RM Sotheby’s, Porsche 70th Anniversary Porsche Experience Center, Atlanta, October 27, 2018

RM Sotheby’s capitalized on the 70th anniversary of the founding of Porsche with a one-time auction at the Porsche Experience Center in Atlanta.

“Capitalized” in the sense that Porsche is far and away the hot marque of the moment. The all-Porsche sale in Atlanta was recognition of that stature and an acknowledgment that Porsches are often the dominant single marque at auctions.

Porsche’s long record of competition success was under-represented in Atlanta. There are only five in the cars reported here. None of them had particularly illustrious competition histories which goes a long way to explaining why they under-performed the sale as a whole with only two of the five selling, a 40% sale rate.

One of those two, however, was the 1985 Paris-Dakar Rally 959 which topped the results with a nearly staggering price of $5,400,000 hammer,  $5,945,000 with commission, a hammer bid that was $2 million more than RM Sotheby’s pre-sale high estimate. And RM Sotheby’s isn’t noted for conservative estimates.

In a market conditioned to expect mind-blowing 515hp twin turbo engines in 959s it is worth noting that the 1984-85 Paris-Dakar 959s had naturally aspirated 3.2 liter Carrera-derived powerplants. The twin turbos showed up at the start in Paris in 1986.

911s dominated the docket, of course. 22 of the docket was made up of cars that don’t qualify as “antique”, having been built in the last 25 years. They were nearly uniformly well-received by bidders, achieving a sell-through of 86.4%, well above that of the sale as a whole even though half of them sold under their pre-sale low estimates.

That success suggests the makeup and interests of the bidders may have skewed to a Millennial audience that grew up dreaming of GT2 and GT3s. For them the fearsome 935 K4 and 956s at Le Mans were ancient history.

Their fathers satisfied themselves with paying $280,000 for an older restored 356A Speedster, $494,500 for a freshly cosmetically restored example, and $307,500 for their rust-red barn find brother.

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2018 53/63 84.1% 57.7% 11.5% $475,937 $168,000

35.3%]

$25,224,640

Andrew Newton attended to gather the on-site observations. The final copy is edited by me, and I am solely responsible for its content and conclusions.

49 of the 63 lots are described, sorted here by lot number. There was a plethora of Porsche automobilia making the first vehicle lot number 162.


Lot # 162 1984 Porsche 944 Coupe; S/N WP0AA0948EN458077; Engine # 43E07368; Guards Red/Black; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $26,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $29,120. – 5-speed, red alloy wheels, Pirelli tires, Blaupunkt cassette stereo, tools, books, manuals, sales invoice, Porsche Production Specification documented. – First year 944, recently serviced and represented as 10,749 miles from new. One owner until a few months ago. Light road wear underneath but the paint and interior are fantastic and this has to be among the best early 944s in existence. – With this level of preservation and mileage this low, this is an ideal example to represent the 944 model in a comprehensive Porsche collection. And at this price, which is absolute top dollar for a 944, it’s really too expensive to put many more miles on.

Lot # 164 1994 Porsche 928 GTS Coupe; S/N WP0AA2923RS820091; Engine # 81R50528; Grand Prix White/Cashmere leather; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $112,000. – Automatic, power sunroof, factory cassette stereo, climate control, power seats. – Showing 16,159 original miles, finished in rare colors and in practically new condition, this is a collector-grade example of the rare GTS version of the 928. – The 928 GTS was the last, fastest and most developed version of the 928 design that stretches way back to the 1970s. The GTS is also the most valuable of the series, but this result was massive, and even more surprising given the automatic transmission.

Lot # 166 1969 Porsche 911E Coupe, Body by Karmann; S/N 119220093; Engine # 6290258; Polo Red/Black leatherette; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $72,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $81,200. – 5-speed, Fuchs wheels, tinted glass, Kardex copy and Porsche CofA documented. – In a Virginia barn since 1986. Pretty much all original. Chips on the front, pitting on the bumpers and dull paint that is rubbed through in spots. Sound interior. Not currently running. With mechanical sorting, it could be a neat car as is since it has just the right amount of patina to be charming without being rotten. – There is some premium paid for originality, especially considering that it doesn’t run. At this price, the new owner doesn’t have any money left over to do much of a restoration, so they might as well leave it alone as a preservation class type of car, which is its highest and best use, anyway.

Lot # 167 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe; S/N WP0AC2995VS375841; Black/Black leather; Estimate $300,000 – $400,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $390,000 plus commission of 11.28%; Final Price $434,000. – 3601/424hp twin turbo, 6-speed, Turbo Twist wheels, yellow calipers, sunroof, vented wing, all-wheel drive, carbon fiber interior trim, air conditioning, air compressor. – 19,447 miles from new but looks like a car with a tenth of that, which isn’t too surprising. One of 345 (just 176 made it to the U.S.) 993 Turbo S models, which features more power and some tweaks to the body. – Among the late air-cooled 911s, the Turbo S is toward the top of the list in terms of collectability. Not a stripped-down track toy, it still has all-wheel drive and a comfy interior, not that they see much time on the road these days. While a few 993 Turbo Ss have sold for more, this result is still near the top and the car deserves to be.

Lot # 168 1971 Porsche 914/6 Targa; S/N 9141430230; Engine # 6414069; Willow Green/Black vinyl; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $130,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $145,600. – 5-speed, Fuchs wheels, engine enlarged to 2.2 liters, Koni shocks, 911 S front calipers, black vinyl covered Targa panel, Porsche CofA documented, owner’s manual, tool roll, jack, passenger footrest. – Documented ownership and great colors, one of two to come to the U.S. in Willow Green. Restored in the 1990s with some light performance mods, but still presents like a fresh car. Very good paint, interior and underneath with nothing to pick on. – Color counts for a lot in Porsche world, and in this case the attractive and rare Willow Green trumped the non-original performance goodies on this car to bring a truly over-the-top price. For reference, another perfectly good 914/6 (Lot 204) in a more common shade of metallic green sold for $95,200.

Photo by Jeremy Cliff © 2018 Courtesy RM Sotheby’s

Lot # 169 1995 Porsche 911 Cup 3.8 RSR Evo Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ99ZSS398084; White/Black; Estimate $250,000 – $275,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $220,000. – Speedline modular wheels, red calipers, fire system, Recaro seat, 410hp upgraded engine with Teilert Engineering slide throttle FI and programmable Porsche efi controller, G-50 6-speed, limited slip and full competition equipment – Rare Cup car upgraded to Evo specs in period. Two owners. Never professionally raced, but has been used and has the usual rock chips on the nose. Otherwise looks just fine and an interesting car. One of the very last air-cooled racing Porsches. – Competition cars had a tough time here in Atlanta, including this very credible RSR built to Evo specs. The racers must have been at Road Atlanta, not the Porsche Experience Center.

Lot # 170 2006 Porsche 911 Carrera S Club Coupe; S/N WP0AB29916S745039; Engine # 68640596; Azurro California/Gray leather; Estimate $120,000 – $160,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $135,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $151,200. – 3,797/381hp X51 Power Kit, 6-speed, Sport Chrono Package Plus, original window sticker and Porsche CoA documented. – Number 39 of just 50 cars built to commemorate the PCA’s 50th anniversary and believed to be the only one sold in Canada. Two tiny scratches on the left rear. Otherwise looks like a new car and has 3,091 miles. – While the 2006 Club Coupe is a rare and collectible car, its value isn’t really clear since it’s not exactly a car that comes up for sale very often and comes from the earlier water-cooled era that isn’t particularly popular with collectors. This example was listed online last year for $230 Grand, but the result it brought here seems a lot more realistic.

Photo by Darin Schnabel © 2018 Courtesy RM Sotheby’s

Lot # 173 1958 Porsche 356A 1600 Super Speedster, Body by Reutter; S/N 83799; Engine # 81253; N/A/Black; Black top; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Unrestored original, 4- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $275,000 plus commission of 11.82%; Final Price $307,500. – Wheel covers, gold brightwork, woodrim steering wheel, wood shift knob. – Missing all carpets and both door panels as well as some exterior trim pieces. Rough older replacement seats, but they aren’t as bad as the rest of the car. The mirrors are missing. The body is down to bare metal and surface rusted in most spots. Very dirty underneath but not majorly rotten. The bumpers are loose. Reported to run but the brakes don’t work. Acquired in the 1980s and a restoration was started, but has been sitting in the Dallas area ever since. Your standard rough barn find, but it is a Speedster and worth saving. – Sold for what a good driver quality example would normally expect to bring. Worth restoring, but at this price it will be a labor of love. Spending more than a car is ultimately worth to buy and restore it is not a tax-deductible contribution to automotive history, as commendable as the project is.

Photo by Patrick Ernzen © 2018 Courtesy RM Auctions

Lot # 174 1965 Porsche 911 Coupe; S/N 303093; Engine # 903173; Polo Red/Black leatherette; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $220,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $246,400. – 1991/130hp, 5-speed, chromed steel wheels, Michelin tires, gold badges, woodrim Porsche steering wheel, Webasto gasoline heater, driving lights, wood dash, Blaupunkt AM/FM radio, VDO dash clock, correct spare wheel, jack, tool roll, owner’s manual. – Dull but actually quite sound original paint. Chips across the nose but no crazing, cracks or other big scratches. It’s just dull. Dull but not ugly chrome and brightwork. Tidy original engine bay. Very good original interior. A dry, clean and honest all original car that looks like it should have fewer miles than the 95,577 on the odometer. Although it was an East Coast car for most of its life, it looks like the kind of original, lightly worn car you see buzzing around Monterey and parallel parked on the street. It’s an ideal preservation class example of a very early Reutter-bodied 911. – Sold by RM at Monterey in 2015 for $187,000. It has covered just 17 miles since then and remains in the same well-preserved and unrestored condition. The all-in price is about a third more after three years and is a reasonable result early in RM’s Porsche Experience Center auction.

Lot # 175 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7 Lightweight Coupe; S/N 9113601580; Engine # 6631543; Grand Prix White, Green Carrera graphics/Black leatherette; Estimate $875,000 – $1,100,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $925,000 plus commission of 10.54%; Final Price $1,022,500. – Green painted Fuchs wheels, Pirelli Cinturato tires, limited slip, single mirror, Porsche CofA, build sheet copy, original Wagenpass documented. – Owned by Eugen Strahl and has a little period race history. Excellent paint, interior and underneath. Freshly restored and just placed first in class at the 2018 Porsche Parade, which says a lot. It’s still show-ready. – The Carrera RS 2.7 Lightweight is pretty much king of the hill when it comes to classic 911s. Values have slipped a bit since the peak of Porsche-mania in the market during 2014-15, but a good Lightweight is still a seven-figure car. This was a fair result that both buyer and seller can be perfectly happy with.

Photo by Juan Rivas courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Lot # 176 1977 Porsche 911 Carrera Turbo Coupe; S/N 9307800697; Engine # 6870714; Guards Red/Light Red leather; Estimate $140,000 – $180,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $135,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $151,200. – 4-speed, Black painted Fuchs wheels, power sunroof, air conditioning, Blaupunkt stereo, owner’s manual, warranty book, spare, compressor, jack, tool roll, Porsche CofA documented. – Special order red interior, supposedly one of one. Condensation in the fog lights and light general wear to the seats, but nothing serious. Sold new in the States, but brought to Colombia by its original owner and regularly maintained. Reimported last year after an overhaul to the engine. Clearly pampered from new, showing 27,652 claimed original and believable miles and far too good to restore. – Considering the special color combination and the level of preservation, this wasn’t a particularly strong price. Then again, 930 prices have been faltering since their big surge in 2015, and this result shows that trend continuing.

Lot # 178 1980 Porsche 935 K4 Race Car; S/N 935K402; Black, Yellow “Interscope”/Black; Estimate $850,000 – $1,100,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $800,000 plus commission of 10.63%; Final Price $885,000. – Modular wheels, Goodyear slicks, 917 brakes, Penske triple adjustable shocks, Salisbury differential. – Second of two Kremer K4s, sold to Interscope Racing driven by Ted Field and Danny Ongais. DNF at Daytona in 1982 and a third at Mosport before selling to Vasek Polak in California. The body is a little beat up from racing but nothing bad. In mostly as raced condition. Built to its current state in the 1990s but will apparently need mechanical reconditioning before use. – One of the most legendary, fast, aggressive sports cars in history, the spawn of the Porsche 935/78 ‘Moby Dick’. It needs plenty of work before being driven anywhere close to its breathtaking potential but that process if reflected in the price it brought here.

Lot # 179 1996 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ99ZTS390508; Engine # 63S86113; Speed Yellow/Black, Gray leather; Estimate $500,000 – $600,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $350,000 plus commission of 11.43%; Final Price $390,000. – Yellow modular wheels, red calipers, whale tail, yellow seat belts and door pulls, Blaupunkt cassette stereo, air conditioning, power windows. – One of about 1,000 built. Delivered new to Germany and just two owners. Represented as 21,623 believable km and represented with a full service history. Nothing to pick on condition-wise. – The most recent example of one of these selling at auction was in Arizona this year, with another 1996 car selling for $428,500. It had lower miles and special-order paint, however, so the result for this Speed Yellow example seems realistic even though the bid is only 70% of the highly optimistic pre-sale estimate.

Lot # 180 1968 Porsche 911L Coupe; S/N 11805291; Engine # 3280983; Light Ivory/Black leatherette; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $102,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $114,800. – 5-speed, Fuchs wheels, Vredestein tires, gold brightwork, Becker Europa stereo, tinted rear window, tool kit, owner’s manual. – Very rare US market only L model represented to have its original numbers-matching drivetrain and a three-owner car. Very good paint, interior and underneath. Restored about eight years ago to appropriate standards and still fresh. – For a brief period, Porsche sold the original 911S model as the “L” model in the United States with a few changes that complied with U.S. safety and emissions regulations, and it had the same 130 hp as the base car. Just 449 were built. This result is fairly modest for a rare model like this, although it did command more money than a base example in this condition would expect to bring.

Lot # 181 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR 2.8 Race Car; S/N 9113600756; Yellow/Black cloth; Estimate $2,400,000 – $2,800,000; Competition restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $2,000,000. – Replacement but correct type 2.8 RSR engine, original 5-speed, very wide Fuchs wheels, Michelin racing tires, ducktail spoiler, Recaro seats, fire system, current FIA HTP. – Rare 2.8-liter RSR. 4th at Sebring, 11th at Watkins Glen in 1973 driven by Grey Egerton and Elliot Forbes-Robinson. Some recent vintage race history and lots of great event eligibility. A handful of chips but mostly good paint. Good, clean interior. Restored in the 1980s but still ready to race and historically significant. – In 2015 Gooding & Co. sold a Carrera RSR 2.8 at Pebble Beach for $935,000. The bid here is more than double that in a bit over three years and was reasonable enough for the bidders, if not for the seller’s ambitious expectations.

Lot # 182 1996 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe; S/N WP0AA2998TS321114; Engine # 64T02135; Grand Prix White/Cashmere Beige leather; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $105,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $117,600. – Red calipers, Pilot Sport tires, sunroof, factory cassette stereo, tool kit, manuals, compressor. – Represented as 27,149 believable miles but pampered and pretty much like new with only three owners. – A 993 C4S, even one so well cared for as this, is a pretty unremarkable car in the context of an all-Porsche auction packed with much rarer models and historically significant race cars. The price here was on the soft side, but not unreasonable.

Lot # 183 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0 Coupe; S/N WP0AF2A90BS786000; Engine # 61B32027; Black, Carbon fiber hood and spoiler/Black leather; Estimate $800,000 – $1,000,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $510,000 plus commission of 10.98%; Final Price $566,000. – 4 liter/500hp, 6-speed, yellow calipers, carbon ceramic brakes, tinted windows and windshield, leather interior trim, Sport Chrono Package Plus, Erector set wing, front axle lift, Sound Package Plus, owner’s manuals, original window sticker and Porsche CofA documented. – Ordered new by Jerry Seinfeld through Porsche Exclusive with tons of options and a $245,515 sticker. With the seller since 2017 and with 5,471 miles from new. – According to RM, the original price of this car was about 245 grand, which apparently makes it the most expensive 997 GT3 RS 4.0 ordered from the factory. It’s also the most expensive one sold at auction, with the Seinfeld connection and the numerous special features counting for a lot.

Lot # 184 1951 Porsche 356 “Pre-A” Cabriolet, Body by Reutter; S/N 10118; Engine # 20486; Pascha Red/Beige leather; Beige top; Estimate $650,000 – $800,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $460,000. – Hub caps, Excelsior tires, boot cover, sun shade, banjo steering wheel, Blaupunkt stereo, wood door trim. – Original engine. Very good paint and brightwork. The doors stick out slightly at the bottom. Some paint chipping off the steering wheel and the face of the original Blaupunkt radio. Excellent interior with hardly any seat time. A few smudges on the boot cover but a tight-fitting top. Inherently very desirable as an early split-window Porsche, plus even more collectible as an open car. Sold originally in Argentina, then restored in the late 1980s and received more restoration work in 2007. – Built at nearly the beginning of the Porsche legend celebrating its 70th anniversary in 2018 with this Atlanta sale, this is a seriously special Porsche, meticulously restored and nearly miraculously still with its original engine. The bidders made a serious effort to buy it, making a realistic offer, but the consignor had more grandiose hopes. Good luck. As good as it is, the age of its two restorations are showing and finding more enthusiastic bidders than were gathered in Atlanta is a faint hope.

Lot # 185 2015 Porsche 918 Spyder Roadster; S/N WP0CA2A18FS800796; Engine # M1800F01300; Liquid Metal Chrome Blue/Black with Acid Green piping; Estimate $1,400,000 – $1,600,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,275,000 plus commission of 10.39%; Final Price $1,407,500. – Non-Weissach car with matte finish carbon interior trim, badge delete, fire extinguisher, Burmester stereo, front end lift, carbon fiber mirrors, tracking system, platinum silver wheels, factory manuals – One owner and 225 miles. Immaculate. – Now that more and more 918s have come onto a market this result isn’t particularly big for used hypercars as prices have softened a bit over the course of 2018. Despite the crowd of deep-pocketed Porschephiles in the bidders’ seats and despite this car’s slick presentation, the price is pretty modest. It’s the third lowest price for a 918 at public auction.

Lot # 186 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Coupe; S/N WP0AC2A94BS783366; Engine # 61B29168; Carrera White, Guards Red accents/Black; Estimate $175,000 – $200,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $175,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $196,000. – 3.8/450hp, 6-speed, Guards Red alloy wheels, Pilot Sport Cup tires, yellow calipers, carbon ceramic brakes, front axle lift, sound package, aluminum footrest, Erector set wing. – Two-owner car with 3,625 miles and in like-new condition. The “aluminum footrest” (aka “dead pedal”) is a $625 option that should be standard equipment in any car with the GT3 RS’s performance presumption. – About a $150,000 car when it was new, this GT3 was perhaps overshadowed a bit by the ex-Jerry Seinfeld 4.0-liter car also in the sale, but this price was nevertheless a fair one that fell within RM’s presale estimate range and can leave both parties satisfied. The Yellow calipers behind the Guards Red alloy wheels look like a slice of pineapple in a watermelon salad.

Lot # 187 1963 Porsche 356B (T6) 1600 Super Coupe, Body by Reutter; S/N 125136; Engine # 61M01330; Black/Black leather; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $105,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $117,600. – Rudge wheels, Firestone tires, power sunroof, luggage rack, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio. – Represented as the numbers matching engine and gearbox as on the included Kardex record. Mostly original paint with significant cracking in several places. Small dent in the left front fender. Several dents on the rear bumper. The seats are aged but there is no cracking or tearing. Tired underneath, but no major rust. An all original California black plate car with just the perfect amount of patina. A really good mix of desirable features and great preservation. – A strong but not over-the-top result given the desirable and rare features, and originality as well as the sheer charm of this unrestored 356.

Lot # 188 1994 Porsche 911 Carrera Speedster; S/N WP0CB2968RS465265; Engine # 62P05218; Guards Red/Black, Silver, Gray leather; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $170,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $190,400. – Body color wheels, snorkely brake light, factory cassette stereo, climate control, sport seats, books, manuals, Porsche Production Specification certificate. – Represented as 11,649 miles from new and looks pretty much new. Fully serviced late last year. – The 964 Carrera Speedster is similar to the earlier 1989 car, with the same humpback treatment behind the seats and a steeply raked windshield. The 964 version is rarer than the 1989 car, but values aren’t all that different. This was a fairly modest result for one with relatively low miles and in essentially showroom condition.

Lot # 189 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe; S/N WP0AA2967MS480259; Engine # 61M01330; Meteor Gray/Matador Red leather; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $187,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $210,000. – Pilot Sport tires, special order interior with all red, burled rosewood dash, CD stereo, rear window washer, power sport seats, limited slip, air conditioning, tools, books, manuals. – Paint-to-sample Meteor Gray with special order Matador Red and rosewood interior. Ordered new by a DC-area lawyer. Some tiny rock chips in the nose. Long scratch on the top of the sunroof. Pretty much like new interior. Showing 18,377 miles and could be better, but impossible to meaningfully fault, and the special order interior was in good taste. An easy car to like. – Then again, maybe the rosewood dash wasn’t to everyone’s taste. Despite being a paint-to-sample car with several special features and a service history, the price here was fairly middle-of-the-road for a 1991 Turbo, surprising for this Turbo’s options, mileage and preservation.

Lot # 190 1951 Porsche 356 “Pre-A” Coupe, Body by Reutter; S/N 11260; Engine # 40274; Maroon/Gray leather, Tan cloth; Estimate $600,000 – $800,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $525,000. – 1953 1500 Super engine, hub caps, banjo steering wheel, Telefunken radio, wood door trim. – Very good paint and brightwork. Even gaps. A few chips in the steering wheel but mostly excellent interior. Oxidized exhaust tip but mostly clean underneath. A high quality restoration on a very desirable early split windshield car, but the incorrect engine and handful of flaws prevent it from being a show car. – $460,000 bid for a split windshield cabriolet and $525,000 for this split windshield coupe with the wrong, even if more powerful, engine? This car should have been gone in a heartbeat at this bid.

Lot # 191 1985 Porsche 959 Prototype Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ93ZFS010007; Engine # 65F00016; Ruby Red/Burgundy leather; Estimate $1,300,000 – $1,600,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $904,545 plus commission of 10.55%; Final Price $1,000,000. – White allow wheels, single side mirror, air conditioning, no radio. – An early “F-series” factory prototype (F7) used for hot weather testing in Europe and on the West Coast, then escaped demolition by going to Vasek Polak under a display exemption. It was displayed in the Matsuda collection in Japan during the 1990s and was eventually registered for road use in the UK in the early 2000s. A few stone chips and cracks in the paint and some wear on the seats, which is enough to make it look bad by 959 standards, but its condition isn’t too relevant since it’s a factory prototype and wasn’t babied during testing, one of only a handful left out of the dozen prototypes originally built. – This is a post-block sale at a negotiated price of $1 million all-in. Porsche 959 prices bounce around but with Mecum having sold a crashed production 959 at Monterey two months ago for $467,500 this is a significant prototype bought for barely more than twice as much. It runs and drives and is a good, but not exceptional, value at this result.

Lot # 192 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7 Touring Coupe; S/N 9113600463; Engine # 6630393; Light Ivory, Black Carrera graphics/Black leatherette; Estimate $650,000 – $750,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $630,000 plus commission of 10.79%; Final Price $698,000. – Fuchs wheels, Pirelli tires, power sunroof, ducktail spoiler, fog lights, Becker Mexico stereo, air conditioning, power windows, heated rear window, limited slip, power antenna, headrests, tool roll, jack, spare wheel, compressor, owner’s manual. – Represented as matching numbers. Metric gauges. Very good paint. Spotless wheels. Good gaps. Excellent original interior with very light wrinkling on the seats. Impressively equipped for a Carrera RS. Originally delivered to Brazil and restored there some years ago, but still presents very well. – This car sold at Bonhams Quail Lodge in 2009 for $232,500 then, in 2015 as Porsche-mania was in full swing, it sold at Bonhams Greenwich for $594,000. It would have been easy for this car to have been overshadowed here by the concours-quality white and green Lightweight car and the factory prototype that were also in this sale, but that didn’t happen and it brought a deservedly strong price.

Lot # 193 1994 Porsche 911 Carrera Turbo S Flachbau Coupe; S/N WP0AC2967RS480442; Engine # 61R01064; Black/Cashmere Beige leather; Estimate $600,000 – $750,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $504,545 plus commission of 10.99%; Final Price $560,000. – Slant nose, Speedline modular wheels, red calipers, power sunroof, factory cassette stereo with CD changer, power windows, air conditioning, “Dark Root Wood” shift knob, tool roll, all original owner’s paper, Porsche CofA documented. – One of 39 US 964 flat nose cars. Single owner. Gorgeous and essentially like new, as you’d expect given the 9,935 miles and single ownership from new. Originally sticker priced at $169,273. – Porsche sold just 39 of these ‘X85’ flat-nose 911 Turbos to the U.S. market, and this is a remarkably low-mile one-owner car. Even so, RM sold another example with higher mileage but in more eye-catching Speed Yellow for $654,000 in Amelia Island this year, and Gooding & Company has sold two of these for over $1M. Another sold for $715,000 at Pebble Beach last year, making this post-block transaction the lowest-priced example in recent memory at auction and a surprise given the makeup of the bidders at the sale in Atlanta.

Lot # 194 1969 Porsche 911E Coupe; S/N 119220874; Engine # 6291719; Bahama Yellow, White graphics/Black leatherette; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $110,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $123,200. – 2,195/155hp, 5-speed, Fuchs wheels, Kumho tires, gold brightwork, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, Porsche Production Certificate documented. – Fairly large scuff on the nose but otherwise very good repaint in Bahama Yellow, the rare original color. Very clean underneath with some light use. Original engine but replacement gearbox. Very good restored interior, but the gauges are a little cloudy. A few disappointing details, but overall a pretty remarkable car that received a full restoration in 2014. – This car hammered not sold at a $100,000 high bid at Mecum Los Angeles this year, which itself wasn’t an entirely unfair offer, but it unsurprisingly found a much more receptive audience at the Porsche Experience Center and this huge price is another example of rare Porsche colors commanding a big premium, in this case at least 20%.

Lot # 196 1985 Porsche 959 Paris-Dakar Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ93ZFS010015; Engine # 6380621; Blue, White “Rothmans”/Black cloth; Estimate $3,000,000 – $3,400,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 2- condition; Reserve; Hammered Sold at $5,400,000 plus commission of 10.09%; Final Price $5,945,000. – Naturally aspirated fuel injected 3.2 litre Carrera engine, all-wheel drive, Terratrip rally computer, spare Carrera engine (09-01005 and probably not coincidental that it is the same as the last six digits of ) included. – One of three 959s used in the 1985 Paris-Dakar driven by 1984 winners Rene Metge and Dominique Lemoyne. Won two stages then broke an oil line and retired. Demonstrated at the Goodwood Festival 2004-06 driven by Jackie and Vanina Ickx, 2008 class winner at The Quail. Clean, orderly and professionally prepared showing the rigors of its rally history with a few bumps and bruises and a thoroughly scuffed skid plate. One of seven development models built for Dakar in 1984-85 with naturally-aspirated engines, one destroyed, 5 still belong to Porsche. – Optimistic bidding with at least two phone bidders and one or two on the floor brought an eye-popping result for this 959. Its credentials are impeccable, however, and as the only survivor not residing in Stuttgart it’s probably the only chance a Porsche collector will have to get one of the early prototype naturally-aspirated 959s. Whatever the motivation, it was expensive to scratch this itch. It was one of a very few cars at the Porsche Experience Center to attract enthusiastic bidding, the others being the Project Gold and the barn find Speedster.

Lot # 199 2011 Porsche 911 GT2 RS Coupe; S/N WP0AE2A91BS778099; Engine # 62B30846; Guards Red, Carbon Fiber hood/Black; Estimate $700,000 – $800,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $485,000 plus commission of 11.03%; Final Price $538,500. – 3.6/620hp twin turbo, 6-speed, yellow calipers, Black alloy wheels, Pilot Sport Cup tires, tinted windows and windshield, carbon fiber seats, Sport Chrono Plus Package, carbon fiber front fenders, navigation, leather/Alcantara fat rim steering wheel. – 894 miles and like new. The fat rim steering wheel belongs on an NYC taxicab. – Still one of the quickest 911s of them all, the 2011 GT2 RS cost about a quarter-million dollars when it was new, but for limited-production high-performance Porsche models to double in value in short order is not unheard of, and this is yet another example.

Lot # 200 1983 Porsche 956 Group C; S/N 956110; White, Blue “JDavid”/Black cloth; Estimate $5,250,000 – $6,750,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $3,500,000. – RHD. 3-liter engine, Le Mans long tail body. – DNF at Le Mans in 1983 driven by John Fitzpatrick, Dieter Quester and David Hobbs, 4th at Norisring, winner in the Road America Can Am, winner at Brands Hatch (Fitzpatrick/Derek Warwick) followed by a succession of podium and top-10 results and ending with a dnf at Le Mans in 1984. Not restored but meticulously presented, it has not run in some time and will need extensive preparation before being experienced on track. – Competition cars were a tough sell in this all-Porsche auction, nowhere better exemplified than by this historic 956 with a mixed competition history in the 80’s. Based on prior 956 results (excluding the $10,120,000 brought by Le Mans winner 956-003 at Gooding’s Pebble Beach auction in 2015) this is a strong and reasonable, even generous, offer for a long-dormant 956 with a mediocre period racing history.

Lot # 201 1970 Porsche 911S Coupe; S/N 9110301049; Engine # 6301397; Tangerine/Black leatherette; Estimate $180,000 – $220,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $172,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $193,200. – 5-speed, Fuchs wheels, Michelin XWX tires, gold brightwork, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, Porsche Production Certificate documented. – Represented as a matching numbers engine, three-owner car. Very clean underneath. Very good lightly used interior. Very good paint that, remarkably, is original except for the hood and deck lid. Long term ownership, lots of documents and impossible to fault in any meaningful way. Never restored because it has always been pampered. – This is a Porsche that has had long term enthusiast ownership and it shows, both in its presentation and in its effect on the bidders who bid it up to a full retail price. It should be tremendously satisfying to be the fourth owner of this 911S.

Lot # 203 1956 Porsche 356A 1600 Super Speedster, Body by Reutter; S/N 82780; Engine # 80703; Glacier White/Red leatherette; Estimate $500,000 – $600,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $445,000 plus commission of 11.12%; Final Price $494,500. – Hubcaps, chrome wheels, bumper overriders, ski rack, boot cover, badge bar, comes with original side curtains, tool roll, jack, spare and manuals, original wheels included. – Represented as matching numbers with 35,304 original miles with known history from new. A few chips and touch ups on the nose as well as a few light scratches throughout, but the mostly original paint (other than the hood) is remarkably good. Same with the interior. It’s nicely mellowed and shows no significant wear despite the age. Used underneath, but clearly very well maintained. A fantastic time capsule Super Speedster, and the ski rack is a really neat little touch. – This is an extraordinarily preserved Speedster with a realistic, but considerable, premium for originality. We call it “visually maintained, largely original”, but it is not far from “unrestored original” and that is reflected in its result.

Lot # 205 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7 Lightweight Coupe; S/N 9113600012; Engine # 6630022; Signal Yellow/Black with Houndstooth cloth; Estimate $1,250,000 – $1,500,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,200,000 plus commission of 10.42%; Final Price $1,325,000. – Fuchs wheels, Pirelli Cinturato tires. – Factory prototype for the Carrera RS 2.7 and the second of nine built. Used in early marketing. No ducktail or Carrera badging. Retained by the factory until model production ended, then went to its first private owner, race driver Helmuth Koinigg. Restored in the 1990s. Very good older paint. The wheels are a little dirty. Very good like new interior. Used a bit, but restored to the standards it deserves and a very significant car. – Sold at Christie’s Monterey in 2006 for $334,000 and at Bonhams Quail Lodge in 2008 for $480,000. This result is almost 3x more in just ten years. A rare and special car, bought for a rare and special price that will only be celebrated by the Porsche cognoscenti.

Lot # 206 1985 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ93ZFS000791; Engine # 67F00834; Garnet Metallic/Pearl Beige leather; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $220,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $246,400. – Factory slant nose, BBS wheels, sunroof, Clarion stereo, power sport seats, black-tipped exhaust, tools, books, Porsche Production Specification certificate and Porsche CofA. – Paint to sample factory slant nose car with just 4,384 miles. There is noticeable wrinkling to the seats, but the pearly upholstery is gorgeous. Added burl wood interior trim, upgraded stereo. The condition is otherwise fantastic. – The factory slantnose option added considerably to the 930’s base price, so many such cars were bought by deeper-pocketed buyers who also took advantage of Porsche’s Special Wishes department, and many slant nose cars have special order features like this one. Given a typical 30% premium for the slantnose, the low mileage and the tasteful extras, the price here makes sense.

Lot # 208 1968 Porsche 911 Coupe; S/N 11835019; Engine # 3380124; Silver Metallic/Black leatherette; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $190,000. – Sportomatic, Blaupunkt AM/FM radio, gold brightwork, tinted glass. – Very rare Sportomatic. Represented as highly original but looks better than many restored cars. Spotless and maintained underneath. Excellent paint and brightwork. Only the front bumper has been repainted. Incredibly good original interior. It’s something of a standout already with the funky semi-automatic Sportomatic transmission, but its level of preservation also sets it apart. – Sportomatic-equipped 911s weren’t very popular when they were new and are even rarer now. This one brought a shocking $286,000 at RM Amelia Island last year, which helps explain the refusal of this reported high bid, even if it does seem more realistic.

Lot # 209 1994 Porsche 911 Carrera Turbo S “Package” Coupe; S/N WP0AC2966RS480447; Engine # 61R00989; Black/Black leather; Estimate $775,000 – $950,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $725,000. – 385hp M64/80 engine, Speedline modular wheels, red calipers, sunroof, wood shift knob, factory cassette stereo with CD changer, “Dark Root Wood” shift knob and handbrake handle, tool roll, Porsche Production Specification certificate documented. – Showing 8,663 miles and looks like a new car. – Only 17 of these Turbo S 964 models were built for the U.S. (flat-nose cars with the 968-style ‘Flachbau’ front end are slightly more common) in this configuration, so in terms of rarity it’s among the rarest of 911s. Even so, examples have popped up for sale. RM Sotheby’s sold one for over $1M in Paris last year and Mecum had one 0no-sale at 850 grand back in August, so holding out at the reported high bid for this one seems reasonable if risky in the present retrenching market and makes the “more common” Flachbau Turbo S sold on #193 for $560,000 seem an even more astute acquisition.

Lot # 210 1967 Porsche 911S Coupe; S/N 305556S; Engine # 960099; Light Ivory/Black leather, Houndstooth inserts; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $205,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $229,600. – Fuchs wheels, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, sports seats (original comfort seats included). – Slightly lower suspension and wider wheels, but it’s barely noticeable. Very good paint and brightwork. Even gaps. Excellent fully restored interior. Same story underneath. Fully restored early 911S finished in 2015 to very high standards without going overboard. – This is a sound value in a highly desirable early Porsche 2 liter sports model 911S.

Lot # 212 1958 Porsche 356A 1600 Super Speedster, Body by Reutter; S/N 84381; Engine # 812782; Fjord Green/Tan; Beige top; Estimate $300,000 – $350,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $250,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $280,000. – Later 1600 SC engine, hub caps, cloth boot cover, woodrim steering wheel. – Good older paint. Small crack above the right front wheel well. Chip on the front bumper. The gaskets on the bumpers don’t quite fit flush. Cracks in the steering wheel cap. The speedometer is a bit faded. Worn but sound and possibly original seats. Tidy underneath. A rare, late Speedster in a rare, good color, but some flaws and the later engine probably relegate it to event duty and more casual driving. – Appropriately discounted for the age of its restoration and the objectively better but incorrect powertrain, this is a fair result that both parties can be happy with and is less than the lot number 173 barn find sold earlier today.

Lot # 213 2007 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Coupe; S/N WP0AC29987S792678; Engine # 61729084; Orange, Black graphics/Black leather, Black suede; Estimate $260,000 – $300,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $230,000. – Black wheels, red calipers, factory radio, orange accents in the interior, Sport Chrono package, headlight washers. – 600 miles and like new despite being a 10-year-old car. Represented with a recent service. – A $145,00 car when it was new, the 997 GT3 RS is one of those limited-production high-performance Porsches that is already collectible with prices exceeding the original MSRP, and this one’s incredibly low mileage makes it ideal for a collection. The consignor’s expectations are a little ahead of the curve, however, and this price could have seen it go to a new home.

Lot # 214 1968 Porsche 911 Targa Soft Window; S/N 11880217; Ossi Blue, Black/Black leatherette; Estimate $170,000 – $190,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $95,200. – 5-speed, Fuchs wheels, plastic rear window, Blaupunkt pushbutton AM-FM radio, Black leatherette roof panel. – Very good repaint and brightwork. Excellent new rear window. Cloudy gauges. Slightly wavy roof vinyl. Clean underneath. Very good unrestored interior. A desirable soft window Targa that is mostly original other than a single repaint and presents very well. – Very strong money, but given the Porsche-centric crowd and the premiums added for the 5-speed, the plastic rear window and the rare attractive paint color, it’s a price that makes sense. The pre-sale estimate would be excessive even for a 911S Targa but the bidders weren’t led astray by it.

Lot # 215 1975 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR 3.0 Coupe; S/N 9115609121; Engine # 6850167; White, Blue/Black; Estimate $2,000,000 – $2,200,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,775,000. – Avon tires, fire system, current FIA HTP – Competition used with plenty of rock chips and a few light cracks but nothing worth fretting over, just signs of an active competition career. Lots of European race history and more recent vintage race wins, plus a very rare 3.0-liter RSR, one of 52 built in total and just 10 in 1975. Class win at the Coppa Florio 1000, Twice DNF at Le Mans 1975-76 and winner of the 1975 European GT Championship. Restored in the 1980s and regularly vintage raced since, including at the Le Mans Classic. Owned by Paul Newman (“PLN”) 1977-1982. Described and appears to be currently historic race ready. – Sold at Bonhams Quail Lodge in 2010 for $370,000 from the Mike Amalfitano collection. Race cars were not the most popular vehicles here at the Porsche Experience Center.

Lot # 217 1996 Porsche 911 GT2 Club Sport Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ99ZTS393096; Engine # 61T205333; Guards Red/Black; Estimate $800,000 – $1,200,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $580,000 plus commission of 10.86%; Final Price $643,000. – 3,797/ca. 450hp, 6-speed, BBS modular wheels, slicks, Momo steering wheel, single Recaro racing seat, fire system, full roll cage, “banana” wing, – Restored to like new with minimal time on it. Used in qualifying for the 1996 Daytona 24 Hours but did not race, then used in a few PCA club races before the restoration that finished this year. – This car cost about 230 grand (376 grand adjusted for inflation) when it was new, but the 993 generation 911 and the GT2 model in particular have become quite collectible since then. Then again, the market for a ’90s race car is not particularly large, and this one has neither a race history nor factory originality going for it. The price is modest given what the buyer got in return even if it is a major investment for a track day car.

Lot # 218 1994 Porsche 911 Carrera Turbo Coupe; S/N WP0AC2962RS480347; Engine # 61R00729; Titanium Metallic/Black leather; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $165,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $184,800. – Modular wheels, red calipers, Pirelli tires, sunroof, Pioneer stereo, books, tool kit, compressor, Porsche CofA documented. – The exterior plastic is just a tiny bit dull and there are a few tiny chips on the fenders, plus a little road dirt underneath. The interior, meanwhile, looks practically like new. Represented as 38,303 miles so it’s had a lot of exercise, but the owner babied it in typical 911 fashion. – The standards were pretty high in this all-Porsche auction, so this relatively high-mileage 964 Turbo that is otherwise just a standard production model didn’t get much attention. It was arguably one of the better deals of the sale.

Lot # 219 2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet; S/N WP0CB299X5S675354; Engine # 64531186; Black/Black leather; Estimate $120,000 – $140,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $112,000. – Yellow calipers, Pirelli tires, heated seats, sport shifter, owner’s manuals, Porsche Production Specification certificate documented. – Some rock chips on the nose. The Porsche crest is missing from the left front wheel. Otherwise it’s a well-kept four-owner 12,808-mile car, but it’s not like new. – The 996 generation 911 doesn’t get much love in some circles for various reasons, including the fact that it was the first water-cooled model. As a high-spec Turbo S model with an open top, however, this car is among the most desirable 996s and the bidders were apparently taken with it given this very high, ahead-of-the-curve price.

Courtesy RM Auctions

Lot # 220 2018 Porsche 911 Turbo Classic Series “Project Gold” Coupe; S/N 001/001; Golden Yellow Metallic/Black leather, Gold stitching; Unrestored original, 1 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $3,100,000 plus commission of 10.16%; Final Price $3,415,000. – Turbo Twist wheels, 3.6/450hp, 6-speed. – Proceeds over $175,000 (1998 MSRP) to the Ferry Porsche Foundation. This is a Porsche Classic exercise, building a new 993 Turbo 20 years after production ended using leftover and Porsche Classic parts with upgraded performance and modern bits. Fabulously detailed (but with no Porsche VIN and not registrable in most jurisdictions) it is beyond perfect. – This result is bragging rights, and very expensive ones at that.

Lot # 221 1980 Porsche 924 Coupe; S/N 92A0433084; Engine # VC003186; Minerva Blue/Black leather; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $48,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $53,760. – Alloy wheels, Michelin tires, power windows, 8-track stereo, sunroof, air conditioning. – Pretty much spotless maintained engine bay. A few tiny chips in the nose but otherwise phenomenal original paint. Excellent interior. The 924 decal on the tail is a little dull. Showing 11,272 believable miles. Is it like new? Not quite, but it’s probably safe to call it the best original 924 around. – This may have been one of the cheapest cars of the sale, but the price was also one of the most staggering. The 924 is the Porsche that a lot of people just love to hate and for years it has been pretty much the cheapest thing with a Porsche badge, but this price is nearly as much as a brand-new Cayman and it was one of only a handful of cars to exceed its high estimate here at the Porsche Experience Center. An absolute home run for the seller.

Lot # 222 1990 Porsche 944 S2 Cabriolet; S/N WP0CB2947LN481638; Titanium Metallic/Linen leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $26,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $29,120. – 5-speed, alloy wheels, Dunlop tires, factory Blaupunkt CD stereo, tools, air compressor, owner’s manual, original window sticker documented. – Represented with 14,685 believable miles and one owner from new. A few tiny chips in the nose plus a few scratches and scrapes on top of the rear bumper, but otherwise great original paint. Some dullness to the door handles. Very tidy underneath. Very light wrinkling to the seats that corresponds with the mileage. A 944, but pampered like a 911. – By the time Porsche introduced an open version of its front-engined water-cooled cars, the 944 was in S2 trim with larger 3.0-liter engine and 208 horsepower, nearly as much as the original 944 Turbo. 944 Cabriolets have generally led easier lives than the earlier and cheaper cars, but this car was still a standout. Given its low miles, solid preservation and the amount of wealth gathered at the Porsche Experience Center, this top-dollar result makes sense.

Lot # 223 1979 Porsche 928 Coupe; S/N 9289201273; Engine # 8290972; Light Blue Metallic/Black leather; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $51,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $57,120. – 5-speed, alloy wheels, Blaupunkt cassette stereo, power windows, air conditioning, tools, jack, owner’s manual – Early 928 with desirable 5-speed and 25,549 miles from new. Very good original paint other than some scratches and rub through on the passenger’s door. Light wrinkling to the seats but the interior is great for the age. Fully serviced and detailed this year. Definitely a collector-grade 928, too good not to leave it as-is. – This was the second-to-last lot of the sale, right before the diesel tractor, but there were still plenty of deep pockets at the Porsche Experience Center when it crossed the block. There aren’t many early 928s left in such good condition, and the 5-speed is icing on the cake. The price is massive, but not a complete surprise given the 5-speed, low miles and exceptional preservation.

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