Worldwide Auctioneers, Scottsdale, January 17, 2018

Worldwide’s second year in the Valley of the Sun during Car Week (which really should be called “Auction Week” because that’s why everyone is here) featured a star studded consignment.

As the numbers that follow show, the sell-through was down 15.1 points from last year. The total sale was off by over $5 million and 54.7% of the 2017 total.

Four lots were reported bid to $1 million or more. None of them sold, leaving bucket loads of money on the table. Last year Worldwide sold two lots on $1 million plus hammer bids, adding $3,080,000 to the sale total.

On the evidence of the numbers it is not generous estimates that created a problem; they were as generous last year.

If there was a problem it was secreted in a tent-within-a-tent with a guard posted outside: the 770K Grosser Offener Tourenwagen once used by Adolf Hitler. If there’s a buzzkill in 2018 it’s anything to do with Adolf Hitler.

Carefully vetted prospective bidders and/or their advisors were admitted one-by-one into the inner sanctum, protecting their identities from casual onlookers, or probing bloggers.

It’s a real quandary: a headline automobile, one of the greatest products of German engineering, design, ingenuity and craftsmanship, that is anathema to a large portion of the population, bearing such a stigma (even though the Hitler-era upholstery has been replaced) that it can’t even be exhibited openly.

It was a stretch to expect it to be sold at auction. And certainly not to someone sitting openly in the auction tent raising a paddle to attempt to acquire a relic of a murderous tyrant. It’s like bidding on Vlad the Impaler’s spear, a blood-soaked rack from the Inquisition or the guillotine that separated Marie Antoinette’s head from her shoulders.

It was unwise marketing and worse positioning.

And it’s only a coincidence that this auction included both the 770K and an SS One, the latter a marque name that William Lyons quickly realized was freighted with negative connotations in the late Thirties and changed to Jaguar.

Fortunately, the Worldwide team is strong and will be back next year with good cars and a less-polarizing headline consignment. Scottsdale 2018 is a lesson learned the hard way.

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2018 51/81 63% 84.3% 0% $122,663 $82,500

[67.3%]

$6,255,800
2017 64/82 78.1% 84.1% 0% $178,718 $104,500

[58.5%]

$11,437,969

Andrew Newton and Greg Ingold contributed many of the on-site observations at Worldwide’s Scottsdale auction; Rick Carey is ultimately responsible for the edits and what you read.

The cars that follow, 42 of the 81 lots offered, are sorted by Marque, Model, Body Style and Year.

Lot # 37 1958 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Veloce Spider; S/N AR1495F04480; Engine # AR131531210; White/Black vinyl, Red piping; Black cloth top; Estimate $110,000 – $140,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $85,000. – Silver steel wheels, radio delete. The numbers are appropriate for a 1969-build Giulietta Spider Veloce, even if the carbs are later Spanish-made units. – Mediocre older repaint on an assembled car with some orange peel on vertical surfaces. Both doors are heavily filled but the fenders are less so. There are a few touched up chips. The major chrome is sound; some of the trim is thin. There are two plugged holes on the front fenders where mirrors once were mounted. The underbody has peeling paint over the old undercoat. Upholstery is sound but for one small break in the driver’s seat piping. The engine compartment is clean and orderly. The 40DCOE Webers are from Spain. A mediocre driver. – The consignor must have had a much higher opinion of this Alfa than those who viewed it during the preview did. The reported high bid is appropriate to its condition.

Lot # 31 1969 All American Racers Eagle-Santa Ana Indy Car; S/N 69703; Engine # AJF524#70400R#83060R; Gold, Black/Black vinyl; Estimate $275,000 – $350,000; Competition restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $240,000. – Turbocharged Foyt-Ford V8, 4-speed, centerlock alloy wheels – The only Eagle-Santa Ana sold to a customer in 1969, to Smokey Yunick and driven at Indy by Joe Leonard. Debris damage (a hose clamp) put a hole in the radiator while running 2nd, and Leonard finished 6th after replacing the radiator. Never raced again, retained by Yunick until he died, then restored. Demonstrated at Goodwood in 2008 but not run since. Very good paint, chrome and upholstery showing only a little careful use. Not like new, but close. – This is a charming history and a great tale to tell, but it would seem like the reported bid could have been enough to see it change hands.

Lot # 26 1954 Austin-Healey 100/4 BN1 Roadster; S/N 150976; Engine # 1B205475; Carmine Red/Black piped in Red; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $53,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $58,300 – Painted centerlock wire wheels, store brand tires, Lucas driving lights, badge bar, woodrim steering wheel, overdrive, dual mirrors, BMIHT documented. – Originally delivered in Belgium. The grille doesn’t quite fit flush. Some paint coming up at the top edge of the passenger’s door. The gaps are a little erratic. Very tidy underneath and very good interior. Good enough to casually show and drive in style, but it’s definitely not perfect. – Sold at Mecum’s Monterey auction in 2012 for $47,700. This is a perfectly appropriate price for an aged but handsome restoration that looks ready to tackle any range of vintage driving events.

Lot # 74 1958 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz Convertible; S/N 58E076247; Black/Red leather; Estimate $120,000 – $150,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $95,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $104,500 – Wheel covers, whitewalls, Autronic Eye, parade boot, pushbutton radio, rear seat speaker, power windows, power top, power seat, dual mirrors. – Small scratch above the left headlight. Good older paint otherwise. Straight body. Light wrinkling to the seats and lightly worn switchgear. Very clean underneath. A high quality restoration of a great car, just a little aged since it was done about 10 years ago. – For an older show car, spectacular in black over red, this is a remarkable bargain that could have brought well over $100,000 hammer without being expensive.

Lot # 55 1936 Cadillac Series 75 Convertible Sedan, Body by Fleetwood; S/N 3A1281; Grey/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $110,000 – $130,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $88,000. – Red steel wheels, wide whitewalls, large hubcaps, dual enclosed sidemounts with mirrors, Trippe lights, dual remote spotlights, rollup division. – Paint, top and interior make a good first impression that doesn’t hold up on closer inspection. The major chrome is good but the trim bits are thin and old. The fender wells have peeling paint over the old paint. The engine compartment has been done and is clean and orderly. The upholstery, top and particularly the instruments and dash are very good. A competently but not thoroughly restored tour-quality Cadillac. – Cataloged as a “fresh ground-up restoration”, this car’s presentation doesn’t live up to that expectation. It looks like a freshly updated older restoration for which the result here is appropriate. It is, however, an ideal car for CCCA tours and is a sound value for that purpose.

Lot # 41 1941 Cadillac Sixty Special Sedan, Body by Fleetwood; S/N 6342534; Black/Gray cloth; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $26,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $28,600 – Wheel covers, Silvertown wide whitewalls, radiator mascot, fender skirts, wood interior trim, dash clock, radio, robe rail. – CCCA Full Classic (TM). Older tires, but the paint, chrome, underbody and interior are all in great shape with no needs. Straight body. Not much in the way of history represented, but a very good example of a late prewar Caddy. – The Sixty Special broke new ground in body design and is an historically important model. This one sold at Barrett-Jackson last year for $44,000, a realistic price, and its result here is a bargain.

Lot # 51 1969 Chevrolet Camaro SS Sport Coupe; S/N 124379N569071; LeMans Blue, White vinyl roof/Black vinyl, houndstooth cloth; Estimate $120,000 – $150,000; Recent restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $81,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $89,100 – L89 396/375hp, 4-speed, power steering and brakes, 3.73 axle with Positraction, SS wheels with Firestone Wide Oval tires, console, AM/FM radio. Includes Protect-O-Plate and copy of the window sticker. – Excellent paint and body with no visible flaws or blemishes. The engine compartment has been fully restored with few signs of use. The underbody has no notable flaws and the interior is still fresh. A gorgeous restoration with few miles since completion, and a rarely seen L89 Camaro. – Reported sold by Russo and Steele here in Scottsdale in 2005 for $69,660 before its current restoration and highly desirable with the L89 aluminum heads, it is a very good value at this price.

Lot # 72 1960 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 00867S109534; White, Silver coves/Black; Black top; Estimate $120,000 – $150,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $90,000. – 283/270hp, dual quads, 4-speed, spinner wheel covers, Silvertown whitewalls, WonderBar radio, heat/defrost, dual quads. – Very good paint, chrome and interior. Small paint blister on the cowl. Lightly run restored engine bay. Multiple NCRS Top Flight winner and Bloomington Gold winner last year, but not super fresh. It’s still gorgeous, though. – Reported sold by Mecum in Denver last July for $88,000. A proven, documented Corvette this good is a six-figure car, so holding out for more at the reported high bid was understandable, although at the reported high bid the buyer’s check would be only a thousand dollars short of 6-figures.

Lot # 64 1967 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 194677S112893; Black, Silver Stinger/Silver leather; Black top; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Modified restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $93,500 – Turbine wheels, side exhaust, L88 heads and induction, woodrim steering wheel, wood parking brake handle, power windows. – Good older paint and chrome. The exhaust surrounds are lightly scratched, as they often are on these cars. Light wrinkling to the seats but mostly very good interior. Tasteful mods for performance and unusual but attractive colors. – Like an L88 on a budget, but it wasn’t a prospect that appealed to many of the Worldwide bidders and it might have even brought more if it had been left stock. It only brought lowball bids that were easy to refuse and was bid on the block to $75,000, closing later with this realistic result.

Lot # 67 1953 Chevrolet Corvette Roadster; S/N E53F001201; Polo White/Red vinyl; Black cloth top; Estimate $275,000 – $325,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $227,273 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $250,000. – WonderBar radio, wheel covers, whitewalls. – Excellent paint, chrome and interior. The little cockpit surround pieces behind the doors that are usually dilapidated and askew are very good. The paint on the hood edges is starting to buff through. The underbody and chassis are like new. There is no sign of fiberglass cloth weave under the paint. A fine but over-restored ’53 Corvette. – Bid to $220,000 on the block, closed later with this result, the same price as another ’53 Corvette brought at RM Sotheby’s. There were four of them in the Scottsdale auctions, an unprecedented gathering.

Lot # 32 1964 Chevrolet Impala SS 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 41447L121052; Palomar Red/Black vinyl; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000 – 409/340hp, 4-speed, wheel covers, bias ply narrow whitewalls, dual exhaust, tach, bucket seats, floor shift, console, factory AM radio, dash clock. – Good, lightly aged older paint. Small ding in the front bumper. The grille doesn’t quite fit straight and the gaps are a little erratic. Good, mostly restored interior. Very clean and lightly used underneath. Body-off restored in 2010 and done professionally, but not to meticulous standards and it’s been lightly enjoyed over the past few years. Represented as the numbers matching engine. – This is a very good value in a competently restored car with a desirable drivetrain.

Lot # 65 1931 Cord Front Drive L-29 Cabriolet; S/N FDA4201; Engine # FDA4201; Blue, Dark Blue accent/Gray; Gray cloth top; Estimate $325,000 – $375,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $260,000 – Chrome wire wheels, dual sidemount spares with mirrors, golf bag door, rumble seat. – Excellent paint, chrome and interior. The underbody is spotless. The only flaw is discoloration and fraying around the rear window. Otherwise, it’s one detailing away from a show field. Restored in 2009 with a long history of ACD, AACA and concours awards. ACD certified. – Despite a restoration that is nearly a decade old this is still a concours-quality Cord with seriously handsome and sporting coachwork. The reported high bid is realistic for it.

Lot # 11 1981 DeLorean DMC-12 Coupe; S/N SCEDT26T0BD006940; Stainless Steel/Gray leather; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $44,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $48,400 – Power windows, air conditioning, manuals. – The body is in good shape and the underbody is very clean. The interior also looks just about like new other than light wear to the seats. There is a light track scratch on the passenger’s side window and a tiny dent on the right A-pillar. Otherwise, it looks like a new DeLorean, and with 897 miles on the odometer, it really should. – Sold at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale in 2010 for a very expensive $51,700. Then sold at Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas two years and 30 miles ago for $36,300. A big but reasonable premium was given for the mileage and mostly like-new condition. It’s destined to life as a collector car, and probably will never see its odometer tick over to four digits.

Lot # 54 1970 Dodge Challenger R/T Hemi Convertible; S/N JS27R0B171715; Plum Crazy/Black vinyl; Black top; Estimate $1,600,000 – $1,900,000; Recent restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,320,000 – 426/425hp Hemi, 4-speed, hood pins, Polyglas GT tires, 4.10 Super Track Pack, Hurst pistol grip shifter, AM-FM, power brakes – Excellent paint and body. The brightwork is all like new. The convertible top fits tightly and has no creasing. The engine compartment are both in like new condition. The interior has no obvious wear. A beautifully restored car with nothing out of place, restored for Milton Robson in the 90’s. Represented as the only Hemi Challenger convertible with a 4-speed and 4.10 Super Track Pack as well as one of just five Hemi 4-speed R/T convertibles. Factory replacement engine block. – Mecum offered this car at Indy in 2009 where it recorded a $700,000 high bid and a year later when it was bid to $675,000. That was then, this is now and the Hemi ‘Cuda/Challengers are working their way out of a market dip brought on my speculators’ hype, then collectors’ reality. This is a modest bid for this car’s configuration, equipment, colors and restoration and not surprising that the consignor elected to keep it.

Lot # 19 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona R/T Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N XS29J9B402970; Hemi Orange, Black/Black vinyl; Estimate $600,000 – $800,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $470,000 – 426/425hp Hemi, automatic, hood pins. – Represented as the original engine. Good original sheet metal with excellent lines. The paint is older and has some swirling. The brightwork is dull around the windows and there is an excessive amount of sealant between the a pillar trim and windshield. The engine compartment is aged although not excessively, and the same goes for the underbody. The driver’s seat has some minor wear and the interior has little major wear otherwise. An 1990s restoration that has been enjoyed but is holding up very well. Original broadcast sheet documented. – Daytonas are rare, much more than Superbirds, but turning down the reported high bid is a triumph of optimistic over reasonable considering the age of the restoration.

Lot # 34 1983 Ferrari 512 BBi Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFJA09B000044393; Red, Black/Black, Red leather; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $200,000. – Centerlock alloy wheels, Michelin TRX tires, Alpine cassette stereo, power windows, air conditioning, Daytona-style seats. – Several chips on the nose and the paint is a little dulled overall. There is also paint coming off the window frames. There are a few small chips on the roof spoiler as well. The gauge faces are a little faded. Represented as a consistently maintained one-owner car, but the mileage is on the high side for one of these at 64,744 miles, and it is in driver condition by Ferrari standards. – This car hammered not sold at Russo and Steele Monterey last year at a $160,000 high bid. That was a lowball offer and refusing it is understandable, but the high bid was a lot more realistic to the car’s used condition. It made a quick trip to Ft. McDowell where a couple days later it was a no-sale at the Silver Arizona auction with a high bid of $195,000.

Lot # 60 2003 Ferrari Enzo Berlinetta; S/N ZFFCW56AX30132049; Engine # 74133; Red/Red leather; Estimate $2,750,000 – $3,000,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $2,300,000. – Assembly number 49105. Chipguarded nose. – 2,752 miles from new. Looks like more. There are no major flaws but the driver’s seat is creased and the firewall metal quilt is dented. It’s a clean used car, but still a used car. – Sold at Gooding’s Scottsdale auction in 2016 for $2,860,000 described as 2,700 miles and today having 2,752. The difference between the bid and the ask is a measure of the difference between sellers’ view of the market and buyers’ in early 2018.

Lot # 69 1989 Ferrari Testarossa Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFSG17A9K0081772; Black/Tan leather; Estimate $150,000 – $175,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $135,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $148,500. – Momo steering wheel. – Same owner since 1989, and he bought it from Johnny Carson’s attorney. Showing 3,996 miles. Engine out service done in October. Very good paint. Very little wear on the seats, and there shouldn’t be given the mileage. Just about like new, and finished in attractive colors. – Offered at Mecum’s Las Vegas sale two months ago where it was reported bid to $147,500, the seller got the message and took the money here at Worldwide’s Scottsdale auction.

Lot # 17 1971 Ford Bronco Wagon 4×4; S/N U15GLJ80612; Swiss Aqua, White hardtop/Black vinyl; Estimate $55,000 – $65,000; Truck restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $33,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $36,300 – 302/205hp, automatic, wheel covers, dual mirrors, rear-mounted spare, auxiliary fuel tank, Marti report. – Very good recent paint. Small scratch on the driver’s door. Very good newer seats and carpets. Light road wear underneath but unrestored. Original glass and window frames. Almost too pretty to feel comfortable actually using it, but still cosmetically restored to truck standards. – For a well-optioned truck that has never been fully restored but meticulously cared for in a West Coast climate, this was a pretty good buy in the currently super-heated market for first generation Broncos.

Lot # 33 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 429 SportsRoof; S/N 9F02Z187783; Raven Black/Black vinyl; Estimate $450,000 – $550,000; Unrestored original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $350,000 – 429/375hp, 4-speed, Magnum 500 wheels, Polyglas GT tires, front spoiler. – The original paint is faded and scratched but not abused. The engine compartment is extremely clean and well sorted with minimal aging. The exhaust has been replaced with the rest of the underbody being original. The interior is excellent and shows little wear. A beautifully preserved car with 8,754 miles, represented to have its original numbers matching and recently freshened drivetrain. – The high bid here would be sufficient for a much more used, higher miles, older restored Boss Nine. This one deserved a significant premium for preservation. It is not alone as an unrestored, drag strip miles only, Boss Nine, however, and it shouldn’t have taken very much more than the reported high bid to take it home.

 Lot # 75 1950 Jaguar Mark V 3.5 Drophead Coupe; S/N 647345; Engine # Z3184; White, Black/Maroon leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $52,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $57,200 – Hub caps and trim rings, hood ornament, dual wing mirrors, Lucas driving lights, fender skirts, wood interior trim. – Older tires and dull wheels. The lenses for the driving lights are on crooked. Good older paint and chrome. Uneven gaps. A few scrapes on the back edge of the driver’s door. Sound but lightly worn older interior, including some imperfections in the wood. Definitely wouldn’t win a JCNA show trophy, but plenty good enough to serve as a stylish driver. – Discounted heavily for its aged condition and bought at no reserve for nearly project car money, the new owner has quite a bit of extra money to put back into some straightforward restoration work.

Lot # 61 1954 Jaguar XK 120 Drophead Coupe; S/N S681056; British Racing Green/Brown leather; Estimate $80,000 – $110,000; Modified restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $67,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $74,250 – Centerlock chrome wire wheels, dual wing mirrors, driving lights, burled wood dash, Getrag 5-speed, engine from a later XK140 MC. – Very good older paint and chrome. Old tires. Very good interior. Light road wear and dirt underneath. Very attractive in these colors and better than your average driver, but no show car and fitted with a drivetrain that may improve drivability but will not help value. – Sold at no reserve and bought for driver quality money. The drivetrain swap proved discouraging to some, but the buyer snagged a fun, handsome XK120 FHC at a bargain.

Lot # 4 1958 Jaguar XK 150 Drophead Coupe; S/N S837950; Black/Red leather; Black top; Estimate $100,000 – $130,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $77,500 – Centerlock wire wheels, Silvertown blackwalls, dual wing mirrors, Lucas driving lights, black cloth boot cover. – Very good paint and bumpers. The wheels could use a cleaning. The rubber around the mirrors is dry and cracking. Two small paint blemishes behind the passenger’s door. Lightly worn but attractive interior. An honest, lightly aged old restoration that’s still good enough that you could be proud to be seen in it. Fitted with a base 3.4-liter engine from new but now has lots of extra punch from a 3.8-liter XK six. – Even though it has a non-original engine, the swap arguably makes it a better car and this car is too good for the reported high bid regardless.

Lot # 22 1962 Jaguar XKE SI flat floor Roadster; S/N 875747; Black/Beige leather; Black top; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $215,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $236,500 – Chrome centerlock wire wheels, cloth boot cover, woodrim steering wheel, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, show polished engine. – Flat floor car represented as restored 400 miles, but two decades, ago. The paint looks older. A piece of rubber around the left front bumper is hanging loose. The seats are lightly worn and the steering wheel is a little beat up. Some of the switchgear is lightly worn but the interior is mostly restored. An early flat floor roadster is just about the most collectible configuration for an XKE, but this one appears to have been restored before these cars got all that expensive. – This result intelligently compromises the age of the restoration and the collectibility of the flat floor XKE in a transaction that is fair to both the buyer and the seller.

Lot # 30 1957 Kurtis Kraft 500G2 Indy Car; S/N 702; Engine # 89; Black, Gold/Beige, Red piping; Estimate $300,000 – $375,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $280,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $308,000. – Offset “laydown” Offenhauser, 4-wheel disc brakes, fuel injection, Jones tach. – Champ Car history from 1957 through 1960 including a 5th at Trenton in ’58 and 8th at Indy in ’59 with Eddie Johnson. An older track-ready restoration for Bob McConnell by Jim Robbins with 255 Offy rebuilt by ex-Bettenhausen and Yunick mechanic Willie Davis in Smokey Yunick’s “City of Daytona Beach” ’58 season livery. This is not a show car, but a faithful restoration to as-raced condition. Gold center Halibrand centerlock wheels, Firestone tires. Display used including Goodwood, and a few chips and scrapes to show for it. 2008 AACA National First Prize winner. – Impressively restored some time ago to as-raced condition, with a solid history at The Brickyard and elsewhere, whether it is on display in a collection or taken on-track at vintage oval events it is going to represent itself, its owner and the driver and crew well.

Lot # 82 1931 Marmon Sixteen Close-Coupled 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 149630; Olive Green, Black fenders/Olive Green; Estimate $200,000 – $300,000; Unrestored original, 4- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $75,000. – Red wire wheels, dual sidemounts with chrome rings and mirrors, Trippe lights, oval Depress Beam headlights, accessory turn signals. – Unrestored chassis and underbody. Good recent upholstery. Shaky, wobbly body with horrible fits and an awful paint job that would be despicable on a Model A. – Any cash offer for this Marmon, a car so neglected and scroungy it might be contagious if touched, should be taken with alacrity, even enthusiasm. Yes, it’s a Marmon Sixteen. It’s also a 4-door sedan bodied Marmon Sixteen, and it is in awful … seriously awful … shape. Parts will probably fall off in the transporter on the way home.

Lot # 52 1959 Maserati 3500 GT Coupe, Body by Touring; S/N AM101524; Ivory/Blue leather; Estimate $250,000 – $280,000; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $197,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $217,250. – Body color steel wheels, Pirelli Cinturato blackwall tires, Maserati Classiche documented. – Sound but old original paint and chrome. Poor, cracked, torn original front seat upholstery; rear seat upholstery is sound but stiff. Doors close smoothly. No evidence of filler beyond that used by Touring. Old undercoat. Orderly original engine compartment with a new brake servo and master cylinder. Good enough to be used as is (with seat covers.) – Bought appropriately for its condition, with no allowance for preservation, both the seller and the buyer should be satisfied with this transaction.

Lot # 66 1967 Mercedes-Benz 250SL Roadster; S/N 12002817; Silver, Silver Hardtop/Red; Estimate $55,000 – $75,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $54,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $59,400 – Hub caps and trim rings, Yokohama tires, Becker Europa radio, VDO dash clock, two tops. – Represented as a three-owner car. Two small chips on the hood. Otherwise very good older paint and chrome. Very good restored interior and what is said to be the original upholstery. Light road wear underneath. A standard older restoration that looks great in these colors. – The time to cash out with these Pagoda SLs was a couple of years ago as prices have dropped notably for both these and 190s, but this result was still appropriate and in line with other recent results for cars in similar condition.

Lot # 62 1939 Mercedes-Benz 770K Grosser Offener Tourenwagen, Body by Sindelfingen; S/N 189744; Engine # 429326; Blue, Black fenders/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate on request; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $7,000,000. – Steel wheels, dual enclosed sidemounts, outside headpipes, dual spotlights, blackout headlight covers blackout lights, dual backup lights, jump seats, translucent sun visors. – Bought by the German government and believed to have been used by Adolf Hitler, formerly in the Imperial Palace Collection. Cracking but sound old repaint. Good interior reupholstered at some time, decent chrome. Orderly but aged engine compartment and chassis. An object, not an automobile. – This Mercedes had its own secluded pre-sale viewing area where qualified bidders were allowed access one-by-one. It was unlikely that anyone would actually buy it at auction, except anonymously on the phone, even with 10% of the hammer price donated to Holocaust education. It is, however, an impressive, heavy, armored monster of German engineering, craftsmanship and design.

 

Lot # 44 1955 Mercury Montclair Convertible; S/N 55LA15427M; Alaska White/Black, White leather; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $47,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $51,700 – 292/198hp, automatic, wire wheels, whitewalls, fender skirts, hood ornament, dual spotlight mirrors, Continental kit, cloth boot cover, column shift, pushbutton radio, dash clock, power windows. – Very good paint and chrome. The doors don’t fit flush. Light wrinkling to the seats and the original gauges are a little bit faded. Small shortcomings and light age take little away from this loaded and elegant car, but it is no longer a show winner – This is a classy car bought for an appropriate price.

Lot # 70 1970 Oldsmobile 4-4-2 W-30 Convertible; S/N 344670M180235; Azure Blue/Blue vinyl; Dark Blue top; Estimate $180,000 – $220,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $155,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $170,500 – 455/370hp, 4-speed, Rally wheels, Polyglas tires, bucket seats, console. – Excellent body. The paint and brightwork have seen minimal wear. The engine compartment and underbody are both excellent and the interior has little use. A beautiful older restoration with few signs of road use. – Hammered not sold at a $180,000 high bid at Mecum Kissimmee last year, which was a fair offer and should have been taken in light of this result. It’s less than the car really deserves, but the seller decided to cut losses, drop the reserve and move on.

Lot # 80 1953 Packard Caribbean Convertible; S/N 26782I05; Turquoise/Green, White leather; White top; Estimate $120,000 – $150,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $102,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $112,200 – 327/180hp, automatic, chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, pushbutton radio, dash clock, power windows, Continental kit. – Excellent fresh paint and chrome. The hood gaps are slightly uneven. Small crack in the steering wheel but mostly excellent interior. The clock actually works and is ticking away. Body-off restored less than 600 miles ago and looks very fresh. – These Packards are expensive to restore, so it’s worth it buy one that’s already been finished. This is just such a car, and it brought a deservedly strong price. The first year Caribbeans are distinctive with their radiused rear wheel arches and monotone colors, not as flamboyant as later multi-color Caribbeans.

Lot # 39 1971 Plymouth ‘Cuda Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N BS23R1B204626; Blue, White vinyl roof/Blue vinyl; Estimate $450,000 – $600,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $380,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $418,000 – 426/425hp Hemi, automatic, 4.10 Super Track Pack, shaker hood, hub caps and trim rings, Polyglas GT tires, rear seat speaker, power brakes. – Stored in a basement, disassembled and on a rotisserie, for years until 2014 and has 21,435 miles from new. Represented as the original engine, transmission and rear axle. Excellent paint and body. The engine compartment is fully restored and is well sorted. The underbody is excellent with no signs of use. The interior is fully restored and unused. A beautiful restoration to factory specs without being overdone. – This ‘Cuda has a great story and a restoration to go with it, which brought a price appropriate to its attributes.

Lot # 50 1957 Pontiac Bonneville Convertible; S/N P857H35520; White, Red/Red, White leather; White top; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $68,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $74,800 – 347/317hp fuel injection, automatic, spinner wheel covers, whitewalls, fender skirts, Continental kit, dual mirrors, WonderBar radio, dash clock, power steering, power brakes, power windows, boot cover. – Very good older paint and chrome. Straight bodywork, but the hood gaps are a little uneven. The driver’s seat is fairly worn and the steering wheel rim has quite a bit of cracking, but the interior is mostly very good. A very attractive car with desirable equipment and lots of performance. Not perfect, but there are no major needs. – Sold at the NY Auto Salon and Auction in 1999 for $88,000 fresh from restoration and still showing positively today, this result is less than a comparable FI Bel Air convertible and far less than the low six-figure price it should have brought here. Unless there is something very significantly wrong with it after a period of museum display, something not apparent in its visual condition, this is a bargain.

Lot # 53 1966 Pontiac GTO 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 242176K115646; White/Red vinyl; Estimate $50,000 – $60,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $33,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $36,300 – 389/360hp, Tri-Power, 4-speed, Rally wheels with trim rings, red line tires, bucket seats, console, floor shift, factory AM radio, Safe-T-Track, PHS documents. – Very good 2017 paint and chrome. The doors don’t fit flush. Lightly pitted window frames. The right headlight bezel doesn’t fit flush. Very good restored interior. Recent paint, but the rest of the car is a sound older restoration. Represented with three owners from new and as a factory Tri-Power 4-speed. – The new paint wasn’t enough to overcome the effect of use and age on the original restoration, but even that qualification wasn’t enough to make this result anything but a bargain for a Tri-Power 360 horse 4-speed GTO.

Lot # 48 1982 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ93ZCS000418; White/Black leather; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $180,000 – White painted Fuchs wheels, Potenza tires, slant nose, sunroof, whale tail, rear window wiper, Momo steering wheel, Ruf speedometer, power windows, Blaupunkt stereo, side intakes, upgraded intercooler, 5-speed gearbox. – Genuine Sonderwunsche car. Very good paint and interior other than very light wrinkling to the seats. Showing 32,187 miles. A barely used factory-tweaked 930. – The factory ‘Special Wish’ cars are, well, special, and that’s especially true when they have as many performance tweaks as this car. Holding onto it at the reported high bid was understandable, as it arguably deserves something on the other side of 200 grand.

 

Lot # 58 2015 Porsche 918 Spyder; S/N WP0CA2A10FS800324; Onyx Black/Black leather; Estimate $1,600,000 – $1,900,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,350,000. – Acid Green calipers, chipguarded nose. – Flawed chipguard application. 1,300 miles and nearly like new. – One of four 918 Spyders in Scottsdale this week. Two sold, bringing $1,292,500 and $1,430,000, and at this bid the final price here would have been $1,485,000, more than enough.

Lot # 57 2005 Porsche Carrera GT Targa; S/N WP0CA29825L001333; Silver/Black leather; Estimate $650,000 – $750,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $560,000. – Yellow calipers, chipguarded nose. – 4,266 miles and unblemished. – One of two in the Scottsdale auctions, the other sold at Gooding & Company for $715,000. There is no shortage of Carrera GTs around, whether at auction or in dealers’ showrooms. There have been 12 at auctions since Scottsdale 2017 and a little over $600,000 is what it seems to take to own one. At prices like that their 605hp V10 and 6-speed are an attractive alternative to the plethora of hybrid Porsche 918s that are crowding into their market space.

Lot # 68 1965 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III Drophead Coupe, Body by Mulliner Park Ward; S/N LCSC39C; Valentines Smoke Green/Stone leather; Stone vinyl top; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $222,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $244,750 – Quad headlights, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, Lucas driving lights, leather boot cover, bucket seats, column shift, armrests, Blaupunkt cassette stereo, dash clock, power windows, Frigiking air conditioning. – A few scratches on the radiator shell and slightly dulled chrome overall. The paint is older and has lost quite a bit of luster. The original upholstery is sound but shows significant wear. Lots of discoloration on the sunshade mirror. The interior wood and switchgear are mostly sound. Light road wear underneath. Mostly original, so it can be forgiven most of its flaws, but in essentially driver condition. Even so, it’s a rare coachbuilt drophead coupe finished in great colors. – Tasteful and distinctive, this is a sound value in a quality car.

Lot # 24 1965 Shelby Mustang GT350 Fastback; S/N SFM5S482; Wimbledon White, Blue stripes/Black vinyl; Estimate $375,000 – $425,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $320,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $352,000. – 5-spoke Shelby alloy wheels, Kumho tires, dash top gauge cluster, woodrim steering wheel. – Very good older paint. The underbody was restored like new and shows a little age and use. Dusty and only superficially prepared for the auction. The interior is sound but gaining some patina. Scuffed windshield and side window trim. Loose trim piece at the bottom of the windshield. A driver quality GT 350. – Like the XKE sold a few lots before it this older restored GT350’s result is a smart balance between its innate collectibility and the age and condition of its late 90’s restoration.

Lot # 43 1936 SS Jaguar 1 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N 348162; Old English White/Maroon; Black vinyl roof top; Estimate $160,000 – $190,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $110,000 – RHD. Maroon painted centerlock wire wheels, sunroof, rear-mounted spare, pop-out windshield, rear interior courtesy light, dash clock, suicide doors, semaphores, single SU carb, hidden modern radio. – Very good paint and chrome. The gaps are a little erratic. The sunroof doesn’t fit quite right. Tidy and restored underneath. The rear upholstery is original and lightly cracked, but the rest of the interior has been restored and features good leather up front and attractive wood. Represented as one of seven known survivors. A really rare piece of early Jaguar history and a sure conversation starter even if it isn’t a concours car. Would be a highlight of any big Jag collection and, relatively speaking, it isn’t even that expensive. – There can be no argument about the attractiveness of this SS Jaguar with its long hood and low roof close-coupled 4-seat passenger compartment set back on the chassis. This is a rare example with a sound and usable British restoration and it’s not surprising that the consignor liked it better that the reported high bid.

Lot # 9 1966 Volkswagen Type 2 (Van) Samba Microbus, 21-Window; S/N 256015181; Green, White/Green; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $110,000 – Hub caps, whitewalls, dual mirrors, dash clock, vinyl sunroof. – US market example. Very good paint, chrome and interior. There are some scratches on a few of the windows and some of the trim pieces as well as some scuffs on the steering column. The upper window gaskets are also a little loose. From a short distance, though, this looks just as good as any other freshly overrestored Transporter, and it looks great in these colors. The 21-Window also isn’t quite as desirable as its 23-window cousin. – There were other freshly redone Transporters that sold very well in Scottsdale this year, including a ludicrously expensive $220,000 23-Window at Gooding. This one isn’t quite concours-quality and as a 21-window it’s worth a little less, but the reported high bid here should have been sufficient to see it change hands.

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