Bonhams, Simeone Foundation Museum, Philadelphia, Monday, October 8, 2018

2018 marked Bonhams seventh year kicking off the Hershey week of collector car events with its Monday auction at the Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum in Philadelphia.

It’s a sale that highlights old restorations, original vehicles and some neglected barn finds. Quality is in ample supply, as are long enthusiast ownership histories. What’s in short supply are fresh, pristine, concours restorations. That’s by design, not by chance.

There are always nifty old vehicles, begging for new, caring homes to realize their potential.

And the setting at Dr. Fred Simeone’s fabulous collection of competition cars is mouth-watering. I’ve seen it many times but never fail to stop and contemplate anew two or three examples. In my case it helps that Dr. Simeone likes Alfa Romeos and has some of the best competition examples in the world.

Anyone with a little free time in Philadelphia could put it to use visiting the Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum, a scant five minutes from the airport. Got a flight connection at PHL? Schedule a few hours’ layover and beat it over to the museum to be amazed. It will be time well-spent, even with the irritation of another trip through TSA screening.

Bonhams Simeone Foundation sale is one of the little sales that Bonhams does so well: an attractive venue with modest setup costs and an eclectic consignment with cars that appeal to a wide variety of collectors. It’s an outlet for a variety of cars that would struggle for attention at Scottsdale, Goodwood or Monterey. Bonhams auction at the Simeone Museum is a happy hunting ground for collectors looking for project cars.

The combination of intriguing consignments and a delightful venue makes this a rewarding start to the Hershey week.

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2018 36/49 73.5% 72.2% 8.3% $67,905 $60,480

[89.1%]

$2,444,576
2017 56/64 87.5% 58.9% 8.9% $56,407 $29,040

[51.5%]

$3,158,768
2016 47/51 92.2% 63.8% 19.2% $35,748 $28,600

[80%]

$1,680,175
2015 64/74 86.5% 44.4% 27% $51,738 $35,200

[68%]

$3,311,200

31 of the 49 cars offered are reported here including several by a new recruit, Jose Martinez, a graduate of San Francisco’s Academy of Art University. Jose is a promising addition to the auction reporting team, bringing a fresh, young classic car sensibility informed by his time at the Academy of Art.

The cars reported here are sorted by lot number.


Lot # 101 1971 Mercedes-Benz 280SE 3.5 Coupe; S/N 11102612001897; White/Blue leather; Estimate $40,000 – $55,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $34,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $38,080. – Automatic, Sony cassette stereo, air conditioning, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, column shift. – Poor old repaint with big rust blisters everywhere. Rotted decklid and bumpers. Sound upholstery but water rotted dashtop wood. Stiff body seals. Weak chrome everywhere inside and out. Trim bits are complete. A daunting project. – While this 280SE 3.5 will be worth well over $100K when it’s restored, getting there will be time consuming and expensive. Unlike some project cars it is too far gone to be driven as is and just needs to head straight to the restoration shop. It brought a full retail price for its specifications and condition and will make M-B Classic’s parts department happy.

Lot # 103 1921 Paige 6-66 Daytona Speedster; S/N 130345D; Engine # 8AP130598D; Red, Black fenders/Blue leather; Estimate $100,000 – $130,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $84,000. – Red wire wheels, single rear-mounted spare, cycle-style fenders, Hudson Spreadlight headlights, 12 volt electrics, turn signals – Edge chipped and lightly scuffed old paint, sound upholstery and interior trim. Good radiator and headlight chrome but erratic trim. The engine is orderly but oily. A sporty cruiser or tour car in well-used older restored condition, the result of a nearly 30-year, multi-owner, restoration process. – It’s no Mercer or Stutz, but it is sporting and fast enough to be enjoyable to drive even at highway speeds. Its condition is erratic but probably better mechanically than its cosmetics suggest and a sound value at this price.

Lot # 105 1967 Amphicar 770 Convertible; S/N 200085; White/Red, White vinyl; Red cloth top; Estimate $50,000 – $60,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $50,400. – RHD. Whitewalls, hub caps. – The paint is in good condition, but there is overspray in small quantities around some of the trim. The brightwork is good except on the driver’s side vent-window, where there is a small amount of rust. The red trim on the belt line appears dull and slightly faded. The dashboard and instruments are complete and nearly flawless. The seats are in good condition with some light stretching. Well maintained engine compartment with a little dirt and grime. An older restoration of a very rare right-hand drive example. – Ordered in righthand drive by an American pilot who was accustomed to that seating position. A well-preserved restoration now almost two decades old and much better than the usual Amphicar, this is a modest result for its history and condition.

Lot # 107 1929 Chrysler Model 75 Roadster; S/N; Turquoise Blue, Blue fenders/Tan vinyl; Tan cloth top; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $45,000. – Primrose wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual sidemounts with mirrors, rumble seat, Black leatherette luggage trunk. – 2014 AACA National First Prize and Senior. Very good older paint, chrome, interior and top. The engine has been brush painted recently without disassembly. 1-barrel Carter updraft carb. A quality older restoration that shows little use but a full complement of age. – Let down by the restoration’s age, this Chrysler failed to impress the bidders at the Simeone Foundation Museum enough to meet the seller’s expectations but was bid to a level comparable with the other one in the sale (lot #146), a consistent result that suggests it is appropriate.

Lot # 109 1956 BMW 502 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 62416; Engine # 2440; Metallic Brown, Ivory/Brown velour, houndstooth cloth; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Incomplete restoration, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $22,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $24,640. – Column shift 4-speed, whitewalls. – Superficial old repaint, overspray in the wheel wells. Sound but tacky new velour interior. Decent chrome. The engine compartment has been superficially resprayed gloss black and a non-running engine dropped in to fill the hole. Stromberg 2-barrel carburetor, alternator, Wilwood master cylinder not plumbed in, etc. Block stamped 80440, not 2440. – An intriguing and unusual car but one with a daunting task to complete it to running, driving, stopping condition. And even then it’ll look pretty sketchy. It took a brave bidder to pay even this much for it.

Lot # 111 2001 BMW Z8 Roadster; S/N WBAEJ13451AH61111; Titanium Silver/Black leather; Black top; Estimate $160,000 – $180,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $145,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $162,400. – Hardtop, books, tools, service records. – One-owner car with 17,818 miles represented. Well-maintained, pristine example. The brightwork shows no sign of pitting with few visible scratches. The headlights covers are relatively clear with few signs of cloudiness around the edges. The factory alloys are in great condition as well. – Reportedly bid to $160,000 at Bonhams Amelia Island auction seven months ago, its result here is substantially below that but the consignor wisely decided against giving it another ride. The new owner got a quality Z8 for a wholesale price.

Lot # 113 1970 Ferrari 365 GT 2+2 2-Dr. Sedan, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 13989; Red/Tan leather; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $192,000. – Sony cassette, alloy wheels, Michelin Defender tires, power windows. – Grubby steering wheel rim and wood veneer on dash. Pitted trim chrome. Mediocre repaint over visible prep, cracked base of windshield posts. Fair major chrome. Grungy engine. Scarred wheels. A neglected, marginal driver. – Sold by Worldwide at Auburn in 2010 for $79,200 when it showed 263 fewer miles on the odometer reading 15,665 today and in essentially the same, neglected rundown condition as here. It isn’t getting any better in the present owner’s neglectful hands and will require no small amount of care and attention to make it look good enough to be worth the pre-sale estimate. It’s a disappointing high bid, but it was appropriate for this disappointing Queen Mother.

Lot # 114 1941 Cadillac 60 Special 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 6343134; Black/Gray leather, cloth; Estimate $30,000 – $45,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $34,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $38,080. – Whitewalls, wheel covers, fog lights, original tools, heater, dash clock, grille guard. – CCCA first-prize winner. The brightwork could use polishing in a few places, but there are no signs of pitting. The paint is in good condition with a few surface scratches. The interior has dark wood trim on the dashboard. The factory AM radio, defroster and heater controls are all present and in condition. A well-maintained older restoration, but no longer a potential prize winner. – The 60 Special was designed by Bill Mitchell and foreshadowed, even in the reign of Harley Earl, the clean, subtle designs that Mitchell would champion at GM in the Sixties. It was one of the most important GM designs of the era, recognized as a CCCA Full Classic ™, and this is a quality, if aged, example that brought a moderate but appropriate price.

Lot # 116 1923 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost 40/50hp Roadster Piccadilly, Body by after RRCCW; S/N 82LK; Engine # R65; Ivory/Vermillion leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $105,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $117,600. – RHD. Vermillion wire wheels, dual sidemounts, Bausch & Lomb drum headlights, rumble seat, 1925 updated 4-wheel brakes. – Replica coachwork by Marcel Delay in the late 80’s replacing the original Hooper landaulet. Sound older repaint with minor scuffs but no edge chips. Flat, dull brightwork. Good, lightly stretched upholstery and interior trim. Orderly but aged engine compartment and chassis. The brightwork will keep someone busy this winter but when done and the mechanical bits refreshed will make this a highly presentable tour car. – The body is elegantly proportioned and built to high standards, but this is Rolls-Royce quality at an affordable price due to the replacement coachwork.

Lot # 117 1911 Breese Paris Teardrop Roadster; S/N Engine No. 2783E; Engine # 2783E; Ivory, Red coachline/Red leatherette; Beige cloth top; Estimate $100,000 – $130,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $78,400. – RHD. Brass brightwork, Fivet 4-cylinder engine, 4-speed, tri-tone bulb horn. – One of three known examples of this evanescent marque. Described as built in 1911 but assembled from components of postwar origin. Owned many years and restored by Emanuel Speraza in the early 60’s. Attractive open coachwork with clamshell fenders. Mediocre old paint and interior, dull brass, brush painted chassis. Needs everything, but seriously cute. – Valuable only for intrigue and uniqueness, the seller should be pleased with this result.

Lot # 118 1911 Breese Paris Roadster; S/N Engine No. M795Y; Engine # M795Y; Aluminum, Matte Black/Black; No top; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Unrestored original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $15,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $16,800. – RHD. Wire wheels, ancient tires, Ford Model A headlights, S.C.A.P. single overhead camshaft 1,392cc 4-cylinder, 4-speed. – Rough, crude and old. One of three known examples of the Breese marque (if it can be called a “marque”) of which two were offered here. Reputedly driven by Robert Breese in the 1946 commemorative running of the Vanderbilt Cup where it finished second. Needs everything, including bodywork that is more than the rudimentary two seats that adorn it today. It’s less than functional as it sits and its components parts are post-WWI in origin, not 1911. – But it is an intriguing thing with a nifty ohc engine and potentially exceptional performance and this is reasonable money for a project with those attributes.

Lot # 119 1933 Packard Super Eight 1004 Touring Car; S/N Engine No. 750814; Engine # 750800; Tobacco/Brown leather; Tan cloth top; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $95,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $106,400. – Ivory wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemounts with mirrors, dual spotlights, jump seats, tan cloth covered luggage trunk, Pilot-Rays, Solar vee lens headlights, Ride Control. – Generally sound dull old paint, cracked on the left hood side and chipped edges. Sound chrome and interior. The engine compartment and chassis have been restored but a while ago. CCCA Senior #1997. – As noted in the catalog, this is a rare body style for the mid-Thirties. Its condition leaves much to be desired but that is reflected in the price and with its potential for the new owner to enhance its presentation it is a sound value.

Lot # 123 1916 Simplex Crane Model 5 46hp Limousine, Body by Brewster; S/N 2196; Engine # 2099; Dark Blue, Black fenders, Black leather roof/Light Blue broadcloth; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $110,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $123,200. – Varnished wood spoke wheels, whitewalls, dual sidemounts, Gray & Davis electric lights, hydraulic shocks, electric starter, windshield visor, jump seats, no division. – Historic records document this Simplex’s original coachwork construction for a client in Boston, displayed many years in the Powers Antique Automotive Museum in Connecticut, then to the UK. Scuffed old paint, dull nickel, sound but faded interior. Orderly but aged engine compartment and chassis. Done a long time ago to the standards of the time, then driven. Probably usable but deserves a new restoration. – Sold by Bonhams in London in December 2015 for $32,565 (GBP 21,458 at the time, this result is GBP 93,800), coming home to America and the consignor’s research into the early history have served it well with this result, but it is an extraordinary car of exceptional quality and rarity.

Lot # 124 1927 Bentley 6 1/2 Liter All-Weather Touring Car, Body by T.H. Gill; S/N PR2310; Engine # PR2308 (see text); Blue, Dark Blue fenders and accent/Grey leather; Dark Blue cloth top; Estimate $800,000 – $950,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $700,000. – RHD. Black wire wheels, Dunlop tires, dual sidemounts with mirrors, Lucas tri-bar headlights, overdrive added. – Replacement engine believed to be MD2458 ex-PR2317 by Bentley circa 1929. Originally a Weymann patent lightweight saloon body. Updated with twin carburetors for the third owner and this T.H. Gill body to a Hibbard & Darrin design for the third or fourth owner, Hugh Hunter. Restored in the late 80’s and still has very good older paint, chrome and interior. Orderly, lightly oily engine compartment and chassis. Restored a while ago and well-maintained and driven since. – Somewhere in the last half century or so this body’s original rear-mounted spare was replaced by the dual sidemounts it currently has, but that hardly affects its appeal and the restoration’s condition is especially impressive. The consignor’s opinion that it is worth more than the reported high bid here is impossible to fault. It is a magnificent motor car.

Lot # 126 1958 Mercedes-Benz 220S Cabriolet; S/N 180030N8505498; Anthracite Grey/Red leather; White top; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Unrestored original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $77,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $86,240. – Wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, 4-speed, AM radio. – At one point owned by the President and CEO of Daimler-Benz North America. Dull, aged, chipped paint. The front and rear bumpers are heavily pitted but rust free. The paint on the front hub caps is peeling. The white top is dirty and has a hole on the interior portion. The rear window is also completely opaque. The interior is in fair shape and appears complete. The seats are dirty and stretched but don’t have any cracks. The wood is in fair condition. Missing its key and the steering column is locked. Fully documented, all original and desirably equipped, but needs much attention. – One the road until 2014, the intervening four years in a Vermont barn have done this M-B no favors but even at this over-estimate result it is a sound value that may clean up to be usable as-is (once a key is acquired and it can be steered.)

Lot # 127 1925 Lincoln Model L Convertible Coupe; S/N 29368; Engine # 29368; Tobacco, Olive, Black fenders/Beige cloth; Beige cloth top; Estimate $80,000 – $110,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $68,000. – Orange wire wheels, wide whitewall tires, dual cloth covered sidemounts with mirrors, Owlite, single large Pilot-Ray fog light, drum headlights and cowl lights, luggage trunk, wood steering wheel, rumble seat with windshield, golf bag door, windshield visor. – Sound but now aged old paint, lightly soiled top with cracked bindings. Edge chips. Dull nickel windowsill trim, generally good chrome. Orderly engine compartment and chassis. A quality old restoration with some tour miles that’s holding up well but showing age. – Sold at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale in 2005 for $70,200, then at Auburn Fall in 2016 for $73,150 ($66,500 hammer), it was offered at Auburn Fall in 2017 where it was bid to the same $68,000 that it brought today. The consignor seems convinced that it is worth more, but that it’s time to reassess that opinion.

Lot # 128 1914 Cadillac Model 30 Touring; S/N Engine No. A1806; Engine # A1806; Brewster Green, Black fenders/Black leather; Black leatherette top; Estimate $65,000 – $85,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $55,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $61,600. – RHD. Dark Green wood spoke wheels, 37-inch blackwall tires, single rear-mounted spare, Gray & Davis electric lighting, nickel brightwork. – Sound, chipped and scratched old paint. Good, lightly stretched upholstery. Orderly, used and lightly oiled engine compartment and chassis. Restored to touring standards a while ago and used for the purpose but still usable and presentable. – Reported sold by Bonhams at Amelia Island seven months ago for $60,480 and mechanically serviced since it is surprising to see it move on at a significant loss. It is a significant value for the new owner at this price.

Lot # 129 1967 Plymouth Barracuda 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N BH23D72265452; Dark Blue Metallic/Blue vinyl; Estimate $16,000 – $24,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $15,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $17,360. – 273/180hp 2-barrel, automatic, wheel covers, bench seat, pushbutton radio, column shift, air conditioning. – Two family ownership from new, stored from new until the early 80’s. Good repaint. Pitting on the steering wheel. Small tear and peeling paint on the dashboard. The front and rear bumpers shine like new, but the rest of the brightwork shows signs of pitting. The weather stripping around the front shows age and wear. Completely stock and almost totally original, it’s a casual driver as-is or would make for a fairly straightforward restoration. – There’s a modest originality premium in this result, but no more than the car deserved. A little work and replacement of some of the body seals and other soft parts will pay off for the new owner.

Lot # 130 1913 Hudson Model 37 Roadster; S/N 36709; Engine # 4741S; Ivory, Black fenders/Black leatherette; Black Cobragrain top; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $22,400. – RHD. Ivory wood spoke 34-inch wheels, dual rear spares, cylinder bolster tank, bulb horn. – Tired old paint and interior. Dirty, used engine compartment and chassis. Sound and complete but tired and unattractive. – “Lovely patina” is the way the cataloger describes this Hudson’s presentation, rather than tired and unattractive or dirty and used. That may have had an effect on the bidders who paid shiny Model T Ford money for it, but got 37 horsepower in return instead of the T’s 20hp.

Lot # 131 1958 Lancia B20 GT Coupe; S/N B20S1763; Engine # B205409; White/Blue leatherette, Grey cloth; Estimate $190,000 – $210,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $155,000. – 2451/112hp V6, 4-speed, woodrim steering wheel, floor shift, Michelin X tires, Hitachi pushbutton radio. – Failing old repaint, chipped and crazed. Sills and wheel arches clumsily filled and blistered in front of both rear wheels. Underbody covered in ancient undercoat, chassis hasn’t been touched in decades. Bumpers and upholstery have been done, instruments are clear and legible. Dirty engine compartment. A project car, but a potentially rewarding one. – Sold at Gooding & Company’s Scottsdale auction in 2014 for $187,000 when the odometer showed 405 fewer miles than it does today. Despite the recent brake rebuild, the reported high bid here is enough for this Lancia B20 GT’s condition.

Lot # 132 1953 Jaguar XK 120 Roadster; S/N S672955; Engine # W6153-S; Red/Red; Estimate $90,000 – $115,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $68,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $76,720. – Chrome wire wheels, original tool kit, JDHT Certificate, Motorola AM radio, comes with its original wheels and tires. – Represented as 5,858 miles from new with a matching numbers drivetrain confirmed by the JDHT Certificate. Light pitting around the windshield frame. The paint is rough with signs of poor body and paint work, as well as deep scratches on the driver’s side rear quarter panel. The front bumpers are also rough with pitting and the passenger’s side bumper is slightly disfigured. The interior is fair, with stretching and cracks on the driver’s seat. The engine compartment is rough, dirty, has rusty fasteners and components. Reported to run and drive, though. Sold new in Los Angeles and almost totally original, though not pampered or particularly well preserved. – Even though on-site observation indicates this Jag has an old repaint it is otherwise nearly completely original, with no significant needs. Bought here for a highly advantageous price, it is a sound value in all respects.

Lot # 133 1931 Isotta-Fraschini Tipo 8A Sports Coupe, Body by Lancefield; S/N 1676; Engine # 1676; Ivory, Black leatherette roof/Saddle vinyl; Estimate $300,000 – $400,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $250,000. – RHD. Dual rear-mounted spares, radiator stoneguard, Desmo fog lights. – One of only three I-Fs bodied by Lancefield. Fascinating history. Originally owned and bodied for London attorney Victor Pryce Webb, used by the British military during WWII, taken to the late Mr. Webb’s home in Australia by his widow and put up on blocks until the late 80’s. Poor old repaint, cracked, chipped and dull. Sound old vinyl upholstery. Thin, weak chrome. Dirty unrestored engine compartment and chassis. Mostly original except for the 30’s repaint and some upholstery. Needs and deserves everything. – One of only three I-Fs bodied by Lancefield. Fascinating history. Originally owned and bodied for London attorney Victor Pryce Webb, used by the British military during WWII, taken to the late Mr. Webb’s home in Australia by his widow and put up on blocks until the late 80’s. Poor old repaint, cracked, chipped and dull. Sound old vinyl upholstery. Thin, weak chrome. Dirty unrestored engine compartment and chassis. Mostly original except for the 30’s repaint, some upholstery and the crankcase numbered 1198, which does not match the engine number plate. Needs and deserves everything.

Lot # 136 1926 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost 40/50hp 4-Dr. Sedan Tilbury, Body by RRCCW (Brewster); S/N S256PL; Engine # 21565; Burgundy, Black fenders/Burgundy leather; Estimate $100,000 – $140,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $61,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $68,320. – Dual sidemounts with strap on mirrors, body color wire wheels, wide whitewall tires, Bausch & Lomb drum headlights and cowl lights, leather windshield visor, trunk rack – The original coachwork on this chassis. Repainted body but old, cracked, peeling paint on the fenders. Good interior. Wire wheels are repainted over old paint and the chassis are orderly but not restored. – Sold by Sotheby’s at the Ben Moser sale in Solvang, California in 1993 for $51,750 with little or nothing done to it since then, nor to its value. Classics like this with frequently overlooked closed coachwork are excellent values as an opportunity to gain the classic experience with Rolls-Royce benefits without spending a lot of money.

Lot # 137 1924 Locomobile Model 48 Open Drive Limousine, Body by Bridgeport Body; S/N 19124; Engine # 19124; Dark Green, Black fenders/Black leather, Blue broadcloth; Estimate $100,000 – $130,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $75,000. – Blue wood spoke wheels, 33-inch blackwall tires, nickel trim, pulldown silk shades, pullup 3-pane division, jump seats, speaking tube, dual rear spares. – 1966 AACA National First Prize. Good old paint, nickel and interior. Orderly engine compartment and chassis looks only a few miles and years old despite the age of its restoration. – Despite the limousine coachwork there is nothing frumpy about this Locomobile, a classy, stately, elegant example of Locomobile quality and J. Frank de Causee’s coachwork. It’s more car than the reported high bid, but not by much, even with this superb quality old restoration.

Lot # 138 1917 Paige 6-51 Brooklands Roadster; S/N 73804; Engine # 9807804; Light Yellow, Black fenders/Saddle leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $58,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $64,960. – Wind wings, pullup rear windshield, Ivory wire wheels, overdrive, pedestal spotlight, turn signals added, rear-mounted beige cloth covered spare, Gray & Davis bell headlights, overdrive added. – Sold new to Thomas Lyle Williams, founder of Maybelline cosmetics and believed to be the only surviving Brooklands Roadster. Original coachwork. Sound older repaint, erratic chrome. Good newer front seat upholstery, older rumble seat upholstery in a different material. Aged and orderly engine compartment and chassis. Cosmetically restored long ago and cosmetically refreshed with paint and front seat. An unusual car in sound driver condition. – Sleek, stylish and sporting even if it’s an older restoration, Bonhams Simeone Foundation Museum bidders recognized its inherent attributes while not overpaying for the old restoration.

Lot # 140 1936 Bentley 4 1/4 Liter Airflow Sedan, Body by Gurney Nutting; S/N B118HK; Engine # K2BY; Red/Beige leather, Red piping; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $170,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $190,400. – RHD. Wheel discs, dual enclosed sidemounts, skirts, sliding sunroof, Lucas headlights and dip beam light, fender mirrors. – Good older paint, weak chrome, sound upholstery and interior trim. The underbody has been painted over old undercoat and driven. Still a handsome car for tours. – We’ve seen this handsome Airflow bodied Bentley several times before and it never fails to attract attention for its combination of “Silent Sports Car” chassis and sleek Gurney Nutting coachwork in bright “Don’t overlook me” Red. It sold at Christie’s Pebble Beach in 1991 for $115,500 and at RM Amelia in 2017 for $165,000. It is an extraordinary automobile that deserved every penny it brought here.

Lot # 141 1913 Stutz Series B Bearcat Roadster; S/N 997; Engine # AB1828; Dark Green, Red Chassis/Black leather; Estimate $550,000 – $650,000; Concours restoration, 1 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $460,000. – RHD. Black centerlock wire wheels, Warner speedometer, electric lights, nickel trim, cylinder bolster tank, luggage trunk, dual rear spares, friction shocks, Phinney Walker clock. – Salvaged from an abandoned chassis and a few usable pieces, built up with various old and new parts and a complete new body (such as it is.) Freshly, brilliantly restored with show quality paint, upholstery and brightwork except for some worn through nickel on the sidelights. T-head four runs like a dream. – Sold at the Dragone Brothers auction in Westport, Connecticut in 2015 for $577,500 and bought here for, shall we say, much less, reflecting its build from some rusty abandoned parts, some old ones and a load of newly fabricated pieces. Its origins are unclear but in the end it’s a (mostly) real Stutz in Bearcat configuration and the effort and expense that went into its preservation are commendable. Reprising the price it brought three years ago also would be commendable, if unlikely.

Lot # 145 1930 Austin Seven 2-Dr. Sedan, Body by Swallow; S/N Engine No. M99312; Engine # M99312; Black, Ivory/Black vinyl; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $32,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $35,840. – RHD. Ivory wire wheels, single rear spare, Lucas headlights, vee windshield with overhanging visor roof. – Sloppy, chipped, scratched and scuffed old repaint. Grubby engine compartment and chassis. Reupholstered front seats but with a big tear on the passenger’s side. Sound but needs everything. – Swallow was the basis of Sir Williams Jaguar, following up on sleek motorcycle sidecars (“SS” = Swallow Sidecar) with saloons on the tiny Austin Seven chassis. It was like an Impala of the time: more stylish, better appointed but still the sound, solid, economical Austin Seven chassis, a modest upgrade at a still affordable price. This one is fairly disreputable but it still bought a strong price.

Lot # 146 1929 Chrysler Model 75 Roadster; S/N Engine No. R262516; Engine # R262516; Primrose, Black fenders /; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $37,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $41,440. – Chrome spoke wire wheels, wide whitewalls, rumble seat, dual sidemounts with mirrors, windwings, turn signals added. – Very good older paint with minor cracking on the right hood side and bubbling on the rear deck. Good chrome. Tight fitting top. Dull instrument panel trim, decent gauges. Good upholstery and interior trim. The chrome wheels have some rust but the rest of the chrome is good. Orderly but used engine and chassis didn’t get cleaned up for the auction. Better than a driver but not until it is cleaned up. – One of two 1929 Chrysler Model 75s in this auction. The other one (lot # 107) was in somewhat better condition and failed to sell on a hammer bid $8,000 more. This one will reward the new owner for a thorough cleanup and brought an appropriate price.

Lot # 147 1930 Cadillac 353 Convertible Coupe, Body by Fisher; S/N Engine No. 506162; Engine # 506162; Light Yellow, Black fenders/Brown vinyl; Black cloth top; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Older restoration, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Post-block sale at $77,679 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $87,000. – Red wire wheels, wide whitewalls dual sidemounts with mirrors, rumble seat, metal luggage trunk, single Pilot-Ray, radiator stoneguard, Depress Beam headlights. – Greasy, grubby old chassis. Dirty but orderly engine compartment. Sound, scuffed in, upholstery. Fair chrome. Mediocre old paint, peeling and chipping along the beltline, particularly on the right side. A tired old restoration that has many needs. – Bonhams website on 10/16/18 does not report this car sold; this result is from Hammerprice. This is a dirty, neglected old restoration and the seller should be happy to get this much for it, despite the inherent quality and desirability of the chassis and coachwork.

Lot # 148 1957 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz Convertible; S/N 5762101362; Black/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $120,000 – $130,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $97,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $109,200. – Sabre-spoke wheels, whitewalls, gold brightwork, power seat, power windows, Autronic Eye, batwing air cleaner. – Surface scratches on the paint. The brightwork has scratches but no pitting. The original upholstery is aged and cracked. The rest of the interior is in good aged condition. A much older restoration showing its age. – Represented as a body-off restoration (“frame off” in the words of the catalog), it is something less than thorough but is still worth every bit as much as the parsimonious price it brought here. It has eye-appeal and on a sunny summer Saturday will make an elegant statement at the golf course.

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Comments

  1. Reply

    Hi Rick, great report as always. I’ve attended Bonhams at Simeone twice in the past, and it’s a great way to kick off Hershey week. The problem for me is getting that much time off, when I’m devoted to being out there Thursday and Friday for The Big Show.

    Lot #129, the ’67 Barracuda, looks like a solid car for a decent price. I would have preferred to know the engine size (as per the VIN, 273 V8 2-bbl), but perhaps you didn’t have access to the engine compartment.

    Lot #132, the Jag XK120 looks like a smokin’ deal if in fact the car is completely original except for the repaint (understandable for red).

    Among the pre-war cars, Lot #146, the ’29 Chrysler, looks especially outstanding.
    And a request for a comment from you: I’ve been observing the continued strength of pre-war sales at auctions. They may not be fetching prices at their high estimates, but they are getting snapped up. A few short years ago, pundits had predicted the death of interest in these cars as the generation that first owned them passed on. To what do you attribute the ongoing interest in cars from the 1910s-1930s?

    Again, thanks for the good read.

      • rickcarey1
      • October 26, 2018
      Reply

      Richard: Thanks for noticing the editorial oversight in the Barracuda description. It is the 2-barrel (which further endorses the car’s originality … it hasn’t been been breathed on with a 4-barrel carb.) The report has been updated with this info.
      On the subject of old cars’ values, you bring up a good point which deserves more lengthy treatment on its own. I’ll work on that.
      Rick

      1. Reply

        Thanks, Rick, look forward to that.

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