RM Sotheby’s, Arizona Biltmore, Phoenix, January 18-19, 2018

“Diversification” is a recognized business strategy which RM Sotheby’s is increasingly employing. In 2018 it sharpened its emphasis on separate business units with separate organizations for catalog auctions (RM Sotheby’s at Arizona, Paris, Amelia Island, Monaco, Villa Erba, Monterey and London), consignment sales (RM Auctions at Auburn, Ft. Lauderdale, Santa Monica and Hershey), a separately-managed private treaty intermediary, its well-established and recognized restoration shop and a new financial services operation.

That structure, and RM’s expanding integration with its minority shareholder Sotheby’s in auctions and marketing is creating a huge (they list 23 full- and part-time Car Specialists and nine managers – not counting founder Rob Myers, its eminence grise) organization. Working along with the Sotheby’s worldwide organization it puts RM, in all its manifestations, in a unique position among collector car companies.

It may also result in some changes in focus, which were perhaps at work at the long-established Arizona auction. Now in its nineteenth year, RM recorded its lowest sale total since 2012. While it might be convenient to ascribe some of the fall-off to the distraction of its $44.8 million sale at Sotheby’s New York headquarters in December, or to the diversion of a prize consignment, the $7.5 million ex-Michael Schumacher F2001 Grand Prix car, to Sotheby’s Contemporary Art evening auction in November, that’s a façade with holes in it.

2015’s $62.8 million Arizona auction followed a New York sale that posted $72.5 million in transactions, $135.3 million in total between the two closely-spaced events. There’s nowhere to hide behind the “distracted by New York” rationale.

The upcoming Paris auction has consignments with low estimates totaling about $45 million, about $10 million ahead of the low estimate total in 2017, so some of the available inventory may have been re-positioned to Paris.

But mostly it is that the marketplace is saturated with auctions and, as noted in the previous paragraph, the available inventory has to be spread judiciously across them.

It didn’t help that RM’s most valuable Arizona consignment, the factory team D-type XKD403, didn’t sell, taking a potential $10 million plus out of the final sale total. But neither D-type in the Arizona auctions sold. Perhaps it’s another sign of a saturated market when two D-types with clear histories go begging for bids high enough to satisfy their consignors’ expectations?

Of lesser importance, but still noteworthy, RM Sotheby’s has revised its Buyer’s Commission to 12% of the first $250,000 and 10% over. It sounds tiny and to the buyer of a seven-figure car it is, but spread over the median sale in Arizona it was an incremental $366,000 in commission, a healthy contribution to supporting all those Car Specialists.

Or the free champagne during the preview, even at Biltmore prices.

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2018 111/128 86.7% 60.9% 8.2% $323,722 $165,200

[51%]

$35,933,140
2017 142/160 88.8% 69.7% 5.6% $378,248 $121,000

[32%]

$53,711,250
2016 127/150 84.7% 74.8% 4.7% $494,344 $176,000

[35.6%]

$62,781,750
2015 110/123 89.4% 49.1% 10.9% $578,232 $220,000

[38%]

$63,605,500
2014 108/126 85.7% 54.6% 14.8% $421,884 $151,250

[35.9%]

$45,563,450

69 of the 128 lots in the auction were viewed on-site by me and Andrew Newton.

They are presented here sorted in Marque, Model, Body Style order.

Lot # 239 1955 Alfa Romeo 1900C SS Coupe, Body by Boano; S/N AR1900C01846; Engine # AR130801207; Light Yellow, Black roof/Black leather, Light Yellow piping; Estimate $1,250,000 – $1,750,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,150,000 plus commission of 10.43%; Final Price $1,270,000. – 1,975/115hp, 50DCOE Weber carbs, 5-speed, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin X tires, Marchal headlights, Audiovox pushbutton radio, Nardi steering wheel. – Franco Scaglione-designed with bulbous flanks, split rear window and high bumpers. Show quality cosmetics, restored like new under the hood and under the car. Displayed in the Preservation Class at Pebble Beach in 2015, then restored to its current impeccable condition and its original Turin Motor Show colors and took best in class at Pebble Beach in 2017. Century of Sports Cars Collection. – Sold by Gooding here in Scottsdale in 2017 before its recent restoration for $990,000, a magnificently restored car that has been done to the highest standards without going to excess. It’s a car that could fit in Scaglione’s BAT lineage, except it was built by Boano, not Bertone. It is spectacular and is a sound buy in this transaction.

Lot # 242 1942 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 SS Spider; S/N 915515; Engine # S953907; Black, Dark Red/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $900,000 – $1,100,000; Rebodied or re-created, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $500,000 plus commission of 11.00%; Final Price $555,000. – RHD. Black wire wheels, triple Weber 36DO2 carbs, 4-speed, enclosed rear-mounted spare, wind wings. – Rebodied long ago for Corrado Cupellini with this 8C 2900-style coachwork. “Period-correct” engine. Very good older paint, chrome and interior. Rebodied and restored to high touring quality standards some years ago and well maintained since, a handsome and styled Alfa. Class 2nd at Pebble Beach in 1997, Concorso Italiano Best of Show in 1998. Century of Sports Cars Collection. – Opened at $400,000 and closed, after some effort, at this result. It’s a seriously mixed-up Alfa but also a serious performance model with gorgeous replica coachwork. It probably won’t make the cut at the Mille Miglia but it cuts some fine style on the road and at this price the ins and outs of its creation make little difference.

Lot # 236 1921 Alfa Romeo G1 Roadster; S/N 6018; Engine # 6018; Dark Red/Black leather; Estimate on request; Competition restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $400,000 plus commission of 11.25%; Final Price $445,000. – RHD. 6.3 liter T-head six, 4-speed, stamped and welded steel spoke wheels, Excelsior tires, cylindrical bolster fuel tank, dual rear spares, modern rally odometers, rear wheel brakes. – Exported to Australia when new, turned into a farm utility runabout, then drove a water pump. Restored with parts from another G1 (now apparently lost because this is believed to be the only survivor) with a replica torpedo roadster body similar to that on a 40/60hp Alfa that Enzo Ferrari drove in the 1920 Targa Florio. Restored again in the early naughts, and again in the teens with this body. An event car with 2014 Mille Miglia and Goodwood Members’ Meeting stickers. Shown at Amelia Island, class winner at Pebble beach. Dull paint, oxidized aluminum, peeling car number paint. Worn and patinaed leather on the seats. Engine recently rebuilt. As good as it needs to be for an exhilarating driving experience. Century of Sports Cars Collection. – This Alfa has patina in abundance, some of it contrived but a lot of it is earned. Some of the construction details (like the exhaust manifolds) display the artistry that early Alfa craftsmen lavished on their automobiles and that would surface again and again in later Alfas. It also has charisma and to Alfa people is precious, no more precious than the price it brought today, though.

Lot # 230 1938 Aston Martin 15/98 Short Chassis Open Sports, Body by Abbey Coachworks; S/N C8821SO; British Racing Green/Beige; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $200,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $224,000. – Painted centerlock wire wheels, rear-mounted spare, wind wings, badge bar. – Straight panels. Paint chips and wear marks evident with touch ups. Crack in the windshield on the driver’s side. Windshield frame and wind wings show wear and plating issues. The top frame is grubby and chipped, and the top boot is dirty and worn. Bad paint crack in the right door jamb. The interior shows dirt and wear but decent driver quality. Gauges and fittings are good. Scuffing on the fender from the hood. The engine bay is decent and reflects age and wear. Incorrect clamps and plastic wire connectors. Fitted with a replacement block and head, but the original comes with the car. An older restoration currently in solid driver condition. – Bought at the low end of the pre-sale estimate range, this is a handsome, charismatic sporting (if not “sports”) car in plenty good enough condition to be toured with pride and shown confidently afterward. Its eligibility for important events is also important and that’s why it brought this much despite showing age, wear and miles.

Lot # 228 2003 Aston Martin DB AR1 Convertible, Body by Zagato; S/N SCFAE62323K800020; Engine # 00447; Mendip Blue/Parchment leather, Pacific Blue trim; Estimate $300,000 – $350,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $300,000 plus commission of 11.67%; Final Price $335,000. – P Zero tires, diamond quilted leather, burled wood dash and trim, factory radio, grey calipers, power-folding outside mirrors, Roadster wheels, books, tools, manuals, Aston Martin leather jacket. – Just 3,700 miles and presents like a brand new car, and you know it’s never seen rough weather because these limited-production Zagatos didn’t even come with a top. One of 99 built. – Over the past few years, these cars tended to go for between $180,000 and $250,000, but more recently between $300,000 and $400,000 seems to be the going rate as their rarity and design begins to overcome the impracticality of the exposed driving position.

Lot # 163 1979 Aston Martin V8 Vantage Saloon; S/N V8S0L12077; Engine # V5402077LFA; Cumberland Grey/Maroon leather; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $215,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $240,800. – Alloy wheels, Dunlop tires, Nardi woodrim steering wheel, power windows, air conditioning, 5-speed, later Pioneer stereo, power sunroof. – One of 12 LHD Oscar India models for North America, represented to have 41,251 miles from new. A few small chips in the nose and air dam. Otherwise very good paint. Vantage upgrades. Light age to the interior but nothing is bad. Cold A/C. Restored by marque specialists to high standards. – It may be upgraded to Vantage specs, but the “Oscar India” specs and Vantage performance brought it deserved Vantage money.

Lot # 256 1987 Aston Martin V8 Volante Convertible; S/N SCFCV81C9HTL15512; Engine # V5855512LFM; Royal Cherry/Beige leather piped in Maroon; Beige top; Estimate $275,000 – $325,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $250,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $280,000. – Avon tires, 5-speed, dash clock, power windows, air conditioning, cassette stereo. – Rare 5-speed. Clear coat coming up in a small spot near the hood. Small scratches on the left front fenders. Light wear to the top. Small cracks on the edge of the passenger’s door. Small rip in the right side of the top. Very good interior other than two small cracks in the console trim. There are a lot of flaws, but they are all minor. A lightly used, original example in desirable configuration. – This very car sold for $68,750 at RM’s Monterey auction in 2005, then $103,400 at Gooding’s Pebble Beach sale in 2012, and while these cars have certainly gotten more valuable since then, the winning bidder here overshot it by quite a bit and afforded it top shelf money, which this car didn’t really deserve. It is a sexy, seductive thing, though.

Lot # 233 1955 Austin-Healey 100/4 BN1 Roadster; S/N BN1L158595; Engine # 1B214207; Lustreen Green/Light Beige piped in Green; Estimate $120,000 – $150,000; Facsimile restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $134,400. – BN2 4-speed, chrome centerlock wire wheels, leather hood strap, Derrington woodrim steering wheel, overdrive, Le Mans upgrades. – Excellent paint and chrome. Even gaps. Excellent interior. Fresh and gorgeous and tastefully upgraded. Looks great in these colors. The only problem is that the shifter boot has come up from the tunnel, but it looks like an easy fix. – Restored to be a tour car and given Le Mans upgrades during restoration, but sold here for top dollar at the kind of price that would ordinarily buy a genuine Healey 100 Le Mans.

Lot # 265 1966 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III Phase 2 Convertible; S/N HBJ8L34959; Engine # 29KRUH9604; Colorado Red, Black/Black; Black top; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $78,400. – Chrome centerlock wire wheels, overdrive, Yokohama tires, headlight stone guards, cloth boot cover, wood shift knob, overdrive, AM/FM pushbutton radio, banjo steering wheel, BHIHT documented. – Very good paint, chrome and interior. Not much to say about this late Big Healey. It’s freshly done to like new standards and looks ready to go. – Bought at an appropriate price for the car’s fresh but not over the top condition.

Lot # 217 1974 BMW 2002 Turbo Sedan; S/N 4290836; Engine # 4290836; White/Black vinyl; Estimate $110,000 – $140,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $130,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $145,600. – 1,990cc/170hp, turbocharged, 4-speed, alloy wheels, Kumho tires, cassette stereo, dash clock, boost gauge. – The doors stick out slightly at the bottom. Lightly run, mostly restored engine bay. Very good paint. Very good interior. Light scratches on the rear bumper. Recently restored by marque specialists, with a few small corners cut. Still a great, genuine 2002 Turbo, which is king of the Neue Klasse family. – Interest in BMW 2002s has been on the rise, and the Turbo is at the top of the heap in terms of rarity and performance. Gooding sold one for $143,000 at Pebble Beach last year, but it was a fresher and better car than this one at RM. Both are very high prices, but a worse example selling for more money only a few months later suggests that these are still on the way up.

Lot # 272 1941 BMW 327 Cabriolet; S/N 87281; Engine # 87281; Blue, Dark Blue Fenders/Blue; Dark Blue top; Estimate $130,000 – $160,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $135,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $151,200. – Hub caps, whitewalls, spotlight. – Straight panels with generally good gaps. Good paint with minor flaws. Very good brightwork with minor pitting. Wheels and tires fine. Pitting on the top frame. Moth damage to the convertible top. Newer upholstery shows light use. Bakelite knobs are yellowed, but the gauges are clear and bright. Scratched glass. Engine bay shows wear and surface rust and the engine has been replaced during the 1990’s cosmetic restoration. Paint peeling on the firewall. Incorrect clamps and fasteners throughout. Decent underbody. Worn hood springs. Never fully restored, at least by today’s standards. – This is a tired and not particularly attractively present pre-war BMW, but it is a pre-war BMW and it scored well with the bidders near the end of RM Sotheby’s 2-day Arizona auction. There is lots for the new owner to do and at this price not a lot of financial flexibility to do it.

Lot # 271 1934 Brewster-Ford Model 40 Convertible Sedan; S/N 181022919; Engine # 9029; Dark Green/Brown leather with cloth inserts; Beige top; Estimate $100,000 – $150,000; Unrestored original, 4- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $89,600. – Painted wire wheels, hub caps, dual sidemount spares with mirrors, dash clock, suicide front doors. – Significant impact damage to the right side fenders. The rest of the One of nine built, four known survivors, four owners from new. Panels are good to fair. The paint is cracked and crazed but original. Body framing wood shows some damage. The top is worn and dirty, but original. All the glass is delaminating. Interior appears original and decent for age. Tool kit included. Incorrect clamps and plastic fuel filter. Mostly original and worn out but not rusty or rotten. – An amazing survivor that has been cherished and seen only limited use since it was built. It’s not the most handsome car of 1934, but it is a rare example and coachbuilt to the high standards of Brewster even in the depths of the Depression. Anyone who wanted to drive through New York, Philadelphia or Boston in 1934 in a luxury car and not have rotten tomatoes thrown at them from food lines would realistically choose something like this Brewster with it oppulent coachwork but Ford V8 sound.

Lot # 153 1993 Bugatti EB110 GT Coupe; S/N ZA9AB01E0PCD39056; Engine # 0064; Nero/Dark Grey; Estimate $750,000 – $950,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $875,000 plus commission of 10.57%; Final Price $967,500. – Wood dash, cassette stereo, power windows, luggage. – One owner car showing 4,554 miles from new. Sold new in the German market. Driven to the Bugatti factory for its 1,000 km service and picked up (not serviced) on the day Bugatti went into receivership. Moved with its original owner to and federalized in the US, then put into storage in 2005. Full service late last year. Low mileage and no wear to speak of. A new car. – Only 130 EB110s were built. Their rarity, combined with the increasing interest in early hypercars and the resurgence of the Bugatti brand over the past 15 years has turned attention to these short-lived Bugattis from the 1990s. Last year, Worldwide hammered one not sold at $590,000 in Scottsdale and Bonhams sold one in Greenwich for $605,000. The result here is a record price for an EB110 GT.

Lot # 168 1953 Chevrolet Corvette Roadster; S/N E53F001184; Polo White/Red; Black cloth top; Estimate $275,000 – $350,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $223,214 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $250,000. – Spinner wheel covers, Firestone wide whitewalls, pushbutton radio. – Excellent paint, chrome and interior. New tight-fitting top. Number 184 of the first 300 Corvettes built. Body-off restoration finished last year. Bloomington Gold certified. Freshly restored to high standards, and as a ’53 it is a sure fit and standout at any of the big Corvette shows. – There were four ’53 Corvettes in the Scottsdale auctions, a number that would normally not be seen in less than a year’s auctions. This is one of three that sold, one bringing an amazing $319,000 at Barrett-Jackson while the other sold for this all-in price at Worldwide. Two out of three at $250K supports this as an appropriate price.

Lot # 214 1962 Chevrolet Impala SS Convertible; S/N 21867L122377; Roman Red/Red vinyl; White top; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $50,400. – 327/250hp, Powerglide, spinner wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, boot cover, dual antenna, bucket seats, console, column shift, tissue dispenser, radio, rear seat speaker, power steering, power brakes. – Even gaps. Good chrome. Sound older paint, but there are some noticeable detailing scratches on the tail. Lightly worn interior, and the rear seats look original. A recently detailed older restoration that’s more than good enough to drive and enjoy but nothing to take too seriously. – Sold by RM in Boca Raton in 2006 for $50,558 freshly restored and now with only 158 more miles showing it is still a quality Impala SS although now it is rather expensive.

Lot # 247 1950 Delahaye 135M Cabriolet, Body by Guillore; S/N 801636; Engine # 801636; Black/Dark Blue leather; Estimate $275,000 – $325,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $240,000. – RHD. Three Solexes, centerlock wire wheels, wide whitewalls, suicide doors, dual mirrors, Philips radio, wood dash and door trim, cloth boot cover, fog lights. – Straight panels with mostly even gaps. Attractive paint with some light aging. The wire wheels are pitted with painted over flaws. Decent brightwork. Partially restored interior with heavy wear to the front seats. The door panels and carpets are dirty with wear. Attractive dash and gauges. The rear seat shows poor attempt at a re-dye. New top boot. An inconsistent restoration done through the 1990s and early 2000s, then painted in 2010. Shown at Pebble Beach in 2011. – Offered at Bonhams Scottsdale auction in 2014 where it was reported bid to $450,000, then sold by Bonhams at Quail Lodge in 2015 for $363,000. It has not aged well in the past two and a half years, something reflected in the pre-sale estimate but even more in the reported high bid. Some of the coachwork details are delicious, but the condition is noticeably deteriorating and the bidders didn’t take kindly to it.

Lot # 159 1973 DeTomaso Pantera L Coupe, Body by Ghia; S/N THPNNJ05246; Orange/Black vinyl; Estimate $110,000 – $140,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $97,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $109,200. – Campagnolo wheels, Goodyear Arriva tires, Blaupunkt radio, power windows, Momo steering wheel. – Stated to be 18,731 miles from new. Very good recent repaint. The exterior plastic is a little dull. Dull door handles. Tidy but unrestored underneath. Good original interior. Never got serious restoration work because it never needed it. – Sold for $69,300 at Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas in 2016, which was a fair price since it was in need of mechanical sorting. Here in Scottsdale, it was represented as having had $17,000 worth of work done on it recently and it brought very strong money at RM Sotheby’s. Today’s price far exceeds what the seller seems to have had in the car, so it looks like quite the successful flip, but no more than what the Pantera is worth.

Lot # 238 1969 Ferrari 206 GT Dino Coupe, Body by Scaglietti; S/N 00378; Rosso Chiaro/Black leather with cloth inserts; Estimate $625,000 – $825,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $380,000 plus commission of 11.32%; Final Price $423,000. – AM/FM radio, Cromodora centerlock wheels, Michelin Defender blackwall tires, vinyl and velour upholstery. – Owned for many years by Akira Stevan Patrick and displayed at the Midglen Studio in Woodside, California. Number 140 of 153 built. Three owner car. Decent chrome but the rub strips are cracking. Sound but slightly dull older repaint. Good, lightly aged interior. Aged, musty smelling original interior. Aged engine and underbody. A tired and neglected but pretty car that makes a good first impression. A very rare alloy body 206 that’s not quite a time warp like new example but still too good as it sits to give a top to bottom restoration. Century of Sports Cars Collection. – This Dino 206 GT was sold by Gooding at Amelia Island in 2014 for $638,000 in essentially the same condition as it is today and now displays just 63 more km on its odometer. It was offered here two years ago in 2016 when it was bid to $600,000. Based on the results for the two 206 GT Dinos in the Scottsdale auctions their limited production status and lightweight aluminum coachwork seems to have fallen from favor to where they bring barely more than 246 GT Dino prices. There is unrecognized value in these cars if that’s true.

Lot # 248 1952 Ferrari 212 Inter Coupe, Body by Ghia; S/N 0191EL; Engine # 0191EL; Yellow, Black/Black leather, Yellow piping; Estimate $1,600,000 – $2,000,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,075,000 plus commission of 10.47%; Final Price $1,187,500. – Chrome spoke, Borrani wire wheels, whitewall bias ply tires, Marchal headlights, heater. – 1952 Paris show displayed, then sold to Argentina’s Juan Peron. Meticulously restored with better than new paint, bright chrome and inviting interior. The underbody and engine are done like new even though the restoration is now almost three decades old. Class second at Pebble Beach in 2002, Cavallino Platinum and Excellence Cup winner in 2003. Ferrari Classiche certified, binder will be provided when received. – Reserve off at $1,050,000. A post-block sale at Brooks Gstaad auction in 1999 for $337,225. Its yellow/black honeybee livery will make a statement at any show or on the road and the result is fair to both the buyer and the seller.

Lot # 243 1972 Ferrari 246 GT Dino Coupe, Body by Scaglietti; S/N 04970; Engine # 142536; Rosso Chiaro/Black leather; Estimate $500,000 – $700,000; Unrestored original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $365,000 plus commission of 11.37%; Final Price $406,500. – Leather-wrapped Momo steering wheel, later CD stereo, air conditioning, power windows, Campagnolo wheels, Chairs and Flares. – US market car. Panels are generally good with some fit issues on rear deck lid. Numerous paint defects, crazing, touch ups, and chips. Bright trim, lenses show age and damage. Weather strip coming apart everywhere. Wind wings don’t close properly. Wheels are corroded, chipped and dirty. Interior very aged with crumbling seat foam, torn upholstery, pulling dash covering. Grimy engine bay. Thoroughly original, but rough. Century of Sports Cars Collection. – It was sold at Gooding’s Amelia Island auction in 2014 for $627,000. This is a fine old Dino, said to be one of five Chairs and Flares Dinos originally delivered in the U.S. The Dino market may not be what it was four years ago, but it is better than this result indicates and the new owner got a significant Dino at an opportunistic price.

Lot # 235 1960 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet SII, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N 1939GT; Engine # 1939GT; Blue/Beige leather; Estimate $1,400,000 – $1,800,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,275,000 plus commission of 10.39%; Final Price $1,407,500. – Chrome spoke Borrani wheels, Michelin X tires, Marchal headlights, behind-grille fog lights, Ferrari build sheet copies. – Featured in Forza Magazine and shown at Pebble Beach. A fair amount of road wear underneath. Good older paint and chrome, color changed from the original Grigio Conchiglia. Light wear to the seats. Fully redone to high standards, but that was a while ago and it’s no longer a show car. It’s still very attractive and would make a solid event Ferrari. – Sold to the consignor at RM’s Monterey auction in 2013 for $1,292,500 and offered by Gooding here in Scottsdale two years ago with a reported high bid of $1,650,000. The restoration’s quality and attention to detail are apparent but the restoration’s best days are behind it and the result here is realistic.

Lot # 152 1957 Ferrari 250 GT Boano Coupe, Body by Boano; S/N 0667GT; Engine # 0667GT; Dark Blue, Silver roof and sills/Beige leather; Estimate $975,000 – $1,150,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $925,000925,000. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, IPRA heater, painted SF shields, Pirelli Cinturato tires, woodrim steering wheel, Marchal headlights and grille mounted driving lights. – Very good older paint with a few small blemishes but no noticeable chips or scratches. The major chrome is good but the vent window trim is thin. The underbody, chassis and engine are restored like new, with minor use and age. A quality restoration described as completed in early 2016 that will be a great tour car. – Within $50,000 of the low estimate it is difficult to see enough gap between the seller’s, buyer’s and auction company’s expectations to explain why this seriously good and pure 250 GT wasn’t sold. It was offered at RM’s Monterey auction in 2015 with a rat’s nest of wiring hanging down from behind the dashboard (now corrected, or at least tucked up and out of sight) where it was bid to $960,000 on the block and reported sold later at an undisclosed price. An astute seller would have made the same decision here, but that didn’t happen.

Lot # 240 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Lusso Coupe, Body by Scaglietti; S/N 5537GT; Engine # 5537; Blue Sera/Beige leather; Estimate $1,800,000 – $2,200,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,525,000 plus commission of 10.33%; Final Price $1,682,500. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XVS tires, Marchal headlights and fog lights. – While the engine is orderly the bottom of the engine compartment is road grimy. The steering wheel rim varnish is worn through. Very good paint, chrome and unmarked upholstery. Thoroughly restored but shows subsequent use. Century of Sports Cars Collection. – Acquired by the consignor at RM’s Monterey auction in 2013 for $1,386,000 fresh from restoration and offered at Gooding’s Scottsdale sale in 2016 where it was reported bid to $1,850,000. The restoration is getting a bit thin but still is dramatic and it’s covered just 182 miles since its sale in 2013. It is a quality Ferrari with a few easily addressable issues and a sound value at this price.

Lot # 149 1966 Ferrari 330 GTC Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 8883; Engine # 8883; Blue/Beige leather; Estimate $550,000 – $650,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $520,000 – Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Blaupunkt cassette stereo, power windows, Mallory CD ignition. – Repainted assembled long ago and still sound. Thin chrome. Cracked original upholstery with pulled seams. Dirty original engine compartment, dull wheels, cracked original undercoat. It would be hard to make a preservation case for this GTC. Owned by the seller, a Ferrari mechanic, since 1977 and stored since 1984 until it was mechanically recommissioned by the seller personally before bringing it to the auction. It will need more work before being safely and reliably put back on the road. – The result here is so close to the low estimate and within any realistic range for a long-stored even if running 330 GTC that it seems like a reasonable seller would have taken the money, if there was any.

Lot # 229 1967 Ferrari 330 GTC Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 10593; Engine # 10593; Oro Chiaro Metallizato/Beige leather; Estimate $500,000 – $600,000; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $500,000 plus commission of 11.00%; Final Price $555,000. – Wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Ansa exhaust, woodrim steering wheel, power windows, factory air conditioning. – Excellent paint and chrome. Very good restored interior. Very clean underneath, including brand new exhaust. Shows a believable 58,890 miles on its odometer. Cosmetically restored last year, but done thoroughly enough that it presents like a fresh, full redo. Finished in its original color, which is on the weird side but still likable. – It is probably sacrilegious to suggest, but this Oro Chiaro 330 GTC would bookend a collection nicely with the Oro George Barris 308 at Barrett-Jackson this week, and particularly at this price. It bought a car that needs nothing to be displayed and enjoyed on the road, a sound value.

Lot # 241 1975 Ferrari 365 GT4 BB Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 18635; Engine # 00358; Dark Blue, Black sills/Black leather; Estimate $450,000 – $550,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $360,000 plus commission of 11.39%; Final Price $401,000. – Borletti air conditioning, power windows, 5-spoke Cromodora centerlock alloy wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Audiovox cassette stereo, Ferrari Classiche certified, but the binder is not included. – Very good repaint and lightly creased and stretched original interior. Clean, dry original underbody with a hint of exterior overspray. Lightly polishing scuffed nose. Static displayed in Japan for nearly four decades showing 7,817 believable km on the odometer. Century of Sports Cars Collection. – Offered at Gooding & Company’s Pebble Beach auction in 2016 where it was reported bid to $460,000 and showed 101 fewer km on the odometer than it does today, this is a pristine early Boxer that begs to be driven more than it has in the last four decades. 365 GT4 BBs have long been overlooked, and that seems to be the case today with this result, an outstanding Ferrari at a modest price.

Lot # 262 1971 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 14019; Engine # B794; Red/Black leather, Red inserts, Black bars; Estimate $550,000 – $650,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $515,000 plus commission of 10.97%; Final Price $571,500. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Pirelli P4000 tires, Marelli ignition modules, Veglia air conditioning, power windows, Blaupunkt AM-FM, painted nose panel, popup headlights. – Adequate repaint with nose chips. Worn and creased original upholstery, new dashtop mouse hair. Oil misted and somewhat grimy engine compartment and chassis. Old, frayed side window channels. Old undercoat in the wheel wells. This is a mediocre Daytona on a week when there are many to choose from. – Sold at Auctions America’s Burbank auction in 2013 for $401,500 with some subsequent work, but still a mediocre Daytona. It brought a price appropriate to its condition.

Lot # 222 2008 Ferrari 430 Scuderia Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFKW64A880164333; Giallo Modena, Gray Stripes/White leather; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $200,000. – Pirelli Corsa tires, carbon brakes, yellow calipers, fire bottle, carbon interior trim. – Just 2,000 miles and looks like a new car, even though it has a white interior. – The list price for the Scuderia was originally a little over $260,000 when it was new. As good as they were, they’re yesterday’s news when it comes to high-performance exotics and are a ways off from being serious collector cars. The reported high bid was reasonable. Gooding had a red one that was bid to 220 grand, but also hammered not sold which is what happens when consignors think it’s still 2016.

Lot # 173 2002 Ferrari 575M Maranello Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFBV55A120129443; Black/Natural leather; Estimate $150,000 – $180,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $117,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $131,600. – CD stereo, F1 gearbox, Daytona seats, clean CarFax, Tubi exhaust (original included). – Represented as 4,000 miles from new with a ‘more recent’ timing belt service. Unblemished original paint. The interior has only a little creasing on the driver’s seat. The underbody is like new. – Sold at Gooding’s Pebble Beach auction in 2016 for $176,000. Two years and $60,000 less; at this depreciation rate Ferrari ownership (if not Ferrari maintenance) might become affordable about the time electric, autonomous driving cars become commonplace. Think about the experience of driving this fox among the autonomous chickens.

Lot # 258 1999 Ferrari F355 GTS Spider, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFXR42A0X0113489; Bianco Avus/Black leather; Estimate $120,000 – $140,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $95,200. – Tubi exhaust, Scuderia shields, factory car cover, books, tools, window sticker. – Paint shows wear and micro scratching. Interior condition reflects the age and 34,851 miles. Missing dome light cover. The engine bay is clean and appears factory correct. Engine cover and front trunk struts are worn and do not hold the panels up. Clean front trunk. Good glass. Reportedly had a major service in August 2016. A two-owner car that’s a little bit better than an average driver. – Reportedly the only one finished in this color for 1999, but what really set it apart was the 6-speed, which by this late in the 355’s production run was getting rarer. In this condition, though, the car was lucky to get this much.

Lot # 244 2005 Ford GT Coupe; S/N 1FAFP90S35Y401939; Midnight Blue, White Stripes/Black; Estimate $275,000 – $325,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $270,000 plus commission of 11.85%; Final Price $302,000. – All four options. – Like new and represented with 2,000 miles. – A straightforward and appropriate result for a standard average-mileage ’05 Ford GT.

Lot # 119 1946 Ford Super Deluxe Station Wagon; S/N 99A1313377; Maize Yellow, Wood/Tan vinyl; Estimate $50,000 – $60,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $56,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $62,720. – Hub caps and trim rings, Firestone whitewalls, spotlight, factory radio, three-row seating, rear-mounted spare. – The original wood is a little rough with some water stains at joints and bolts but presentable and well-preserved. There is a long scratch on the right rear fender. Paint coming up with surface rust poking through on the drip rails. Good newer upholstery and sound original dash. An older superficial cosmetic redo of an inherently charming woody. – The preservation of this Ford and the fact it has never fallen into disrepair adds significant value that was recognized by the bidders. They could have paid even a little more than this and had a solid value.

Lot # 226 1971 Intermeccanica Italia Convertible; S/N 50391414; Red/Black leather; Black top; Estimate $160,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $160,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $179,200. – 351 Windsor/310hp, 4-speed, lightly modified, Magnum 500 wheels, Cinturato tires, Ansa exhaust, power windows, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, factory air conditioning. – The headlight covers don’t fit evenly. There is a paint run on the hood, but the finish is very good and blemish-free. Good interior with newer seats but original dash and switchgear. Formerly owned by Alex Trebek and more recently treated to a reasonably high quality restoration. These are still cars that offer Ferrari looks, performance and exclusivity for a fraction of the price. – This is a good example, and maybe it’s the TV celebrity history that induced the bidders into Jeopardy territory with this price, enough for the best one in the world.

Lot # 250 1954 Jaguar D-Type Roadster; S/N XKD403; Engine # E20659; BRGreen/Green leather; Estimate $12,000,000 – $15,000,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $9,800,000. – RHD. Dunlop centerlock alloy wheels, Dunlop Racing tires, wraparound full Plexiglas windscreen, driver’s head fairing and fin, Lucas LeMans headlights, black side exhaust. Spare works engine included, to be shipped later. Lavishly documented. – Cracked and chipped old paint, patinaed old upholstery. The chassis is probably not as worn and dirty as it was when Stirling Moss and Peter Walker retired it from LeMans in 1954 after leading early but definitely driven with a windshield full of historic event tech stickers and a history of historic racing and informed caretakers.

– Bidding stalled at $7.6 million, then resumed in quick $100k increments, to this disappointing reported result. It didn’t win LeMans, but it did lead. Neither D-type in the Scottsdale auctions found value equilibrium between consignors and bidders and at values like this is it difficult to argue with the consignors’ assessment of value.

Lot # 209 1960 Jaguar Mark 2 3.8 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N P214910BW; Engine # LA82978; Cotswold Blue/Red leather; Estimate $50,000 – $60,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $26,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $29,120. – Painted centerlock wire wheels, automatic, dual mirrors, fog lights, woodrim steering wheel, heater, pushbutton radio. – JDHT Certificate. Comes with tools and jack. A little paint is coming off the wheels. Light pitting and scratching on the window frames. Sound older paint. Good lightly worn interior that was restored apart from the rear upholstery, which is original and worn but still presentable. A handsome older full restoration with plenty of life left in it, even if it isn’t a show car. – Even with the automatic, this car deserved more than this but sold at no reserve. Great for the astute new owner, who could have paid another 10 grand without issue.

Lot # 176 1951 Jaguar XK 120 Roadster; S/N 671978; Engine # W45458; Bronze/Dark Green leather; Khaki cloth top; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $84,000. – Hub caps and trim rings, Firestone whitewalls, fender skirts, full weather equipment. – Restamped chassis. Fairly dirty old tires and wheels. Chip in the left front fender. Some paint rub through on the front edge of the doors. Small dent in the exhaust tip. Lightly worn unrestored interior. Light road wear underneath. Represented as restored, but clearly done a long time ago and probably before these cars were worth much. The color also just isn’t the best for an XK. – A driver quality car rightly recognized for what it is and bid to what it deserved.

Lot # 170 1952 Jaguar XK 120M Fixed-Head Coupe; S/N S680003; Engine # W58738S; Suede Green/Suede Green leather; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $84,000. – Chrome wire wheels, Michelin X tires, fender mirrors, Lucas headlights, JDHT documented. – Restored like new with very good paint, upholstery and interior wood. The major chrome is good but some of the window moldings are weak. The engine compartment is orderly and in largely like new condition. A pretty Jag that is not too good to drive. – Bought appropriately, despite the optimistic estimate, for its condition and specifications and an unusual Special Equipment “M” example with the fixed-head coupe body that should be particularly satisfying to drive.

Lot # 211 1958 Jaguar XK 150 Roadster; S/N S831469; Engine # V56388; Mist Grey/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $89,600. – Chrome centerlock wire wheels from an E-Type, narrow whitewalls, dual wing mirrors. – Good older paint in original colors other than a few chips at the back of the driver’s door. Good chrome. The top is mostly good but fraying at one of the bottom edges. Original but tidy underneath. Very good interior. Comes with JDHT Certificate. An attractive driver quality cosmetic restoration and an eye-catching weekend cruiser. – Not a show car by any means but a good, sound driver that changed hands at a realistic price.

Lot # 151 1960 Jaguar XK 150 Roadster; S/N S832119DN; Engine # V74758; Ice Blue/Dark Blue leather; Dark Blue cloth top; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $95,200. – Chrome wire wheels, Avon tires. – Cylinder head (LC1146-9) does not match the block but the original comes with the car. ID plate has four pop rivets but six holes. The back of the block is oily. The paint on the hydraulic fluid reservoirs is cracked. The paint and chrome are good but the trunk lid is twisted. Two tonneau cover posts are missing and their holes not filled. A presentable but superficial older restoration. – It probably is more fun to drive with the 9:1 compression head now fitted than with the original 8:1 head. The restoration is sound, but has some unsettling compromises that brought an intelligently compromised price. The consignor shouldn’t complain. Rather, take this as a lesson that preparation and presentation count for a lot.

Lot # 264 1959 Jaguar XK 150S Drophead Coupe; S/N T838092DN; Engine # VS18289; Black/Red leather; Black top; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $150,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $168,000. – Chrome centerlock wire wheels, cloth boot cover, overdrive. – Numbers matching with tools and JDHT certificate. Great panels and gaps. The Black paint is almost flawless. Excellent trim. Fresh wire wheels. Nothing to fault with interior or top. Spotless engine bay with no fluid in the overflow bottle. The car is very fresh and above reproach. – A top notch car sold at a top notch price.

Lot # 171 1963 Jaguar XKE SI 3.8 Roadster; S/N 879122; Engine # RA12929; Silver/Burgundy leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $175,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $196,000. – Chrome wire wheels, Michelin XVS tires, pushbutton AM radio. – Represented as matching numbers. Good paint, upholstery, top and chrome. Done to good standards a while ago and driven. The trunk lid doesn’t latch flush and the door fits are a little off. Class winner at the 2015 JCNA LA Concours. A quality Jag. – This is serious money but it brought a well-restored and maintained car that was judged 999.8 points three years ago and appears to have been driven only a little and carefully since then.

Lot # 218 1966 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster; S/N 1E12433; Engine # 7E76599; Silver/Claret leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $200,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $224,000. – Chrome wire wheels, Michelin Defender 205/70R15 tires. – Excellent fresh paint, chrome and interior. The engine compartment is show polished. Cylinder head and block have the same numbers and are represented as original. The rear wheel wells are painted body color over undercoat and have slight rust bleeding through at panel joints. Gorgeous eye candy in attractive colors. – The body color paint in the wheel wells is a jarring and unusual feature, but this still is an outstanding E-type at a reasonable price.

Lot # 156 1954 Kaiser-Darrin 161 Roadster; S/N 161001023; Pine Tint Green/Green; Pine Tint Green cloth top; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Modified restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $115,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $128,800. – 331/230hp Cadillac 331 V-8, wire wheels, whitewalls, wind wings, Getrag 5-speed. – Gorgeous original colors. High quality paint. Very good interior. Restored underneath. Good chrome. It looks fresh and correct, but will drive better with the drivetrain swap, which was done in the spirit of the last handful of Kaiser-Darrins that were fitted with Cadillac engines from new. – The 230hp of this Kaiser-Darrin and 5-speed gearbox should be a lot more satisfying to drive than the 90hp of the original Kaiser six. The workmanship is of a very high standard, which gives some confidence about the overall quality and execution of the swap. And the price is less than a stock configuration example in this condition.

Lot # 160 1991 Lamborghini Diablo Coupe; S/N ZA9DU07P0MLA12283; Red, Gunmetal mirrors/Black leather piped in Red; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $170,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $190,400. – OZ Racing mirrors, wing, Alpine cassette stereo, power windows, air conditioning. – Very early Diablo. Three-owner car. Excellent blemish-free paint. Showing 4,762 miles. Like new interior. And a like new car. – Gooding sold another first year Diablo with 600 miles and a special-order interior for $217,250, but this red car still brought a very strong price that furthers the trend of Diablos finding favor among collectors as Countaches retreat a bit.

Lot # 224 2001 Lamborghini Diablo VT 6.0 Coupe; S/N ZA9DU01B71LA12645; Arancia Atlas/Black leather, Orange piping; Estimate $275,000 – $325,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $260,000. – Alloy wheels, cross-drilled rotors, all-wheel drive, P Zero tires, power windows, air conditioning, Pioneer CD stereo. – Clear bra on the nose and mirrors. Flawless paint. Showing 12,005 miles. The bottom of the driver’s seat is a little flat but that’s the only sign of age on this final year Diablo that’s finished in an appropriately look-at-me color. – Bid to less than it cost new, this car deserved another few bids, and with the apparent growing interest in Diablos, the buyer shouldn’t have a hard time finding a willing buyer at the desired price.

Lot # 253 1962 Maserati 3500GT Spyder, Body by Vignale; S/N AM1011441; Engine # AM1011441; Verde Bosco, Verde Bosco hardtop/Beige leather; Estimate $575,000 – $675,000; Unrestored original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $545,000 plus commission of 10.92%; Final Price $604,500. – Borrani wire wheels, Cinturato tires, hardtop, Blaupunkt multiband pushbutton radio, Lucas FI, 5-speed, disc brakes. – Rough original paint with numerous chips around the panel edges and lots of paint flaking off the hardtop. Decent original chrome that still has some shine. Road wear and oxidation underneath but it’s mostly sound. The seats are cracking, but the dash and switchgear are pretty good. One of just 242 Spider versions, and includes original tool kit and owner’s manual. Very rare and attractive with two owners from new and 30,157 miles. A solid choice for someone who wants a preservation class show car, and it has reportedly been kept up mechanically with an engine and driveline rebuild in 2013. – The Giovanni Michelotti-designed 3500GT Vignale Spyder is one of the most seductive and appealing cars to come out of a golden age of Italian coachwork. Never restored and apparently regularly cared for this is a solid, attractive and well-equipped example in attractive colors bought at a price that discounts it for its preservation rather than the other way around. The new owner got an outstanding Maserati for a modest price.

Lot # 213 1958 Mercedes-Benz 190SL Convertible; S/N 1210408502551; Engine # 1219219502376; Strawberry Red Metallic, Ivory hardtop/Beige leather; Beige top; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $175,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $196,000. – Hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, Becker Europa radio, two tops. – Straight panels with good gaps. Minor paint flaws on the hardtop. Good brightwork. Excellent interior with some over-polishing. Clean engine bay. Some inconsistent clamps and fasteners. No scratches on any of the glass. Restored years ago but still holding up very well. – Sold here in 2013 for $129,250 and while this is an outstanding 190SL the price it brought is difficult to conceive except for the appeal of the Strawberry paint (which it had back in ’13, and it was the same paint.) 190SLs have come way off their recent high prices, a trend not represented in this very expensive result.

Lot # 158 1957 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster; S/N 1980427500295; Engine # 1989807500347; Silver/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $950,000 – $1,050,000; Recent restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $980,000 plus commission of 10.51%; Final Price $1,083,000. – Rudge-style wheels, Yokohama tires, Becker Europa radio, Karl Baisch luggage. – Excellent paint and chrome. Gorgeous wheels. The right rear bumper is about an inch and a half further out from the body than on the left side, which is very noticeable. Even gaps. Gorgeous restored interior with very light wear to the seats. Recently rebuilt fuel injection. The rear bumper issue and the odd choice of tires are odd, but the presentation is top notch for the most part. – Present but withdrawn from the 1992 Kruse Scottsdale auction where it showed 35,000 miles. Now restored again and showing 44,145 miles it has all the earmarks of a car that has been babied and had its needs met as they turned up. It is a realistic buy at this price.

Lot # 130 1948 Packard Eight 22nd Series Station Sedan; S/N; Engine # H409501; Egyptian Sand, Wood/Tan with cloth inserts; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $42,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $47,040. – Hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, Overdrive, amber fog lights, cormorant mascot, sun shade, heater, dash clock, radio. – The wood is showing some age with light cracking, but there is more severe cracking at the back. Paint chips around the edge of the hood. The paint is otherwise good but older. Good interior. Never fully restored, but has gotten major attention over the years when needed. These were something of a sales flop for Packard when they were new, but they are among the company’s most collectible postwar models today. – The result here is appropriate for this Standard Eight Station Sedan’s condition, but accords it scant credit for preservation. The new owner got a sound, unusual, practical Packard for a reasonable price.

Lot # 166 1933 Packard Eight-Series 1001 Cabriolet, Body by Graber; S/N 376978; Engine # 719177; Blue, Light Blue/Tan leather; Blue cloth top; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $170,000. – Light, Blue wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual. enclosed sidemounts, Solar headlights, Trippe lights. – Ex-Sergio Franchi. Sad, cracked, chipped old paint. Worn and creased old upholstery, good top. Erratic chrome. Aged and road grimy chassis. An elegant and unusual car that needs a restoration. – Even with the Sergio Franchi provenance the condition just isn’t good enough to be worth much if any more than the reported high bid. Even bought at this level the restoration would quickly put the finished car financially underwater.

Lot # 215 1938 Packard Twelve Series 1608 Landaulet, Body by Rollston; S/N 16082025; Black/Black, Beige; Beige top; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $200,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $224,000. – Hub caps and trim rings, dual enclosed sidemount spares, cormorant mascot, landaulette roof, Silvertown whitewalls, banjo steering wheel, speedometer and dash clock in the back, jump seats, intercom, division window, drinks bar. – The Doris Duke Packard with tons of history and used to drive her back and forth between New Jersey and Newport. Paint flaking off the spare wheel covers. Older tires. The paint is sound but no longer fresh. Fully restored about 10 years ago and no longer a concours winner, but it’s still a fascinating car with this body style, its interesting features and its history. – The passage of time is beginning to tell on this restoration, even though it is less than ten years old. The bidders recognized it and bid with caution to arrive at this appropriate result.

Lot # 144 1953 Porsche 356 Cabriolet, Body by Reutter; S/N 60266; Engine # 32009; White/Dark Red leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $230,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $257,600. – Hubcaps, louvered trim rings, bias ply blackwall tires, bent windshield, heater, Porsche CoA. – Represented as the original engine. Good paint over a generously filled body. Driver’s door doesn’t close flush but the gaps are even. Under the right door there is a 4 inch scrape that should buff out. Very good upholstery, instruments and top. Orderly engine compartment in nearly showroom condition aside from a little gasoline staining on the left carburetor. – Not sold at a reported high bid of $375,000 at Mecum’s Monterey auction in 2014, an historical artifact that does little to make the seller feel better today, even with this realistic result. Its condition is largely above reproach, and so it the result.

Lot # 143 1953 Porsche 356 Coupe, Body by Reutter; S/N 50747; Engine # 31564; Pasha Red/Beige vinyl, cloth inserts; Estimate $175,000 – $250,000; Recent restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $200,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $224,000. – Hubcaps, bias ply whitewalls, bent window, Porsche CoA. – Replacement engine. Generously filled body with attractive paint but with orange peel on the windshield posts. Very good chrome, upholstery and gauges. The engine compartment is superficially redone and squirted black. The engine itself is done but installed without detailing. Makes a good first impression that doesn’t hold up. – Obviously the bidders here at the Biltmore liked this Porsche a lot more than I did not only here but also at RM’s Monterey auction in 1998 when it was similarly described … and sold for $16,264. It would not have been a good value at the low estimate and at this price it is seriously expensive.

Lot # 142 1955 Porsche 356 Speedster, Body by Reutter; S/N 80671; Engine # 35226; Ivory/Red leather; Red cloth tonneau cover, Black cloth top; Estimate $300,000 – $375,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $315,000 plus commission of 11.59%; Final Price $351,500. – Hub caps, Avon tires, cloth boot cover, gold brightwork. – Gorgeous Pre-A Speedster. Excellent paint, chrome and interior. Represented as matching numbers. Fully redone to very high standards without going overboard and without fault. – Not sold at a $375,000 high bid at Mecum Monterey in 2015, a result that with the $315,000 hammer price here speaks eloquently for the 2 1/2 years in the collector car market. The result here is full value for the money, for both parties.

Lot # 140 140 Porsche 356 1500 Cabriolet, Body by Reutter; S/N 60351; Engine # 32422; Pascha Red/Beige leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Concours restoration, 1 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $250,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $280,000. – Hubcaps, whitewalls, Telefunken radio, tools, jack, Porsche CoA. – Represented as the matching numbers engine. Excellent paint, interior and chrome. The engine compartment is pristine. The doors fit perfectly. Impressively restored and fresh as a daisy. – It is impossible to fault the car, nor even the price it brought. It is particularly impressive when it’s on the same row as the superficially-presented 356 Coupe in Pascha Red. The contrast in preparation and presentation was dramatic.

Lot # 223 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Speedster; S/N WP0EB0911KS173786; Engine # 64K06570; Cinnabar Red/Beige leather; Black top; Estimate $350,000 – $425,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $310,000. – Chromed Fuchs wheels, gold lug nuts, Comp T/A tires, air conditioning, power windows and seats, snorkely brake light, Blaupunkt Charleston cassette stereo, wide body, short throw shifter, limited slip. – Surely the most interesting (or weirdest) of these ’89 Speedsters. Special ordered with suede door trim, dash, steering wheel, shifter and console, so there is suede absolutely everywhere (except on the seats.) It’s not fine or smooth, though, but almost shaggy and from a distance looks like it’s made out of golden retriever. Showing 253 miles and looks like a new car, but you’d have to really be a fan of that interior to want this car. “Der Letzte Speedster”. – Most of the time, special order features on a Porsche set it apart and can command a little bit of money, but it’s hard to tell whether this car’s suede everything interior help it or hurt it. The craftsmen at Porsche must have had no few one-liners to offer while trimming it. It was bid to a perfectly fair price, though, and could have gone to a new home at the reported high bid.

Lot # 263 1996 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ99ZTS390495; Engine # 63S86105; Polar Silver Metallic/Black, Gray leather; Estimate $425,000 – $525,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $385,000 plus commission of 11.30%; Final Price $428,500. – Speedline modular wheels, Pilot Sport tires, factory cassette stereo, air conditioning, power windows, Club Sport wing. – Imported from Japan where it was one-family owned from new. Very light wear on the seats. The bottom lip is lightly chipped but the rest of the original paint looks very good. Showing 10,682 km. A lightly used Carrera RS, slightly better than the nearly identical Japanese market one over at Bonhams. – The nearly identical Bonhams car went unsold at $330,000 so it seems that this one attracted all the attention, although this one has no representation of import paperwork, either. It is oddly optioned with heavy convenience items like A/C and power windows that defeat the intent of the Carrera RS, but that may be part of its appeal here.

Lot # 164 1976 Porsche 911 Carrera Turbo Coupe; S/N 9306800364; Engine # 6860373; Ice Green Metallic/Black leather; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $155,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $173,600. – Black Fuchs wheels, Pirelli tires, sunroof, CD radio, Blaupunkt stereo, power windows, air conditioning. – Special order paint. Two small blisters and a scratch on the left front fender. Small chip on the hood. Small blisters on the passenger’s door. Light wrinkling on the seats. Well maintained original engine bay. Represented with 11,234 miles but the odometer reads 6,595 miles after a 185mph speedometer change in 1977 when the original read 4,856. An attractive but used first year 930. There are plenty of original examples that are better than this, but that doesn’t make this a bad one. – Another soft 930 price for a mostly very good example. Prices spiked in 2014 and 2015 with the rest of the 911s and then flattened, but they now appear to be retreating as this and other transactions show.

Lot # 141 1988 Porsche 911 Turbo 930 Coupe; S/N WP0JB0931JS050407; Engine # 68J00629; Granite Green Metallic/Grey-Green leather; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $145,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $162,400. – Body color Fuchs wheels with polished rims, Potenza tires, sunroof, Blaupunkt cassette stereo, power windows, air conditioning, side intakes, power seats. – Factory slant nose car and an even rarer US market example. Showing 29,026 miles from new. There is a tiny, tiny chip in the right front fender but the paint is fantastic. Very light wear to the seats. Clearly pampered. – Porsche 930s haven’t been selling all that well recently, and this seems like driver money rather than the price of a very good factory slant nose car. It hammered not sold at a $200,000 high bid at Mecum Monterey two years ago, and even that was a modest number. The new owner got a very good value.

Lot # 212 1973 Porsche 911E Targa; S/N 9113210180; Black/Beige leatherette; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $82,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $92,400. – Fuchs wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Blaupunkt cassette stereo, factory air conditioning, 5-speed. – Several chips and scratches on the tip of the nose. The wheels are a little dull. The paint is pretty dull right below the windows. A few scratches in the roll hoop. The brightwork is painted black. Light road wear underneath. Lightly worn original interior. A reasonably well preserved unrestored original car with rare factory air conditioning, not that you would expect it to work. – Sold for $79,750 in Santa Monica two years ago. In Arizona, it was more appropriately given a premium for its preservation and rare options and sold at a fair price.

Lot # 139 1967 Porsche 911S Coupe; S/N 305991S; Engine # 960311; Aga Blue/Red leatherette; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Recent restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $170,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $190,400. – Chromed wheels, Pirelli tires, gold brightwork, woodrim steering wheel, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, headrest seats, Porsche CoA. – First year 911S. Represented as numbers matching. Excellent paint and chrome. Straight body with even gaps. Spotless, perfect wheels. Excellent restored interior, although there is some age on the dash trim. A phenomenal looking, desirable car with seemingly only one small corner cut. – This is a fairly modest result considering that Gooding sold another ’67 S in no better condition and a 1970 2.2-liter model for nearly 20 grand more. Maybe it’s the color? No, Aga Blue looks good.

Lot # 155 1987 Porsche 959 Komfort Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ95ZHS900020; Engine # 65H00087; Silver/Gray leather; Estimate $1,000,000 – $1,250,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,050,000 plus commission of 10.48%; Final Price $1,160,000. – Blaupunkt cassette stereo, power windows, power seats, air conditioning, height-adjustable titanium spring suspension. – Very tiny chip on the right side of the nose. Strangely, the door gaps aren’t even. The gaps around the hood aren’t even, either. Represented with 8,900 miles but the odometer shows 2,663 miles because the odometer reading 9,616 km was switched when the car was imported. Light wear on the seats but not bad. Fully federalized and California legal as well as fully sorted and serviced. – Having a roadworthy and fully legal 959 was attractive enough for the bidders to ignore the small cosmetic issues on this car and pay a price usually commanded by like-new examples.

Lot # 251 1929 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Ascot Tourer, Body by Brewster; S/N S178FR; Engine # 21788; Red, Maroon fenders, Silver accent/Beige leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $245,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $274,400. – A lefthand drive Springfield PI with chrome wire wheels, blackwall tires, dual sidemount spares, dual spotlights, wood dash and door trim, dual windshields with rear wind wings. – Straight, close-fitting panels. Older paint presents well with minor flaws. Some wear to the polished side trim. Radiator plating is worn and dull. Some inconsistent fasteners used. Very good top. Modern upholstery materials used. Missing fasteners in the rear windshield. Represented with original chassis, engine and body. Well known ownership history. Restored in 2010 and needs a going over before hitting the show field, but mostly very high quality. – Sold by Bonhams at Quail Lodge in rather deteriorated and original condition in 2010 for $172,000, then offered by Gooding here in Scottsdale in 2013 after restoration where it was reported bid to $280,00, sold by Bonhams in Scottsdale in 2014 for $255,000 and a no-sale at Barrett-Jackson Westworld in 2015 at a reported bid of $375,000. The B-J bid may be disregarded and the result here is consistent with earlier values. It is a quality example with sleek coachwork and is worth every dollar of the price it brought.

Lot # 121 1950 Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith Sedan, Body by Park Ward; S/N LWHD54; Grey, Pewter Grey/Grey leather; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $56,000. – Hub caps, Firestone wide whitewalls, fender skirts, dual wing mirrors, single Lucas driving light, rear air conditioning, semaphores. – Repainted in the ’70s. Paint blisters in the bodywork creases. Tiny dent in the right front fender. Light orange peel on the right rear door. Very good interior with very pretty wood. Imperfect panel gaps. Small blisters in the right A-pillar. Maintained but unrestored engine bay. Delivered new in Canada and mostly original. – An elegant and distinctive coachbuilt Silver Wraith with some unusual features, like the rear wheel “spats” and a high level of preservation. The bidders recognized both its quality and its visual appeal with a solid price the seller should be happy to put in the bank.

Lot # 147 1965 Shelby Cobra 289 Roadster; S/N CSX2442; Red, Black vinyl hardtop/Black leather; Black top; Estimate $900,000 – $1,200,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $900,000 plus commission of 10.56%; Final Price $995,000. – Silver painted wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, wind wings, grille and trunk guards, luggage rack, woodrim steering wheel, full weather equipment including two tops, luggage rack – Represented as the original engine. Excellent paint and brightwork. The underbody and mechanicals show minimal use. The interior leather is reported to be original and the driver’s seat back is torn and has several pulled seams patched with duct tape. Gauge faces are starting to yellow. A sympathetic old restoration with little subsequent use. Sold new in Illinois. Lightly crashed early on and apparently repossessed. Later color changed and stored from ’73-’90. Fully restored in the 1990s. – In 2016 this Cobra was no-saled at Auburn Fall, then at Ft. Lauderdale the next April. Its odometer has added 154 miles since 2016, probably all on and off transporters and the pre-auction test drive by Donnie Gould. Its preservation is not unusual for a ring & pinion 289 Cobra, but is noteworthy and a factor in its value.

Lot # 254 1965 Shelby Mustang GT350R Fastback; S/N SFM5R213; White, Blue stripes/Black vinyl; Estimate $1,000,000 – $1,200,000; Competition restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $850,000. – Torque Thrust style 5-spoke alloy wheels, 9.50-15 tires, pullup Plexiglas side windows, braced rollbar, bucket driver’s seat, 4-point belts. – A Cobra Caravan car shipped to Peru and raced there in long distance road events. Thoroughly race prepared and pretty good looking for a racecar. A SAAC and MCA winner. – Reported sold by Russo and Steele in Monterey in 2007 for $660,000, the reported high bid here was sound, but maybe not enough to recognize its Cobra Caravan history.

Lot # 259 1968 Shelby Mustang GT500 Fastback; S/N 8T02S16918100533; Wimbledon White/Black vinyl; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $95,200. – Shelby wheels, Goodyear Eagle II tires, 4-speed, console, radio, grille-mounted driving lights, Shelby signature on the dash, Marti report. – The chrome is a little tired and the engine bay has plenty of use. Good older paint. Lightly worn interior with original dash. An older restoration that has seen plenty of use and is no longer a great car, but is still a pretty good one. – Overshadowed by the GT350 R also in the sale, this presentable if fairly aged GT500 brought a modest price that leaves the buyer with a few grand left over to put into the car or just into their pocket and drive it as is.

Lot # 131 1967 Toyota 2000GT Coupe; S/N MF10L10111; Bellatrix Yellow/Black; Estimate $600,000 – $700,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $600,000 plus commission of 10.83%; Final Price $665,000. – Michelin X tires, dual mirrors, woodrim steering wheel, wood dash, wood shift knob, factory radio. – Desirable LHD US market car. Lightly run engine bay. Good older paint. A few scuffs on the exhaust tips, but they look like they would buff out. Very good fully restored interior. Restored once in the 1980s and again in 2003, now showing light age. – The million-dollar 2000GT was a short-lived fad, but this is still modest money for a fully restored car, especially one of the rare original US market examples.

Lot # 216 1979 Toyota FJ43 Land Cruiser Hardtop 4×4; S/N FJ4362054; Mustard Yellow, White roof/Dark Gray vinyl; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $72,800. – Warn winch, dual mirrors, bench seat, rear-mounted spare. – Spotless underbody. Good, fresh paint. The body is a little wavy. Small scratch on the nose. Very good like new interior. Sold new in Colombia, like so many of them were, and freshly done to slightly better than the usual truck standards. – Sold for $49,500 at Motostalgia’s Indy sale in 2015. Land Cruiser prices have actually softened since then, but apparently the bidders on this one didn’t get the memo. As a medium wheelbase FJ43, it’s automatically more desirable than the run of the mill FJ40, but this is still a lot of money for one that isn’t the world’s best.

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