Barrett-Jackson, WestWorld, Scottsdale, January 12-20, 2019

Barrett-Jackson’s annual crowdfest at WestWorld in Scottsdale is amazing, and it seems to grow more amazing every year.

The shear masses of people walking through the gates to confront the array of sponsors, vendors and exhibitors – a gauntlet to be run every day just to get to the auction cars – is startling. The gate receipts (and it was $80 per adult to get in on Saturday alone) must be enormous.

The overall sale was Barrett-Jackson’s second largest ever, up 10% from 2018 and 23.4% from 2017 but trailing 2015’s banner year when $130.9 million changed hands at WestWorld. [These totals count only vehicles, including charity sales. The hours and hours of automobilia added over $6 million.]

There were several notable changes as B-J constantly repositions its presentation and docket makeup. Cars sold with reserves have all but disappeared. There were only two this year, of which one sold. Last year there were 30 and they had a dismal 33.3% sell-through.

Over one-third of the 1,825 vehicles listed in the docket were self-identified as “custom”, “mod”, “rod”, “replica” or “tribute”. They sold extremely well. In a number of cases resto-mods brought more money than their restored stock-configuration counterparts, even in intrinsically valuable cars like mid-year Corvettes.

B-J has been a leader in promoting resto-mods, popularizing and positioning them years ago as a promising market segment that appeals to younger collectors who expect the same performance, handling and comfort in their collector cars that they expect in their modern daily drivers.

One troubling note is the number of older cars represented as “original miles”. It’s too good to be true, and the bidders in the WestWorld arena (the ones whose opinions really count) didn’t seem to be misled by outlandish claims.

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2019 1824/1825 99.9% $68,665 $48,400

[70.5%]

$125,244,755
2018 1731/1751 98.9% $65,775 $41,800

[63.5%]

$113,856,655
2017 1708/1716 99.5% $59,434 $40,700

[68.5%]

$101,513,833
2016 1482/1490 99.5% $69,112 $47,850

[69.2%]

$102,423,750

The cars here were viewed on-site by Andrew Newton, Greg Ingold, Chris Winslow, Jose Martinez and me. As always the final copy is my responsibility.

There are 168 vehicles reported here. They’re sorted by Marque, Model, Year and Lot Number for easier search {and so the consistency of our observations can be checked.} That is over 23,000 words of copy, which is why this report took a while to prepare, edit and check.


Lot # 374.1 1978 AMC Pacer D/L Station Wagon; S/N A8A687C319493; Yellow, Woodgrain/Beige vinyl; Unrestored original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $8,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $8,800 – Automatic, power steering and brakes, air conditioning, roof rack. – Represented as 45,435 miles from new. Sound but chipped original paint, good chrome and original interior. Ugly, disorganized engine compartment indiscriminately squirted with black paint. A neat thing that needs a sympathetic home. – Sometimes original is good, but other times and in this case, it is just old and neglected. This beater looks like it has covered much more than the reported 45,000 miles, or perhaps it has just been lived in. Either way it didn’t get anyone excited at WestWorld and brought the paltry price it deserved.

Lot # 985 2007 Aston Martin Vantage Coupe; S/N SCFBB04BX7GD06627; Titanium Silver/Black leather; Black top; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $49,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $53,900 – 6-speed, clear bra on the nose, Continental tires on the front and Goodyears on the rear, climate control, power windows, seats and steering – The paint is very good, but there are a few spots on the wheels where the coating has been damaged. The front Continental tires are in good condition, but the rear Goodyears are completely bald. The interior is very good with light wear on the driver’s seat but the rest of the upholstery is like new. Represented with 24,827 miles and a service history, plus it has the desirable 6-speed manual, but there are some areas of concern and the mismatched tires are a red flag. – Mid-2000s Astons aren’t really collectible cars yet but rather used ones. This one is a standout with the manual, but its presentation left some things to be desired and it brought about half of what it would have cost new which is a realistic number considering what other ones on the market are asking.

Lot # 759.1 1959 Austin-Healey 100-6 BN4 Roadster; S/N BN4L077189; Red/Black; Black top; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $33,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $36,300 – Chrome wire wheels, Dunlop SP Sport tires, aftermarket exhaust, tonneau cover, overdrive, Moto-Lita woodrim steering wheel. – Good paint and chrome. Polished SU dashpots. Boot lid stands slightly proud. The upholstery is a poorly fit kit. Faded fuel gauge face, but the other gauges are good. Very good chrome. The engine compartment has had plenty of attention but not a restoration. Very clean and restored underneath with new exhaust. The doors stick out slightly at the bottom. Not represented as a fresh restoration, but it looks like one. – A modest result for a mostly good car, but not as modest as the $30,800 it sold for at Bonhams Scottsdale last year. It hammered not sold at a $50,000 high bid at Mecum Denver last year as well, a missed opportunity

Lot # 36 1969 Austin-Healey Sprite Mk IV Convertible; S/N HAN9U83584G; Green/Black vinyl; Black top; Enthusiast restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $5,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $5,500 – Hub caps and trim rings, woodrim steering wheel, modern stereo with JVC speakers in the back, Weber carb. – Rough paint with lots of chips and scratches plus some severe cracking at the front of the hood. The trunk also has a Union Jack decal across all of it, which just looks tacky and has got to go. Very good interior other than small rips in the driver’s seat and another small one in the driver’s side headrest. Dry and maintained underneath, and the engine bay is fairly clean and complete. Fundamentally, this isn’t a bad car at all, just quite rough around the edges. Paint and seat covers are all it needs to make it a great driver. – At this price, the new owner definitely has money left over for paint and seats, and will still be in this car for less than it’s really worth. This Sprite has needs, but it was one of the best deals of the week. At big auctions like Barrett-Jackson it pays to arrive early and stay late.

Lot # 1028 2008 Bentley Continental GTC Convertible Coupe; S/N SCBDR33W68C053260; Cypress/Saffron leather; Beige top; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $88,000 – Massaging front seats, Birdseye maple veneer, 20-inch chrome wheels – Very good paint and brightwork. There a few wrinkles on the front seats but the carpets are like new. Well-kept and represented with 20,248 miles, but a bit used and not represented with a service history. – This result is less than half of what this car cost new just 10 years ago. Depreciation is a guarantee with late model Bentleys. There is probably even more depreciation in this Bentley’s future, especially if the new owner doesn’t keep up with the expensive maintenance.

Lot # 517 1955 Buick Century Convertible; S/N 6B8003155; Yellow/Yellow leather; White vinyl top; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $47,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $51,700 – 322/236hp, Dynaflow, power steering, brakes, windows, bench seat, top and antenna, chrome wire wheels, whitewalls. – Stated to be 49,000 miles with a good fresh paint job, sound interior and top and good chrome. The fit between the side windows and the top is too wide. The underbody has old undercoat but is clean and dry. – This result recognizes the condition issues but also gives full credit for the generous equipment and originality. It is a sound value for the new owner and a fair result for the seller.

Lot # 1068 1987 Buick Regal GNX Coupe; S/N 1G4GJ1173HP443660; Black/Black, Grey cloth; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $88,000 – Car number 22, includes purchase documents, window sticker, GNX jacket and GNX hat. – Very good paint with no deterioration. The headlight bezels have a few minor worn spots. The underbody is clean and shows minimal use and the interior has no noticeable wear. A well-kept car with sparing use showing just 7,614 miles. – A pretty modest result given this car’s low mileage and impressive preservation, which surprisingly didn’t excite the bidders as much as expected. A six-figure price wouldn’t have been entirely out of the ordinary, but maybe everyone was saving up their exuberance for the $132,000 Blazer that sold two lots later.

Lot # 1477 1987 Buick Regal GNX Coupe; S/N 1G4GJ1172HP448610; Black/Grey, Black cloth; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $95,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $104,500 – Car number 265, 1,564 miles, includes GNX owner’s book. – 1,564 miles so says the owner. Good original paint with no significant blemishes, the engine compartment is very clean as well as the underbody. The interior is unused. This is a like new car. – This car sold here two years ago in the same condition for $117,700, and this is an indication of softening GNX prices since then.

Lot # 753.1 1987 Buick Regal Grand National Coupe; S/N 1G4GJ117XHP457264; Black/Black, Grey cloth; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $66,000 – Dealer invoice, factory radio, power windows. – 31 miles and like new. – The original owner bought two Grand Nationals new, driving one while this car “would be an investment.” The ’87 Grand National started at $16,617, or about $37,500 in 2019 dollars. It brought top dollar for a GN here in Scottsdale and 66 grand doesn’t make for a bad return in investment terms, but if the only point in keeping this car for 30 years was to make money, buying a bunch of Apple stock instead would have been a much better idea.

Lot # 1307 1987 Buick Regal Grand National Coupe; S/N 1G4GJ1178HP457991; Black/Grey, Black cloth; Unrestored original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Included in another lot $122,000 plus commission of; Final Price $134,200 – 836 miles, one of the ‘Twinz’ garage find Grand Nationals, includes window sticker, sold as a pair with lot 1307.1 – 836 miles, put away from new. The bumper fillers are faded and chalky looking. The paint has faded, especially on the trunk lid. The engine and underbody are aged and have oxidation from sitting too long. The interior is the bright spot on this car and has little wear. Typically cars with this mileage are in far superior condition. This car is complete hype, and the word ‘neglect’ comes to mind rather than ‘preserved’. – Sold with Lot #1307.1 with comments in that record.

Lot # 1307.1 1987 Buick Regal Grand National Coupe; S/N 1G4GJ117XHP457992; Black/Grey, Black cloth; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Included in another lot $0 plus commission of; Final Price – 595 miles, one of the ‘Twinz’ garage find Grand Nationals, includes window sticker, sold as a pair with lot 1307. – The paint is aged but not to the extent of its twin next to it. The engine and underbody do have deterioration from sitting. The interior is clean and well sorted. The far better car of the two GNs, but not a shining example of preservation compared to others of its mileage. More hype than significance for its condition. – Either of these cars offered by themselves in their low mileage, deteriorated, original condition would struggle to sell for $50,000. The combined result here is a miracle of presentation and hype but something that Barrett-Jackson often succeeds in accomplishing. Sold with Lot #1307 with the price for both recorded there.

Lot # 745.1 1965 Buick Riviera GS 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 494475H919193; Turquoise Mist/White; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $57,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $62,700 – 425/360hp, dual quads, automatic, power steering, brakes and windows, pushbutton radio, air conditioning, tilt steering column, styled steel wheels, narrow whitewalls. – Represented as 36,205 miles and all original, this is a highly impressive and beautiful Riviera GS. There are a few paint nicks and chips but nothing major. The interior is lightly stretched but sound and attractive. The engine compartment is surprisingly clean and orderly, showing a life of conscientious care and attention. – The remarkable preservation of this Riviera GS got no attention at all from the WestWorld bidders. Low mileage claims are rampant here but nothing about this GS suggests that in this case it is anything but accurate. It’s just a sweet example of a particularly beautiful GM automobile and it could have brought another $15-20,000 without being seriously expensive. As it is, the buyer got a fine car at an advantageous price.

Lot # 1285.1 1954 Buick Skylark Convertible; S/N A1052939; Tunis Blue/Green leather; White vinyl top; Recent restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $135,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $148,500 – 322/200hp, Dynaflow, chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, Delco Remy battery, power top, power seats, power brakes, power windows, power steering, AM radio. – The chrome and trim are good. One small paint nick that was well repaired and one crack in the paint near the parade boot. Gaps are excellent. The engine bay is well detailed and appears correct. Well restored and clean underneath. The interior is excellent with some wear to the driver’s side door pull. The gauges are clear and bright. Mostly gorgeous and aside from a few really little flaws a pristine restored Skylark. Reportedly just 58 miles since a full restoration and it looks like it – The result here deserved a better Skylark than this somewhat aged one with a few shortcomings, but it is a piece of eye candy in Tunis Blue and bidders can be understood to have been captivated by its dramatic presence and there is nothing wrong with their determination to own it at this price.

Lot # 1576 1976 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible; S/N 6L67S6Q254812; Black/Black; Black top; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000 – Power top, windows, locks, steering and brakes, automatic climate control, digital clock, six-way power seats, cruise control, AM/FM with tape player, rear defogger, remote trunk release, tilt and telescopic steering column, remote mirrors, Guidematic headlamp controls. – Original example with 887 miles. The paint has been cleaned and detailed over the years. The interior is remarkably well kept and still has the factory window stickers. A mothballed time capsule car. – Thinking that this would be the last American-made convertible, a lot of people snatched up ’76 Eldorado convertibles as investments. While those concerns certainly didn’t come true and you can still buy domestic convertibles 43 years later, there are still quite a few preserved Eldorados out there and this must be one of the lowest-mile examples of them all. While not exactly a big return on initial investment, this is a huge price for one and about as much as the seller could have hoped for.

Lot # 1336 1956 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz Convertible; S/N 5662062975; Bahama Blue/Blue, White leather; White vinyl top; Recent restoration, 1 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $250,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $275,000 – 365/305hp dual quads, automatic, Satin Gold Sabre alloy wheels, wide whitewalls, tinted sun visors, air conditioning. – Exquisitely restored to far better than new condition with flawless paint, brilliant chrome and inviting interior. Under the hood is better than it left the factory. Fabulously done to better than new without destroying its authenticity. – Breathtaking beautiful and meticulously presented in better than new condition, every detail is deliberately picked out and presented. Among the cars at Barrett-Jackson in 2019 this stood out as the very best of the best, and that’s no small accomplishment. The bidders recognized it for what it is and let fly with their bids. There is no quarrel with the result here, and it is a lot better buy than many at B-J realized.

Lot # 349 1949 Case SO Orchard Tractor; S/N 5309494SO; Flambeau Red, /; Recent restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $30,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $33,000 – 4-speed, orchard wheel coverings, weighted drive wheels, ohv engine. – Painted assembled like most tractors but to higher standards. Strange shift pattern. – Orchard tractors with their paper airplane-like wheel fairings and low driving position are fascinating design studies combining streamlined good looks with eminent practicality. They bring healthy prices, too, although this result may be less than what was spent on the restoration. Even if it never sees another orchard it will look great pulling a wagon in the July Fourth Parade.

Lot # 1543 1957 Chevrolet 210 Station Wagon; S/N VB57S247237; Rose, White roof/Silver vinyl, Black cloth; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $29,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $31,900 – Bal Air trim, 283/220hp, automatic, power steering, factory air conditioning, chrome wire wheels, 4-wheel disc brakes (no power booster ), WonderBar radio. – The paint, chrome and interior are better than new. The engine compartment is very good but has some road grime in the depths. Gauges are crisp and sharp. – People have a hard time knowing what this Chevy Wagon is worth. At Mecum Houston in 2012 it was sold for $54,590. A year later at the same venue it sold for only $38,160 but four months after that it sold at Mecum Monterey in 2013 for $53,500. Four years later it was down again, selling here in 2017 for $39,600. It should be an enjoyable cruiser and family weekend car, particularly at this price, its lowest ever.

Lot # 763.1 1956 Chevrolet Bel Air Convertible; S/N VC56J132752; Onyx Black/Black; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $66,000 – 265/205hp, 3-speed, overdrive, fender skirts, power steering, power brakes, power seat, power top, Continental kit, padded dash, WonderBar radio, reverse lights, tissue dispenser, wire wheel covers. – An older well done and cared for restoration. The paint looks good for the most part but there are scratches and chips per the 25 years since the restoration was done. Chrome is good and well cared for. The stainless trim is polished with minimal scratches and the wheel covers look new. The interior has some slight pitting on the trim metal and the driver’s seat has some slight wrinkling. A mostly good older restored Bel Air Convertible in sound driver condition. – The result here is a reasonable price for a ’56 Bel Air convertible with the Power Pack engine, but not so much for one so lavishly equipped as this and with the overdrive 3-speed in its drivetrain. The new owner got an unusually good Bel Air in handsome colors for not a lot of money.

Lot # 1045 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air Convertible; S/N VC57J174887; Surf Green/Green vinyl; Beige vinyl top; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $71,500 – 283/245hp dual quads, Powerglide, spinner wheel covers, whitewalls, bat wing air cleaner, dash clock, heater, AM radio. – The paint is very good without any significant defects or damage. The brightwork is very good, but there is some pitting on the front bumper. The interior is very good as well and it all looks new. The white canvas top is good, but the frame does have a little rough and peeling paint. Body-off restored to a high standard, but not done yesterday. – Back in 2010 when this car’s restoration was a bit fresher, it sold here for $82,500. It then sold at Mecum Indy last year for $66,000 but had a better go of it for its second time in Scottsdale, reaching a solid number that takes into account the desirable configuration and quality of the restoration, but also its age.

Lot # 1238 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N VC57A171072; White/Red; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $44,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $48,400 – 283 with dual quads, Powerglide, power steering, power brakes, power windows, tissue dispenser, wheel covers, dual exhaust, generator, clock, temp gauge. – Said to be 6,077 original miles. The bodywork is fair and the panel gaps are excellent. Same with the chrome and stainless trim. Unfortunately, there is cracked paint under the current finish. Otherwise, the interior and chrome are both excellent. Excluding whatever is going on with the finish itself, it’s a decently well restored and well equipped car, an older restoration that could use another round of attention. – Sold for $62,700 at Barrett-Jackson West Palm Beach last year. There’s no information other than the highly questionable claim of 6,077 miles, no engine number to confirm its original configuration, and it’s been painted. The bidders treated it like an ordinary cosmetically restored ’57 Bel Air hardtop, which is exactly what they should have done. Compare it with Worldwide’s unrestored 283/240hp Bel Air FI hardtop for $60,500 and this result is right on the money.

Lot # 1152 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air FI Convertible; S/N VC57N167953; Engine # painted over; Matador Red/Red, Silver vinyl; Black vinyl top; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $88,000 – 283 engine with Rochester fuel injection, Powerglide, power brakes and steering, spinner wheel covers, whitewalls, reproduction WonderBar radio, skirts, continental kit, dual rear antennas. – 1996 AACA Grand National winner and still exceptional with standout cosmetics and a clean, orderly engine compartment with only some age and oily mist coating, said to have been out and refreshed two months ago. The engine number is obscured. A solid car but with troubling details and deficient documentation. – This old girl has been around a while, evidencing the ups and downs of the Tri-Five Chevrolet market. It was reported sold here in 1995 for $49,350, at RM’s Toronto auction in 2007 for $113,94 and at the Leake Dallas auction two months ago for $75,350 (whether before or after the recent engine refresh is unclear). The painted-over engine number is troubling, but even with that it’s a quality old car for a reasonable price.

Lot # 432 1972 Chevrolet C10 1/2 Ton Fleetside Long Bed; S/N CCE142B142489; Mariner Blue, Frost White/Blue vinyl, cloth; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $33,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $36,300 – 350/175hp, power steering and brakes, clearance lights, aftermarket radio, column shift 3-speed. – Very good paint, panel alignment and trim. The underbody and engine bay has been completely redone to a standard higher than on most restored trucks. The interior is excellent and appears like new. Beautifully restored and needs nothing. – Very strong money (even though it is less than it brought here last year, $40,700), especially for a long bed, but deserved considering this C10’s spotless, no-excuses presentation.

Lot # 1535 1977 Chevrolet C10 1/2 Ton Fleetside Long Bed; S/N CCL147S145295; Mariner Blue, Light Blue/Blue vinyl, cloth; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000 – 350/165hp, automatic Silverado trim, air conditioning, wood dash, bed liner, mud flaps. – Represented as 18,108 miles from new. Has had a quick, recent respray although the car card maintains it is original paint. The bumpers appear replaced. The bottom lip of the hood has surface rust. The engine compartment is aged and cast iron bits have surface rust. The frame paint appears original and is without oxidation the exhaust is old and will need replacement eventually. The interior is very good and the dash is crack free, which is fairly remarkable on an original C10. An honest, gracefully aged old C10 with a respray. – Sold at Worldwide Dallas last year for $11,000. Vintage pickups are hot, but not so hot that a C10 long bed should double in value in less than a year. This is an expensive result.

Lot # 1289.1 1969 Chevrolet Camaro COPO 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 124379N662520; LeMans Blue/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $137,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $150,700 – L72 427/425hp, 4-speed, power brakes and steering, 4.10 Positraction, body colored wheels with hubcaps with Goodyear Wide Tread tires, AM radio. Certified by Camaro Hi-Performance, 2009 MCACAN Concours Gold and 2010 American Camaro Association Bowtie Class Gold award. – COPO 9561. Excellent paint with no visible flaws. The trim has all been restored or replaced. The engine and underbody are pristine. The interior has no visible wear. A gorgeous old restoration that has likely seen more miles in an enclosed trailer than on the street. All documented, correct and awarded. – A strong car that hammered not sold at a $150,000 high bid at Mecum Indy in 2011 and sold for $143,000 at Mecum Indy last year. This result is on the modest side for such a well restored car but it isn’t unfair.

Lot # 548.1 1990 Chevrolet Camaro IROC-Z Sport Coupe; S/N 1G1FP23F2LL134862; Bright Red/Grey cloth; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $49,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $53,900 – 305 engine, 1LE package, 5-speed, rear window defogger, radio, decal and stripe delete, 16-inch aluminum wheels – Good original paint with a few minor chips to the nose. The underbody is excellent and shows little use. The interior shows like new, as it should be given the 1,417 miles showing. – The 1LE is a seldom-seen package on the third gen Camaro intended to make the car competitive in SCCA Showroom Stock racing. The combination of options added bigger brakes, aluminum driveshaft and suspension upgrades, but GM didn’t promote it and few cars were actually sold. But even so, and even considering this one’s incredible level of preservation, this is a staggering price for any third gen Camaro. Especially since this one sold at Barrett-Jackson West Palm Beach in 2006 for $18,360 and for $25,970 at Kissimmee in 2012.

 

Lot # 411 1997 Chevrolet Camaro SS 30th Anniversary LT4 Coupe; S/N 2G1FP22P6V2146669; Arctic White, Hugger Orange stripes/White; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $27,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $29,700 – LT4 350/330hp, 6-speed, power windows, cassette stereo. – Good original paint with one small blemish at the bottom of the passenger’s side B-pillar. The engine bay is immaculate and the underbody shows little use. The interior is very good with only minor wear indicated on the driver’s side seat. Just 2,990 miles and a well-kept example of a rare LT4-powered car from SLP. – Just 108 of the SLP-built Camaros for 1997 got the hotter LT4 V-8 from the Corvette, so they’re pretty special in the grand scheme of things even if they don’t look much different from any other Camaro to the casual observer. This wasn’t a particularly strong price for one, especially with such low miles, so the new owner can be quite pleased at getting one of the rare bargains out of this auction.

Lot # 1067.1 1967 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 124377N206910; Ermine White, Black stripes/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $88,000 – CE replacement 302/290hp block, 4-speed, power brakes, cowl induction, red line tires, AM radio. – Represented as 8,929 miles from new, date code correct engine and transmission. Decent paint with some loss of shine from dusting. The rear bumper has some scuffing and there are a few gouges by the fuel filler. The engine compartment is aged from sitting, although it looks to have been restored at some point. The interior is aged but not overly worn. A reasonably well presented ’67 with a replacement engine. – This result is a huge premium for the reported miles, on the order of $25,000, which is not supported by the car and its replacement engine and gearbox. Someone went to a huge amount of work to assemble a stock of date code correct parts to go with the low miles and was rewarded with an exceptional price which the new owner will regret when it’s time to sell.

Lot # 1146.1 1967 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 124377L160650; Marina Blue, White stripes/Black vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $102,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $112,200 – 302/290hp, 4-speed, power brakes, red line tires, console, 12-bolt rear end, 4.10 Positraction. Documented by Jerry MacNeish, includes Protect-O-Plate and purchase documents. – The older repaint that has dulled slightly but is not scratched up. The bumpers have some scuffs and the bright work has dulled slightly. The engine compartment is clean but has aged slightly, most notably the master cylinder has minor surface rust. The underbody is clean and has minor surface oxidation. The interior is clean and has minimal wear. Even the seats have little indication of use. A beautifully preserved car showing 47,930 believable miles other than a repaint that’s old enough to look nearly original. – There were three ’67 Z/28s at Barrett-Jackson, but this one stood out for being nearly all original, and that level of preservation explains why it was by far the most expensive of the three.

Lot # 1041.1 1969 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 124379N570256; Cortez Silver, Black stripes/Black vinyl; Recent restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $93,500 – 302/290hp DZ engine, 4-speed, Cragar wheels, Radial T/A tires, spoilers, Hurst T-handle shifter, radio delete, 12-bolt rear, 3.73 Positraction, Mallory ignition, column tach, Yenko traction bars, power brakes. – Built by Don Yenko for a friend to be a small-block Camaro that could compete with the big-blocks on the drag strip, and supposedly it ran low 12s in period. Very good older paint with some detail scratching. Very good brightwork. Restored interior showing light wear. Believed to be a unique car, and while not perfect, its rarity counts for a lot. – Sold for $154,000 at Mecum Harrisburg in 2017, which was about double the price of a standard Z/28. That seemed realistic for something so rare and fast, and makes this result seem like a very good buy in comparison.

Lot # 1037 1967 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 RS 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 124377L156294; Bolero Red, White stripes/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $68,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $74,800 – MP code(smog) 302 engine, RS trim, plenum induction air cleaner, Rally wheels, red line tires, AM radio, NCRS shipping report and Jerry MacNeish cert, Z/28 registry as car #184. – Excellent paint, and the panel gaps are prefect. The stainless is exceptionally well polished but there are three or four minor scratches and small dings, most notable on the driver’s door sill. The chrome bumpers are excellent but the vent window trim has polished out divots. The underbody is impeccable and the engine bay near concours. There was a vintage pic of this car to support the cowl induction air cleaner. The interior is perfect excluding the driver door sill trim. A fantastic show-ready example, plus it’s a ’67 and has the RS trim. – A pretty modest result for such a rare Camaro that ticks a lot of the right boxes. It could have brought another 10 grand without being expensive. It hammered not sold at an $80,000 high bid at Mecum Indy 10 years ago, but sold there last May for $57,200, a huge bargain.

Lot # 1402 1969 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 124379N609965; Fathom Green/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $210,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $231,000 – ZL1 427, rebodied in period, non-OEM trim tag, power brakes, 4.10 Positraction differential, radio delete, column shift. Previously owned by Reggie Jackson. – Decent older paint with no major flaws. The bumper and brightwork have been redone. The engine compartment is very good and shows minimal use, and the interior has no wear. An average example of a desirable ZL1 less hurt by the presentation and more by the automatic transmission and the rebody. – Sold here 10 years ago for $319,000 and got even less attention this time around. While this is likely among the least desirable of the ZL1s, this is nevertheless a lower than rock bottom price for one. The odometer has added just 58 miles since 2009.

Lot # 668.1 1968 Chevrolet Caprice Station Wagon; S/N 166458C122022; Tan, Woodgrain/Tan vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $22,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $24,200 – Factory installed 427/385hp, automatic, power brakes and steering, air conditioning, roof rack, AM/FM radio. – The original paint is faded and has cracking throughout but the Di-noc woodgrain is new. There are chips along the front header panel. The bumpers and brightwork appear cleaned but not restored. No significant pitting or damage anywhere. The engine and underbody are aged and have oxidation but are clean. A very cool mostly unrestored family cruiser with much more punch under the hood than you’d expect just looking at it. – There can’t have been very many Caprice wagon buyers who ticked the box for a 427 back in the day, and even fewer would have taken such good care of the car once they got it. This may very well be the only one of these cars with this engine, but that didn’t seem to excite the Barrett-Jackson bidders who were focused on Blazers and Fox-body Mustangs, apparently. In terms of exclusivity (and to a large degree, performance), this is a great value.

Lot # 430.1 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 136370L175016; Autumn Gold/Gold vinyl; Cosmetic restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000 – 350/300hp, automatic, power brakes and steering, air conditioning, bench seat, column shift, aftermarket wheels, build sheet documented. – The bodywork is fair with mostly factory sheetmetal and factory quality panel gaps. The finish itself could be a lot better, though, with masking issues and painted over surface corrosion pits as well as what looks like vinyl roof adhesive that was not completely removed. The underbody has some new paint, but is unrestored. New seat upholstery, but some interior panels were not installed properly. A quick respray of an original car to make a fair driver represented to have 29,000 miles from new but looks like more. – The seller should be very pleased with this result, but it might have brought more if it had been left alone and played on the originality theme. The new owner paid for the stated miles, but didn’t get a very good car.

Lot # 1582 1969 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu SS 396 Convertible; S/N 136679K399193; LeMans Blue/Parchment vinyl; White vinyl top; Recent restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $48,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $52,800 – 396/350hp L34, Wide Oval tires, M20 4-speed, 12-bolt Positraction rear end with 3.55 gears, factory radio, factory air conditioning converted to 134A, rosewood steering wheel, console. – Good recent paint but there are some tiny fisheyes visible as well as some cracks at the trunk corners. The panel gaps are even. Some masking errors on the headlight surrounds. The underbody was restored with no notable wear. The top is tight, looks newer with no noted tears. Interior is fair, though it might need new door cards. Gauges are clear and bright. Glass is fair with some track scratches. A full, relatively recent restoration that cut some corners. – Maybe not the most Chevelle per dollar, but a pretty much spot on result for a good but flawed 4-speed car.

Lot # 775.2 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 396 Convertible; S/N 136670B178168; Mist Green, Black stripes/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Recent restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $89,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $97,900 – 396/350hp, 4-speed, Soft Ray glass, bucket seats, center console, power top, power brakes, power steering, ZL2 Cowl induction, Positraction, tilt steering column, Super Sport wheels, Firestone F70-14 tires, MacNeish certificate, build sheet, window sticker, Protect-o-Plate documented along with other rare paper. – Flawless better than factory paint. The chrome is show-ready, but the stainless trim still needs slight polishing. Panel gaps are near perfect. The underbody is well restored with no leaks. The engine bay is perfect and appears correct. The interior is flawless. With one owner until 2011 and restored to better than new standards. – Sold for $71,500 at Mecum Kissimmee in 2017, two years ago. It is impossible to fault this SS 396 convertible in any meaningful way. Except, that is, in the price it brought, which is a bit short of the six figures it should have brought. Thoroughly documented, stunningly presented and it might be only the “Mist Green” paint that deterred the WestWorld bidders. This is a prize showpiece. It isn’t cheap, but it isn’t expensive, either.

Lot # 796 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 454 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 136370R221194; Tuxedo Black, White stripes/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $51,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $56,100 – 454/450hp LS6, automatic, power steering and brakes, rear sway bar, dual exhaust, disc drum brakes, bucket seats, console,3.31 Positraction, 12-bolt rear, Protect-O-Plate documented. – The paint is fair at best with runs in places like the edges of the passenger’s door. It also has some light detail swirling. The panel gaps are factory, and the chrome on the bumpers look good, but close inspection shows prep issues. The wheels are fair as they were refinished but needed more glazing before paint. The glass is scratched and the seat upholstery is a bit loose. A real LS6, but has a replacement engine and its condition leaves a bit to be desired as well. – Discounted heavily for its disappointing condition and lack of the original engine, even more so than in 2015 when it sold here for $88,000, but more than it brought at Mecum Kansas City in December 2013 where it sold for $44,405. It’s a thunderous driver, but generously valued on account of the superficial cosmetics and replacement engine.

Lot # 1055 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 454 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 136370B166179; Black Cherry, White Stripes/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $62,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $68,200 – 454/450hp LS6, Hydramatic, 12-bolt Positraction, 4.10 gears, cowl induction hood, power brakes, F41 suspension, power steering, Wide Oval tires. – Even gaps that are slightly better than factory. The paint is excellent for the most part but starting to show age via swirl and chips. The bumpers are fair with some hazing and factory fit issues. The body trim could stand a polishing. The engine bay is showing some age with dull surfaces and some manifold stains. No rust on the exhaust, however. Appears correct. Older well done restoration but no documentation listed. The consignor claims it has 38,000 miles from new, but omits any claim that the engine is original to the car. – The fact it doesn’t claim an original engine is strong evidence that it isn’t and that skeptical view of life is reflected in the price it brought.

Lot # 752.1 1932 Chevrolet Confederate Deluxe Sport Roadster; S/N R2985567; Light Yellow, Black fenders/Heather leatherette; Beige cloth top; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000 – Orange wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual sidemounts with mirrors, chrome hood side vents, rumble seat, free-wheeling, wind wings. – Excellent paint, chrome, interior and top. 1983 AACA National First Prize looks like it could have been 2013. Very sharp externally but showing age, heat damage and fluid leakage under the hood. – This Chevrolet Confederate Deluxe was sold here in 2011 for the rather astounding price of $66,000. It’s a third less in 2019, but still expensive.

Lot # 175 1962 Chevrolet Corvair 95 Rampside Pickup; S/N 2R124S100774; Woodlawn Green, Cameo White/Gray cloth; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $77,000 – 145/80hp, 4-speed, hub caps, whitewalls, floor shift, radio, dash clock. – Very clean restored engine bay and underbody. Very good fresh paint and chrome. Very good fully restored interior. Both Rampsides and Loadsides were never very common, and they’re even rarer now since lots of them were used as intended and tossed away. They’re fairly special in any condition, but someone has clearly thrown a lot of money into this one and it’s great. – It is possible that Rampside Corvairs are the best-ever motorcycle transporter with easy, low access to the bed over the drop-down ramp. In any event, this one brought a market-moving price, huge and unprecedented money that will have every surviving Rampside Corvair heading for a restoration shop.

Lot # 135 1965 Chevrolet Corvair Corsa Convertible; S/N 107675W232918; Evening Orchid/White vinyl; White vinyl top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $15,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $16,500 – 164/180hp turbocharged, 4-speed, wire wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, later pushbutton radio (original included), heat and defrost (disconnected). – Lightly scratched bumpers. Other than a deep scratch on the hood and a chip on the right rear, the Evening Orchid paint looks very good. Small dent on the left rear fender. Lightly worn steering wheel and very light discoloration to the seats but mostly good interior. Fully restored in 2004 and showing its age, but this color, this engine and this body style make it a standout for Corvair folks. – But not a standout for most of the folks at Barrett-Jackson, it seems. Maybe it was the color or maybe it was something else, but this Corsa brought a modest result that would ordinarily buy a rougher car.

Lot # 1651 1964 Chevrolet Corvair Monza Spyder Convertible; S/N 40667W109469; Light Yellow/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Enthusiast restoration, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,150 – 164/150hp turbo, 4-speed, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, boot cover, performance camshaft and valves, pushbutton radio, original spare. – Bad old repaint with poor prep work issues plus cracking in several spots. Tidy but used engine bay. Newer seat covers, but the steering wheel looks tired, the gauges are faded, and there are some scratches around the radio. As a genuine turbo Monza convertible, this car really could and should be better. Although it’s not worth a ton of money, it deserves a competent restoration and in its current state isn’t something to be particularly proud of. – At this price, though, the new owner is in it for already too much and embarking on any major improvements will turn this into an expensive car quickly. Something closer to 15 grand all-in would have been more realistic.

Lot # 1017 1966 Chevrolet Corvette Race Car; S/N 194676S121162; Red, Silver stripe/Black vinyl; Competition restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000 – Bored-out 327 V8, 4-barrel, T-10 4-speed, Hurst shifter, flared rear fenders, wide Torque Thrust wheels, Blue Streak slicks, chrome side exhausts, Accusump, roll cage, 4.11 Positraction, JAZ fuel cell. – Only one SCCA tech sticker and it is old, possibly 2013. Shiny paint with some visible prep shortcuts and blisters on the driver’s door. New upholstery on the Kirkey seat and new Racequip belts. It doesn’t appear to have been used recently, but it is impressively clean. – The car card mentions a service in 2014, which along with the tech sticker substantiates the inference it hasn’t been used recently and will require extensive service, maintenance and preparation before it can go back on track. It got someone’s attention here at WestWorld inspiring visions of track day exhilaration and a price that is generous for the age of its preparation and presentation.

Lot # 819 1969 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe; S/N 194379S716303; Riverside Gold/Saddle leather; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $55,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $60,500 – 427/400hp L68, 4-speed, original tank sticker, Protect-O-Plate, other assorted docs, Soft Ray glass, 3.55 Positraction, power brakes, transistor ignition, side exhaust, power steering. – Represented as the original engine. Good older paint with some chips and light scratches. The panel gaps are good, but the chrome finishes show some age and scratches. The glass is fair and probably original. Lamp lenses are original but in fair condition. The interior was restored but the driver seat shows some wrinkles. An older restoration that was pretty high quality, plus the car has good options and lots of documentation. – When it comes to classic Corvette values, options count for a lot. This car has a lot of the good ones, and they added up to produce a strong price despite the age of the restoration and a not particularly attractive color. It also sold for $57,200 here in 2009 and here again in 2011 for $55,000.

Lot # 802 1972 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 1Z67L2S518352; Mille Miglia Red/Black leather; Black top; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $185,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $203,500 – LT1 350/255hp, 4-speed, air conditioning, power brakes, hard top and soft top, power windows, BF Goodrich Radial T/A tires, AM/FM radio, tilt steering column. – Represented as the matching-numbers engine. The old repaint has dulled with time and polishing. There is a filled chip on the passenger’s side door. The bumpers and trim are very good. The underbody is clean and shows little use. The interior is in good condition and the seats show minor creasing from use. A decent example of a final-year LT1 but certainly not perfect. – What is missing here? By any rational standard this is crazy money. It’s not original, so there’s no premium for that. This is a well-under six figures car bought for more than double its value. Education on why it’s worth this much will be appreciated, but from this vantage point it’s more than double its value.

Lot # 1282 1972 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 1Z67L2S521657; Mille Miglia Red, Black vinyl hardtop/Black vinyl; Black top; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $132,000 – 2,993 original miles, LT1 350/255hp, 4-speed, power brakes, Goodyear Wide Tread tires, Soft Ray glass, hardtop, AM/FM radio. – The old but original paint has slight deterioration from age, although it is free of cracks, scuffs and crazing. The brightwork is excellent and free of flaws. The engine compartment is clean, shows little use and is free of leaks. The underbody is very good with only minor oxidation on the frame and a light coat of oxidation on the exhaust. The interior is very good with minor creasing on the driver’s seat. A beautifully preserved and maintained LT1 Corvette with all the awards including Bloomington Gold Survivor in 1992, Special Collection in 1990, NCRS Top Flight in 1993, a Duntov Award, a Chevy Vettefest Triple Crown in 2002 and yet another Bloomington Gold Survivor and Benchmark. – This is huge money for an LT1, especially a ’72 model, but its level of preservation is very special and it sold for $137,500 at Mecum Monterey in 2015, so it’s safe to call this a fair price. It is so pristine and valuable that it will never turn another mile except on and off transporters in its life, nor probably have its LT1 blipped over 2,500 rpm. It is an artifact, not an automobile, but a wonderful artifact.

Lot # 1525 2007 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 Coupe; S/N 1G1YY26E475102675; Black/Black; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $38,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $41,800 – 6-speed, Hurst shifter and aftermarket air intake, black wheels, red calipers, built in radar detector, heads up display, heated seats, navigation. – Represented with 8,500 miles. The paint does not have any dings or scratches. The front splitter has only a few superficial scuffs. The inner wheel wells do not have any damage from rocks or burnouts. The wheels are free from any curb rash, although residue from stick on weights needs to be cleaned up after rebalancing. The underbody shows no real wear or deterioration. The driver’s seat has minimal signs of wear from use. Could use a detailing, but a mostly very solid low-mile and lightly used Z06 that despite its age will still be one of the fastest things on the road. – High performance Corvette models like the Z06 have a bright future in terms of collectability, but the C6 is still a used car in most people’s eyes. This car was about 70 grand when it was new. At the realistic price it brought here at WestWorld it’s an enormous amount of performance per dollar.

Lot # 702 1972 Chevrolet El Camino Pickup; S/N 1D80W2B642715; Engine # none; Metallic Blue, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Modified restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $28,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $30,800 – Modified 454 LS5 with Edelbrock EFI, 4-speed, Hurst shifter, Cragar S/S wheels, Radial T/A tires, aftermarket AM-FM and woodrim steering wheel, cowl induction, air conditioning, tube headers, limited slip with 3.31 gears, power front disc brakes. – Very good paint on impressively flat body panels and even gaps. The underbody has been done like new but the chassis hasn’t and is dirty and scraped even in the engine compartment. Brake fluid has discolored the booster. Probably runs better than it shows and it was built with the LS5. – This is a desirable El Camino, but the modifications limit its value and particularly its marketability. It was bought here for a reasonable price taking all that into account and giving due credit to the impressive bodywork and paint.

Lot # 698 1968 Chevrolet El Camino SS 396 Pickup; S/N 138808B111625; Butternut Yellow, Black stripes/Black vinyl; Enthusiast restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $23,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $25,300 – 396/325hp, automatic, GM of Canada Documents, Positraction, tilt steering column, tachometer, column shift. – Horrible paint with inclusions and orange peel. The bed is pretty beat up. Bad panel gaps with misaligned hood. Uneven stripe masking. New interior. Unrestored underbody but very clean engine bay. A driver that needs another round of paint at the very least. – This price isn’t outrageous but it’s favorable to the seller and leaves the new owner with nothing left over to address this car’s several needs, including the awful paint. This is a lot to pay for an El Camino that is much better suited to making runs to the dump and the lumber yard than it is even a casual weekend car show.

Lot # 1526.1 1963 Chevrolet Impala 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 31847S313002; Engine # F0725S; White/Dark Red vinyl, cloth; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $18,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $19,800 – 327/250hp, Powerglide, air conditioning with R134A and a modern rotary compressor, power steering, wheel covers. narrow whitewalls, AM radio with Audiovox underdash FM converter, dual outside mirrors, bench seat. – Good older repaint, good chrome and upholstery. Old undercoat in the wheel wells. Grimy engine compartment and chassis. Cosmetically redone to impressive standards but otherwise original, neglected and used. – This Impala is a real paradox: beautiful to look at but grungy underneath where it counts. The bidders didn’t like it, either and the seller should be happy it wasn’t penalized any more than the $5,000 or so discount that this result indicates.

Lot # 996 1966 Chevrolet Impala SS Convertible; S/N 168676F229431; Madeira Maroon/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $44,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $48,400 – 396/325hp, M20 4-speed, power front disc brakes and steering, Vintage air conditioning, Positraction, wire wheel covers, bucket seats, console, tachometer, AM radio. Unspecified documentation and provenance included. – Decent repaint with a few filled chips along the passenger’s side. The bumpers appear replaced and the trim is polished. The underbody has been painted, the seats have been reupholstered, and worn bits replaced. The seat belts are original and faded. A well-optioned and reasonably well restored genuine SS represented to have its matching numbers engine. – The matching numbers engine and generally thorough restoration are encouraging attributes, but the price it brought is generous.

Lot # 452.1 1972 Chevrolet K5 Blazer 1/2 Ton Open Top Utility 4×4; S/N CKE182S156182; Green, White roof/White vinyl, Green plaid cloth; Modified restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $71,500 – Carbureted Vortec 350 engine, automatic, power brakes and steering, BF Goodrich All Terrain T/A tires, air conditioning, roll bar, factory bucket seats and console, aftermarket stereo. – Good paint. New bumpers. The grille trim has some scratches and the windshield trim is dull. The underbody has been painted but a lot of components underneath are aged. The interior is in good condition with normal wear from use. A cosmetically redone driver with a more potent but incorrect engine. – You’d think this was just about the best Blazer in the world from the price it brought, but people were shelling out big prices for just about any Blazer in Scottsdale this year. Barrett-Jackson had 10 Blazers, several of them customs. The cheapest was $19,800, three of them brought over 70 grand, and the most expensive was a restomod for $132,000. This result reflects enthusiasm for Blazers, but is more money than the expedient cosmetic redo it has received warrants.

Lot # 948 1972 Chevrolet K5 Blazer CST Open Top Utility 4×4; S/N CKE182F163991; Black, White roof/White vinyl; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $66,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $72,600 – 350/175hp, automatic, power steering and brakes, air conditioning, BF Goodrich All Terrain T/A tires, factory bucket seats, console and tachometer. – Very good paint. The bumpers and trim have all been replaced or restored. The engine bay and underbody are all like new. The interior is excellent and appears unused. A pretty stunning, fresh body-off restoration on an early Blazer done to the kind of standards not often seen. – With a sale price like this, though, we can expect to see more Blazers get this kind of treatment. Several Blazers sold for outrageous prices at Barrett-Jackson this year, so the demand is certainly there and the shops that have been feeding the now played-out FJ market can turn their attentions elsewhere.

Lot # 393 1987 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS Coupe; S/N 1G1GZ11G5HP147089; White, Red/Maroon cloth; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $30,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $33,000 – 305/180hp, automatic, 3.73 Positraction, T-Tops, cruise control, console, F41 suspension, air conditioning, power windows, gauges. – The original paint has no major flaws, only a few chips along the passenger’s side wheel well and both rocker panels. The body is excellent and has no dings or misalignments. The underbody has minor aging from sitting and the interior is like new. A very well preserved car. Showing 7,447 believable miles and stored carefully for the most part. – An over-the-top result for a car that, with mileage this low, is probably destined for a life of static display to round out a comprehensive Chevy collection.

Lot # 1066 1966 Chevrolet Nova SS 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 118376N172709; Marina Blue/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $132,000 – L79 327/350hp, sold new at Nickey Chevrolet, 4-speed, body color wheels with hubcaps and red line tires, bucket seats, center console, AM radio. Includes Protect-O-Plate, mileage verification, the original Protect-o-Plate and verified by Jerry MacNeish. – Excellent paint with no noticeable flaws. Very good body lines and panel gaps. The bumpers are shiny but also have light scratches from improper polishing. The engine bay and underbody are very good. The interior shows no significant use. An attractive car with a few minor details lacking. – Sold for $93,500 here in 2009, then $95,700 here in 2015. To say it hit a home run in 2019 is a serious understatement. It’s a rare example, but it is expensive at this price.

Lot # 1557 1970 Chrysler 300 Hurst 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N CM23U0C219243; Spinnaker White, Gold, Black vinyl roof/Tan leather; Recent restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $31,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $34,100 – 440/375hp, automatic, power steering, windows, seats and brakes, air conditioning, pushbutton radio, Rallye wheels, trim rings, Radial T/A tires. – Very good repaint, chrome and original interior. The chassis and underbody have been done and are like new. There are a few paint flaws, notably on the right rear fender and below the vinyl roof. The upholstery is a little aged and surface creased. The driver’s door window is scratched. Overall, though, this is a surprisingly good example of an unusual Chrysler. – The A-12 Hurst package consisted of fiberglass hood, deck lid with spoiler and quarter panel extensions coupled with special paint as seen here. This one sold here last year for $50,600 with its substantially reduced price this year giving no cause for celebration, except by the new owner who got a limited production, luxury Chrysler that is loaded with options and accessories for a seriously modest price.

Lot # 1389 1937 Cord 812 Supercharged Convertible Sportsman; S/N 31631F; Brown/Beige leather; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $210,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $231,000 – Chrome outside headpipes, large hubcaps, wide whitewalls, Philco radio, exhaust cutout, restamped replacement engine. – Excellent paint and chrome. Very good only lightly stretched upholstery. Oily, road grimy chassis. A quality restoration with some touring miles on it. – Offered by Bonhams here in Scottsdale last year where it was a no-sale at a reported bid of $145,000, then sold by them two months later at Amelia Island for $112,000. The seller here, if was the same as the Amelia buyer, should be shouting the praises of Barrett-Jackson from rooftops, but the buyer got an excellent Sportsman in the bargain and should be extremely happy with it at ACD and other events.

Lot # 129 1941 Crosley Convertible; S/N C22580; Yellow/Dark Red leatherette; Beige cloth top; Cosmetic restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $11,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $12,100 – Air cooled 2-cylinder with 13hp, 3-speed, red wheels, rear-mounted spare. – Represented as 25,837 miles. Dull, discolored old repaint, sound upholstery, chipped edges, dull chrome, good top and side curtains. Oily, grimy engine and chassis. Aged, neglected and never very good but complete. Could be driven as is, but not proudly. – The mileage claim is irrelevant in light of its rather sad condition. The car card describes it as “Restored to factory specifications”, a similarly irrelevant claim. It is a cute little toy, however, and it brought barely more than golf cart money, but it’s barely more than a golf cart.

Lot # 141 1947 Crosley CC Pickup; S/N CC4721263; Yellow, White/Brown leatherette; Recent restoration, 1 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $24,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $26,400 – White wheels, hubcaps, blackwall tires, sliding side windows, oil filter. – Excellent paint, interior and chrome. Texture painted bed and inside the hood. Everything is done and done to high standards. A Pebble Beach Crosley. – The restoration and condition of this Crosley is quite amazing, its modest price is even more amazing. It’s not to everyone’s taste, but at this price it should have been impossible to pass up.

Lot # 825 1955 Dodge C-3-PW 1 Ton Pickup; S/N 83951464; Yellow, Black fenders/Black vinyl; Truck restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $48,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $52,800 – 230/111hp six, 4-speed, 2-speed transfer case, 7,000 pound Braden winch, side mounted spare, jerry can. – Good paint with no significant signs of use. The driveline was redone with the truck and shows light use with a few drips. The good bed floor has not been scraped. The interior does show light aging but nothing too bad. Body-off restored about 10 years ago to truck standards and lightly used since. – An imposing presence which seems to have had the desired effect on the bidders who compensated the owner well for the time and effort spent restoring it.

Lot # 1010 1970 Dodge Challenger R/T 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N JS23U0E122717; Plum Crazy, White side stripe/Black vinyl; Recent restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $56,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $61,600 – 440/375hp, 4-speed, Power steering and brakes, hood pins, Track Pack, 3.54 differential, Rally dash instruments, Rallye wheels with BF Goodrich Radial T/A tires, bucket seats, pistol grip shifter, AM/FM radio. – Very good paint. The door gaps need adjustment. The drip edge trim has a few noticeable scuffs. The engine and underbody have been redone to like new condition and the interior is very good. A relatively recent restoration in good colors that presents well, but falls down on a few of the details. An important note is that it doesn’t claim that this is the original 440 (the wording on the car card is tricky.) – The bidders weren’t confused by the obtuse phrasing on the car card but exacted an excessive discount for a car that should have brought appreciably more than this.

Lot # 1072 1970 Dodge Challenger R/T 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N JS23V0B440192; Dark Green Metallic/Green vinyl; Recent restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $110,000 – 440/390hp Six Pack, 4-speed, power brakes, shaker hood scoop, stripe delete, Magnum 500 wheels, bucket seats, pistol grip shifter, AM/FM radio. Inspected by Dave Wise. – Excellent paint. Great body lines and panel gaps. The engine bay and underbody are restored to like new as well as the interior. A gorgeous restoration finished relatively recently and with nothing overlooked. – A coating of High Impact paint would have brought more enthusiastic bidding for this impeccably restored Challenger Six Pack, but it’s almost more unusual and special in the standard EF8 paint color. Both the seller and the buyer of this Challenger R/T should be satisfied with this result.

Lot # 1452 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon Coupe; S/N 2C3CDZH99JH103041; Tor Red/Black leather; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $140,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $154,000 – 3 original miles, Harmon Kardon stereo, comfort group interior, includes Demon Crate. – In as delivered condition. 3 miles. – The Demon started at about 85 grand, but several have come to auction since and they have consistently sold in the neighborhood of 150 grand, so this is a straightforward result.

Lot # 1090 1970 Dodge Charger R/T SE Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N XS29R0G166728; Black, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Unrestored original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $132,000 – Special Edition package, 426/425hp Hemi, automatic, power steering and brakes, Rallye wheels with Goodyear Polyglas GT tires, bucket seats with center arm rest. Includes broadcast sheet, warranty book and Govier Report. – The original paint has fading and crazing throughout. The bumpers have some light pitting and the stainless is dull. The engine compartment is heavily aged but not neglected, and the underbody is clean but with a light oxidation throughout. The interior is good and not overly worn out. All original but never neglected and desirably equipped. Quite a find, even with the replacement 1968 date coded Hemi engine. – The buyer of this Charger R/T SE Hemi got something of a value, a real Hemi car for 440 Six Pack money because of the replacement engine. Bragging rights on a budget.

Lot # 1241 1968 Dodge Coronet R/T Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N WS23J8A178349; Light Green Poly, White vinyl roof, Black tail stripes/Green vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $93,500 – 426/425hp Hemi, automatic, power brakes, Magnum 500 wheels with red line tires, bucket seats with console, power windows, gauges. – Good paint with no significant flaws. The vinyl roof fits tightly but does have some light blemishes, which are hard to avoid when it’s white. The engine compartment has been redone and shows little use. Same with the underbody. The interior is very good and shows no significant wear. A good but not quite perfect full restoration. – A real J-Code Coronet Hemi, but no one is claiming it was built with this 426/425hp Hemi which is enough to take the froth off its value. The price it brought, even given its original Hemi configuration, borders upon generous.

Lot # 536 1985 Dodge Ramcharger Prospector Sport Utility Vehicle; S/N 1B4GD12W9FS581566; Cream, Gold/Gold cloth; Unrestored original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $21,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $23,100 – 360/175hp, automatic, Cooper tires, hood ornament, bucket seats, console, air conditioning, factory AM-FM radio, power windows, brakes and steering, cruise control. – Represented as 7,572 miles but not quite a time warp truck. The bumpers are dull and there are scratches all over the grille. The paint is only lightly faded, but there are numerous chips and scratches. Cracked left taillight lens. The weather stripping is pretty dry. Tidy with no rust underneath. Excellent original interior by virtue of sheer lack of use. Age issues aside, this has to be one of the lowest miles and best totally original Ramchargers around. – If this truck in this condition had a Ford or Chevy badge it probably would have brought a staggering price, but the Dodge doesn’t quite have the following as the Broncos and Blazers and this is at the top of the value range currently. The new owner may have bought an appreciating asset if Ramchargers start up the Bronco/Blazer appreciation curve.

Lot # 946 1979 Ferrari 308 GTS Spider; S/N F106AS29861; Red/Beige leather; Black Targa panel top; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $49,500 – Aftermarket modular wheels, Pirelli tires, power windows, power door locks, factory air conditioning, aftermarket stereo – Good repaint with one small nose chip and another at the back of the driver’s door. Worn original upholstery with a repaired tear in the driver’s seatback bolster and a poorly repaired seat cushion pull. Old, oil misted engine compartment. Disconnected A/C compressor but stated to have new timing belts, bearings, fuel and water pumps and electronic ignition module. Represented to have 48,323 original miles, but looks like far more than that. – Used but claims to have been recently serviced even if that didn’t extend to the A/C system. The list of work done would be typical for a car that has sat for an extended period. It brought a moderate price that is appropriate to its disappointing condition.

Lot # 1027 1986 Ferrari 328 GTS Spider; S/N ZFFWA20B000059995; Rosso Corsa/Black leather; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $62,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $68,200 – Alpine cassette stereo, tools and jack. – The paint is very good but there are some chips and scratches on the nose, hood and rear. The interior is good with some light wear on the driver’s seat. The wheels and tires are in good condition. The wheels have a few scratches but no real scaring. Well maintained with a recent service and showing 26,768 miles which the seller represents are original. – This car sold for $57,200 at Worldwide Scottsdale 2017, then sold here last year for $83,600. This in-between result is more realistic to the car’s actual value.

Lot # 813 2002 Ferrari 360 Spider; S/N ZFFYT53A220129745; Argento Nürburgring/Black leather; Black cloth top; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $88,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $96,800 – Challenge rear grille, Grey calipers, Daytona seats, power windows, air conditioning, modular wheels, chipguarded nose and mirrors. – Stated to be 20,586 miles and only lightly used. Clean CARFAX. – This result is generous for a 360 Spider with the F1 paddle shift gearbox.

Lot # 1260 2002 Ferrari 360 Spider; S/N ZFFYT53A920130035; White matte wrap/Red leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $110,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $121,000 – Racing exhaust, clear engine cover, aftermarket wheels, CD changer stereo, SF shields – Stated to be <16,600 miles and clean CARFAX. The wrap shows some shortcuts, but fortunately the paint underneath it is white so they don’t show up prominently. – This is far and away the most expensive 360 Spider of the four offered at Barrett-Jackson. It goes against the conventional wisdom, but at this venue it might be the modifications and the wrap that appeal to this audience. To others with a more conservative approach those attributes would detract from value. This is a Barrett-Jackson price.

Lot # 1013.1 2003 Ferrari 360 Spider; S/N ZFFYT53A230133988; Silver/Black leather; Black cloth top; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $82,500 – 6-speed, Red calipers, Potenza tires, Daytona-style seats, factory radio, SF shields – — Bid to $60,000 at both Mecum Chicago in October and Mecum Las Vegas three weeks later where it was described: “Big chip on the nose. Lightly detail scratched paint. Small scuff on the left rear fender. Good interior. The top is a little dirty. Neither mileage nor service history represented, and these colors aren’t the best, but it does stand out as a 6-speed car.” It did well here at WestWorld.

Lot # 1616 2004 Ferrari 360 Spider; S/N ZFFYT53A340137923; Dark Blue/Tan leather, Black bars; Dark Blue cloth top; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $63,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $69,300 – Power Daytona seats, SF shields, Ferrari modular wheels, Red calipers. Ferrari stereo. – Good original paint with no nose chips, very good nearly like new interior and top except for a scuffed plastic rear window. Both mirrors have small touched up stone chips. Clear headlight covers. A well maintained all-original car in an attractive livery, but mileage and service history are unknown. – Said to be one owner so it’s not too much of a stretch to expect the mileage to be indicated. In the absence of such information the bidders wisely declined to stretch to own it, with this modest price the result.

Lot # 1360 2004 Ferrari 360 Challenge Stradale Berlinetta; S/N ZFFDU57A440138536; Le Mans Blue/Blue, Grey Suede; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $150,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $165,000 – Special order paint and interior, yellow calipers, window sticker, books and tools. Assembly #55647. – Detail swirled paint could use some attention. Chips on the nose. The wheels have a few scratches, and the trim around windows is a bit wavy. The headlight lenses are a bit faded. Very good special order grey and blue interior. Documented service history from new, a $30,000 timing belt service was performed 800 miles ago and total mileage is 9,885. – Reported bid to $161,500 at Russo & Steele here in Scottsdale last year. Another year older and worth $11,500 less at the hammer bid.

Lot # 811 2000 Ferrari 360 Modena F1 Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFYU51A5Y0122314; Argento Metallizzato/Black leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $90,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $99,000 – Daytona seats, air conditioning, Tubi exhaust, power windows and locks. – Stated to be 23,674 miles, and in good, well looked after condition. Clean CARFAX. – Fully valued at $70,000, the premium reflected in this price is irrational, but … this is Barrett-Jackson WestWorld and that’s not an uncommon comment.

Lot # 1344 2008 Ferrari 430 Scuderia Berlinetta; S/N ZFFKW64A580164239; Black/Red, Black Alcantara; Not viewed, notes from the catalog condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $200,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $220,000 – Converted to a 6-speed by European Auto Group in San Antonio, TX. – Stated to be 11,000 miles. – The mystique of the 6-speed among modern Ferrari buyers is nowhere more clear than here where a huge price was paid for a non-standard 6-speed manual shift conversion, then carries no premium at all, and possibly even a small discount, in this transaction.

Lot # 1450 2010 Ferrari 458 Italia Berlinetta; S/N ZFF67NFA0A0175483; Rosso Corsa/Tan, Black leather; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $150,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $165,000 – Yellow calipers, Daytona-style seats. – A few tiny but deep paint chips on the nose. Otherwise in very good lightly used condition and represented with 7,751 miles. – The 458 had a base price of well over 200 grand when it was new, and while it’s no longer a current model, it’s not yet a classic either. This is a used exotic bought for used exotic money.

Lot # 1458 2010 Ferrari California Convertible; S/N ZFF65LJA3A0169498; Nero Daytona Metallizzato/Beige leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $107,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $117,700 – Yellow calipers, power Daytona seats, front parking sensors, CD changer, climate control, power windows, SF shields. – Stated to be 15,944 miles and a clean CARFAX. Looks pampered. – The third of three Ferrari Californias at Barrett Jackson, all of them with similar miles and barely used condition and all of them bought within a few thousand dollars of each other.

Lot # 1472 2010 Ferrari California Convertible; S/N ZFF65LJA5A0168384; Rosso Mugello/Beige leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $97,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $106,700 – Scuderia shields, red brake calipers, power Daytona-style heated seats, Yellow tach face, 20-inch wheels, navigation. – At first glance the paint looks very good, but upon further inspection there are lots of small blemishes as well as an inch-long deep on the driver’s side. The wheels are in good condition as well as the Pirelli tires. Represented with 25,000 miles and a used car. – Stickered for $224,000 and sold for $127,050 at Mecum Los Angeles eleven months ago. The auction history only confirms that Californias are still depreciating and is consistent with the other two Californias offered at Barrett-Jackson.

Lot # 1123 2014 Ferrari California Convertible; S/N ZFF65TJA8E0200525; Matte Black wrap/Black leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $110,000 – 4297/460hp, 7-speed AutoManual, Daytona seats, SF shields, carbon-ceramic brakes, parking camera, xenon headlights, rear parking sensors, cruise control, climate control and more. – Stated to be 27,065 miles. The matte black wrap is strange, but trendy, and is in good shape. It’s unfortunate that it’s not radar absorbent. – One of three Californias at Barrett-Jackson, the matte wrap makes it stand out. The price it brought is appropriate for its equipment and miles.

 

Lot # 1617 1998 Ferrari F355 Spider; S/N ZFFXR48A6W0110876; Rosso Corsa/Tan leather; Black cloth top; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $58,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $63,800 – 6-speed, Ferrari alloy wheels, air conditioning, JVC stereo, Assembly # 27894. – Good original paint, worn original upholstery, particularly the driver’s seat bolster and cushion. The top of the engine compartment has been cleaned up, but not the nether reaches. One small chip touched up with the wrong color by the engine hatch. A sound driver but with no service history. – A respectable used 355 Spider in an attractive (i.e., not red) color for a reasonable used Ferrari price.

Lot # 1027.1 2006 Ferrari F430 Coupe; S/N ZFFEW58A060147976; Black/Black leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $92,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $101,200 – SF shields, power seats, 19-inch 5-spoke alloy wheels. – Stated to be 37,851 miles. The exterior is good but the interior is difficult to evaluate because of its heavily tinted side windows. – Reported bid to $80,000 at Mecum Chicago in October, then $75,000 at Mecum Las Vegas three weeks later. The tinted windows didn’t seem to bother the bidders here at WestWorld.

Lot # 1448 1988 Ferrari Testarossa Berlinetta; S/N ZFFTA17B000062111; White/White; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $130,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $143,000 – Power windows, air conditioning, seats covered in sheepskin covers. – There is a small spot on the driver’s side fender that has been touched up. The wheels are good and do not show any scarring, just some light surface scratches. The seat covers have some smudges on them, and there’s no telling what the seats underneath actually look like. The splitter does have small scratches as well. Given the 3,852 miles it is represented as having accumulated, this could be a better car, but it’s a one-owner example finished in rare colors. – Another Testarossa that isn’t as good as the big price it brought. The mileage puts it in Never-Never land, not low enough to have much effect on value, and not high enough to have been enjoyed.

Lot # 1615 1991 Ferrari Testarossa Berlinetta; S/N ZFFSG17A9M0086974; Yellow/Black leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $61,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $67,100 – K40 built in radar detector, dual outside mirrors, air conditioning, mobile phone. – Very good paint and interior. The engine compartment is clean and dry. Seats are lightly worn but sound. Represented as recently serviced but not when or what. Clean original underbody. The odometer shows 36,594 believable miles. – Consignors and auctions can have unusual definitions of “recently” and “recent” and it is unwise to rely on such an unquantified term. The B-J bidders certainly didn’t and paid an appropriately hedged price for this Testarossa.

Lot # 1136 1986 Ferrari Testarossa Monospecchio Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFSA17A8G0064115; Rosso Corsa/Tan leather; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $132,000 – Flying mirror model, power windows, air conditioning. – Many blemishes on the paint, especially on the front clip and driver’s side, where there are some chips and cracks. The engine bay is tidy and clean and the car received an engine-out service two months ago. The alloy wheels have surface scratches but are free of scarring. The interior is good other than slightly sagging and wrinkled seats. Engine-out serviced in two months ago. Maintained and represented to be a relatively low 13,154-mile car, its condition is that of a higher miles example. – An expensive result for just about any Testarossa, let alone a far from perfect example. This price should have bought a much better car, even taking into account the early “Flying mirror” configuration. The recent engine-out service helps account for some of the result and saves the new owner from worry for several years.

Lot # 142 1972 Fiat 500L Coupe; S/N 3065936; Engine # 3380966; Light Yellow/Black vinyl; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $17,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,700 – Folding sunroof, hubcaps, blackwall tires, heater. – Decent repaint, chrome, glass and upholstery. Oily engine, road grimy chassis. Cute and sound if not beautiful. – Sold at Worldwide’s Auburn auction in 2014 for $17,600, at Auburn Fall in 2016 for $11,550, here at Barrett-Jackson two years ago for $10,450. It is somewhat surprising that it brought this much in 2019, but it is even more surprising that it sold for so little in 2017.

Lot # 463.1 1951 Ford Custom Deluxe Convertible; S/N 0476H5149522; Tudor Red metallic/Red leather; Black cloth top; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $27,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $29,700 – Flathead V8, 3-speed, hubcaps, trim rings, whitewalls, skirts, bumper overriders, radio. – Sound but aged repaint, decent LeBaron Bonney leather upholstery, good chrome and stainless. A usable weekend driver quality Ford convertible. – Bought appropriately for its condition, this Ford has appeal and utility, is good enough to be driven with pride, but is not so good it can’t be driven.

Lot # 664 1963 Ford Galaxie 500 Convertible; S/N 3E65Z165872; Rangoon Red/Red vinyl; White vinyl top; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $19,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $20,900 – 390/300hp, 4-speed, polished 16-inch Torque Thrust wheels with low profile tires. – Very good paint, chrome and interior, tight-fitting top. The engine compartment is orderly but beginning to age. – Sold by RM from the Sam Pack collection in 2014 for $38,500 and offered by Mecum in Dallas last October where it was bid to $24,000. Its aging cosmetic restoration was never done to particularly high standards and the larger wheels add nothing to its presentation. Even at that, though, it is a good value in this transaction and will be a rewarding weekend cruiser.

Lot # 1133 1963 Ford Galaxie 500 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 3U66R145641; Corinthian White, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Facsimile restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000 – R-Code 427/425hp, 4-speed, 4.11 Traction-Lok differential, Kelsey Hayes wheels, bench seat, floor shift. – Good paint and body. The stainless around the roof has a few marks. The engine compartment is very good and shows little use. The exhaust is new past the cut outs. The interior has many original appearing components but the seats have been redone. A desirably optioned car that presents well, but the R-Code engine is not represented as original. – If the engine was the one it got on the assembly line this could be a six-figure car, but it’s not and the $72,000 it hammered not sold at during Mecum Portland last year seems like a missed opportunity. The price here is, however, cheap for a real R-Code Galaxie 400 4-speed even with the replacement engine. The new owner should be gloating over this deal all the way home, and every time it is driven.

Lot # 1355 2005 Ford GT Coupe; S/N 1FAFP90S05Y400120; Engine #;, /; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $300,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $330,000 – BBS wheels, Red calipers. – 52 miles and all original. – The lowest mileage of all the Ford GTs at Barrett-Jackson, with a low miles premium.

Lot # 1379 2005 Ford GT Coupe; S/N 1FAFP90SX5Y400593; White, Blue stripes/Black; Original, modified for competition or performance, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $200,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $220,000 – 850hp, Whipple supercharger, KW adjustable suspension, custom gauges, carbon fiber diffuser. – Someone had great fun with this Ford GT, spending loads of money making it faster and different. – The bidders didn’t appreciate the difference and buried its value in relation to the vast amounts of money spent. Collectors who value originality handicapped its value, appropriately, but the new owner will show its heels to the rest of the Ford GTs. It’s a choice.

Lot # 1300 2006 Ford GT Coupe; S/N 1FAFP90S96Y400716; Red, White stripes/Black; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $260,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $286,000 – Red calipers, BBS wheels, window sticker documented. – Represented as 2,746 miles and original. – There were four Ford GT non-Heritage editions at B-J. This was the first to cross the block, selling at a representative price.

Lot # 1313 2006 Ford GT Heritage Edition Coupe; S/N 1FAFP90S26Y401948; Gulf Blue, Orange/Black; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $485,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $533,500 – BBS wheels. – #335/343 Heritage editions, one of <50 Heritage Editions sold in Canada. 3,092 miles, which is a ton for a 2006 Heritage Edition. – Sold for $412,500 at the Barrett-Jackson Palm Beach auction in 2014 and the first of three essentially identical Ford GT Heritage Editions to cross the block here at WestWorld today. It stands out solely by virtue of its Canadian delivery, a distinction of dubious consequence at best, and the relatively high miles. For it to be worth $110,000 hammer more than it was three years ago, with more than negligible miles (even if there are only 42 more than in 2016) is breathtaking.

Lot # 1376 2006 Ford GT Heritage Edition; S/N 1FAFP90S36Y400209; Gulf Blue, Orange/Black; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $450,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $495,000 – BBS wheels, McIntosh stereo. – 288 miles and like new. – This is the second of three 2006 Ford GT Heritage Editions that crossed the Barrett-Jackson block today. While it has barely more than delivery miles it sold for substantially less (7.2%) than the high miles example that sold about two hours ago as the number of bidders declined by one and the competition cooled off.

Lot # 1406 2006 Ford GT Heritage Edition; S/N 1FAFP90S36Y401828; Gulf Blue, Orange/Black; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $420,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $462,000 – McIntosh stereo, BBS wheels, Gunmetal Grey calipers. – #324/343, 77 miles, like new. – The third of three 2006 Heritage Edition GTs to cross the B-J block today. It had the lowest mileage of the three but brought the lowest price, proof – if anyone needed further evidence – that supply does affect demand and by this time even the seemingly inexhaustible Barrett-Jackson bidder pool had been whittled down. It’s not “cheap”, but it is the “cheapest” of the three essentially identical Ford GT Heritage Editions at WestWorld today.

Lot # 3012 2019 Ford GT Heritage Edition; S/N 2FAGP9CWXKH200001; Gulf Blue, Orange/Black Alcantara; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Charity Fundraiser, no buyer’s premium $2,500,000 plus commission of; Final Price $2,500,000 – Loaded. – VIN 00001 Heritage Edition for 2019. Brand new, direct from Ford with all proceeds to the United Way for Southeastern Michigan. – No Buyer’s Premium charged, nor any 24-month lockup as on the first year of this generation Ford GT. Sold to a multi-store dealer and NASCAR team owner.

Lot # 1326 2006 Ford GT Coupe; S/N 1FAFP90S46Y401322; Tungsten Grey/Black leather; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $300,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $330,000 – Upgraded supercharger reportedly giving 650hp (and obviating any Ford warranty), stripe delete (one of just 25 in this color combination), BBS wheels, red calipers, McIntosh stereo, all the accessories. – Like new with 607 miles. – The second of the non-Heritage Ford GTs to cross the block and different with its Tungsten Grey paint and stripe delete, a great way to stand out in a gated community with many Ford GTs.

Lot # 1365 1965 Ford Mustang 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 5F07U100002; Caspian Blue/Medium Blue; Recent restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $175,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $192,500 – Pilot line production number 2, 170/105hp six, 3-speed, AM radio, includes a literal trunk load of pictures and documentation. – Excellent paint done to factory standards. The bumpers and brightwork have all been redone or replaced, the engine compartment has been fully restored and looks absolutely correct. The interior looks like new. A gorgeous restoration of the lowest serial number Mustang in private hands. – Not sold at a $300,000 high bid at Mecum Indy in 2017, an historical artifact of little note except for its VIN number. Apparently the WestWorld bidders didn’t much care.

Lot # 577 1967 Ford Mustang 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 7T01C258557; Frost Turquoise, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Enthusiast restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000 – 289/200hp, automatic, bucket seats, floor shift, vinyl top, power steering, gauge pack. – Fair paint at best with some small fisheyes and inclusions. The panel gaps are even and new bumpers were installed, but the stainless trim needs polishing. Rubber window gaskets are older and cracked. The wheel covers are aged and show some oxidization. New interior, but aged gauges. The underbody was not restored but was painted. A fair driver. – This car doesn’t have much going for it in terms of equipment or condition, and it’s expensive at this price. Early Mustangs are everywhere and there are always a ton for sale, so it would not be hard to find a better car for less money.

Lot # 1038.1 1971 Ford Mustang SportsRoof; S/N 1F02J114068; Maroon Metallic/White vinyl; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $43,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $47,300 – Non-Mach 1 Mustang with 429 Super Cobra Jet, engine listed as ‘correct’ not original, 4-speed, power steering and brakes, body color wheels with hubcaps and Goodyear Polyglas tires. Includes Marti Report. – The paint is old and has lost some of its luster. Paint has chipped away from the passenger’s side drip rail. The rear window is heavily scratched and the stainless trim is dull. The engine bay and underbody appear to have been gone through recently and are in excellent condition. The interior is rather bland but in good condition. A mechanically restored car with interesting options, but unremarkable in presentation. – This car sold for $74,250 at Mecum Indy last year, but the number it brought here in Scottsdale seems a lot more realistic when you account for the mediocre presentation and non-original engine.

Lot # 852 1990 Ford Mustang 5.0 LX 25th Anniversary Convertible; S/N 1FACP44E2LF159132; Deep Emerald Green/White; White top; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000 – 24 miles, 7-Up Edition, includes window sticker and Marti Report. – 7-Up contest prize. Original paint has lost some shine from dusting. The top is immaculate. The engine bay is unused and the car has not been dealer prepped. A time capsule with just 24 miles from new. – While the six-figure Cobra R (Lot 851) stole the show in terms of Fox-bodies this year, this factory-fresh 7Up car was the jaw-dropper here two years ago. It sold then for a whopping and unreasonable $82,500 and while the 44 Grand it brought this year is still a lot of money, lighting clearly didn’t strike twice.

Lot # 851 1993 Ford Mustang 5.0 SVT Cobra R Hatchback; S/N 1FACP42D1PF169179; Vibrant Red/Grey; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $132,000 – 302/230hp, 5-speed, Marti Report, black wheels, original window sticker. – The paint has no chips or scratches, but it has dulled slightly over time from age and dusting. The engine compartment is immaculate and the underbody indicates zero use. The interior has not gone through the dealer prep and still has the plastic on the seats and floor. Truly a time capsule car. Car 11 of 107 Cobra Rs built, never registered and only owned under two dealerships from new with 551 miles on its odometer. – Fox-body Mustangs did very well in Scottsdale last year and they did very well this year for the most part, but none fared better than this one. It’s a desirable model and it’s essentially still fresh in the wrapper, but this is an insane price, especially considering the fact that it sold for “just” $66,000 in Kissimmee three years ago.

Lot # 1021 1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 SportsRoof; S/N 0T02G132614; Grabber Orange, Black/Ginger cloth, Corinthian vinyl; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $78,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $85,800 – 302/290hp, 4-speed, rear window louvers and spoiler, front spoiler, Boss 302 stripes, power brakes, Deluxe Marti Report and build sheet copy documented. – A cosmetic restoration. The panel gaps are poor as the driver’s side fender does not align well with rocker and the driver’s side taillight extension does not align well with either the quarter panel or trunk lid. The paint could have done with further blocking as well as there is still a bit of wavy reflection. The wheels are well polished. Some of the interior pieces are showing age though general fading, the front seat upholstery looked new. The engine bay was restored but some finishes were chipped and aged and the underbody was restored as well. Good for local shows or enjoyable as a decent driver. – Attractively equipped and brightly colored, this is a jelly bean that is impossible not to like and it brought a realistic price for its equipment and condition.

Lot # 1364 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 429 Fastback; S/N 9F02Z195381; Wimbledon White/Black vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $225,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $247,500 – 429/375hp, 4-speed, Magnum 500 wheels, Polyglas GT tires, front spoiler, hood scoop, 3.91 Traction-Lok, power steering, power brakes, Philco radio, KK # 1785. – Represented as matching numbers with single repaint and otherwise original. The paint is older and a little tired. Very tidy underneath. Clean wheels. Very good original interior. Well-kept and never restored because it never needed to be and still shouldn’t be. – Bid to a reported $210,000 at Russo & Steele Monterey in 2013, sold for $209,000 at Auctions America Ft. Lauderdale in 2009 and bid to $230,000 at Mecum Indy last May, this is a choice Boss 429 that has never been messed with and is in great and largely original condition. It’s a good value at this price.

Lot # 1399 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 429 Fastback; S/N 9F02Z195401; Red/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $260,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $286,000 – 429/370hp, 4-speed, Magnum wheels, Polyglas GT tires. – Represented as 4,558 miles from new, restored in 2000 and used only for shows since then. Thoroughly documented with build sheets, Kar Kraft invoice and Marti Report. – Sold at Indy by Mecum in 2012 for $265,000 and bought here for slightly more, an exceptional example among several Boss 429s at Barrett-Jackson.

Lot # 1428.1 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 429 Fastback; S/N 9F02Z173018; Wimbledon White/Black vinyl; Original, modified for competition or performance, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $137,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $150,700 – Replacement engine, aftermarket intake, performance exhaust system, adjustable shocks, LeCarra leather rim steering wheel, no power steering. – The modifications probably make sense once the original engine was lunched. – The replacement engine and modifications, however, drive a stake through the heart of this Boss 429’s value.

Lot # 1217 1969 Ford Mustang Mach 1 SportsRoof; S/N 9T02R172975; Meadowlark Yellow, Black/Black vinyl; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $49,500 – Ram Air 428/335hp, automatic, Marti Report, air conditioning, tinted glass, hood pins, AM 8-track radio, high back buckets, front and rear spoilers, rear window slats, center console with floor shift, original build sheet and Marti Report documented. – Possibly original paint which is currently in fair condition. The panel gaps are factory. Some of the stainless trim is oxidized and hood leading edge is dinged. The chrome bumpers are fair and are showing age through polishing swirl. The interior looks new and presents well. Maintained but doesn’t look to have ever been seriously restored, a cool car with desirable equipment. – Sold for $52,800 here in 2012, it brought $59,400 here in 2014 in essentially the same condition and it’s a rarer, better and more desirable car than its result today would suggest. There is sometimes an inclination at Barrett-Jackson to favor glitz and this Mach 1 isn’t glitzy, it’s just a sound, never neglected high performance Mustang that got overlooked at WestWorld.

Lot # 862 2003 Ford Mustang Mach 1 Coupe; S/N 1FAFP42R63F373141; Red, Black stripe/Black; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $33,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $36,300 – Original window sticker, manuals and Marti Report. – This car is like new in every way, only has 9 delivery miles and the interior has not been dealer prepped. Still a new car wearing its factory shipping stickers. – While essentially still new, though, it has sold before. Barrett-Jackson got $55,000 for it at Palm Beach in 2016, an excessive result that wasn’t repeated here, but its result still isn’t far off what the car cost new and fairly appropriate given the mediocre prices that fourth gen Mustangs are commanding at the moment.

Lot # 1070 1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N D7FH161602; Gunmetal Grey/Red vinyl; Black vinyl top; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $132,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $145,200 – D-Code 312/245hp with dealer installed dual quads, automatic, soft top and porthole hardtop, power brakes and steering, dual exhaust, power windows, back up lights, signal seeking radio, engine dress up option. – The paint is excellent, as are the panel gaps. The chrome is excellent and the stainless trim was well polished. Excellent nearly show quality engine bay and underbody for the most part, but the rear springs look like refinished originals. The interior is show quality. A perfect and show-ready fresh Amos Minter restoration. – Gunmetal is absolutely the best color for ’57 Thunderbirds, complementing the lines and surfaces. And a red interior doesn’t hurt. Minter’s T-birds always get an enthusiastic reception at Barrett-Jackson, and this is no exception, earning a premium of at least 25%.

Lot # 48 1949 Hillegas Midget Sprint Car; S/N; Light Blue, Red scallops/Red; Competition restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000 – Ford V-8 60, aluminum heads, 6-bolt mag wheels, dirt tires, 3-speed. – Described as having some in-period racing history and neat, if not pristine with old paint and some track wear as well as old and probably unreliable mag wheels. Some racing history is claimed. – It’s a neat old thing and its 3-speed means it is suitable for road course use as well as ovals. Compared with the more recent Midget sold just before it, however, it is expensive.

Lot # 863.2 2001 Honda S2000 Convertible; S/N JHMAP114X1T005986; Silverstone Metallic/Black; Black top; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $49,500 – Intake and exhaust system upgrades, air conditioning. – Like new paint, engine bay and interior. Just 941 miles and carefully kept. – Top dollar for an S2000, but this is a top-notch car and you’d be hard-pressed to find a better one, especially since most S2000s were driven. This is slightly more than the original MSRP including inflation and firmly fixes the upper end of the S2000 value curve.

Lot # 743 1963 Jaguar Mark 2 3.8 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 7A899080701749402; Brick Red/Black leather; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $30,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $33,000 – RHD. 3.8 six, 4-speed, overdrive, chrome wire wheels, Vredestein tires, Blaupunkt cassette stereo, Moto-Lita woodrim steering wheel, fender mirrors, Lucas fog lights, aluminum radiator, alternator. – Musty-smelling surface cracked and scuffed original leather. Sound paint with cracks near the antenna and minor touched up chips, good interior wood. The doors close tightly but not flush. Original undercoat in the wheel wells. The engine compartment is superficially cleaned up but not restored. A decent driver. – A fast and desirable car with the 3.8 engine and 4-speed with overdrive, but basically handicapped in the U.S. by righthand drive. It does have potential as a movie rental for British crime dramas and it is honestly represented as a “driver-level sedan” which brought it a reasonable price.

Lot # 1028.1 1968 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster; S/N 1E17423; Engine # RA4297-9; Dark Red/Black leather; Black leatherette top; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $110,000 – 4,235/265hp, 4-speed, 3 SU carbs, aftermarket AM-FM, chrome wire wheels, aluminum radiator, dual electric fans, headers, Michelin MXV4 tires. – Engine block 7E16737-9. Selectively restored and lightly modified under the bonnet and the interior with good paint, chrome and upholstery. Wheel wells have old undercoat. Good glass. Restored in 2012, said to have only 500 miles since, and done to good driver standards. – The Jaguar is as good as the price it brought, an enjoyable driver for appropriate money.

Lot # 783.1 1967 Jaguar XKE SII Fixed Head Coupe; S/N 1E34268; Primrose Yellow/Black leather; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $110,000 – Chrome wire wheels, narrow whitewalls, Blaupunkt multiband radio, 4-speed, grille guard. – Good repaint, interior, glass and chrome. Shadows in the rear bumper chrome and pits in the left front bumper. The grille guard is crude at best. JDHT certificate documented (originally Opalescent Silver Grey.) Represented as 45,210 miles from new and there is nothing about the car that calls that into question. – A mediocre XKE SII with open headlights, this is a notably magnanimous price for a it, a car that should have been off and away to a new owner at $60,000.

Lot # 141.1 1979 Jeep Cherokee Chief Station Wagon; S/N J9A17NN057712; Alpaca Brown, Black/Beige vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $19,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $20,900 – 360/170hp, automatic, Goodyear Wrangler tires, bucket seats, column shift, pushbutton radio. – Decent paint. The bumpers are dull and scuffed. There is chrome chipping where the grille peaks. The frame and axles appear repainted long ago and underbody is very aged. The interior is aged although not heavily worn. Original other than a repaint and probably destined to be restored. – This isn’t a remarkable vehicle condition-wise, but it’s pretty unusual to see an early Cherokee these days in any kind of condition. People are starting to flock to vintage trucks, even the unusual ones. Anything over 20 grand for a far from perfect one like this would have seemed insane just a few years ago, but while this is a strong price today it isn’t too surprising.

Lot # 47 1946 Kurtis Kraft Midget Sprint Car; S/N 43; White, Silver scallops/Grey; Competition restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $15,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $16,500 – Alcohol fueled 160hp Chevy Nova (“Hooterville Offy”)

with Alcon fuel injection, I/O gearbox, magneto ignition, quick change rear, centerlock alloy wheels, Hoosier slicks, trailer included. – Exceptionally neat, tidy and professionally prepared and presented. Ready to turn left with alacrity and style. – An impressive Midget in unusually handsome condition both mechanically and cosmetically that promises to be great fun for not much money. At a price like this it doesn’t pay to restore one.

Lot # 1416 2001 Lamborghini Diablo VT 6.0 Coupe; S/N ZA9DU01B61LA12744; Monterey Blue/Beige leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $320,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $352,000 – LOC exhaust, carbon fiber rear wing, front end lift system, carbon fiber interior trim, Alpine stereo. – 22,979 miles and two owners. Good original paint, lightly stretched upholstery. – Crossed the block at Mecum’s Monterey auction in August where it was reported bid to $285,000 and with the fairly high miles the price it brought here at WestWorld is generous.

Lot # 1435 2011 Lamborghini Gallardo LP570-4 Superleggera Coupe; S/N ZHWGU7AJ4BLA10156; Arancio Borealis Metallic/Black Alcantara; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $122,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $134,200 – Carbon-fiber interior, rear wing and mirrors, LED light package, transparent engine cover, leather steering wheel, Alcantara headliner, rearview camera, front lift system, navigation, tinted windows, K&N air filters, orange brake calipers, chipguarded nose, mirrors and rear wing. – 8,623 miles and no apparent wear or use. – More bright Yellow than Orange, but bought reasonably for what it is and the miles it has covered.

Lot # 1412 2012 Lexus LFA Nürburgring Coupe; S/N JTHHX8BH5C1000301; Black/Black Alcantara; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $835,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $918,500 – 4.8 liter/562hp V10, 6-speed sequential gearbox, all documentation. – One of 50 built. Other than some paint issues on the right front fender, unblemished, one owner and like new with 885 miles. – The LFA Nürburgring is one of the hot items among supercars and this result is representative of the handful of recent auction transactions. RM Sotheby’s got $885,000 for an LFA Nürburgring this week at the Biltmore.

Lot # 1411 2012 McLaren MP4-12C High Sport Coupe; S/N SBM11AAA1CW001505; Silver, Black, Red accents/Black leather, Alcantara; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $195,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $214,500 – 3.8 liter twin turbo V8, 675hp, 7-speed automanual, carbon-ceramic brakes. – Represented as built for Ron Dennis, one of ten High Sport models built, the only MP4-12C painted in this garish assortment of McLaren F1 team colors. Signed by F1 drivers and crew. Show car equipment, preparation and preservation with 364 miles. – Cycled through a series of Mecum auctions in 2016-17 with reported high bids gradually declining from $900,000 to $600,000 and claimed here for a pittance. It is remarkable that such egregious performance, exclusivity and over-the-top identity could be had for so little and is a bargain, even if the wheels do look like they’re accented in Red Neon.

Lot # 1405 2019 McLaren Senna Coupe; S/N SBM15ACAXKW800005; Black Amethyst, /; Black leather, Alcantara top; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,325,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,457,500 – 4 Liter/789hp twin turbo V8, 7-speed AutoManual, active aerodynamics, carbon-ceramic brakes, active suspension. – 281 miles and like new. – This McLaren Senna makes the MP4-121C High Sport sold six cars later for $214,500 look like the bargain of the century even though the Black Amethyst paint on this one is a big improvement on the garish F1-inspired livery of the MP4. If you have to ask how much it is, you can’t afford it, and mere mortals – even very wealthy ones – probably can’t drive it which may be why it has only 281 miles.

Lot # 1457 1957 Mercedes-Benz 190SL Convertible; S/N 1210406503319; Black/Grey; Older restoration, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $93,500 – Wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, Weber carburetor. – This car claims 57,831 original miles. The paint is poor with lots of peeling along the edges, and where there isn’t peeling the paint is uneven. The brightwork around the windows is heavily pitted. The interior, on the other hand is very good and still appears new in comparison to the rest of the vehicle. The wheel covers have plenty of scratches and the wheels are pitted where exposed. Represented as a full restoration, but that must have been a long time ago. – This is a driver quality 190SL bought for driver money. For a brief period in 2014-16, the best 190SLs were bringing over 200 grand and people started spending serious money on restorations, but things have settled down since then and this car was restored before that trend came to pass. Even at that, this is a seriously generous price to pay for a notably bad car.

Lot # 1418 1965 Mercedes-Benz 230SL Roadster; S/N 11304222010632; Dark Blue/Blue-Grey leather; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $170,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $187,000 – Automatic, two tops, power windows, 8-track stereo, wheel covers, Hankook tires. – Bought new by John Lennon and largely preserved since then. Good paint and interior, clean underbody, barely worn upholstery. – Although the car card said it was sold “in 1999 to the current Florida museum owner” it is recorded as being sold by Worldwide in Scottsdale in 2017 for $247,500. It is three times the value of a similar non-celebrity 230SL, an expensive way to situate your buns in John’s butt-prints.

Lot # 1417 2006 Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren Coupe; S/N WDDAJ76F86M000695; Crystal Galaxite Black/Red leather; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $265,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $291,500 – 5.4 liter/617hp supercharged V8, 5-speed AutoManual, propeller-spoke alloy wheels, side outlet exhaust. – 490 miles, still has the window sticker attached. – Sold in 2012 by Russo & Steele in Monterey at a reported $237,600 and destined to sit seductively in collection after collection for the rest of its life still wearing its vision-obscuring window sticker. It brought quite a bit more here although it’s scant evidence of any generally enhanced perception of the SLR McLaren.

Lot # 1047.1 1967 Mercury Comet 202 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N 7H01R546391; Onyx Black/Red vinyl; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $87,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $95,700 – R-Code 427/425hp, 4-speed, 3.89 Traction-Lok differential, power brakes, body color wheels with hubcaps and whitewall tires, AM radio, bench seat. – The paint is dull from age and polishing. There is a patch around the antenna that is noticeably dull. The brightwork is clean and in good condition. The engine compartment has been well kept but has signs of use. The same goes for the underbody. The interior is well kept, just aged like the rest of the car. Reported to be restored with NOS parts, and it looks like this was many years ago, but the R-Code engine is the thing that really sets this car apart. – This car sold for $118,800 at Russo and Steele Scottsdale in 2007, then for $107,000 at the GAA Auction in Greensboro last March. Its restoration was fresher then and prices for rare but relatively obscure muscle cars like this actually aren’t a whole lot different from what they were in 2007, so the result here is realistic.

Lot # 801 1970 Mercury Cougar Eliminator 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 0F91G544281; Competition Gold, Black scoop and side accents/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $93,500 – 302/290hp, 4-speed, Super Drag Pak, 4.30 rear axle, Polyglas tires, rear spoiler, hood scoop, dual mirrors, tinted glass, bucket seats, Hurst T-handle shifter, factory radio, dash clock, heavy duty battery, Marti Report documented. – The paint is smooth with some chips on the leading edge of the hood and cracking on the passenger’s side drip rail. The passenger’s side door is also misaligned. The bumpers are in excellent shape while the remaining brightwork is mildly tarnished and scuffed. Lightly scratched window glass. Large touched up scratch on the passenger’s door. Very good chrome. Even gaps. The engine compartment is clean with oxidation from light use. The chassis is undercoated and has a replacement exhaust. The interior is complete and restored. Represented as the original engine and transmission. Documented with an Elite Marti Report. – Peddled here and there over the past three years, its one noted sale was here last year at exactly the same price it brought today. That’s impressive consistency.

Lot # 1050 1970 Mercury Cougar Eliminator 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 0F91G517271; Competition Gold, Black stripes/Black vinyl; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $110,000 – 302/290hp Boss 302 engine, 4-speed, power brakes and steering, 3.91 Traction Lok differential, AM radio with 8 track. Includes factory invoice and Marti Report. – Excellent paint, body and brightwork with no noticeable flaws. The engine and underbody look like new and have no indication of use. The interior is immaculate. A gorgeous Boss Eliminator. – 1970 was the last year for the Cougar Eliminator, which could be had with the high-revving Boss 302 engine, a 351 or a 428 Cobra Jet. 302s are worth a lot more than the 351 but this was nevertheless a surprisingly high number even for such an exceptionally good 302 Eliminator.

Lot # 770 1970 Mercury Cougar XR-7 Convertible; S/N 0F94Q509887; Gold/Brown leather; Brown top; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $47,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $51,700 – Polyglas GT tires, 428/335hp Super Cobra Jet, Ram Air, automatic, power steering, power disc brakes, power windows, power top, tilt steering column, floor shift, air conditioning, console, pushbutton radio, Marti Report documented. – Represented as one of 37 built this way. Not represented as original, but looks it. A few chips on the paint here and there but it’s mostly good. Lightly scratched window frames. Lots of wear on the steering wheel. The seats are lightly wrinkled but very good for original leather. The gauges are faded and a bit cloudy. Some light work underneath but not fully restored. Very rare engine and loaded with options, plus it’s a convertible, but there are some disappointing flaws. – Sold for $44,000 here in 2015 and for a paltry $26,500 at Auburn Fall in 2017, the WestWorld bidders recognized this XK-7 for what it is and paid a realistic price for it. If the Auburn Fall buyer sold it here there was a big celebration dinner in Scottsdale tonight.

Lot # 1250 1970 Mercury Cyclone Spoiler 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 0H17C557363; Competition Blue, White side stripes/White vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $88,000 – 429/370hp Super Cobra Jet, 4-speed, 3.90 Traction-Lok differential, Drag Pack, power brakes, Goodyear Polyglas tires, bucket seats, console. – Very good paint and body. The panel gaps are very consistent. The stainless trim is a bit dull and would benefit from attention. The engine compartment and underbody are very clean and show little use. The interior is complete and without significant wear although the edge of the driver’s seat has some soiling. A highly interesting if slightly ugly bit of obscure muscle car history that could use more attention on a few details but is mostly good. – A very special, limited production Mercury that found a ready audience at WestWorld and brought an enthusiastic price, helped in no small degree by its nearly impeccable presentation and dramatic paint (which is “Competition Blue” on a Mercury and “Grabber Blue” on a Ford.)

Lot # 551 1959 Mercury Monterey Convertible; S/N N9WA551017; Red/Red, White vinyl; White vinyl top; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000 – 383/280hp V8, automatic, chrome wire wheels, dual outside mirrors, skirts, radio. – Sound but old paint, interior and chrome. Torn top behind the left rear window, erratic window fits with old seals. A large weekend driver. – Sold here four years ago for $49,500. This year’s result is appropriate for its present condition and what has transpired in the marketplace in the past four years.

Lot # 358 1958 Morris Minor Pickup; S/N 0FB477608; Dove Grey/Red vinyl; Grey cloth top; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000 – 1,275cc, dual SU carbs, 4-speed, Red wheels, hubcaps, trim rings, banjo spoke steering wheel, turn signals. – Professionally repainted with a few flaws that hardly detract from the paint’s quality. Good interior, bed canopy and gauges. The engine compartment is like new. An unusually good restoration for a Morris Minor pickup. – Crossed the block at Mecum’s Las Vegas auction two months ago where it was reported bid to $21,000. The wait and entry fee for B-J took a further slug out of the somewhat smaller successful bid here, but this is an attractive little truck at a modest price for the new owner.

Lot # 951 1971 Oldsmobile 4-4-2 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 344871R117990; Black/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $71,500 – 455/340hp, 4-speed, air conditioning, power brakes, Ram Air, bucket seats and console, rear spoiler. – Represented as matching numbers and 74,875 miles. Good paint with some scratches and a few chips. Good panel gaps and well-polished chrome and stainless. The wheels are well polished as well and the glass is clear but has a few scratches. The underbody was restored. The interior presents well and looks new. Well done older restoration that would show just fine at cruise-ins and be good for weekend cruising. – 4-speeds are very desirable on 4-4-2s and can carry a premium of as much as 20 percent, which partly explains the very strong price this car brought. It’s actually the exact same price it brought at Barrett-Jackson West Palm Beach in 2011.

Lot # 1071.1 1971 Oldsmobile 4-4-2 Convertible; S/N 344671M104959; Blue, White stripes/Blue vinyl; White vinyl top; Older restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $67,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $73,700 – 455/340hp, automatic, Power brakes and steering, air conditioning, W27 aluminum 3.23 limited slip differential cover, SS I wheels with Firestone Wide Oval tires, AM/FM radio, console, air induction hood, dual gate shifter, sport steering wheel, original build sheet and Protect-o-Plate documented. – Represented as the oringal numbers-matching engine. Excellent paint and body. The brightwork has been all replaced or refinished. The top fits tight without any wrinkles. The engine and underbody have been redone to like new standards and the interior shows like new. A beautiful restoration with almost no indication of use. First place winner at the Oldsmobile Nationals in 2015 and still capable of being shown. – A superb 4-4-2 convertible with a full complement of bells and whistles that brought a fully-deserved superior price. It’s not inconceivable for it to have brought more, but that required more euphoria than was in the Scottsdale air this year.

Lot # 769 1969 Oldsmobile 4-4-2 W-30 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 344879M348040; Aztec Gold, White Stripes/Gold vinyl; Enthusiast restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $37,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $40,700 – 400/360hp, 4-speed, SS I wheels with Goodyear Polyglas tires, bucket seats, center console, Rally gauges. – Represented to be the original engine. Decent paint with a few small bubbles on the trunk lid and a masking flaw for the passenger’s side hood stripe. The bumpers appear replaced and the brightwork polished. The grille surround trim is aged and has pitting. The underbody has been restored but shows use since. The interior appears mostly untouched and has signs of use. Old cosmetic restoration that draws little to itself aside from being a W-30 with a 4-speed. – This car hammered not sold at a fairly weak $35,000 high bid at Mecum Dallas last year, but it didn’t get much more love here in Scottsdale. It deserves another round of restoration, and at this price the new owner at least doesn’t have too much into the car already. Done right, instead of done half-assed, this could be a $100,000 car.

Lot # 1455 1970 Oldsmobile 4-4-2 W-30 Holiday Coupe; S/N 344870M217489; Sherwood Green, Gold stripes/Black vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $93,500 – Numbers matching 455/370hp drivetrain, automatic, W27 aluminum differential housing with 3.90 Anti Spin differential, body color wheels with hub caps and Goodyear Polyglas tires, bucket seats, console with Hurst Dual Gate shifter, AM radio, ammeter. Drag racing history in period then returned to factory condition in the 1990s. Copy of delivery order – Drag raced when new with the original engine preserved and now reinstalled. Represented as 19,988 miles. Good 25+ year old repaint with minor paint chips near the hood badge. The chrome and stainless are excellent and do not have significant fading or wear. The engine compartment appears mostly untouched, although the engine appears to have been repainted when it was out. The underbody is very clean and without significant deterioration. The interior has minimal wear or aging. A very well maintained older cosmetic restoration. – It’s an interesting history, that’s for sure, and shows uncommon good sense on the part of the first owner in preserving the drivetrain, interior and other bits. Its originality is somewhat compromised, however, by the history that made it possible and the age of the restoration isn’t helping things. The price it brought reflects all of that and the good judgment of the Barrett-Jackson bidders.

Lot # 942 1972 Oldsmobile Cutlass 4-4-2 W-30 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 3G87X2M141703; Flame Orange, Black hood stripes/White vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000 – 455/300hp, automatic, power brakes and steering, 3.42 Anti Spin differential, SS II wheels with Goodyear Polyglas tires, bucket seats, console, AM/FM radio. – Good paint. The hood and door alignment need to be tweaked a hair. The engine bay and underbody are very good and show very little use. The interior has been redone and has little use. A good example of a hard to find W-30. It needs only minor tweaks to raise it to improve the presentation. – By 1972, the 4-4-2 was no longer its own model and was back in the Cutlass range. Performance was naturally down from the glory days, but the ’72 W-30 still put down a respectable 300 horses and today they’re relatively collectible. The bidders really took to this one despite its handful of flaws and the less desirable automatic. It also sold for $47,300 here in 2011, so the strong result here was no fluke.

Lot # 1053.1 1929 Packard Eight Convertible Coupe; S/N 267781C; Dark Red/Black leather; Black cloth top; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $105,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $115,500 – Silver painted wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual sidemounts with mirrors, rumble seat, no heater, luggage rack, radiator stoneguard, Trippe lights. – Sound old paint with edge chips and some detail cracks. The windshield frame chrome is failing. Dusty old engine compartment and oily, road grimy chassis. Sound interior and top, good gauges and dashboard. Done reasonably well long ago, then driven. – Sold here in 2011 for $110,000 and nothing appears to have been done to or with it since then. Even the odometer reads only 1 more mile than it did eight years ago. The result is a strong endorsement of the steady values of quality automobiles from the classic era.

Lot # 1288.1 1971 Plymouth ‘Cuda 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N BS23V1B327831; Hemi Orange, Black/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $115,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $126,500 – 440/385hp Six Barrel, 4-speed, power brakes and steering, shaker hood, Go Wing, billboard stripe, Rallye wheels with Goodyear Polyglas GT tires, bucket seats, console, pistol grip shifter. – Good paint. The body lines are straight and the panel gaps consistent. The brightwork has a few scuffs around the back window. The engine compartment is clean and has little use. The underbody is clean and has no deterioration. The original interior is very good and shows no significant wear. A well cared for and documented car with great presentation. – According to the odometer, this car has done just 24 miles since 2008, when it hammered not sold at Kruse Fort Lauderdale at a $167,500 high bid. It then sold at Rupp Fort Lauderdale a year later for $135,000 then brought a high bid of only $105,000 at Mecum Kissimmee last year. Cuda values aren’t too different from what they were back then, and the quality of this car’s restoration trumped its age to result in this strong but deserved price.

Lot # 980.1 1970 Plymouth ‘Cuda Gran Coupe 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N BP23L0B132732; In Violet/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $47,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $51,700 – 383/290hp upgraded with a 4-barrel, 4-speed, Pistol-Grip shifter, bucket seats with center console, overhead console, steel wheels with center caps, air conditioning, Dave Wise vehicle inspection report. – The paint finish is fair with some inclusions and one tiny bubble in the passenger’s side C pillar. The panel gaps are fair at best. The hood has some alignment issues but is not rubbing. The chrome bumpers are good, but the stainless trim is fair with some scratches and dings. The glass has some rubs from window seals, and the interior is fair as it shows some age from light fading and wrinkles. The underbody is unrestored but well detailed. A good driver with a non-original engine. – Despite what the car card says, this is not “Plum Crazy”, it’s “In Violet”. It was sold at Mecum’s April Kansas City auction in 2013 for $31,800. The price it brought here is appropriate for its configuration and generous equipment, but a bit edgy for a replacement engine ‘Cuda.

Lot # 1470 1970 Plymouth ‘Cuda Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N BS23R0B211108; In Violet, White/White vinyl; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $132,000 – Power brakes, listed as ‘date code correct’ Hemi engine, automatic, shaker hood, hockey stick stripe, bench seat, column shift, hood pins. Includes Dave Wise Report. – Good paint. Straight body with consistent panel gaps. The brightwork is very good. The engine and underbody are excellent and have no deterioration whatsoever. The interior is very good and has no wear. A well restored car with nothing to criticize other than the non-original engine. – Replacement engine … half price … which is an unduly harsh judgment of this otherwise very well done Hemi ‘Cuda, but that’s the way it is sometimes in a notoriously fickle venue. In the end the new owner got a ‘Cuda that will be owned and driven proudly for a modest price and a very good value.

Lot # 1003 1971 Plymouth GTX 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N RS23U1R134416; Tor-Red, Black/Black, Orange vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $110,000 – Original 440 engine upgraded to Six Barrel configuration and headers added, 3.23 Sure Grip differential, power steering and brakes, Magnum 500 wheels with BF Goodrich Radial T/A tires, bucket seats, console with floor shifter automatic and pistol grip handle, AM radio. – Very good paint. The driver’s side door is slightly out of alignment from the body line. The engine has been completely redone. The interior does show some use and the woodgrain decal on the console has some bubbling. An eye catching car with tasteful upgrades, just misses on a few details. – And it’s not “Hemi Orange”, it’s a Plymouth and the EV2 color is “Tor-Red”. A multiple award-winner at the 2018 World of Wheels, in excellent condition let down by some minor but troubling oversights that the WestWorld bidders overlooked in their enthusiasm for the torrid color.

Lot # 1044 1969 Plymouth Road Runner 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N RM23M9A257120; Rallye Green, Matte Black hood, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $62,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $68,200 – 440/390hp Six Barrel, 4-speed, 4.11 Sure Grip differential, power brakes, lift off hood, bench seat, AM radio. Govier Report and reproduction trim tag. – Excellent paint and body. The brightwork is like new. The restored engine compartment shows no use and the underbody is immaculate. There is no wear on the interior. Beautifully restored and quite eye catching in Rallye Green, but the engine isn’t represented as original. – Reported sold post-block for $79,200 at Mecum Houston last year after a $72,500 high bid at Mecum Indy 2017 and a $70,000 high bid at Kissimmee 2018. It then to yet another no-sale at a $75,000 high bid at Mecum Portland back in June. The market has spoken repeatedly and pretty consistently to what this car is worth and this result, the lowest the car has ever attracted, could be considered to be something of a good value.

Lot # 1500 1970 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Coupe; S/N 228870N130932; Polar White, Blue stripes/Black vinyl; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $66,000 – 400/335hp, 4-speed, power brakes and steering, 3.08 Safe-T-Track differential, Rally II wheels with BF Goodrich Radial T/A tires, console, AM radio, includes documents (unspecified). – Represented as matching numbers. Good paint overall. The filler strip for the front spoiler and body is too long and hangs into the wheel wells. The passenger’s side wheel has chips in the paint. The underbody has had an amateur paint job and a subframe connector has been welded in. The seats have been reupholstered and the driver’s seat has some stretching as well as the gauge lenses are cloudy. It is a cosmetic restoration that missed on a lot of details, which is disappointing on an otherwise very cool car like this. – An expensive result that could have bought a more thoroughly restored and higher quality Trans Am.

Lot # 772 1972 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 2V87X2N505611; Cameo White, Lucerne Blue Stripe/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $54,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $59,400 – 455/300hp HO with M22 4-speed, Rally II wheels with Goodyear Polyglas GT tires, power front disc brakes, 3.42 rear axle, dual exhaust, aftermarket radio, PHS documented. – Very good paint and body. The lines and gaps are all straight and consistent. The engine has some paint discoloring on the exhaust ports from running, but that’s it. The underbody is restored and very clean. The passenger’s seat upholstery appears a bit baggy while the driver’s seat looks unused. A good older body-off restoration. – And a good price to pay for it, too, a sound car with a quality older restoration bought for no more nor less than it deserved.

Lot # 842 1978 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am SE Coupe; S/N 2W87Z8N111711; Starlight Black, Gold/Black; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $82,500 – 400/220hp, 4-speed, air conditioning, Uniroyal Steel Belted Radial tires, AM/FM radio Hurst T-tops, Trans Am Nationals class winner and original window sticker documented. – Excellent paint and body work. The body lines and panel gaps are as good as it gets. The engine bays and underbody show minimal use and the interior is immaculate. Fully restored and in immaculate condition. – This result is fair to both the buyer and the seller, reflecting both the quality of the restoration and the rarity of its 4-speed.

Lot # 758.1 1979 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Special Ed Y84 Coupe; S/N 2W87K9N183776; Black, Gold graphics/Black; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $63,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $69,300 – 403/185hp, automatic, Special Edition, T-tops, radio delete, build sheet, window sticker and PHS documented. – Very good original paint with no blemishes. The wheels are like new. No signs of use underneath and the seats are still wrapped in plastic. A like new car with 7,067 miles. – The tires are original, too, which suggests a new set on new wheels are in order if it’s to be driven much farther than on and off a transported. It was sold here seven years ago in 2012 for $71,500, both prices carrying a generous premium (on the order of 50%) for originality.

Lot # 737.1 1964 Pontiac Grand Prix 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 894P248329; Marimba Red/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $27,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $29,700 – 389/303hp, automatic, power brakes and steering, 8-lug wheels, bucket seats with console mounted tachometer. Pontiac Oakland Club Junior and Senior award. – Represented as 35,113 miles. Good repaint with no serious blemishes. The bumpers and brightwork are very good. The underbody has been restored but has seen some use since. The interior is very good and has no notable wear. A good professionally-done restoration with limited use. – The ’64 Grand Prix is one of the most attractive and refined designs of the 1960s even though it’s somewhat overlooked. This price is on the high end for an older restoration and base powertrain, but it’s more realistic than the $35,200 it sold for here two years ago. It also sold at Kruse Avondale back in 2005 for $27,540 when the restoration was fresh. The odometer has added only 478 miles since 2005

Lot # 746.1 1964 Pontiac Grand Prix 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 894D5524; Marimba Red/Red vinyl; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000 – 389/330hp Tri-Power, 4-speed, pushbutton radio, tinted windshield, 8-lug wheels, narrow whitewalls, tach, buckets and console, PHS documented. – Represented as 20,501 miles and an all-original drivetrain. PHS documented but unfortunately 421-badged by the original owner. Good cosmetics, flat panels, some original paint. A Bloomington Survivor Zenith Award winner. PHS documented. – Offered at Mecum’s Rockford (Belvedere) auction in 2004 where it was reported bid to $23,000 and sold at Mecum Indy in 2011 for $37,100, this GP has added 419 miles to its odometer since 2004 and still remains a beautiful, nearly pristine, unrestored example save for some paint work. The 421 badges are unfortunate but it is difficult to come up with a reason to remove them now that they’ve been part of its history for fifteen-plus years. The result here is a substantial premium for preservation and originality but the new owner should feel confident with this car’s history and quality.

Lot # 345 2006 Pontiac GTO Coupe; S/N 6G2VX12U26L550368; Impulse Blue/Black leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $17,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,700 – 6-speed and all the rest, Kumho tires – Original and unmolested with 39,327 miles. – A bargain. I should have bought this as backup for my 2005 GTO that is driven 12 months a year.

Lot # 1025 1969 Pontiac GTO Judge 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 242379B164347; Matador Red, Judge graphics/Black vinyl; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $55,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $60,500 – 400/366hp Ram Air III, 4-speed, power brakes and steering, Safe-T-Track differential, hood tach, PHS documented. – Very good paint and body. The brightwork and trim are all very good but not over polished. The engine and underbody have been fully redone and show minimal use, and the interior has no significant wear. A professionally done, documented restoration on a genuine Judge and there isn’t anything to nitpick. – Not sold at a $60,000 high bid at Mecum Indy in 2010. The bidders at WestWorld must have seen something that troubled them because the thoroughly restored and documented Judge with desirable Ram Air III power is a bargain.

Lot # 1256 1969 Pontiac GTO Judge 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 242379R157231; Carousel Red, Black vinyl roof, Judge graphics/Black vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $48,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $52,800 – 400/366hp Ram Air III, 4-speed, power brakes and steering, Safe-T-Track differential, Hurst T-handle shifter, Vintage air conditioning. – Good paint and body. The rear bumper has a few scuffs and minor gouges. The engine compartment has been redone and the underbody appears mostly original with some light surface rust. The interior shows minor use with possibly recent reupholstered seats. Mostly original but has gotten cosmetic attention when necessary and represented as the original engine and 4-speed. Essentially a driver. – This car sold for $99,000 here in 2016, which was expensive even for its impressive preservation. This result, on the other hand, is modest considering the original engine and 4-speed. What it arguably deserves is a sweet spot somewhere in the middle of those two numbers.

Lot # 1075.1 1970 Pontiac GTO Judge 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 242370P160448; Starlight Black, Judge graphics/Red vinyl; Enthusiast restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $72,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $79,200 – 400/366hp Ram Air III, 4-speed, power brakes, Safe-T-Track differential, hood tach, Rally II wheels, bucket seats, console, AM radio. Includes PHS paperwork and window sticker. – Good paint other than a chip on the passenger’s side quarter panel. The passenger’s door gap is inconsistent. The lower windshield trim is marked up from the hood. The engine compartment is very good and shows minimal run time. The frame has a fresh coat of chassis black. The interior is good and nothing is out of place other than some scuffs on the door cards. Fine scratches on the rear bumper. Good and fully restored, but misses on a few details. – Sold for $66,000 at Mecum Monterey last August with only 11 more miles on the odometer, and before that for $58,300 at Mecum Indy in 2011 when muscle car prices were near their bottom. This is a considerably stronger result than in Monterey and the car hasn’t had any serious work since then, but it isn’t particularly expensive in today’s GTO market.

Lot # 836.1 1966 Pontiac GTO Royal Bobcat Convertible; S/N 242676P182056; Engine # 240121WT; Montero Red/Black vinyl; White vinyl top; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $82,500 – 389/335hp with Tri-Power added, 4-speed, Hurst shifter and alloy wheels with trim rings, Firestone red line tires, Protect-O-Plate, 3.55 Safe-T-Track, Royal Bobcat performance kit, factory radio, power steering, power brakes, power top, floor shift, console, bucket seats, PHS documents. – Good engine bay with heat rash on the exhaust and fuel residue on the carbs. Small touch up on the right front fender. Otherwise very good paint and chrome. Very good top with some folding wrinkles. Straight body with dead even gaps. Good new dash top, the interior and gauges are fantastic. A mostly amazing car. It needs a new dash treatment, but for the most part it’s a stunner with lots of desirable equipment. – The Royal Bobcat package was well known at the time and adds some historical Pontiac appeal to this otherwise extremely attractive GTO convertible. It was reported sold at Mecum Kissimmee a year ago for $92,400 and has added only 159 miles to the odometer since then. It’s a sound value at this price.

Lot # 1255 1965 Pontiac LeMans GTO Convertible; S/N 237675K124482; Montero Red/White; Black top; Recent restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $93,500 – 389/360hp Tri-Power, 4-speed, power brakes and steering, 3.90 Safe-T-Track differential, red line tires, bucket seats, console. Includes PHS paperwork. – The paint is very good as well as the panel fit and brightwork. The engine compartment is very clean and the engine shows little run time. The underbody is immaculate and the interior shows no use. A very well done body-off restoration with few miles since and still looks very fresh. – This very good Tri-Power convertible could have sold for six figures without being surprising, so at this price it’s a good value. Whoever bought it for $82,500 here in 2015 got an even better deal.

Lot # 1227 1961 Porsche 356B (T5) Coupe; S/N 115335; Black/Tan leather; Enthusiast restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $77,000 – Later 1582/90hp S90 engine, pushbutton radio, Porsche CofA. – Good paint other than some light scratching. The brightwork is heavily pitted on the front bumper and the window trim. The glass is good, and the interior is ok as well but all four seats and the dashboard show wear. Deep wrinkles in the seats but no tearing at least. The rest of the leather interior is good. The trunk is clean and tidy. The chrome wheel covers are good. Has had minor restoration work but could use a more thorough redo to the kind of standards a car like this deserves. – This car’s inconsistent presentation and lack of original engine certainly didn’t do it any favors, but at this price the new owner has a presentable driver quality 356 at a reasonable price.

Lot # 1413 1992 Porsche 911 RS Lightweight Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ96ZNS491825; Rubystone Red/Black leatherette, Rubystone cloth; Recent restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $295,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $324,500 – 3.6/260hp, 5-speed, Porsche CofA documented. – Good repaint and interior. Spotless underbody. Strange color. Originally delivered in Japan, 30,380km from new. – Rare in the U.S. because they were not imported here when new, the 911 RS Lightweight has scant interior trim, lowered ride height, adjustable suspension and other trick details. This one might have brought more, except for the color even though in a field of 911s it will not go unnoticed.

Lot # 1481 1986 Porsche 911 Turbo 930 Coupe; S/N WP0JB093XGS050902; Guards Red/Black leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $88,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $96,800 – Red Fuchs wheels, Blaupunkt Monterey radio, air conditioning, power windows, sports seats with electric height adjustment, power windows, power sunroof, CoA. – The paint is very good with no significant scratches but there are two small blisters on the hood. The red, black, and chrome rims are in good condition but some of the lug nuts are slightly rounded. The black trim and weather-stripping is in great condition with very little warpage. The black interior is very good with only some wrinkles on the driver seat showing wear commensurate with the 39,502 miles showing said to be supported by maintenance records. – 930s really aren’t bringing the money they used to, but seeing this pretty good example going for anything under six figures was still pretty surprising. Provided it doesn’t anything major service-wise in the near future, it’s a solid buy and will be a rewarding ride for the new owner.

Lot # 139.1 1975 Porsche 914 Custom Targa Coupe; S/N 4752901769; Orange, Black sills/Black leatherette; Black Targa panel top; Modified restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,550 – 2.0 liter, 5-speed, Alpine cassette stereo, aftermarket alloy wheels, Pirelli tires, dual Weber carbs, steering wheel rim taxi driver cover. – Painted assembled and apparently masked by feel. Sound older upholstery. Rear “Porsche” panel doesn’t fit flush. Torn shift boot. Air conditioning console under the dash but no corresponding equipment on the engine. Loose weatherstrip. The rear bumper has a pustulent growth. – This much money should have bought a better 2-liter 914. This is really a remarkably unattractive car.

Lot # 1414 2005 Porsche Carrera GT Coupe; S/N WP0CA298X5L001399; GT Silver Metallic/Ascot Brown leather; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $650,000 plus commission of; Final Price $650,000 – Yellow calipers. – Two owners, 5,031 miles, serviced 50 miles ago with new tires. – One of only two lots at Barrett-Jackson offered with a reserve and the only one not sold. The fascination with the Carrera GT wore off and prices declined until a few years ago but now are recovering as its largely analog performance is becoming more attractive. The reported bid here was not enough to argue for selling it.

Lot # 1386 1935 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Tourer; S/N 201TA; Blue, Black fenders/Beige leather; Beige cloth top; Rebodied or re-created, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $132,000 – RHD. Body color wheel discs, dual sidemounts, dual windshields, wind wings, metal luggage trunk, wood cockpit surrounds, fender mirrors, Lucas tri-bar headlights. – 1945 rebody from the original Brewster limousine, rather heavy and Teutonic but practical. Sound older paint, excellent chrome and good only lightly worn upholstery. The interior wood and cockpit surround is attractive but the varnish on the rear cowl is pimply and blistered. The underbody and chassis show no small accumulation of road dirt from touring. A big, stately touring Rolls-Royce. – In design and style this PII leaves a lot to be desired but its eligibility for many prestigious and enjoyable events and touring ability make it a sound value at this price.

Lot # 1536.1 1967 Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow Sedan; S/N SRX1351; White/Blue leather; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000 – Wheel covers, whitewalls, rear seat tables, aftermarket radio, power windows, power seats. – Tired old budget respray with masking errors, lots of chips and scratches, and orange peel. The wood on the dash and doors is in really rough shape, but the seats look surprisingly good. The leather grab handle on the left rear window is broken. Dry underneath, but not particularly clean. Not represented with a service history but does claim the 55,616 miles on the odometer are original. Silver Shadows have been the affordable way into RR ownership for decades, but as a result many have been treated cheaply. Case in point…this car. – A chrome bumper Silver Shadow in wedding white certainly does have some charm to it, but this car didn’t really deserve anywhere near the price it brought, which should have bought a much cleaner no-excuses example and made a big win for the seller.

Lot # 1415 2005 Saleen S7 Twin Turbo Coupe; S/N 1S9SB18175S000053; Silver/Grey leather; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $625,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $687,500 – 750hp 7-liter twin turbocharged Ford V8, 6-speed, custom-fitted driver’s seat, tinted glass, LCD dashboard. – 240 miles. – This result is what it is with little to compare it with.

Lot # 369 1987 Subaru Brat (Truck) GL Pickup 4×4; S/N JF3AU53B4HE500452; Grey, Red/Grey vinyl, cloth; Unrestored original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,150 – Bridgestone tires, cassette stereo with aftermarket speakers, air conditioning, T-tops. – Lots of chips and fisheyes in the paint. Clean and tidy underneath. Spray-in bedliner. 5e rear jump seats are scratched up and cracked in a few places. Very good interior. Not as good as you might think given the 27,364 miles represented to be all it has covered, but it’s in decent shape and it’s complete, plus a BRAT is always charming and you could actually fool around with this one a bit without worrying over e Rey scratch and tick on the odometer. – The Brat (Bi-drive Recreational All-terrain Transporter) had its backward-facing and dangerous-looking rear seats in order to qualify it as a passenger car rather than a light truck for tax reasons, and introduced America to Subaru all-wheel drive a generation before it became the chosen brand of hikers and college professors. This Brat one sold for $17,600 at Worldwide’s Texas Classic sale in April of last year. It has twice now brought very strong money, which shows that people really are after decent examples. There are hardly any examples left at all, but there was another one (Lot 333) at Barrett-Jackson that despite having accident history still sold for $13,200.

Lot # 1014 1964 Sunbeam Tiger Convertible; S/N B9470583LRXFE; BRGreen/Beige vinyl; Black vinyl top; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $90,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $99,000 – 260/164hp, 4-speed, Panasport alloy wheels, Tiger Paw blackwalls, Sony CD stereo. – Very good paint, chrome and upholstery. Bright, crisp gauges. There are a few issues including the chrome brackets behind the doors and small chips on the front edges of the top boot hard covers. The underbody has not been restored and is covered in old undercoat. – This is a reassuring car, not only for its condition but also because it exudes the aura of a car that’s never been messed with, not even the common early upgrade of trading the 260 for a 289 with its 36 extra horses. It brought a generous price for its condition, understandable under the circumstances, but enough to buy a Mk II in similar condition.

Lot # 834 1966 Sunbeam Tiger Convertible; S/N B382002092LRXFE; Metallic Dark Green/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $52,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $57,200 – Upgraded to a 289 from the original 260. 8-spoke Minilite style alloy wheels, Sumitomo blackwall tires, aluminum radiator, electric fan, headers, oil cooler. – Mediocre old repaint, poor fitting leaky top with big gaps over the side windows. Disorganized engine compartment. Old undercoat in the wheel wells. A Tiger best avoided. – The WestWorld bidders didn’t have the advantage of this advice, but they proved to be well aware of the hazards present in this haphazardly modified Tiger and appropriately hedged their bets with this price.

Lot # 412.1 1982 Toyota Pickup Deluxe Pickup 4×4; S/N JT4RN48D5C0049237; Scarlet Red, Black, Grey/Beige vinyl; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $15,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $16,500 – 2.5-inch lift, BF Goodrich All Terrain T/A tires, 5-speed, Aisin locking front hubs, AM-FM – 72,618 miles from new. Good recent repaint. The bed has been lined. The chassis has had an amateur repaint and the engine bay appears original. The interior is very good and without wear. A good, budget cosmetic restoration appropriate for an old workhorse like this. – Old Toyota pickups are nearly indestructible and for a long time were very cheap, so to find one in decent shape is pretty special. Enough people in the collector car hobby value that utility (or just remember it fondly) to the point that good Toyota pickups are bringing surprisingly high prices. And while $16,500 isn’t crazy money or anything, it seems very strong for the kind of truck that you used to be able to pick up all day for under 10 grand not all that long ago.

Lot # 363.1 1990 Toyota Sera Coupe; S/N 2BG50607600001475; Pale Metallic Green/Beige cloth; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $13,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $14,300 – RHD. M.C.O alloy wheels, General Evertrek tires, 1.5 liter 110hp engine, automatic, air conditioning, parking sensors, rain-sensing wipers, Super Live Surround Sound system. – JDM only hatchback with gullwing doors. Good original paint with a smattering of chips on the nose. Good original interior with a few spots on the cushions. Rare, original and well-maintained but has 120,684 km on its odometer. – One of the more unusual Japan Domestic Market cars in recent experience and thoroughly equipped, the WestWorld bidders can be considered the ultimate authority on this Toyota’s value since there’s nothing else to go on.

Lot # 3010 2020 Toyota Supra Coupe; S/N 20201; Matte Grey, Red mirrors/Red; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Charity Fundraiser, no buyer’s premium $2,100,000 plus commission of; Final Price $2,100,000 – The first production 2020 Toyota Supra, engine cover signed by Toyota CEO and development driver Akio Toyoda and comes with his driving suit and helmet. – A proceeds to the American Heart Association and the Bob Woodruff Foundation. Chassis number engine 20201. [It isn’t this car, which is a pre-production show car, but the first one to be built on the production line.] – Sold with great acclaim to Toyota dealer John Staluppi.

Lot # 1314 1957 Watson Indy Roadster Re-Creation; S/N None; White, Red/Red vinyl; Competition car, original as-raced, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $110,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $121,000 – An offset 270 Offy-powered Watson roadster assembled in 2012 to run at Bonneville. Hilborn fuel injection, 425hp, Joe Hunt magneto,

Winters Performance transmission, 3.78 rear gears with drop gear giving 2.53 final ratio, Wilwood rear disc brakes, two fire systems, roll cage. – The developers of this beast spent six years working up to setting a world record of 181.147mph at Bonneville in August 2018 using many A.J. Watson parts from the Fifties. There are some whimsical graphics including Halibrand-replica stickers on the wheel discs and a vinyl graphic quick fill fuel connection. It is clean and orderly, if used, and at least the salt has been scrubbed off. – When is a Watson roadster not a Watson roadster? When it’s a Watson LSR car. Someone at Barrett-Jackson took up the challenge, or at least appreciated the presentation and the cachet of having “the only Indy Offenhauser in the world still in competition.” It’s worth what the WestWorld bidders said it is.

Lot # 454 1954 Willys-Jeep L6-226 Pickup 4×4; S/N 5516810001; Tan/Tan; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $19,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $20,900 – 226/115hp Super Hurricane six, 3-speed, steel wheels, AM radio, single spare in the bed. – Old paint with numerous chips and scratches on the fenders. The stainless trim is aged and dulling. The wood bed trim is bleached and cracking. The frame has been painted, but the components are aged and several paint drips are under the truck. The upholstery has been redone, but nothing else inside has. Inconsistent finish and overall dull, it has serial #0001 and a claimed 2,123 original miles going for it but is otherwise unremarkable. – An expensive result for a mediocre early Jeep pickup, but these are a rare sight these days in any condition and at this number it’s not as expensive as it was in 2017 (showing exactly the same 2,123 miles on the odometer), when Barrett-Jackson sold it in Las Vegas for $33,000.

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Comments

  1. Reply

    Hi Rick, thanks for the thorough report. Your auction reporting is the best on the internet. RE: BJ, are most of these bidders inebriated? I kid (a little), but I lack any other explanation for some of the high prices.

    RE: Lot # 783.1, the ’67 Jaguar E-Type. I am no Jaguar expert, but I would classify that car as a Series I. Were the tail lights above the bumper as the front lenses are? I believe I’ve read that “some” ’67s got open headlights as the factory slowly transitioned to all the Series II features. Anyway, for a color-changed car, it does seem to have sold for a number a bit above average, but it’s still purdy. Best, Richard

      • rickcarey1
      • February 10, 2019
      Reply

      I accepted B-J’s description of this car as an SII without further checking, but you’re probably correct that this is the obscure and confusing “SI 1/2”.
      Many years ago B-J had an open bidders’ bar and bidders (and lucky media) could drink themselves into oblivion on the house. Not so much today as the number of tipples each day is limited (and the media is lucky to get Diet Coke.) Inebriation is less of an issue than, I think, the euphoria that overtakes some bidders when they arrive, burdened by the expectations of their mates back home who expect them to come home with a car. B-J is the only auction I know of where “I paid a record price” is a brag.

    • Martin Gleason
    • February 12, 2019
    Reply

    Thanks for reviewing the McLaren MP4-12c. I couldn’t believe the price when it crossed the block as I remember seeing it at Mecum numerous times. You never disappoint with your great work.

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