivers easing the transition to self-propulsion. This is a well-restored example that has been reasonably well preserved and brought a price appropriate to its condition.

Lot # 420 1904 White Model ‘E’ 15hp Rear Entrance Tonneau; S/N 1877; Engine # E39; Cream, Maroon fenders and chassis/Maroon leather; Maroon vinyl surrey top; Estimate $80,000 – $120,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $67,200. – RHD. Phare Angelicus self-generating acetylene headlights, Gray & Davis kerosene sidelights, Forse speedometer, wicker pannier baskets and umbrella basket, Waltham clock, Neverout kerosene utility light. – Sound old paint and upholstery. Orderly but aged. One of eleven Model E White steamers known to survive and not run in years although preserved in decent condition. Extensive recommissioning will be required before it powers up; a new boiler wouldn’t be a bad idea. – There’s at least a chance this White steamer will pass muster with the dating experts at Britain’s VCC and be eligible for the annual London to Brighton Veteran Car Run. That’s a risk assumed, along with the cost of recommissioning, in the price it brought in this transaction.

Lot # 419 1905 Delaunay-Belleville Model BAA 20hp Touring Car; S/N 506V; Engine # 506V; Red,/Black leather; Black cloth cape top; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $78,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $87,360. – RHD. T-head 4-cylinder, 20 ALAM hp, 3-speed, Jones speedometer, Ducellier kerosene sidelights, B.R.C. Lenticulaire Parabolique self-generating acetylene headlights, single right-hand spare, folding windshield. – Discovered in a barn of its first owner, Joseph Winkler, in 1964. Later restored by John Caperton with this reproduction coachwork. Sound old paint and older upholstery. Dull brass. Sound but aged and neglected and very elegant. – Sold to Frank Spain at the McInnis auction of Dr. Terry Bennett’s collection in 1991 for $78,650 and, at least according to my notes of it at the time, in pretty much the same condition now as it was then (I wish I could say the same about myself.) It is a quality automobile with distinctive (if made up) coachwork but it generously bought at this price.

Lot # 423 1905 Cadillac Rear Entrance Tonneau; S/N Engine No. MDR25642; Engine # 25642 (on title only, see text; Red, Black accent and mudguards/Black leather; Estimate $100,000 – $150,000; Older restoration, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $68,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $76,160. – RHD. Dietz Dainty Sidelights, white tires, Rival folded trumpet bulb horn, Dietz Dainty Tail Light. – Apparently this Cadillac was assembled from assorted 1903-05 parts by LaRue C. Thomas, a Cadillac dealer in Los Angeles, in the 1980’s. Broken left front leaf Spain. Sound upholstery and paint with some panel cracks. Good brass. Disorganized engine. Attractively presented but in need of much mechanical attention. – It’s an entertaining story, but the mixed character of this Cadillac seriously impacts its value and the collection should be pleased to get this much for it.

Lot # 417 1906 Queen Model K Touring; S/N 1917; Engine # 284; Green,/Black leather; Black vinyl top; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $57,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $63,840. – RHD. 270/26hp 4-cylinder, 3-speed, Warner drum speedometer, Standard folded trumpet bulb horn, Neverout acetylene headlights, Gray & Davis acetylene generator and kerosene taillight, Dietz kerosene sidelights. – Formerly in the Harrah’s Collection. Dull brass, chipped old paint, sound upholstery and top. Leaky, dirty engine and superficially repainted chassis. A big, impressive, rare automobile but long term neglected and in need of re-restoration. – The Harrah’s provenance is a definite plus in this Queen’s value and, if I remember correctly from the dispersal of John Moir’s A-Z Collection at Hershey in 2014, the only “Q” automobile built in the States in any quantity. Surviving Queens are typically 2-cylinder buggy-ish machines but this is the queen of Queens with its big 4-cylinder engine and despite nearly reaching Bonhams pre-sale high estimate is a sound value on that basis as well as its excellent Harrah’s/Frank Spain provenance.

Lot # 416 1907 Ford Model R Runabout; S/N Engine No. 1758; Engine # 1758; Brewster Green,/Black leather; Black leather top; Estimate $20,000 – $35,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $28,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $31,360. – RHD. 149/18hp 4-cylinder, 2-speed transmission, shaft drive, Sterling acetylene headlights, Gray & Davis kerosene sidelights and taillight, Rival folded trumpet bulb horn, white tires – Poor old chipped and dull paint. Cracked original upholstery and top. Dull brass. A restoration project, but all there. – Henry Ford was getting it right by the time the Model R came out in 1906 with the outline of the Model T clearly visible in the Model R’s configuration and elemental design. This is a fairly poor example but restoration will be as elemental as the Model R’s design. Considering what will be spent on it, however, this is a very generous price.

Lot # 415 1908 Columbus 10hp 2-Cylinder Autobuggy; S/N 26; Cream, Black leather mudguards/Black vinyl; Black cobra grain top; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $37,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $41,440. – 101/10 ALAM hp air cooled opposed twin, 2-speed planetary gearbox, lefthand tiller steering, bulb horn, kerosene sidelights and taillight – Sound older paint, upholstery and top. Lightly oil misted engine and chassis. On condition alone, one of the best of the early cars in the collection, and also one of the most unusual looking, with its garbage can nose. – In the agrarian society of the American Great Plains, a car that looked like a buggy was comfortingly familiar as well as adapted to the rudimentary trails that passed for roads. This Columbus was built at the same time Henry Ford was finalizing the Model T, another and ultimately more successful approach to putting farmers and ranchers on self-propelled wheels. The result here in Tupelo is appropriate for what this Columbus is as well as its well-restored and -maintained condition.

Lot # 403 1910 Hispano-Suiza 8hp “Boattail” Sports Roadster; S/N 0515; Engine # 5; Cream, Black/Black vinyl; Estimate $30,000 – $50,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $22,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $24,640. – RHD. Varnished wood spoke wheels, brass acetylene headlights and Tarrida spotlight. – Quick, casual repaint over rust; some arc welded panel work indicates later body (or extensive rebuild); broken headlight lens, missing generator; gen’ly neglected; chassis and engine appear complete and original. Believed by the Hispano-Suiza Society to be a later 1914 “Economico” engine in a 1910 chassis and bodied in the 60’s by Josep Vert. – Bought in 1991 at the McInnis auction of Dr. Terry Bennett’s collection for $30,250 and still in essentially the same aged condition. This is an economical entry ticket to membership in the Hispano-Suiza Society.

Lot # 411 1910 Paterson Model 30 Touring; S/N 26094; Engine # 26094; Dark Blue, Cream chassis/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $39,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $43,680. – RHD. Stewart speedometer, Rushmore acetylene headlights, E&J kerosene sidelights, folded trumpet bulb horn, Cream wood spoke wheels, kerosene taillight, disconnected acetylene generator. – Chipped old repaint. Most of the upholstery has been replaced but the rear seat cushion is original, if not long for the world. Dirty unrestored engine compartment and chassis. Ex-Benjamin L. Sharpsteen (director of “Dumbo”) and Harrah’s from which Frank Spain acquired it in 1986. – Seen any Patersons lately? It will not be surprising if the answer is “no”, and this is the only one I’ve seen in nearly 30 years. It’s good enough to be used as is, if not shown anywhere serious. Its link with Harrah’s is a strong provenance hook that adds to its appeal which was recognized in the price it brought here.

Lot # 414 1910 Glide Model 45 Scout Touring; S/N 1040; Cream, Beige fenders/Black leatherette; Beige cloth top; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Cosmetic restoration, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $68,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $76,160. – RHD. 354/45 ALAM hp four-cylinder, 3-speed, varnished wood spoke 41-inch wheels, Rushmore acetylene headlights, Prest-o-Lite tank, Van Sicklen drum speedometer, right-hand spare bracket but no wheel. – Indifferent old repaint while assembled. Sound upholstery but tired, faded old top. Orderly and clean unrestored engine and chassis. Chassis plate is for a Model R but the wheelbase fits a Model 45 Scout. – Offered at The Auction in Las Vegas in 1992 where it was reported bid to $43,000 and sold post-block to Frank Spain for the Tupelo Automobile Museum. Previously owned by Homer Fitterling and Donald L. Ephlin; the restoration predates the current indifferent quality repaint. There are only three Glides in my auction record and two of them are this car so “rarity” is a given, as is performance from its 354 cubic inch engine. As cars of this era go, it also is attractively bodied, with enough ground clearance to go off-roading (a desirable, if not essential, quality in 1910 when most roads outside urban areas were rudimentary tracks.) This price is an appropriate recognition of its history, performance, rarity, preservation and style.

Lot # 410 1911 Brush Model E Runabout; S/N 16484; Lime Green, Beige chassis/Black vinyl; Black cloth top; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $27,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $30,240. – 10 ALAM hp single cylinder, 2-speed planetary transmission, chain drive, coil spring suspension, Bleriot acetylene headlights, sidelights and taillight are missing. – Very good paint, brass and wood. Clean, orderly engine compartment but one valve stem doesn’t line up with the tappet. An older restoration to better than new that is holding up well. – Alanson P. Brush was an automobile pioneer, part of the original Cadillac design team. He built his first Brush automobile in 1907 with backing from Frank Briscoe, concentrating on light single-cylinder power. It proved to be a losing proposition when faced with 4-cylinder competition from Buick and Ford but Brush’s reputation did not suffer and the restoration of this Brush single and its reception by the Tupelo bidders, not to mention Frank Spain’s choice to include it in the Tupelo Museum. validates the appeal of both the Brush automobile and Alanson K. Brush’s reputation.

Lot # 407 1912 White Model 30 G.A.D. Roadster; S/N 17143; Sand, Grey accent/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Unrestored original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $64,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $71,680. – 226/40hp ALAM four, 4-speed, Stewart speedometer, oval bolster tank, loose single rear-mounted spare, luggage trunk, Beige wood spoke wheels, Gray & Davis electric headlights, C.M Hall sidelights, no taillight, Klaxonette electric horn – Dull, dirty, tired but deliciously original and complete. Acquired in 1993 from the estate of Leo Bongers, apparently in exactly this condition. It’s tired through and through, but equally is an amazing survivor. – Any attempt to do more than put this ancient White into running, driving, stopping condition would be sacrilegious, destroying its breathtaking originality and the bidders here in Tupelo seemed to appreciate its significance with this generous above-estimate price which reflects the current popularity of preservation class vehicles and the whole concept of preservation rather than restoration.

Lot # 408 1912 Cartercar Model R Tourer; S/N 6481; Tan, Brown fenders and accent/Black leather; Tan cloth top; Estimate $20,000 – $35,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $42,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $47,040. – RHD. 254/40 ALAM hp 4-cylinder, acetylene headlights, kerosene sidelights, no taillight, single right-hand spare, Stewart speedometer, Klaxon horn, nickel brightwork. – Notable for its infinite-speeds friction transmission, Cartercar was an example of the ingenuity and creativity of automobiles at the beginning of the 20th century. That it ultimately failed says something about the value of practicality. Sound but aged and microblistered old paint. Sound upholstery and top. Dusty engine with old coolant leak stains. Sound and usable after extensive mechanical work. – Continuously Variable Transmissions continue to pop up trading on their promise of keeping internal combustion engines working it their most efficient, or powerful, ranges while relieving the driver of the necessity for changing gears. Cartercar’s system was ingenious, to be sure, although the rather primitive friction materials of the day may have made it a maintenance nightmare. This example has much to commend it, not least its relatively good condition and it will impress mechanically-minded onlookers when it’s driven or shown, much as it must have impressed Frank Spain when he bought it. It also impressed the bidders here in Tupelo.

Lot # 412 1912 Haynes Model 19 2-, 3-Seater Roadster, Body by Amesbury Reed & Rattan; S/N Engine No. 2559; Engine # 2559; Dark Red, Black fenders, wicker body/Black vinyl; Estimate $30,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $36,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $40,320. – RHD. Stewart speedometer, single right-hand spare wrapped with a 26-bell harness strap, Gray & Davis acetylene headlights, kerosene taillight and sidelights, Saxon pedestal -mounted spotlight, Phinney Walker clock.

– Amesbury Reed & Rattan Co. woven body with a mother-in-law seat under the rear deck. Harrah’s-style sign found in the rear compartment. Good older paint, wicker and upholstery but the top is missing. Dull brass. Sound and complete in usable condition once recommissioned. – Sold at The Auction in Las Vegas in 1992 for $33,600. There was no carbon fiber in 1912, but a usable lightweight composite could be found in rattan. Such coachwork was rare even then, and they don’t generally survive, making this relatively good example something highly out of the ordinary. The Tupelo bidders didn’t recognize its rarity and the buyer got a good value at this result.

Lot # 405 1913 Westcott Model 4-40 Roadster; S/N Engine No. 1563; Engine # 318/40; Sand, Brown fenders and accent/Brown leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $67,200. – RHD. 318/40hp four, 3-speed, varnished wood spoke wheels, dual rear-mounted spares, oval bolster tank, electric lighting, Stewart drum speedometer. – Known ownership history from new. Good older paint and nickel brightwork. Worn and surface creased older upholstery. Good lightly soiled top. Clean, orderly engine compartment. An older restoration from the Harrah’s Collection to high standards that is holding up well but showing its age. – This is a neat and sporty old car with some serious horsepower for its era, it was bought from Harrah’s in 1986 and is surprisingly good considering the age of its restoration. It will need comprehensive mechanical attention before being used, but the work required is straightforward. In over 30 years of auction results, this is the first Westcott.

Lot # 406 1913 Minerva Model GG Five-Seater Touring, Body by Cann of Camden; S/N 22378; Engine # 22378; Cream,/Cream leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $37,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $41,440. – RHD. Cream wire wheels, single right-side spare, electric lighting, unusual 2-door body with 5-passenger accommodations. – Poor old paint with rust along many panel margins. Stiff but sound leather. Dull brass. Orderly but old and dusty engine compartment. Probably a really old and now neglected restoration that needs to be done again. – Sold at the McInnis sale of Dr. Terry Bennett’s collection in 1991 for $60,500, it seems to have suffered more than some of the other older restorations while in Tupelo but the new owner will be rewarded with a highly unusual sleeve-valve automobile made even more distinctive by the Cann of Camden 2-door, 5-passenger coachwork. Both Bonhams in their pre-sale estimate and the bidders in their modest result recognized that this Minerva’s future lies in restoration.

Lot # 401 1914 Trumbull Model 15-B Cyclecar; S/N 733; Black,/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Estimate $10,000 – $15,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $13,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $14,560. – 14 ALAM hp/18 brake hp 4-cylinder, 3-speed, shaft drive, Stewart speedometer, Green wire wheels, electric headlights and spotlight. – Sound old paint and interior. Dusty and oil misted engine and chassis. Tired but sound and complete. – Long before Volkswagen and Nash Metropolitan introduce the compact car to the American lexicon in the Fifties it was a popular concept in the Teens as exemplified by this Trumbull, a tiny automobile with a tiny engine designed to transport two people is spartan surroundings. Henry Ford killed the concept with his economical, practical and utilitarian Model T and set America on a course from which it has rarely diverted. That doesn’t lessen the appeal of tiny cyclecars, of which this Trumbull is a good if neglected example. It brought modest Model T money, an astute acquisition that has ongoing appeal and is rumored to be going back to Trumbull, Connecticut, named for its illustrious family.

Lot # 402 1914 Saxon Model A Roadster; S/N 2753; Dark Green, Black fenders/Black vinyl; Black cloth top; Estimate $10,000 – $15,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $8,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $8,960. – Electric lighting. – Quick old paint; a most attractive small roadster with rear transaxle, now dented and neglected. Grungy engine compartment and chassis, but at least it has a top and a windshield. – The Detroit-built Saxon’s notable accomplishment among early light cars was that it claimed “standard tread”, that is, its wheels fit on the carriage and wagon tracks of the day. It’s not likely to see another like it on a brass era tour, which makes it a decent value at this modest price, $340 less than Frank Spain paid for it at the Kruse auction in Carlisle, PA in 1991.

Lot # 426 1915 International Model F Huckster; S/N 5069R; Black, Rust/Torn; Black cloth top; Estimate $15,000 – $30,000; Unrestored original, 4- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $10,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $11,200. – Red wood spoke wheels, solid rubber tires, T-head four, shaft drive. – Dull, dirty and unrestored, like it just came out of a field, but complete and a straightforward restoration. – Cataloged as a “Depot Hack”, there are no seats in the bed, no evidence that there ever were any, and no means of access to the bed for passengers. Rather, it is plainly obvious that this is a truck, the fixed roof and rollup sides suggesting a huckster wagon. It takes a serious truck collector to take on this full restoration project and the bidders were not overly enthusiastic about the prospect, at least as indicated by the price.

Lot # 427 1915 Winton Model 15 5-Passenger Touring; S/N 20567STC; Dark Green, Black fenders/Black leatherette; Black leatherette top; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Unrestored original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $51,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $57,120. – 477/48hp L-head six, 4-speed, rear-mounted spare, Cream wood spoke wheels, spotlight, Controllite headlights, Warner drum speedometer, Waltham clock. – Cracking paint and wood body panels, torn driver’s seat. Dirty, dry engine compartment and chassis. Dull brass. A complete automobile ready for the restoration it deserves. – This is a huge, powerful, high quality automobile that probably will soon see a restoration but until then has potential as a Preservation class entrant. Put into running, driving condition it will be a great tour car for which the owner has no worries at all about stones and birds.

Lot # 428 1915 Lozier Model 82 Speedster; S/N 8328; Engine # 8324; Sand,/Tan leatherette; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $56,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $62,720. – Klaxonet horn, cylinder bolster tank, dual rear-mounted spares, Tan wood spoke wheels, electric lighting. – Restored with a reproduction body copied from a 1913 Lozier years ago by Frank Faust. Good older paint and upholstery. Weak nickel brightwork, water damaged headlight reflectors. Leaky, oily engine. Presentable but in a strange monochromatic livery. The catalog says this 1915 Model 82 has a 369 cid engine, but other resources say the Model 82 is 425/36hp. – Lozier is one of the most respected makers of luxury cars in the early years of the past century. They rarely come to market and the muted reception of this one is disappointing, but not unreasonable based on the repro body. The new owner has a wide range of options including making it run, drive and stop and touring it.

Lot # 429 1916 Owen Magnetic M-25 Tourer; S/N Engine No. 7N16022; Engine # 7N16022; Cream, Black fenders/Black vinyl; Black cobra grain top; Estimate $80,000 – $110,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $115,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $128,800. – 366/34 ALAM hp six, electric motor drive, body color wire wheels, whitewall tires, Solar electric headlights, Warner drum speedometer, rear-mounted spare, nickel brightwork with brass windshield bracket and radiator, jump seats. – Believed to have been first owned by a doctor in San Bernardino, California and used in the 1916 Rose Parade in Pasadena. Sound older edge chipped paint. Sound upholstery and top. Restored a while ago to decent standards but unused for many years. A straightforward re-restoration project or usable as is after recommissioning. – “Magnetic” is a bit of marketing hyperbole since this is a gas-electric hybrid using complex mechanical speed controllers. The only magnet(s) are in the electric motor, but it stands as a forward-thinking engineering solution that despite its operating simplicity and silence survived only a few years in the face of high costs (the M-25 Touring was $3,750, as much as a Packard Twin Six). The current restoration was before its acquisition by Frank Spain, and looks like it, good enough to be driven but not for show except as an example of advanced thinking that would be vindicated only with the advent of modern electronic controls as the hybrid vehicles of the 21st century. Rarely seen these days, this car was sold at The Auction in Las Vegas in 1992 for $27,300 and probably hasn’t turned a wheel under its own power since then. Frank Spain’s fascination with the drive system is endorsed by the presence in the Tupelo collection of another Owen Magnetic, a bare, unrestored, chassis with the complete drivetrain that sold for $14,560. The result for this car is by a factor of nearly three times the highest price ever paid for an Owen Magnetic.

Lot # 431 1916 Auburn Series 6-38 “Chummy” Roadster; S/N 16024; Blue, Black fenders and hood/Black vinyl; Beige cloth top; Estimate $30,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $27,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $30,240. – 212/40hp T-head six, 3-speed, Peerless clock, Varnished wood spoke wheels, whitewall tires, single rear-mounted spare, Stewart drum speedometer, running board luggage fence, electric lighting. – Sound old paint with abundant edge chips. Full weather equipment, sound older upholstery, original interior trim. Dry, dusty engine compartment restored long ago. Solid and complete. – An unusually cute little Auburn powered by a healthy Rutenberg 6-cylinder that combined with its light weight should give remarkable performance, for its condition this is a seriously moderate price and a good value.

Lot # 432 1917 Hupmobile Model N Roadster; S/N SE9595PA; Blue, Black fenders and hood/Black leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $10,000 – $20,000; Unrestored original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $7,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $8,400. – 242/38hp ALAM four, 3-speed, Stewart drum speedometer, Solar drum headlights, spotlight mirror, single rear-mounted spare, body color wood spoke wheels. – Chipped, faded, dull, cracking old paint. Surface cracked original seat back upholstery, Black vinyl reupholstered cushion. Torn old top, Dull brightwork but shiny headlights. Dirty, dry unrestored engine compartment and chassis. A sound and complete restoration project. – If there is a poster child for “museum car” this Hupmobile could be considered. It’s old, tired and hasn’t turned a wheel under its own power in decades. It’s also complete and unusual, not to mention more powerful than a Model T Ford. The bidders didn’t give it much attention, resulting in an unusually good value here in Tupelo.

Lot # 435 1917 Pierce-Arrow Model 48-B-4 Runabout; S/N 15880; Engine # B44055; Grey-Blue,/Maroon leather; Black leatherette cape top; Estimate $80,000 – $120,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $84,000. – RHD. 524/78 ALAM hp T-head six, 4-speed, varnished wood spoke wheels, Westinghouse hydraulic spring shackle dampers, dual rear-mounted spares, Dawley headlights, cape top, good nickel trim. – Originally built as a roadster, with coachwork re-created during restoration by Ted Thompson in the 80’s. It has been repainted assembled with some masking misses. Good upholstery and top. The engine and chassis have been restored, then run a little with a bit of oil mist and some grime. Presentable and usable for tours and events once it is recommissioned after long static museum display. – The sheer size of this Pierce-Arrow makes a statement of its own when carrying the 2-seat Runabout body, and is an ostentatious way to deliver two people to the country club. Which, of course, is exactly what the original owner intended. This is a usable old restoration and brought a surprisingly modest price from the Tupelo bidders.

Lot # 434 1918 Stanley 736 Touring; S/N 18816; Dark Green, Black front fenders/Black leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $9,000 – $12,000; Unrestored original, 5+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $22,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $24,640. – Cream wood spoke wheels, opening windshield, Warner drum speedometer, rear-mounted spare bracket but no wheel or tire. – The boiler is missing, the paint is old, scratched and chipped. The upholstery also is old but looks like it could survive. The top is torn and dirty. Needs everything, and even more but the structure is all there and sound. It’s a big project. – I recently bought my granddaughter a high school graduation card that channels Dr. Seuss”: “Oh, the places you’ll go.” That applies to this Stanley as well. Fortunately for the new owner even if there had been a boiler, after years of static display it would have needed replacement anyway and its absence makes the restoration even more straightforward. A steam car like this is a mechanical marvel and even at this above-estimate price is going to be a rewarding, if not inexpensive, project for the new owner.

Lot # 437 1920 Apperson Model 8-20 Anniversary Eight Tourster; S/N Engine No. 21070; Engine # 21070; Light Blue, Black fenders/Black leather; Black cobra grain top; Estimate $25,000 – $40,000; Older restoration, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $42,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $47,040. – 322/60 ALAM hp eight, 3-speed, body color disc wheels dual sidemounts, Green glass windshield visor, Van Sicklen speedometer. – Quick old repaint assembled with masking misses. Dull brightwork, stiff old upholstery with some pulling seams. Dusty engine compartment with some road grime. Less than presentable but complete, sound and a reasonable restoration project. – The counterpart to this attractively bodied, sporting, Tourster is in the ACD Museum in Auburn and with 60 ALAM horsepower this 8-20 will make short work of a trip to join it. Its body is one of the most attractive among the Tupelo Museum collection and the bidders showed their appreciation of its power, rarity and style with this over-estimate but still reasonable price.

Lot # 438 1921 Martin Wasp Model B Cape Top Victoria; S/N Engine No. 1368; Yellow, Black fenders/Black vinyl; Black cloth cape top; Estimate $30,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $46,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $51,520. – 355 cid Wisconsin T-head 4-cylinder rated 36 ALAM and 70 brake horsepower, 4-speed, body color wire wheels, whitewall tires, Flintex drum headlights, electric Klaxon horn, Stewart Warner drum speedometer, rear-mounted spare. – Unusual tourer built in Bennington, VT with strange-looking cape top. Assembled from Martin parts with an all-new body in the early 50’s by William Gregg. Doors drop badly, some compromised paint. Preserved well since 1991. – Reported sold by Kruse at Auburn Fall in 1991 for an unrecorded amount after the buyer welshed on the deal. It appeared then pretty much as it does now almost three decades later but the performance from its Wisconsin four should be satisfying. Having been assembled from parts bought from the original builder, Karl H. Martin, it is arguably only 70 or so years old, with an unusual story that will be enjoyable retold. Being essentially unique the price it brought here in Tupelo is reliably realistic.

Lot # 439 1921 Packard 3-35 Twin Six Town Car, Body by Wolfing ton; S/N S24583; Engine # S167752B; Black, Grey fenders/Black leather, Grey cloth rear; Estimate $30,000 – $50,000; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $67,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $75,040. – 424/88hp V12, 3-speed, Waltham clock and speedometer, dual sidemounts, jump seats, rollup division, window shades, coachbuilder branded drum headlights, opening windshield, unfinished wood spoke wheels. – Mostly original with repainted fenders and chassis. Grungy original engine compartment. Good older driver’s compartment upholstery and probably original rear. Preservation is probably the optimum destination for this Packard but restoration, if it comes, will be straightforward. – This elegant Twin Six is a Preservation class contender with high quality coachwork from a little known Philadelphia coachbuilder (which survives today as a school bus dealer under continuous family ownership.) It would be a shame to restore it beyond making it run and drive and preserving the elegant rear compartment’s upholstery and fittings. The result here reflects its potential as well as the quality of the Twin Six chassis.

Lot # 440 1923 Brewster-Knight Model O2 Town Landaulet; S/N 2372; Engine # 2372; Dark Green, Black fenders/Black vinyl, Beige cord rear; Black leatherette top; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $32,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $35,840. – 277/54hp sleeve valve four, 3-speed, jump seats, rollup division, smoker’s kit, vanity, speaking tube, Western Electric driver’s intercom, Warner drum speedometer, dual sidemounts, Gray & Davis electric headlights, Klaxon electric horn, varnished wood spoke wheels, whitewalls. – No taillight. Rough engine compartment with coolant leak residue under the water pump. Fair older repaint and upholstery. Dull brass brightwork. Dirty unrestored engine compartment. The chassis has been repainted but not restored. Elegant but tired and neglected. – It can be maintained that in the 1920’s Brewster built the finest coachwork in America and this is a fair example of its craftsmanship, a sincerely elegant Town Landualet that accommodates its occupants’ fashionable hats inside the tall folding top and in fully open form has refined sporting characteristics. The complicated Knight-type sleeve valve engine is something of a challenge, but is nearly silent and intriguing in its complexity. It didn’t find much favor here in Tupelo but is a good value in an impressively equipped luxury car.

Lot # 441 1923 Marmon Model 34 Speedster; S/N 2230096; Engine # 11740; Ivory, Black fenders/Black leather; Black leatherette top; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $81,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $90,720. – 340/84hp overhead valve six, 3-speed, Van Sicklen drum speedometer, Warner drum headlights, wind wings, body color wire wheels, golf bag door, single rear-mounted spare. center-mounted accelerator pedal. – Ex-Harrah’s. Mediocre old repaint, upholstery and top. The engine compartment has been cleaned up but the chassis is original and grubby. The nickel brightwork is thin and dull. A tired old restoration that hasn’t run under its own power in years but is seemingly complete. – While this Marmon was well-restored, probably by Harrah’s, its neglected condition illustrates the vicissitudes of long museum display with inadequate resources for maintenance and regular use. Just sitting on display is not good for vehicles and while recommissioning this Marmon may be straightforward it won’t be inexpensive which is not adequately reflected in the generous price it brought.

Lot # 442 1923 Ford Model T Tudor Center Door Coupe; S/N Engine No. 7036116; Engine # 7036116; Black,/Beige cloth; Estimate $10,000 – $20,000; Unrestored original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $8,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $8,960. – Rear-mounted spare, AC drum speedometer, pullup side windows, anti-shimmy springs, windshield wiper, top hinged windshield. – Awful old brush repaint, reupholstered driver’s seat. Stained original remaining upholstery, moth eaten headliner. Needs everything. – This is one of the more desirable Model T closed body styles, a funky combination of 5-passenger seating with only two doors that made access to both the front and rear compartments difficult. Restoration will be reasonable, however, and the result will be an unusual Model T that will stand out among the vastly more common touring cars.

Lot # 444 1924 Gardner Model 5 5-Passenger Sedan; S/N 2783C0; Engine # CE8394; Olive Green, Black fenders and hood/Pumpkin velour; Estimate $10,000 – $20,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $9,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $10,640. – 214/21.7 ALAM hp Lycoming four, 3-speed, disc wheels, drum headlights, opening windshield with a single wiper and metal visor, rear-mounted spare, pullup quarter windows, Stewart drum speedometer, flying gargoyle radiator mascot. – Dull, edge chipped old repaint, water stained upholstery, rough unrestored engine compartment and chassis. Peeling running board covers. Tired and used, but sound and complete. Needs pretty much everything. – An unusual marque notable for the Gardner family’s long association with Chevrolet building bodies for much of the Mississippi valley and eventual acquisition by General Motors. The family continued with their own cars of which this is a sound but neglected example that brought an appropriate price.

Lot # 443 1927 Ford Model T Roadster; S/N Engine No. 13575626; Engine # 13575626; Green, Black fenders/Black leatherette; Black leatherette top; Estimate $7,000 – $10,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $12,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $13,440. – Cream wire wheels, single rear-mounted spare with leatherette cover. – Repainted assembled with abundant overspray and poor masking. The paint on the rear deck is bubbling badly. Dirty engine and chassis. It’s a reasonable restoration project, but it’s a restoration project. – Jaunty may describe this late Model T with its evolved styling but its condition is disappointing and the price it brought is generous for what it is.

Lot # 445 1927 Hispano-Suiza T49 Short Chassis Drophead Coupe, Body by Duple; S/N 7944; Engine # 7944; Blue, Polished aluminum hood/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $80,000 – $120,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $95,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $106,400. – RHD. 3,746/90hp single overhead cam six, 3-speed, body color wheel discs, dual sidemounts, Bleriot headlights, dual pane raked opening windshield, rumble seat, dual Toby taillights. – Once owned by Sebring 12 Hours founder Alec Ulmann, later by the Crawford museum where it was on display for many years. Casual but sound old paint, top and lightly creased upholstery. Crudely brush painted chassis. Orderly older restored engine compartment. Scratched interior wood. A handsome but old car that needs comprehensive attention. – The age and superficial character of this Hisso’s museum-style presentation is factored into the price it brought but offset by its well-proportioned and attractive coachwork. In other words, this is a handsome automobile that brought a superior price based on its rarity and style if not its presentation.

Lot # 446 1927 Stutz Series AA “Blackhawk Speedster”, Body after LeBaron; S/N AAR584425; Black,/Taupe leather; Estimate $80,000 – $120,000; Rebodied or re-created, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $52,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $58,240. – RHD. Single overhead camshaft 322/113hp inline eight, 3-speed, taupe painted wire wheels, dual sidemounts, wind wings, Lucas headlights, folding windshield, Brown “Trip Lite” taillights, cycle fenders. – Cracked windshield, dull nickel trim, sound but aged and soiled upholstery. Oily, dirty engine compartment. The boattail body is a UK-built replica of the Blackhawk that finished second at LeMans in 1927. – An enjoyable and accurate replica of one of the most famed of Stutz’s models, this is a “just for fun” car that has remarkable performance and the lightweight sporting coachwork to take advantage of its power. It should be a realistic project to recommission and a delight to drive and tour this summer, especially at this highly advantageous price.

Lot # 433 1928 Pierce-Arrow Model 81 Rumble Seat Convertible Coupe; S/N 8104306; Engine # 8104315; Orange, Brown fenders/Brown leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $25,000 – $40,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $44,800. – 288/75hp six, 3-speed, Cream wire wheels, wide whitewalls, Dawley headlights, Bausch & Lomb headlights, opening windshield with visor, rumble seat, single rear-mounted spare. – Headlight lenses installed inside out. Stained top. Dull instrument panel with dusty gauges. Dirty engine compartment and rather road grimy chassis. Pimply old paint. A quality car, but it needs a restoration to realize its potential – Beyond its inherent Pierce-Arrow quality and performance the coachwork’s low roof is pleasingly sporting and attractive. Sure, the restoration is old and it’s a typically neglected “museum car”, now with dated colors, but this is a sound value in a sporty CCCA Full Classic ™ even at the top of Bonhams pre-sale estimate range.

 

Lot # 448 1928 Franklin Airman Sport Tourer; S/N Y180777L1; Engine # E128552; Maroon, Black fenders/Beige vinyl; Beige cloth top; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $44,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $49,280. – 236/46hp air cooled six, dual sidemounts, Parabeam headlights and matching cowl lights, fender mirrors, folding rear windshield, Beige cloth covered luggage trunk, giant 4-spoke wood steering wheel, varnished wood spoke wheels. – Ex-Harrah’s. Sound older paint with relatively few scratches and chips. Sound upholstery and top. Dull nickel brightwork. Orderly but aged engine compartment and oily, road grimy chassis. – Daring ideas sometimes go without contemporary recognition, a fate illustrated by this air-cooled Franklin. Like Stanley’s steam cars, the Franklin eventually sprouted a conventional grille in keeping with the then-dominant water-cooled cars and as its identity withered so did its market presence, eventually passing from the automotive scene in 1934. This 1928 model is the first named “Airman”, a double entendre recognizing both the engine’s cooling and legendary airman Charles Lindbergh’s devotion to the Franklin marque, a devotion shared with this car’s former owner, Bill Harrah. It’s going to be a labor to return it to running, driving condition but one that will be rewarded by driving in style in this J. Frank deCausse designed sport tourer.

Lot # 449 1929 Cord Front Drive L-29 Cabriolet; S/N 2925603; Engine # FDA927; Yellow, Green accent/Dark Green leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $100,000 – $150,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $101,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $113,120. – Twilite headlights, dual cloth covered sidemounts with mirrors, rumble seat, no radio or heater. – Good older paint now cracked, shrunken and losing chips here and there. Weak chrome. Dull instrument panels and interior handles. Modern GM door pulls. Dry, orderly older restored engine compartment and chassis. The odometer shows 3,878 miles and based upon the condition it has probably covered that since being restored. Appealing, but needs a repaint and attention to details like the practical but anachronistic door pulls. – Innovative and attractive, the Cord Front Drive was revolutionary for its time. This example’s cabriolet coachwork takes full advantage of the low-slung chassis with all its drivetrain’s components located forward of the firewall. The paint is too far gone to be preserved and the new owner will soon have to invest at least in a quick over-paint, which probably will morph into more extensive and expensive restoration. Fully and magnificently restored Front Drives have brought 1/3 million or more and 1/5 million is easily attainable making this result reasonable for both the buyer and the seller.

Lot # 451 1929 Fiat 525N 7-Passenger Touring; S/N 201029; Engine # 103248; Primrose, Tan fenders/Black leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $36,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $40,320. – Carello headlights, Fog King fog light, disc wheels, wide whitewalls, dual vinyl wrapped sidemounts, leatherette luggage trunk, Metron speedometer and clock, jump seats. – Orderly but aged and oily engine compartment. Dull, scratched and chipped old paint. Weak chrome. Dirty top, cracked old upholstery with pulled seams. Imposing, big FIAT and a CCCA Full Classic(tm). – With the equivalent of about 220 cubic inches in its L-head six this FIAT will move along at a healthy speed even with its full complement of seven aboard and it’s also attractive coachwork. It is a sound value even at this over-estimate price that will make for some interesting conversations on tour or weekend cruises.

Lot # 452 1929 Packard 626 Eight Convertible Coupe; S/N 236142; Grey, Black fenders/Black vinyl; Black cloth top; Estimate $50,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $72,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $80,640. – Body color disc wheels, wide whitewalls, dual sidemounts with mirrors, rumble seat, luggage rack, Trippe lights, radiator stoneguard, dual remote Sportlite spotlights. – CCCA National First Prize No. 1778 and looks like it with quality paint, chrome, interior and top. The engine compartment was restored like new and now is only moderately aged, as is the slightly oily and road grimy chassis. Physically this is one of the best cars in the Tupelo Museum, even though it is but a Standard Eight, and it should be quickly returned to regular use at a modest cost. – Faced with an expanse of “museum cars’ that had sat immobile and with little more care than an occasional dusting this Packard stood out for its generally very good condition. As such it brought a relatively strong price, but one still within the realm of reason.

Lot # 447 1930 Hispano-Suiza H6B Coupe Chauffeur, Body by J. Fernandez; S/N 12202; Engine # 302163; Blue, Black fenders, Gold coachline/Black leather, Grey cloth rear; Black cloth top; Estimate $250,000 – $350,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $300,000 plus commission of 11.67%; Final Price $335,000. – RHD. Body color wheel discs, wide whitewalls, dual sidemounts, Marchal headlights, radiator stoneguard, sliding tendelet, Jaeger clock and speedometer, inlaid wood luggage trunk, rollup division, opening windshield. – Handsome and lavishly finished coachwork by J. Fernandez prior to his association with “Dutch” Darrin. Very good older paint, upholstery and mixed nickel/chrome brightwork. Clean, orderly engine compartment and chassis. Rotten, cracked old tires. Restored decades ago and holding up very well. – Although his Hisso was acquired by Frank Spain in 1995 from Herbie Livingston’s collection it had been offered at the World Classic auction in Monterey (successor to Rick Cole’s) in 1993 where it brought an unsuccessful high bid of $150,000. Its condition is remarkably good for a car restored in the early 80’s and a 1981 Pebble Beach class winner while owned by Tom (Domino’s Pizza) Monaghan. Even with the heavy, elaborate coachwork it has adequate power for touring and it is a sound value at this result.

Lot # 457 1931 Lincoln Model K Touring Conversion; S/N 68978; Engine # 46445; Ivory, Bronze fenders/Tan vinyl; Beige cloth top; Estimate $20,000 – $40,000; Rebodied or re-created, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $36,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $40,320. – 385/90hp V8, 3-speed, body color wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual sidemounts with mirrors, dual windshields, chrome hood side vents. – Cracked old repaint with fisheyes and dust inclusions. Sound but unattractive upholstery. Dirty engine compartment and chassis. Cracked old tires with major flat spots. Converted from a 4-Dr. Sedan, neatly but not impressively. – This result is surprising for a cut Lincoln, even with the desirable equipment like dual windshields and sidemounts, in fairly neglected condition. It would have been a much better buy much closer to its low estimate and is moderately expensive at this price.

Lot # 460 1932 Nash 1080 Special Eight Convertible Sedan, Body by Seaman; S/N B69103L; Engine # B81753; Lilac, Pink/Lilac vinyl; Tan cloth top; Estimate $80,000 – $120,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $84,000. – 261/100hp overhead valve inline eight, 3-speed, body color wire wheels, wide whitewalls, Glolite headlights, folding windshield, Stromberg UUR-2 updraft carburetor. – Ex-Harrah’s before the present restoration. Old paint over rust and old paint on chassis, sound but gaudy older orange peely paint on the body applied over old rust pits. Good interior. Curdled running board mats. Dirty engine compartment and chassis. A sound and complete car but one that needs and deserves comprehensive restoration. – Sold at The Auction in Las Vegas in 1992 for $35,700 which appears to be where Frank Spain acquired it for the Tupelo Museum. Charlie Nash built impressive cars, and sold them for impressively modest prices, including this big Special Eight. Its 100hp won’t perform like a Duesenberg, but it is enough to be appreciated and enjoyed, particularly at this moderate price.

Lot # 450 1934 Duesenberg Model J Prince of Wales Berline, Body by Rollston; S/N 2575; Engine # J-547; Black, Black cobra grain roof/Beige cloth; Estimate $500,000 – $600,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $405,000 plus commission of 11.23%; Final Price $450,500. – Wire wheels, dual sidemounts, vee windshield, rollup division, jump seats. – Repainted and reupholstered, otherwise original and rough. The wire wheels are repainted over rust pits, the chrome is spotty. Sound upholstery and interior trim but aged dashboard missing its altimeter, some controls and the steering wheel center cap. Paint is flaking off the frame and chassis. Missing the taillight, too. – One of the highlights of the Tupelo collection, the closed coachwork is particularly attractive even if the condition is neglected and aged. One of few cars in the Tupelo collection to sell below the already reasonable low estimate, but appropriately bought in view of the expensive restoration that’s in its future.

Lot # 462 1934 Morgan Runabout; S/N D-1023; Engine # MX/781; Cream, Brown fenders/Brown leather; Estimate $30,000 – $35,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $37,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $41,440. – RHD. Matchless 998/36hp vee-twin, Marchal headlights, cycle front fenders. – Rebodied as a Super Sports on the original MX-series “Family Three-Wheeler” chassis, probably in the 90’s. Decent older paint and interior, pretty much everything else is right out there and usable. A Morgan driver. – This is a charming little vehicle, its rebodied history notwithstanding, and is more than good enough to drive and enjoy, although moderately expensive in this condition at this price.

Lot # 464 1936 Bentley 4¼ Liter Pillarless Sports Saloon, Body by Vanden Plas; S/N B189GP; Engine # J7BYX; Black, Silver-Grey sides/Grey leather; Estimate $30,000 – $50,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $33,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $36,960. – RHD. Red wire wheels, dual sidemounts, Lucas tri-bar headlights, Notec fog light, sliding sunroof. – Handsome 4-door coachwork with right doors that drop and fit unevenly. Only one front seat. Shiny but casually applied repaint, sound older upholstery and interior trim. Neglected, dusty engine compartment. Filthy, greasy, grimy chassis. The bodywork on this restoration will cost a fortune. – A sweet-looking Bentley but with a myriad of needs that weigh on the new owner’s bank balance, the price it realized is moderate even taking its needs into account, a stylish and appealing Bentley Sports Saloon with healthy performance.

Lot # 465 1936 Lagonda LG45 Touring; S/N 12112; Engine # LG45/224/S2 – 12112; Metallic Green,/Green leather; Dirty Beige cloth top; Estimate $220,000 – $290,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $150,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $168,000. – RHD. Lucas tri-bar headlights, dual enclosed sidemounts, body color wire wheels, trafficators, wind wings. – Indifferent old repaint, erratic chrome. Cracked and torn upholstery; the rear seat is beyond saving or use. Dirty engine compartment. A charming but sadly neglected automobile in need of “everything”. – Frank Spain had a thing for Lagondas as evidenced by the number of them in the Tupelo Museum, and they are stimulating high performance classics with wonderful Frank Feeley designed coachwork. Bought right here at this result, the new owner can recommission it with minimal cosmetic work and enjoy it on road tours or weekend jaunts while holding on for the restoration it will ultimately need.

Lot # 466 1936 Alvis Speed 25 SB 4-seat Tourer, Body by Cross & Ellis; S/N 13341; Engine # 13623; Black,/Dark Brown leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $100,000 – $150,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $83,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $92,960. – RHD. 3.6 liter/106hp overhead valve inline six with triple SU carburetors, 4-speed, black wire wheels, Lucas headlights and fog lights, single left sidemount spare. – Pimply old repaint, weak chrome, sound old upholstery. Orderly but aged and neglected engine compartment. A neat car, but one that needs (and deserves) comprehensive attention although it might be used, after a lot of mechanical attention, before ultimately heading to restoration. – Frank Spain had not just one but three Alvises including this highly original and complete Speed Twenty-Five. It bears attractive 4-seat tourer coachwork, but its condition is such that a restoration looms large in its future. This is the most expensive of the trio, all of them in similar “museum car” condition. It’s also the prettiest.

Lot # 468 1937 Chrysler Airflow Eight 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 7023012; Black,/Grey cloth; Estimate $20,000 – $40,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $28,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $31,360. – 324/130hp eight, 3-speed, Motorola 60 radio, heater, skirts, hubcaps, wide whitewall tires. – Sound older paint, chrome and interior. Clean, dry underbody. Some paint shrinkage on the right front fender and sand blast patches on the side windows. Orderly older restored engine compartment and chassis. A quality older restoration that is amenable to improvement with minimal effort or expense. – Unfortunately for its place within engineer Frank Spain’s Tupelo Museum this 1937 Chrysler Airflow looks far more conventional than its predecessors, losing the visual distinction that the Airflow brought to its earlier versions and disguising its advanced design concepts. It’s a poor automobile Museum example of an Airflow and it’s remarkable that it brought this much in this condition.

Lot # 470 1938 MG VA 4-Passenger Tourer; S/N VA1999T; OEWhite,/Tan leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $35,000 – $70,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $26,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $29,120. – RHD. 1548/58hp four, 4-speed, chrome wire wheels, blackwall tires, Lucas headlights. – Scratched, chipped paint. Worn but sound upholstery. Worn, frayed faded old top. Filthy original engine compartment and chassis. – Seriously nasty, although a rare MG model and amenable to careful attention and recommissioning. This is what it’s worth, despite the rarity of the model in the U.S.

Lot # 471 1938 Alvis Speed 25 SC Roadster; S/N 14609; Engine # 15090; OEWhite,/Red leather; Tan cloth top; Estimate $100,000 – $150,000; Rebodied or re-created, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $49,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $54,880. – RHD. Red wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual horns, Marchal headlights, fender mirrors, wind wings, single rear-mounted spare, multiband radio, cowl-mounted trafficators. – Decent older paint, chrome, top and interior. The engine compartment is dirty and neglected. Modified coachwork. Pretty to look at, until the hood is raised. – Frank Spain appreciated Alvises, as shown by the number of them in the Tupelo Museum. This is far from the most pure, but is an attractive, low-slung roadster that appropriately characterizes the marque’s appeal. It’s a charming, low slung, car with sporting coachwork bought at a realistic price.

Lot # 475 1939 Graham-Paige Model 97 Supercharged 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 501131; Blue, Silver-Grey roof/Beige cloth; Estimate $30,000 – $50,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $28,000. – 217/116hp supercharged six, 3-speed, hubcaps, trim rings, whitewalls, skirts. – Mostly original and tired with a superficial repaint in flamboyant colors. – There comes a point, which is here after 55 of the 76 viewed cars in Frank Spain’s Tupelo Automobile Museum collection, when it is borderline impossible to be objective. This Graham is a toad. It has lumpy taxicab bodywork. It has a museum-car repaint. The Tupelo bidders weren’t fooled and paid almost little enough for it, although they could have paid less and not been extravagant.

Lot # 482 1939 Lagonda V 12 Drophead Coupe; S/N 14116; Engine # 14116;, /; Estimate $55,000 – $90,000; Incomplete restoration, 5+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $83,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $92,960. – 4,480/175hp V12, 4-speed. – Disassembled with cardboard boxes full of parts and the engine on a stand, but a significant U.S. delivered lefthand drive version of a highly regarded and beautiful automobile. Dusty and dirty, preservation is out of the question and heaven only knows what will turn up missing when the parts are inventoried. – When the restoration is completed this could be a half-million dollar automobile and this result is a fair place to start. It’s also a daunting task that assumes vast reserves of cash to finance it.

Lot # 474 1940 Buick Super Series 50 Convertible Coupe; S/N 13809773; Maroon,/Dark Red vinyl; Beige cloth top; Estimate $30,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $29,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $32,480. – 3-speed, Motorola radio, Red wheels with trim rings and hubcaps, wide whitewalls, dual remote Appleton spotlights, skirts, fog lights, bumper overriders. – Sound body with doors that close solidly but with tapered gaps. Lightly creased upholstery. Bright chrome. The hood hits the spotlight brackets and won’t open. The underbody has been restored and only sparsely used. Good gauges and dashboard with one cracked plastic escutcheon for the key. Cracked steering wheel rim. – This is a used old car, with compromised function from the spotlights’ interference with the hood. The bidders weren’t charmed by it, nor should they have been.

Lot # 473 1941 Ford Model 91A DeLuxe Convertible Coupe; S/N 184949340; Maroon,/Saddle vinyl; Black cloth top; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $38,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $42,560. – Banjo spoke steering wheel, radio, heater, clock, rumble seat, hubcaps, wide double sided whitewalls, 23-stud 221 V-8. – Very good paint, chrome and upholstery. Orderly older restored engine compartment with a shower of battery efflorescence. The cowl is chipped behind the hood. A good car with the potential to be better with some simple attention. – If you owned a Ford like this in 1940 you were set “for the duration” of WWII. Attractively restored and conscientiously maintained in the Tupelo Museum collection, there is nothing about this ’40 Ford that can’t be corrected in a few weeks to bring it to a much better presentation. It is a serious value at this price.

Lot # 488 1941 Ford Model 86 Station Wagon; S/N 186403707; Maroon, Wood/Tan leatherette; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $37,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $41,440. – Hubcaps, trim rings, whitewalls, 3-row seating, radio, heater, 3-speed, enclosed rear-mounted spare. – Pimply old repaint, sound upholstery, no front floor mats or carpet. The windshield gasket is narrower than the one that was on when repainted leaving a quarter inch gap of old rusty steel all around. Body varnish is peeling and the wood, which appears to be original, is waterstained at joints and fasteners. Dirty unrestored engine compartment and chassis. A sound and solid vehicle but with serious shortcomings that were not obvious in the Tupelo Museum but can’t escape a close look. – This Ford wagon is attractive from 30 feet but up close is superficially done and borders on nasty an opinion that was shared by the Tupelo bidders who gave it little respect.

Lot # 489 1941 Lincoln-Zephyr Convertible Coupe; S/N H121360; Black,/Red leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $40,000 – $70,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $44,800. – Radio, heater, hubcaps, trim rings, wide whitewalls, skirts. – Mediocre old repaint, good upholstery, folding frayed top. Cracked steering wheel. Good chrome but the stainless is scuffed and the right grille chrome is peeling. Orderly and probably restored engine compartment is aged and dusty. A usable driver that will reward some attention. – Generously bought for its aged and neglected condition, this Lincoln-Zephyr is a classy ride that will reward its new owner despite the price it brought.

Lot # 490 1948 Jaguar Mark IV 3½-liter Drophead Coupe; S/N 637127; Ivory,/Green leather; Green cloth top; Estimate $80,000 – $110,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $78,400. – 4-speed, fender mirrors, Lucas tri-bar headlights, fog lights, trafficators, chrome wire wheels, wide whitewalls. – Very good paint, chrome, interior and top. Clean, shiny wheels. The engine compartment is orderly but aged and a little dusty from long museum display. Moth or vermin eaten top liner. A high quality older restoration done to better cosmetic standards than mechanical. There are many issues to deal with before this Jag is driven, let alone shown. – One of the better cars in the Tupelo Museum collection, and one of the better results even though it’s less than the pre-sale low estimate, a price that reflects the car’s qualities and condition.

Lot # 491 1948 Tucker 48 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 1028; Engine # 33535; Sand Beige,/Tan cloth; Estimate $1,250,000 – $2,000,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,800,000 plus commission of 10.28%; Final Price $1,985,000. – Tucker radio, hubcaps, wide whitewalls, pre-selector 4-speed Tucker Y-1 transmission – Part of the original factory-built run of Tuckers, tested at Indy in 1948. Represented as the original engine. Good paint, chrome and interior. Orderly older restored engine compartment. Done to competent standards in factory condition with only a little age evident on its 1980’s restoration. – Despite the 1988 movie hype Tucker values loped along in low- to mid-six figures for years before exploding into seven-figures about a decade ago, since then becoming reliable $1-2 million dollar cars. Most of the really expensive ones are over-restored pieces of jewelry while this one is an satisfyingly unpretentious restoration to factory appearance. The bidders obviously liked it, a whole lot, and paid a premium price, the third highest price realized at auction for a Tucker, a result that is generous by all but the bidders’ standards.

Lot # 492 1949 Triumph 2000 Roadster; S/N TRA1832; Dark Green,/Dark Green leather; Beige vinyl top; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $18,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $20,160. – Steel wheels, hubcaps, fender mirrors. badge bar, fog lights. – Pimply old paint, fair chrome, worn original upholstery. Stiff, unusable top. Wheel trim rings on the left side, none on the right. Hazy gauges. Dull interior brightwork. Dry, grimy engine compartment. – Marginally usable, but not with any pride at all in its condition or presentation, this is a project car bought for project car money.

Lot # 493 1949 Allard M-Series Drophead Coupe; S/N 851; Ivory, Green fenders/Beige vinyl; Beige cloth top; Estimate $35,000 – $60,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $28,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $31,360. – RHD. 221/90hp Ford V-8, 3-speed, cream wire wheels, wide whitewalls. – Erratically wet sanded repaint, sound upholstery and fair interior wood. Dirty, oily engine compartment. Cracked, dull banjo steering wheel. Dirty gauges and one empty hole on the dash. – This is an Anglo-American hybrid with little style and even less performance, bought for an appropriately modest price.

Lot # 513 1950 Talbot-Lago T26 Record 3-pos. Drophead Coupe, Body by Veth & Zoon; S/N 101058; Purple, Lilac, Ivory fenders/Ivory leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $180,000 – $240,000; Concours restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $175,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $196,000. – RHD. Lilac wire wheels, blackwall tires, Supralux headlights, 4-speed preselector, skirts, enclosed rear-mounted spare, 4-spoke leaf spring steering wheel, fog lights. – Excellent older paint, chrome, interior and top in flamboyant colors typical of its 90’s restoration. Clean, orderly older restored engine compartment. An impressive older restoration that is holding up well and could be shown after some diligent detailing. Said to run well. – Sold to Frank Spain at The Auction in Las Vegas in 1996 for $83,790 despite wreathing Don Williams in a cloud of steam on the auction block when a radiator hose burst. That result is $135,000 in 2019 dollars, a tidy return for a tidy car.

[Actually I think I have these photos but they’re still on the memory card of the camera I left in my rentacar after Mecum Indy last week, a camera gratefully recovered by the next renter of the Toyota Highlander, Jack Sullivan, a real, honest, gentleman. When it gets back to me I’ll update this post with the missing shots.]

Lot # 499 1954 Kaiser Darrin 161 Roadster; S/N 161001022; Cream,/Red vinyl; Beige cloth top; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $68,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $76,160. – Wire wheel covers, whitewall tires, 3-speed, overdrive, wind wings, side-facing rear seat. – Mediocre repaint over old paint. Sound but surface cracked original upholstery. Good newer top. The wheel covers are missing the center cap emblems. Orderly old engine compartment. Fair chrome. A presentable driver and a sound and mostly complete restoration project. – Fully and exactly restored this Kaiser Darrin with “Dutch” Darrin’s beloved pocket doors would be worth over $150,000, about twice what it brought here, an achievable combination at this price. The major stumbling block? Getting those wire wheel covers right. Everything else is simple and straightforward.

Lot # 501 1955 Messerschmitt KR200 Kabinenroller; S/N 55522; Cream, Carmine accent/Red vinyl; Estimate $30,000 – $50,000; Unrestored original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $28,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $31,360. – Transparent bubble roof, wire wheel covers, Porta-wall whitewalls. – The front bumper is missing. Very good bubble roof. Good upholstery and interior trim. Orderly engine compartment. Tired original paint peeling off the left taillight housing. Torn, frayed roof seal. Cute, and usable as is but probably best suited for restoration and a trip to the Monterey auctions this August. – For younger readers, Porta-walls were flexible dummy whitewalls that mount between the wheel rim and tire. They tended to get gouged and torn and quickly look shabby, like these do. There is ample room at this price to give this Kabinenroller the restoration it needs and still make a buck.

Lot # 502 1955 Jaguar XK 140MC Roadster; S/N S810413; Engine # G1600-8S; OEWhite,/Maroon leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $60,000 – $85,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $66,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $73,920. – Chrome wire wheels, fog lights, blackwall tires. – Dirty engine compartment. Good paint, chrome and lightly stretched upholstery. Good, even door gaps. Good enough to drive and valuable enough to pay it some attention. – Sold for $35,000 at the Kruse auction in Miami in December 1991 when it was pretty much the same condition as it is here. The result here is remarkably close to the same amount in 2019 dollars ($64,957), a calculation that those who claim collector cars are a great investment should note with caution.

Lot # 504 1957 BMW-Isetta 300 Bubble Window Z-Bar coupe; S/N 423609; Ivory,/Black leatherette; Black leatherette top; Estimate $20,000 – $50,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $22,400. – 4-wheels, sunroof, hubcaps. – Cracked old repaint, sound interior, dull aluminum Z-Bar trim and silver painted front nerf bars. Vinyl wrapped steering wheel rim. Not very presentable but a sound restoration project. – Bought right for its condition and restoration prospects, this is the most desirable version with bubble side and rear windows and the Z-bar trim.

Lot # 506 1957 Chevrolet Corvette FI Convertible; S/N E57S105526; Engine # F723EL; Venetian Red, Beige coves/Beige vinyl; Beige vinyl top; Estimate $50,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $63,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $70,560. – 283/283 fuel injection, 4-speed, WonderBar radio, power windows, spinner wheel covers, windshield washer, electric windshield wipers. – Microblistered old paint, good panel fits. Good interior and top. Orderly but aged engine compartment, leaky master cylinder. Good major chrome with some weak trim bits. Restored like new decades ago and kept well, but showing its age. – Probably acquired by Frank Spain at the Kruse Miami auction in December 1991 for $39,000 ($72,400 in 2019 dollars), its result here is reasonable for an aged Fuelie that has a lot of specialist work ahead of it before taking to the road.

Lot # 510 1958 Packard 58L 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 58L6229; Purple, Pink roof/White vinyl, Black cloth; Estimate $30,000 – $50,000; Unrestored original, 4- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $10,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $11,200. – Automatic, pushbutton radio, power steering, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls. – Awful cracking paint, speckled chrome, sound but old upholstery. Doors close well and have even gaps. An ugly car in ugly condition and just a project. – One of 675 hardtops built in 1958, the last year for Packard automobile production, even though it was a badge-engineered Studebaker with perhaps the ugliest nose ever inflicted on any America automobile. The bidders here it Tupelo showed it exactly as much respect as it deserved and it was lucky even to bring this much. It is a daunting restoration project that might bring $50,000 when completed. It will still be ugly.

Lot # 516 1960 Mercedes-Benz 190SL Roadster; S/N 12104010015368; Medium Blue, Medium Blue hardtop/Tan leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $70,000 – $100,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $69,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $77,280. – Two tops, Weber carbs, hubcaps, narrow whitewalls, Kenwood cassette stereo. – Decent chrome, lightly stretched upholstery, good top, gauges and steering wheel. Good older paint. Grubby engine compartment. The wheelwells have been quickly repainted. It’s a decent looking car as long as the hood is closed. – Cosmetically restored to decent driver appearance but with a lot of work to do under the hood to bring its overall appearance to contemporary standards even for a weekend driver, this is an appropriate price to pay.

Lot # 518 1964 Leslie Special Phaeton; S/N CAR 3; Ivory,/Red vinyl; Beige cloth top; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Original, with non-original appearance items, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $112,000. – Old Sol spotlight, 4-wheel hydraulic brakes, white tires, red wood spoke wheels, described as having an automatic transmission, the prop men thoughtfully provided a clutch pedal. – As its chassis number suggests, this is one of four Leslie Specials built by Warner Brothers for “The Great Race” in 1965 and used by Tony Curtis as Leslie Gallant III opposite Jack Lemmon as Professor Fate, Peter Falk as Maximilian Meen and Natalie Wood as Maggie DuBois. It is based on a 1957 Ford F-100 pickup and powered by a 260 Ford V-8. Well-used and long displayed, the lot includes appropriate movie memorabilia. – This is so over-the-top it can’t be ignored, nor did the bidders turn up their noses at it, the sort of display that any museum or “attraction” can employ effectively to draw spectators, and a fun old thing for weekend excursions with kids and grandkids who would also appreciate old-time Blake Edwards comedy. The F-100 underpinnings and hydraulic brakes mean it’s also somewhat more safe and reliable to use. As movie cars go this is better than most.

Lot # 526 1967 Roth Wishbone Two-Seater; S/N; Metallic Red,/Black vinyl; Estimate $80,000 – $120,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $95,200. – Totally chromed up VW drivetrain, chrome wire wheels and suspension. – Ed “Big Daddy” Roth’s creation, later cut up and still later reassembled by a former Roth employee known today only as Dirty Doug. A showcar with more years than miles. – Wishbone was sold at the 1985 Harrah’s auction for $12,000 ($28,200 in 2019 dollars.) It is thoroughly impractical but as garage art it is a showstopper and if this is what the Tupelo bidders thought it was worth who’s to argue with them and their willingness to empty their pocketbooks to acquire it?

Lot # 543 1970 Mercedes-Benz 280SL Roadster; S/N 11304412014339; Light Yellow, Light Yellow hardtop/Saddle vinyl; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Unrestored original, 4- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $39,200. – Automatic, Frigiking air conditioning, Blaupunkt AM-FM, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, probably two tops. – Cheap old Earl Scheib-quality repaint, otherwise original, tired and dilapidated. Largely complete and a sound basis for restoration. – This is an appropriate result for a 280SL restoration project. At least it’s not (overtly) rusty.

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Comments

  1. Reply

    What an extraordinary collection of cars (although that Nash paint job really hurts)! We will be in Tupelo in September, driving the Natchez Trace Parkway after doing the National Corvette Museum big event and I was dismayed when I read some months ago that the Tupelo Museum would be closing. Although it looks like it was more car storage venue than a museum, it would have been fun to see some of these unusual vehicles, rare in any condition.

      • rickcarey1
      • May 25, 2019
      Reply

      I walked into the Tupelo Automobile Museum and was struck by the array of seriously intriguing, seriously old, imaginative cars arrayed through the building. It was an experience and sad to see it dispersed, but also encouraging to see how many of the cars were bought at healthy prices that turned the “people today don’t appreciate old cars” theories on their heads. They were appreciated and people spent big, real money to acquire them. I hope they have new, enthusiastic owners who will get them running and show them off.
      Rick

    • Kent
    • June 16, 2019
    Reply

    I am curious as to your thoughts on the 1938 Cadillac. I bought it and would like to hear your opinion on it, good and bad. I did enjoy reading your comments on the other cars. Thanks

      • rickcarey1
      • June 16, 2019
      Reply

      Kent,
      I didn’t look at it in Tupelo, so I can’t comment on it one way or the other.
      Rick

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