RM Sotheby’s, Arizona Biltmore, Phoenix, January 17-18, 2019

RM Sotheby’s got bumped in 2019, relinquishing their ballroom auction space to a medical device national meeting.

This is the second time this has happened and the RM crew has gotten very good at working around the dislocation, setting up a tent marquee in the valet parking lot for the auction venue and moving much of the pre-sale viewing outside onto the driveways in front of the Biltmore. Fortunately (for the most part) the weather cooperated and the outside viewing turned out to be pleasant, and notably good for photography.

The loudest complaint came from Rob Knowles doing the last minute car cleanup as the auction cars headed for the block, “They put the cars out here under a row of trees with leaves falling on them and birds doing what birds do.”

The modest overall sale total is largely attributable to the disappointing sale results for million dollar cars. There were twelve lots with pre-sale low estimates of $1 million or more. Just half of them sold, leaving $20 million or so on the table at the auction’s conclusion. Even those that found new homes did so on hammer bids under their low estimates.

It was a pattern seen to some degree all over the Scottsdale auctions: the high rollers weren’t rolling, they were sitting on their paddles. That also is apparent in the small average transaction value in the table below

There are, however, many outstanding cars in the report that follows which details 91 of the 155 lots on offer. Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2019 131/155 84.5% 66.4% 10.7% $281,312 $145,600

[51.8%]

$36,851,890
2018 111/128 86.7% 60.9% 8.2% $323,722 $165,200

[51%]

$35,933,140
2017 142/160 88.8% 69.7% 5.6% $378,248 $121,000

[32%]

$53,711,250
2016 127/150 84.7% 74.8% 4.7% $494,344 $176,000

[35.6%]

$62,781,750

The cars were written up on-site by Andrew Newton, Greg Ingold, Jose Martinez and Rick Carey. The last-named is responsible for the final copy and comments.


Lot # 117 1959 AC Ace-Bristol Roadster; S/N BEX1087; Engine # 100D2952; Red/Black leather; Estimate $275,000 – $300,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $245,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $274,400. – Driver’s rollbar, silver painted wire wheels, Michelin X tires, 100D2 engine with triple Solex carbs, dual outside mirrors, disc front brakes, full weather equipment, racing windscreen. – Raced when new by Rod de Ronge. Aged repaint, mostly original upholstery, chassis and engine compartment. Torn, cracked original upholstery. Clear, crisp gauges except for a foggy clock and an inoperative odometer. Never restored but consistently kept up and maintained. – It may not be the best-looking Ace-Bristol around, but is one of the most honest that’ll ever be seen and brought a seriously modest price here at the Biltmore

Lot # 109 1995 Acura NSX Coupe; S/N JH4NA1187ST000428; Formula Red/Tan leather; Estimate $70,000 – $80,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $62,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $70,000. – Alloy wheels, power windows, power seats, air conditioning, cassette stereo. – Excellent paint with no noticeable wear. The underbody is very clean and the interior looks practically unused. Showing 17,866 miles and about as close to a like-new original NSX that you can find. – Prices for early NSXs appear to have peaked after a big run-up in 2014-16, but there is likely still plenty of room for growth in the long-term as the people who longed for an NSX when it was new get older and come into more money. This was a deservedly strong price and it is still, even two decades old, a sublime driving car.

Lot # 179 1963 Apollo 3500GT Coupe, Body by Intermeccanica; S/N 1004; Red/Black leather; Estimate $140,000 – $160,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $134,400. – Buick V-8, 4-speed, Borrani wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, Jaeger gauges, Michelin X tires. – The paint is very good with only a few small blemishes on the driver’s side. The brightwork is very good, however the trim around the windshield is fairly dull especially when compared to the rest of the vehicle. The interior is very good, with a only minor wrinkles on the driver seat. Very clean and orderly engine bay. A straightforward older restoration. – Almost like a contemporary Ferrari in terms of styling if not quite in performance or sophistication, the Apollo is one of several Italo-American hybrids that offers a tempting alternative to the more expensive Italian thoroughbreds. Over six figures seems on the expensive side for a 3500 (a larger 5.0-liter model was available) wearing an older restoration, but Apollos are rare and gorgeous and if you really want one the opportunity doesn’t often come up.

Lot # 136 1967 ASA 1000 GT Coupe, Body by Bertone; S/N 01196; Red/Black vinyl; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $147,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $165,200. – 1092/104hp, 4-speed, Borrani alloy centerlock wheels, woodrim steering wheel, Talbot outside mirror, dual 40DCOE Webers. – Restored to like new condition in 1998 and still impressively presented. Excellent cosmetics. Like new underhood. Very sharp throughout. – Sold by Barrett-Jackson in LA in 2003 for $30,240, then at WestWorld six months later in 2004 for $33,750. RM sold it at Monterey in 2006 for $81,400, then here at this eye-opening price of double what it brought 13 years ago. Its condition is unchanged. Go figure why it is worth this nearly high estimate hammer bid.

Lot # 270 1989 Aston Martin Vantage Volante; S/N SCFCV81V2KTL15795; Cannock Black/Cream leather piped in Black; Black Everflex top; Estimate $375,000 – $450,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $250,000. – 5340/403hp, automatic, Weber-Marelli injection, flared fenders, air dam, sill cladding, deck lid spoiler, power top, power windows, air conditioning, dash clock, wood trim. – Bought new by golfer Greg Norman, so one can assume the boot is large enough for a bag of clubs. Final year for this model. Represented as 7,931 miles from new. A few small scratches on the front bumper and a small ding on the left rear wheel. Light wrinkling to the driver’s seat but otherwise like new interior. Very rare US spec car in essentially like new condition. – The Greg Norman history is less important than the low mileage and solid condition, which the bidders and the Biltmore didn’t recognize for some reason. This car has done just 11 miles since it sold for $330,000 at Gooding Amelia Island two years ago, and if anything it’s worth more now than it was then.

Lot # 225 2000 Bentley Continental SC Coupe; S/N SCBZZ22E8YCX65102; Peacock/Oatmeal leather; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $220,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $246,400. – Alloy wheels, Pirelli tires, removable glass roof, wide body, power seats, cassette stereo. – Special limited-production SC (Sedanca Coupe) model with removable glass roof, reportedly one of 73 built. Like new interior. Very good paint. Nothing to knock it for. Represented with 24,527 miles, but in essentially like new condition. – This is a lot of money and the hammer bid is 10% over RM’s realistic presale high estimate, but then again these cars did cost about 300 grand new. So it has depreciated, just not nearly as much as most late-model Bentleys.

Lot # 216 1947 Bentley Mk VI 4-Dr. Sedan, Body by Freestone & Webb; S/N B370BH; Engine # B185B; Cream, Beige/Tan leather; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $47,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $53,200. – RHD. Wheel covers, wide whitewalls, Flying B, dual wing mirrors, single driving light, suicide doors, B-pillar trafficators. – One of a dozen with this body style, so it’s no ordinary Mk VI even if its coachwork is more Rolls-Royce formal than Bentley sporting. A few cracks at the front of the left running board. Chips on the filler cap. A few chips on the trunk lid. Masking errors around the rear window and around the coach line. Very good interior with clean wood. Large chip on the right front door. Clean and tidy underneath. Some blisters at the right bottom of the hood. A rare car eligible for some good events plus it’s finished in good colors, but it’s not as gorgeous as it looks from a short distance. – A quality older restoration in great running condition from the Calumet Collection, the frumpy coachwork is a problem, but in the bargain the new owner got quality construction and great luxury for a modest price.

Lot # 235 1947 Bentley Mk VI Drophead Coupe, Body by Franay; S/N B26BH; Engine # B13B; Brown, Grey/Brown leather with Dark Brown ostrich skin inserts; Brown cloth top; Estimate $375,000 – $425,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $435,000 plus commission of 11.15%; Final Price $483,500. – RHD. Wheel covers, Michelin tires, fender skirts, Flying B, dual spotlights, single driving light, suicide doors, engine-turned dash, Marchal headlights, fitted crystal stemware, china and picnic hamper, suitcases. – Very good chrome. Small scratch behind the grille and a few small scratches on the right side, but mostly very good older paint. Excellent interior. Discolored tires. Commissioned new by an American paper mill heir. Inherently gorgeous, but showing its age from an older restoration, which also added features such as the chrome body accents and ostrich seats. – A pretty huge result, especially despite the age of the restoration and its embellishments, that was over RM’s presale high estimate. It sold for $211,500 at Bonhams Quail Lodge in 2000, when its restoration was much fresher, then for $396,000 at RM Amelia two years ago. It made its mark here at the Biltmore where, even more than at the Ritz in Amelia, it benefited from the location’s ambience.

Lot # 221 1948 Bentley Mk VI Sport Saloon, Body by James Young; S/N B495CD; Engine # B498C; Black, Dark Grey/Grey leather; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $200,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $224,000. – RHD. Hub caps, fender skirts, Flying B, single driving light, sunroof, rear seat tables. – Interesting James Young bodywork that looks almost like a Hudson from the back. Used at the 1948 Earls Court Show on the James Young stand. Formerly owned by Le Mans winner Duncan Hamilton. Some paint blistering in several spots, particularly along the top of the passenger’s door. Lightly worn front seats and steering wheel, but the wood is very good. Used and unrestored underneath with some oxidation on the frame but nothing serious. Cosmetically restored at some point, but given the rare postwar coachwork it deserves a more comprehensive redo. – While neither particularly pretty nor in very good condition, this car seduced at least two bidders to reach this highly expensive price that is well above RM’s presale estimate. It sold for just $21,700 at Bonhams London in 2003 and hasn’t been restored since, so if the seller here was the same buyer as back then, that’s quite the return.

Lot # 238 1956 Bentley S1 Continental Drophead Coupe, Body by Park Ward; S/N BC7LBG; Engine # BC7B; Masons Black/Dove Grey leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $1,100,000 – $1,400,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $975,000 plus commission of 10.51%; Final Price $1,077,500. – Wheel covers, whitewalls, Flying B, boot cover, automatic, newer radio, complete set of tools. – Reportedly one of only 31 left-hand drive examples. The paint is very good, no significant scratches or chips. The interior is good as well. There are some signs of wear on front bucket seats, but there are no significant cracks or wrinkles. The tires are beginning to yellow. An aged restoration, but holding up well and a highly desirable configuration. – A seriously elegant Bentley for which a serious price was paid.

Lot # 224 1991 Bentley Turbo R Empress II Coupe, Body by Hooper; S/N SCBZR03D8MCX34842; Tudor Red/Cream leather piped in Red; Estimate $200,000 – $300,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $115,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $128,800. – Chrome wire wheels, sunroof, climate control, power seats, rear seat tables. – Special Empress model built on a Turbo R chassis by a revamped Hooper. Showing 7,229 miles represented as original. Very light wrinkling to the driver’s seat but otherwise like new interior with soft upholstery and gleaming wood. Small blister on the left front and a small scuff on the front bumper. Small crack on the right rear fender. Good wheels, clean underneath. In typical Hooper fashion, this car is very distinctive, but also just a little ugly. It’s not quite like new despite the miles, but if you want something a little different, a Hooper Empress certainly qualifies. – While not totally unique, Hooper didn’t make very many of these Empress IIs and reportedly just two were left-hand drive. Exclusivity counts for a lot, and this result is roughly eight times what a normal Turbo R in this condition would bring.

Lot # 246 1958 BMW 507 Series II Roadster; S/N 70157; Midnight Blue, Midnight Blue hardtop/Red leather; Dark Blue cloth top; Estimate $2,500,000 – $3,000,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,972,727 plus commission of 10.25%; Final Price $2,175,000. – Rudge wheels, 5-speed, disc brakes, hardtop and soft top, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio. – Replacement 160hp engine. Very good paint with only a few minor chips on the nose. The brightwork is excellent. The engine bay and underbody are clean and have been well maintained. The interior is very good with no major wear. Restored in the early 2000s then shown at Pebble Beach in 2002 and currently holding up very well. – Even though it nearly put the company out of business when the car was new, the 507 is king of the hill when it comes to BMW values and this one has desirable options, good colors and an older but concours-quality restoration to its credit. It’s not the most expensive one ever sold, but the bidders struck a fine balance between the age of the restoration and its quality and it took a while for RM to put the deal together in this post-block transaction. It also sold for $1,925,000 at Gooding’s Pebble Beach auction five years ago, but 507s have gotten more valuable since then.

Lot # 181 1955 Buick Special Estate Wagon; S/N 4B1113385; Green, White roof/Green, White vinyl; Estimate $37,500 – $47,500; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $21,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $23,520. – 264/188hp, Dynaflow, wheel covers, whitewalls, dash clock, original bill of sale, power steering, power brakes, color-matched luggage with wicker Brexton picnic set. – The paint is very good other than a few scratches and light under spray were the fenders meet the body. All of the brightwork is very good with very light surface scratches around the cowl. The upholstery and interior trim are also very good. A mostly very good but just cosmetically restored example of a relatively rare Buick wagon. – A relatively rare sight, a ’55 Buick Special wagon is nevertheless not particularly valuable. This one brought a strong but realistic price despite being the second-to-last lot of the night.

Lot # 257 1930 Cadillac 452 V-16 Dual Cowl Sport Phaeton, Body by Fleetwood; S/N 702401; Engine # 702401; Light Grey, Grey fenders/Light Grey leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $750,000 – $900,000; Concours restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $850,000 plus commission of 10.59%; Final Price $940,000. – Red wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemount spares with mirrors, luggage trunk, dual spotlights, mascot, Pilot Rays, Jaeger dash clock, speedo and clock in the rear, robe rails, rear armrest, dual windshields, radiator stone shield. – The paint is excellent. The interior trim and paint are also excellent. The upholstery is also very good other than very light wear on the driver’s side. Some yellowing on the right rear tire but the rest of them look good. The red wheels are also very good with just a slight under spray between the red wheel and the chrome trim. The black canvas top is also in excellent condition. Restoration by Stone Barn in New Jersey finished in 1990 for Phil Wichard, then won National First awards from AACA and CCCA. – Sold by RM at Amelia in 2008 for $522,500, then by Gooding in Scottsdale in 2010 for $410,000 in a post-block transaction, the 1930-31 Cadillac 452 V-16 is the pinnacle of the “cylinder wars” that defied the Great Depression [Duesenberg adherents may now scoff and complain]. As quiet as an electric motor, as smooth as ice, the Fleetwood dual cowl phaeton vee-windshield coachwork is sublime, befitting the majesty of the chassis and driveline of this automobile. It is not a chassis that translates gracefully to close-coupled convertible coupes or roadsters, rising to its potential in four-seat conveyances like the dual cowl Sport Phaeton. This one sold for $522,500 at RM Amelia in 2008 and $410,000 in a post-block transaction at Gooding Scottsdale in 2010. It is seriously expensive at this result but there are only about 18 survivors known, most of them locked up in long-term collections, and it is major eye-candy.

Lot # 275 1941 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible Coupe, Body by Fisher; S/N 8353831; Light Grey/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $52,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $58,800. – Hub caps, whitewalls, fender skirts, radiator mascot, radio, column shift. – Light chips and touch ups at some of the panel edges because the gaps are pretty uneven. The paint is a little dull overall as well. Good older chrome, but some of the trim is lightly pitted. Light wrinkling to the seats but the interior is otherwise very good. Clean restored chassis. Lightly yellowing tires. Represented with recent mechanical work and an attractive driver. – The Haze Grey paint is appropriate for this barely pre-war Cadillac, as is the price which, if some thought is given is a rare open Cadillac for less than a ’55 Chevy Bel Air hardtop … with a six.

Lot # 128 1967 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 194677S114980; Rally Red, Black Stinger/Red vinyl; White top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $135,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $151,200. – 427/435hp L71, 4-speed, power brakes, 4.11 Positraction, F41 suspension, side pipes, redline tires, power windows, AM/FM radio, tank sticker documented. – Excellent paint and brightwork throughout. The top is tight fitting but has marks on the driver’s side. The mechanicals have been completely redone to the point of factory overspray on the engine. The interior is very clean had has no significant wear. NCRS Top Flight and Duntov Award in 1998, Bloomington Gold. A very good example but with some age and a re-stamped replacement engine block. – This car sold for an expensive $209,000 at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale in 2011. C2 prices aren’t much different than they were then, but this result for a non-matching numbers but well-restored example with a creditable NCRS and Bloomington Gold history is reasonable.

Lot # 158 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe; S/N 30837S118801; Ermine White/Red vinyl; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $89,600. – 327/250hp, Powerglide, power steering and brakes, air conditioning, wheel covers with whitewall tires, power windows, AM/FM radio. – Decent paint with some wear along the door edge. The bumpers are clean and the stainless trim is clean. The engine appears to have been repainted and many components refreshed. A decent car overall, although hindered by the fact it is equipped with a base engine and a Powerglide transmission. Never fully restored, just got attention when needed during the 62,719 miles it has covered. – In a world where high output engines are the order of the day, the appearance of an air conditioned, base engine, Powerglide “Split Window” Corvette is highly exceptional. This example’s preservation and reassuring sense of continuing care and maintenance are also unusual and are reflected in the price.

Lot # 114 1953 Chevrolet Corvette Roadster; S/N E53F001087; Polo White/Red; Beige cloth top; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $185,000. – Wheel covers and whitewalls. Car number 87 of 300 – Decent paint with a small crack on the passenger’s side fender behind the headlight. The engine compartment is excellent and correct. The interior shows no significant use. An attractive first year Corvette with only a few minor flaws. NCRS Top Flight in 2015 after a multi-year restoration. – Any 1953 Corvette is collectible since it’s both the first and rarest year for America’s sports car. This one also hasn’t been to auction before and its condition is very good if no longer top notch. The smooth paint is something of a detriment. ’53 Corvettes had visible fiberglass weave under their skimpy paint and when that’s gone also gone is some of the early, handmade, charm of the ’53. The bidders here seemed to be switched on to that distinction and weren’t particularly attracted to it. “Too perfect” is sometimes a hindrance.

Lot # 254 1931 Chrysler CG-8 Dual Cowl Phaeton, Body by LeBaron; S/N 7803131; Engine # CG4192; Light Grey/Grey leather; Grey cloth top; Estimate $325,000 – $425,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $300,000 plus commission of 11.67%; Final Price $335,000. – Wire wheels, hub caps, wide whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemount spares, radiator mascot, dash clock. – Reportedly one of 85 Dual Cowl Phaetons with multiple awards including CCCA Primary First, Best of Show at Hilton Head Concours d’Elegance, Best in Class at Pebble Beach, First Prize AACA Grand National. Previously owned by Chrysler Vice President Darrel Davis. The paint is very good, free of any noticeable scratches or blemishes, except for a pea-sized chip located on the waistline pinstriping near the rear passenger’s door. The canvas top appears to be in great condition. The brightwork is also very good other than light pitting on the wheels and taillight. The front and rear bench seats are in good condition. The rubber running boards have begun to dull. A well-maintained restoration with multiple awards to its credit, but those were in the early 2000s and it’s no longer a show winner. – A seriously handsome automobile restored to high standards. At Gooding’s Pebble Beach auction in 2006 this was in a pair with a CG-8 Sedan which together brought $627,100. The sedan later sold for $139,000, leaving this DC Phaeton with a hefty $488,100 cost basis, a long way from the realistic price it brought here thirteen years later.

Lot # 180 1932 Chrysler CP-8 Coupe; S/N 7525898; Dark Green, Black fenders and roof/Green cloth; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $37,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $41,440. – Dual sidemount spares, wire wheels with hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, split windshield, dual chrome horns, Trippe safety lights, pull-down shades in the rear. – The paint is good, but there are two long cracks where the A-pillar meets the roof along both the driver’s and passenger’s sides. The brightwork is also very good with only just a small amount of pitting on the windshield. The fabric on both front and rear seats is excellent and showing no wear. All four tires have begun to yellow, but the wheels are in good condition with just a few small chips on the rears. A well presented but older restoration. – Sold for $30,450 at “The Auction” in Las Vegas in 1992. Sold for $35,510 at Kruse Fall Auburn in 2003 when it showed exactly the same 88,182 miles on the odometer that it does today. It is adaptable, stylish and able to tolerate modern traffic all contributing to being a very sound value at this price.

Lot # 255 1937 Cord 812 Supercharged Convertible Sportsman; S/N 8122036F; Engine # FC2655; Maroon/Red leather; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $190,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $212,800. – Pre-selector shift transmission, factory radio, amber fog lights, chrome hub caps, wide whitewalls. – Auburn Cord Duesenberg and CCCA award winner, not originally supercharged. From the Richard L. Burdick collection. The paint is fair, it does have a substantial amount of chips and scratches, including a fairly deep scratch on the inside driver’s side fender, as well as chips and cracks near the passenger’s door and driver’s side retractable headlamp. The brightwork is good with very little surface scratching and very light pitting. The seats do not have any tears or significant scratches, but they’re lightly worn. All four wheels have significant peeling of the paint, but the hub caps are in good shape with only one significant scratch on the right rear wheel cover. A well-kept but aged restoration. – It is unusual to see an 812 Supercharged Convertible Sportsman at auction, so seeing two of them here in Scottsdale is unprecedented. Barrett-Jackson sold a somewhat better preserved old restoration for $231,000 putting this result firmly on the value curve as a representative price for a quality car.

Lot # 279 1974 DeTomaso Pantera L Coupe, Body by Ghia; S/N THPNND06705; Yellow/Black vinyl; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $55,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $61,600. – Campagnolo wheels, Dunlop GT Qualifier tires, leather-wrapped steering wheel. – Single owner until 2015. Showing 24,134 miles represented as original. Dull plastic bumpers. Lots of cracks on the nose and some paint is flaking off on the right side with surface rust poking through. More cracking and peeling on the A-pillars and around the door handles. Dirty wheels. Dirty underneath. Very well preserved interior that looks a lot better than the body. Could be enjoyed as-is or could be a relatively straightforward restoration. Buyer’s choice. – At this price, the new owner has plenty left over for restoration work. This is better than your average rough Pantera project, even though that’s the kind of price it brought.

Lot # 119 1989 Ferrari 208 GTS Turbo Spider, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFZA28B000079700; Red, Matte Black roof panel/Crema leather; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $90,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $100,800. – Pioneer CD stereo, air conditioning, 5-spoke Ferrari alloy wheels, Pirelli tires. – Very good paint and original interior with little use evident. Good engine compartment. Not fresh but gives good account of itself and its history. – A strange beast, rare in the U.S. because it was built to get around Italian taxation of cars with more than 2 liters displacement. The extra complication of the turbocharger is not, in this case, offset by a performance advantage and there’s no reason for it to bring more than a 308 in similar condition, which this result is.

Lot # 273 1957 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe Speciale, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N 0751 GT; Engine # 0715 GT; Grigio Metallizzato/Camel leather; Estimate $11,000,000 – $13,000,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $7,500,000. – Chrome spoke Borrani wheels, power windows, no outside mirrors. – Built for Princess Lilian de Rethy, wife of King Leopold III of Belgium, later gifted by her to Dr. Ernest de Bakey. Further owners include John Delamater, Norm Silver, Anthony Wang and others of similar note. Restored in 1997 for Philippe Lancksweert in the present livery. The coachwork is distinctive, including an elongated nose with covered headlights, bright accented front fender vents and a blind quarter fastback greenhouse. Despite the restoration now being more than 20 years old it has been carefully preserved and sparingly used so it is still excellent. Ferrari Classiche certification in process with its present drum brakes (as delivered) but also applicable to the 1960 factory-fitted 4-wheel disc brakes installed for Princess Lilian. – This is an important and distinctive one-off Pinin Farina Ferrari but one with a vaunted pre-sale estimate to which the RM Sotheby’s bidders were immune. The amount offered here is low enough that it could be re-restored to present standards without breaching the low estimate.

Lot # 248 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 10051; Engine # 10051; Blue Sera/Blue leather; Estimate $2,800,000 – $3,200,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $2,650,000. – Chrome spoke Borrani RW 1039 wire wheels, Michelin XWX blackwall tires, Carello headlights. – Excellent paint, chrome and interior. Restored like new in 2011. Ferrari Classiche certified. – Offered by Gooding & Company at Pebble Beach in 2010 in Fly Yellow before returning to the present Blue Sera, a hue close to the original Bleu Ferrari, with a high bid of $850,000 and sold a year later by RM at Monterey for $1,485,000. In 2015 it was sold from the headline RM Monterey Pinnacle Portfolio Collection for a massive $3,300,000. It is an impeccable 4-cam in unusual colors but the reported high bid here is probably too much pain for the consignor to bear although it is reasonable in present conditions.

Lot # 149 1985 Ferrari 288 GTO Berlinetta; S/N ZFFPA16B000056761; Red/Black leather, Red cloth inserts; Estimate $3,200,000 – $3,600,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $3,050,000 plus commission of 10.16%; Final Price $3,360,000. – Sony CD stereo, air conditioning, power windows, 5-spoke Speedline Ferrari modular wheels, Sumitomo tires, SF shields. – U.S. delivered, now with 2,875 miles and like new aside from some polishing scratches. The upholstery is unblemished, the engine compartment is clean and orderly and is represented to have just had a belt service. – Based on historic 288 GTO auction transactions this is an expensive outlier due partially to the modest mileage and partially to its U.S. delivery.

Lot # 163 1968 Ferrari 330 GTC Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 11517; Engine # 11517; Giallo Fly/Black leather; Estimate $600,000 – $800,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $620,000 plus commission of 10.81%; Final Price $687,000. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, AM-FM. – Prize-winning Norbert Hofer restoration, excellent Junior Conway Fly Yellow paint, chip guarded nose, good plating on chrome, rubber and glass without fault, oddly dull black leather interior. 2005 Cavallino Classic Platinum, Pebble Beach in 1998. Ferrari Classiche certified. – Sold by Christie’s at Pebble Beach in 2003 for $156,000, then by Gooding in Scottsdale in 2010 for $374,000, and by Gooding at Pebble Beach in 2013 for the outlier price of $946,000,a staggering example of price inflation of 330 GTCs that has moderated recently to reach this appropriate result.

Lot # 142 1967 Ferrari 330 GTS Spider, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 10773; Dark Red/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $2,200,000 – $2,500,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,825,000 plus commission of 10.27%; Final Price $2,012,500. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Blaupunkt multiband radio, power windows, air conditioning – Old undercoat in the wheel wells. Good older paint, chrome and interior showing negligible use or age. Good gauges and dash but scratched power window switch escutcheons. Ferrari Classiche Red Book certified. Represented as 33,766 km from new, repainted for Frank Gallogly in the mid-90’s and thoughtfully preserved since. – For a 330 GTS that has never been restored and went through the early 80’s anguish of being stolen from Paris and then fraudulently sold in Florida this is one heck of a car and worth every dollar of the moderate price it brought.

Lot # 124 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 17607; Engine # B2088; Black/Dark Red leather, Black bars; Estimate $575,000 – $675,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $520,000 plus commission of 10.96%; Final Price $577,000. – 5-spoke Cromodora centerlock alloy wheels, Michelin XWX tires, painted nose panel, popup lights, Grundig cassette stereo, power windows, Veglia air conditioning with dash-mounted control panel, accessory volt and outside temperature gauges, headrest seats. – One owner until 2014 and 85,172 km from new, the fifth from last Daytona built. Engine and gearbox replaced years ago. Good chrome, interior and quality new paint. Old undercoat in the wheelwells. Clean but disturbing under the hood with incorrect air cleaner cover nuts and bad wiring repair with crimped connectors and exposed conductors. The bottom of the engine compartment and chassis are road grimy. Nice paint, but the rest isn’t up to its standard. Ferrari Classiche Red Book certified. – Sold by Bonhams at Goodwood in 2014 for $612,406 (GBP 359,900 at this time; this result is GBP 477,400.) Then sold by Gooding at Pebble Beach in 2015 for $715,000. It has added only 55 kilometers to the odometer since then but lost $38,000 in market value at this result, about in line with Daytonas’ track record over the past 3 1/2 years.

Lot # 242 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 16965; Giallo Fly/Black leather; Estimate $650,000 – $750,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Reported sold but not confirmed. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Borletti air conditioning, power windows, Cromodora alloy spare wheel, tools, jack, dealer pouch, U.S. delivery. – Even gaps, flush fits, excellent paint, good chrome. Good interior with some wear on driver’s seat. Good leather dashtop. Lightly scuffed trim chrome. Old undercoat on chassis. Top of the engine is nice but down low it’s not so good. Includes tool kit, jack, manuals and warranty card. A good, presentable driver-quality Daytona with only 13,717 miles from new. – Sold by Gooding here in Scottsdale seven years ago for $390,500. It’s hard to reach any conclusion based on RM’s reticence about the result here, but it is reasonable to conclude it was embarrassingly low.

Lot # 159 1971 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona NART Spider, Body by Michelotti; S/N 14299; Dark Blue/Cognac leather; Dark Blue cloth top; Estimate $600,000 – $650,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $605,000 plus commission of 10.83%; Final Price $670,500. – Brown leather rim steering wheel, centerlock alloy wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Alpine CD stereo, air conditioning, popup lights. – An expensive exercise that resulted in making a Daytona look like a Corvette, commissioned in 1976 by Luigi Chinetti for his wife Marion. Restored to like new with excellent paint and very good lightly worn and creased interior. Clean and well-maintained engine compartment and underbody. Ferrari Classiche “Attestation of Historic Interest.” – Gooding sold this Ferrari at Pebble Beach in 2013 for $720,000 and it has added 3,915 miles to the odometer since then, miles that were offset by careful maintenance and preservation to keep it in comparable condition. Its design is a matter of personal appeal, but it will stand out among a sea of Daytonas and is a sound value at this price.

Lot # 146 1973 Ferrari 365 GTS/4 Daytona Spider, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 16839; Giallo Fly/Black leather; Black top; Estimate $2,200,000 – $2,600,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,850,000. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, popup lights, Veglia air conditioning, Blaupunkt AM-FM, power windows. – Ex-Sir Anthony Bamford and Otis Chandler. Good repaint, even gaps and flush fits. Good surface creased upholstery. Good bumper chrome but scratched windshield frame and bright trim. Dusty and aged engine compartment and cockpit. Ancient undercoat in the wheel wells. Looks like it has sat for years with little attention and was negligently prepared for the auction but Ferrari Classiche Red Book certified (replacing the Euro-spec components with their original U.S.-spec counterparts to achieve it.) – It’s a “factory” (or at least Scaglietti) cut Daytona Spider, the class of the field that elevates it from a “cut Daytona” to a real Daytona Spider. It was sold by Christie’s at Lyndhurst in 1999 for $354,500. There are only 2,948 more miles accumulated on its odometer since then, a period of two decades and it isn’t getting any better with age having been a 2-condition car in 1999 and a 3+ condition car in 2019. The reported high bid here is parsimonious, but recognizes that this car hasn’t done much of anything in twenty years.

Lot # 131 1983 Ferrari 512 BBi Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFJA09B000044993; White/Crema leather, Red Zegna cloth inserts; Estimate $275,000 – $325,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $225,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $252,000. – Pioneer cassette stereo, Cromodora alloy wheels, TRX tires, air conditioning, power windows. – Very good older repaint, seats are slightly worn and stretched. The engine compartment is very clean and correct. Not fresh but very good, and represented with a recent belt service. – A reassuring 512 BBi that shows the benefits of meticulous recent restoration work with only slight wear on the Ermenegildo Zegna upholstered seats, it also is a reassuring price that reflects the present value of this model.

Lot # 262 1973 Ferrari Dino 246 GT ‘Chairs & Flares’ Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 07520; Engine # 0011753; Azzuro Metallizzato/Black leather; Estimate $400,000 – $500,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $450,000 plus commission of 11.11%; Final Price $500,000. – Campagnolo alloy wheels, Michelin XWX tires, flared fenders, Daytona seats, power windows, open headlights, owner’s manual, tools, jack. – Restoration completed in 2017 and as fresh as expected but with a replacement engine. Ferrari Classiche certified. – This is a magnanimous price for a Chairs & Flares Dino with a replacement engine, even a Classiche-certified one, and even in such gorgeous condition.

Lot # 144 2017 Ferrari F12tdf Coupe, Body by Scaglietti; S/N ZFF81BFA3H0224226; Grigio Titanio/Blue leather, Blue-Grey Alcantara; Estimate $950,000 – $1,100,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $910,000 plus commission of 10.55%; Final Price $1,006,000 HAG. – Manettino steering wheel, carbon fiber interior trim, front fender ducts, splitter, sills and diffuser, SF shields, Yellow calipers, air conditioning, Ferrari stereo. – One owner, <280 miles, generously optioned (to the tune of $90K) and maintained like new, because it is and it is still under the Ferrari maintenance program until 2023. – Breathtakingly powerful with 769 naturally aspirated horsepower from its front-mounted 6.3 liter V12 and featuring sexy details like rear wheel steering (“Passo Corto Virtuale”, virtual short wheelbase) to make it behave like a more nimble competitor. Only 799 were built and this one is buried in options, although many of them are carbon fiber bits meant to reduce weight. Still, it was about $500K new, with $90K in options making this result a serious price to pay for exclusivity. Its low miles are perhaps the result of its breathtaking performance where 280 miles might be all a driver of even finely tuned responses could experience before concluding, “This is more car than this driver can handle.” Someone at the Arizona Biltmore was ready to take on the challenge, though, as this handsome price endorses.

Lot # 280 1996 Ferrari F355 Spider, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFXR48A9T0104887; Giallo Modena/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $78,400. – 6-speed, Ferrari alloy wheels, SF shields, power windows, climate control, Pioneer CD stereo, books and tools. – 17,427 miles from new, major service in 2017. Very good original paint. The engine compartment looks good on top but has road grime below. The seats, particularly the driver’s, are surface creased and have areas of discoloration, a bit more than just patina, which deserves attention and could have been done when the “sticky buttons” were corrected. – This is a surprisingly good result for a used F355 Spider, even in Giallo Modena. Perhaps the bidders were sucked into the trap of the catalog’s description of “the desirable six-speed manual transmission”. In the F355 the 6-speed was standard and the paddle shift F1 gearbox was the hot, and more rare, option as opposed to later Ferraris built with the F1 gearbox in mind from the beginning. This result isn’t irrational, just full retail.

Lot # 105 2006 Ferrari F430 Spider; S/N ZFFEW59A560149477; Grigio Silverstone/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $112,000. – SF shields, Silver calipers, 5-spoke Ferrari alloy wheels, Pirelli tires, carbon fiber dash center panel, manettino steering wheel, Ferrari stereo, chipguarded nose. – Represented as <13,000 miles and looks like it with unblemished paint and butt polished driver’s seat and some scuffing of the driver’s seatback bolster. The engine compartment is similarly aged and used. The top is folding creased and the plastic rear window is scuffed. It’s not pristine, but it’s not neglected. – Offered at Russo & Steele Monterey five months ago where it was reported bid to $97,500, just $2,500 under the successful hammer bid here which represents a very good value in a barely used F430 Spider.

Lot # 276 2008 Ferrari F430 GTC GT2, Body by Michelotto; S/N 2604; Dark Blue, White stripe and roof/Black cloth; Estimate $425,000 – $475,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $313,636 plus commission of 11.59%; Final Price $350,000. – 6-speed manually shifted sequential transmission, red calipers, centerlock alloy wheels, yellow headlights and driving lights, full roll cage, splitter, adjustable wing, full roll cage, fire system, two OMP seats, racing harnesses, data acquisition, quick fuel and oil systems, 24-hour lighting. – One of about 53 built by Michelotto but never raced and in as-delivered pristine condition. – Sold at Barrett-Jackson in 2015 from the collection of John Rosatti for $300,000 and apparently unused since, this transaction closed post-block with this result. It will be a glorious track day car but its condition and preservation suggest it will never see the track where the vicissitudes of stone chips and trying too hard would sully its preservation.

Lot # 261 1995 Ferrari F512 M Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFVG40A0S0100380; Engine # 161524; Rosso Corsa/Beige leather; Estimate $325,000 – $375,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $320,000 plus commission of 11.56%; Final Price $357,000. – Modular wheels, Michelin tires, power windows, air conditioning. – Two owners, the present owner since 1998, and 24,487 miles. Religiously maintained with belt services every five years, the most recent being two months ago. Essentially impeccable with only slight stretching on the driver’s seat and a lightly scuffed seat bolster. The engine compartment and underbody are like new. – It would not have been unrealistic to see this exceptionally well-maintained example of the ultimate Testarossa variation bring more than the result here, but in the end the transaction is fair to both parties.

Lot # 154 2017 Ferrari LaFerrari Aperta Spider; S/N ZFF86ZHA2H0224581; Nero Daytona, Red/Black, Red; Estimate $6,500,000 – $8,500,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $5,500,000. – Chipguarded nose, car cover, carbon fiber trim and roof panel – Excellent condition inside and out, as it should be given that it’s a two-year-old LaFerrari with 1,500 miles. – The only LaFerrari, closed or open, in the Scottsdale auctions. People are still trying to figure out what they’re willing to pay for an open-top Ferrari with 949 hybrid-enhanced horsepower but $5.5 million seems about right.

Lot # 266 2005 Ferrari Superamerica Convertible, Body by Scaglietti; S/N ZFFGT61A450144238; Rosso Corsa/Tan leather; Estimate $350,000 – $400,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $307,500 plus commission of 11.63%; Final Price $343,250. – Paddle shift, Ferrari modular wheels, Bridgestone tires, climate control, power windows and Daytona seats, Red calipers, SF shields, Ferrari CD stereo, Assembly # 61656, Fiorano Handling Package, original window sticker documented. – 8,755 miles and like new although a little dusty under the hood. – Sold by Auctions America at Santa Monica in 2016 for $385,000 and suitably marked down for the ensuing two and a half years and a few miles.

Lot # 106 1959 Fiat-Abarth 750 GT Coupe Double Bubble, Body by Zagato; S/N 100558327; Red/Beige vinyl; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Competition restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $89,286 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $100,000. – Silver wheels, hubcaps, Mohawk tires on the back, Dunlops on the front, woodrim steering wheel, dual outside mirrors. – Poor repaint applied over old paint while assembled. Good upholstery with some age and use. Crack on the right windshield post, orange peel on the left. Poor masking. Decent chrome. Good, clean, orderly engine compartment shows some effort was expended where it matters. – This is a sloppy Fiat-Abarth, relieved from being despicable only by its orderly engine compartment. On that basis it’s also expensive, a car that needs more attention than it deserves at this price.

Lot # 258 1956 Ford Customline Country Sedan Station Wagon; S/N P6DX177263; Buckskin Tan, White/Buckskin Tan vinyl with Brown cloth inserts.; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $38,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $42,560. – Wire wheel covers, whitewalls, Thunderbird Special 312/225hp engine, automatic, power steering, heater, dash clock, pushbutton radio, three-row seating. – The paint is very good, with just some slight peeling on the rear hatch. The brightwork is also very good. The interior trim, upholstery, two-tone cattle themed bench seats are also in great condition, but there is staining on much of the headliner. The wheels and tires are in great condition. Spotless restored engine bay. A relatively rare car with a rare engine, restored to good standards but never fully taken apart. – This car sold for just $24,840 at Branson Spring in 2009, but in Arizona its combination of attractive colors, cattle-motif interior and rare drivetrain proved a charming one and it brought a strong but not crazy price.

Lot # 170 2006 Ford GT Coupe; S/N 1FAFP90S16Y401908; Centennial White, Blue stripes/Black; Estimate $300,000 – $400,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $285,000 plus commission of 11.75%; Final Price $318,500. – BBS forged wheels, painted calipers, stripes (the only three options offered on Canadian-delivery cars.) – 773 miles and essentially a new car, but that’s expected among 2005-06 Ford GTs. – A fair price in line with other recent results for GTs. Prices aren’t growing anymore but they’ve stayed high despite the regularity with which these cars come to market. The White with Blue stripes livery is unusual and attractive.

Lot # 272 1986 Ford RS200 Coupe; S/N SFACXXBJ2CGL00133; White/Red cloth; Estimate $275,000 – $325,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $200,000. – Alloy wheels, Bridgestone tires, Red leather steering wheel. – One of the original 200 homologation cars. Showing just 8,483 miles. Good paint other than a chip behind the passenger’s door and a few more on the nose as well as a long scratch on the door frame. Represented as having been mechanically recommissioned after long storage but needs new tires. – This car sold for $181,500 at Bonhams Quail Lodge in 2017 and has done just 117 miles since then. It needed sorting then, but has gotten it. It was overshadowed by the RS200 Evolution here (Lot 135, not sold at $435k), just like it was overshadowed by the exact same car at Quail Lodge (sold for $550k) and the reported high bid was modest given the mechanical refresh, but it was arguably a number worth considering. Or maybe the seller should try an auction that doesn’t have another RS200 in it.

Lot # 135 1986 Ford RS200 Evolution Rally Car, Body by Ghia; S/N SFACXXBJ2CGL00084; White, Blue graphics/Red cloth; Estimate $500,000 – $700,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $435,000. – Evo spec car with larger 2.1-liter Cosworth engine, Sparco seats, leather rim steering wheel – Very good paint with some expected paint chips in the wheel wells. The interior does not show significant aging, and the mechanicals show very well. Benefiting from significant mechanical work, this is a very good example of the desirable Evolution spec RS200, one of 24 built (compared to 200 of the regular-spec cars). – This RS200 sold for $550,000 at Bonhams Quail Lodge in 2017, and we called it a #3 car at the time. Since then, it has had extensive mechanical work and currently presents much better, so the decision to hold out at the much lower reported high bid was a reasonable one.

Lot # 268 1940 Ford Standard Marmon-Herrington Station Wagon; S/N 185820441; Cloud Mist Grey, Varnished wood/Brown leatherette; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $225,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $252,000. – 4-wheel drive conversion by Marmon Herrington (# LD4P-4-5820441), 3-row seating, tailgate-mounted spare. – Restored like new for Nick Alexander’s famed woodie collection. Excellent paint, interior, brightwork and mostly original wood with only slight water staining at joints and fasteners. 2003 Pebble Beach class and Dearborn Award winner. – Sold from the headline Nick Alexander collection at RM’s Monterey auction in 2009 for $231,000, this is still an extraordinary Ford Woody despite having added 3,979 miles to its odometer. There is no quarrel with the slightly higher price it brought here ten years later.

Lot # 116 1948 Ford Super DeLuxe Station Wagon; S/N 899A2251597; Shoal Green-Grey, Wood/Tan leather; Estimate $100,000 – $130,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $84,000. – 3-row seating, hubcaps and trim rings, enclosed rear-mounted spare, heater, Columbia 2-speed axle. – Excellent paint, chrome and interior. Original roof covering, running boards and rear fender stone guards. Excellent birch framing and mahogany panels and varnish. A delicately balanced compromise between restoration and preservation. 42,407 miles on the odometer. Ex-Nick Alexander collection. Dearborn Award winner. – Sold by RM from the Nick Alexander Collection at Monterey in 2009, a celebration of all things Ford Woody. It’s added only 20 miles to its odometer since then and has been maintained in Nick Alexander condition, if anything a little better now than it was then. It’s a real showpiece, with an impeccable provenance, and is a good value at this price.

Lot # 282 1978 International (IHC) Scout II SSII Utility; S/N H0062HGD17192; Omaha Orange, Black/Black vinyl; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Facsimile restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $39,200. – 345/168hp, automatic, rebuilt to top-spec Super Sport II specifications, power brakes and steering, bucket seats, floor shift, factory radio. – Excellent paint and body. The graphics have all been applied well. The chassis is fully restored and has no indication of off-road use. The mechanicals are all freshly redone and the interior shows no use. A beautiful International in a condition rarely seen anywhere, although built to rare SSII specs and didn’t leave the factory that way. – What is to be made of this thing? It isn’t what it wants to be. It isn’t how it was built. But it is a seriously enthusiastic creation. The price is, with all due respect to the RM Sotheby’s catalogers’ estimate, what it worth.

Lot # 160 1993 Jaguar XJ 220 Coupe; S/N SAJJEAEX8AX220789; Engine # 6A10332SB; Silverstone Green/Sand leather; Estimate $400,000 – $500,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $375,000. – Alpine CD stereo, sunroof. – Fantastic paint with no noticeable blemishes. The engine compartment has no deterioration and the interior is immaculate. A beautifully preserved car in a striking color and with just 9,073 km. It was also sold new to Tom Walkinshaw, and last year got a $50,000 service. – The XJ220 can be an expensive car to service even in the among the other complicated and computerized supercars, but it’s also somewhat undervalued since it lives in the shadow of cars like the McLaren F1 and is largely remembered for disappointing buyers by not having a V-12. This is a mostly very good car and it probably deserved another few bids, but the reported high bid was within spitting distance of the low estimate and could have been considered.

Lot # 263 1962 Jaguar XKE SI flat floor Roadster; S/N 875712; Engine # R20529; Silver/Black leather; Black top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $176,786 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $198,000. – Polished wire wheels, upgraded to a Tremec 5-speed (original 4-speed included), woodrim steering wheel, comes with JDHC Certificate. – A flat floor car that was originally painted red and sold in California, then restored by Classic Showcase in 2004. Excellent paint with straight body panels. The panel gaps are all consistent and the brightwork is very good throughout. The underbody is clean, although it does show some use. The interior has been completely redone, and the driver’s seat has slight stretching from use. An excellent example with minimal time on the road. – Appropriately discounted for the age of its restoration and its incorrect (but objectively better) gearbox, this is a straightforward result that both parties can be satisfied with. It was sold to John O’Quinn in 2005 for $132,000 shortly after restoration and has added 4,578 miles to the odometer since then, miles that are essentially invisible in its presentation.

Lot # 174 1969 Jaguar XKE SII Roadster; S/N 1R11057; Engine # 7R82169; Black/Black leather; Black top; Estimate $110,000 – $130,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $72,800. – Centerlock wire wheels, Michelin tires, woodrim steering wheel, pushbutton radio, boot cover, 4-speed, grille and trunk guards, JDHT certificate documented. – Two small dents on the hood. Dull but presentable original paint. Significant wear and light cracking on the seats. Tidy and dry underneath, but used. The wood on the steering wheel is a little dry. A totally unrestored two-owner survivor car with 53,835 miles. Not babied, but presentable and charmingly aged. Given $14,000 worth of mechanical sorting plus new tires recently, so it’s also usable as-is. – A slight but not generous premium given for this car’s preservation, but an SII E-Type doesn’t excite people as much as an earlier car. An SI in this condition would have caused more of a stir. It also would have been a lot more expensive.

Lot # 125 1937 Lancia Astura Fourth Series Cabriolet D, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N 412984; Green/Tan leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $300,000 – $400,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $230,000. – RHD. 19-degree 2,972/82hp V8, 4-speed, Green wheels, hubcaps, Michelin tires, Bosch headlights, Jaeger tach and speedometer, Veglia engine gauges. – First owned by the Italian ambassador to Great Britain, later restored over three decades in Australia and completed in the Naughts. Very older good paint, interior, chrome and tight-fitting top, The underbody and engine are nearly like new. A quality example in an odd choice of color (except in Eire) with a restoration that looks better than its age despite having accumulated over 12,000 miles since it was completed. – This Astura is an overlooked opportunity to acquire a seriously sophisticated piece of engineering and design from the Thirties. Its engine, driveline and chassis are examples of Lancia’s best work, now mostly forgotten and overlooked. A stunningly competent classic era luxury car, the consignor’s reluctance to accede to the bidders’ lack of recognition is entirely understandable: it deserved to bring more.

Lot # 171 1949 Lesovsky-Offenhauser “Blue Crown Special” Indy Roadster; S/N 3; Engine # 82; Metallic Blue/Brown leather; Estimate $250,000 – $350,000; Competition restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $180,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $201,600. – Dark Red wire wheels, Firestone Speedway tires, Offenhauser engine with dual sidedraft carbs, torsion bar independent front suspension, transverse leaf spring live axle rear, four-wheel drum brakes, Jones tach. – Third at Indy in 1949 driven by George Connor for Lou Moore and Charlie Marant, 8th in 1950, later raced in the Northwest by Bob Gregg and Len Sutton. Good external cosmetics and older cockpit upholstery. Mechanically restored with professional new plumbing but many old scratched and aged parts like the radiator, front crossmember and suspension, steering box and driveshaft. The seat belt is ancient. – A classic Indy Roadster from the early postwar era and successful at Indy, the mixed condition is a concern apparently also felt by the bidders at the Biltmore. The result reflects that but this will be an impressive piece of garage art, and even more impressive when tuned up and turned loose at historic oval track events. It is a sound value.

Lot # 141 2012 Lexus LFA Nürburgring Coupe; S/N JTHHX8BH8C1000485; Whitest White/Red; Estimate $850,000 – $1,100,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $800,000 plus commission of 10.63%; Final Price $885,000. – Nürburgring package, Potenza tires, tinted glass. – Just 54 miles and essentially a new car, but then again there are supposedly some brand new never sold ones still out there at Lexus dealerships, so this car technically isn’t as close to a new one as you can get. – The Nürburgring package added 10 horsepower, a faster-shifting transmission, a front splitter, revised suspension, different wheels and some aero bits for an extra 70 grand on top of the LFA’s original $375,000 base price. There are supposedly still a few unsold LFAs out there at U.S. Lexus dealerships, so this huge result seems a bit strange. Then again, those unsold ones must not be Nürburgring cars, because Barrett-Jackson sold a black LFA Nürburgring down the road in Scottsdale this year as well, and it brought $918,500.

Lot # 178 1934 Lincoln Model KA Town Sedan, Body by Murray; S/N KA2850; Engine # KA2850; Black, Black/Grey cloth; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Unrestored original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $22,400. – Dual sidemount spares, wire wheels with hub caps, rear suicide doors, wood dashboard and trim, dash clock. – CCCA Full Classic (TM). One of 425 sedans built in 1934. The original paint is poor with scratches, shallow and deep, as well as peeling on every panel. The brightwork is also poor, especially around the windshield, with very heavy pitting as well surface oxidation. The front bench seat is poor with two fairly large tears, but the rear bench seat is in good condition. An unrestored survivor that looks complete. A bit rough to try to keep it original. It would be a rewarding but expensive restoration. – This promises to be a labor of love if it is to be restored, even at this price, which is reasonable for the closed coachwork and condition.

Lot # 274 1977 Lotus Esprit S1 Coupe; S/N 77090403H; Engine # AC7 7709; Oxford Blue/Beige cloth; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $50,400. – Alloy wheels, Hankook tires, air conditioning, power windows, factory cassette stereo. – Long term single ownership and represented with 15,480 original miles. A few scratches on the front bumper. Light cracking in the paint behind the right headlight, which isn’t uncommon on a Lotus. There is a little more on the right rear, but the original paint is otherwise very well preserved but slightly dull. The all-cloth (and very brown) interior looks practically new. Showing 15,480 believable miles. An unrestored original and not perfect, but no early Esprit is. It has to be one of the world’s best. – RM sold another nearly immaculate original ’77 Esprit in Monterey last year for a staggering $106,400, well above what anyone expected. These have been somewhat undervalued vintage exotics for a long time, and it seemed like people were coming around to the Esprit. Not quite, however, at least not to the tune of a six-figure price. This result is arguably the more realistic top end of Esprit S1 prices, and the Monterey sale seems like an outlier.

Lot # 260 1932 Marmon Sixteen Coupe, Body by LeBaron; S/N 16141830; Engine # 16779; Green/Beige cloth; Estimate $400,000 – $600,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $600,000 plus commission of 10.83%; Final Price $665,000. – Wheel covers, whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemount spares with wheels, Trippe speed lights, golf bag door, rumble seat, wood dash with Jaeger clock. – CCCA Senior Winner, reportedly one of six two-passenger coupes known to survive. The paint is in good condition with just a few small chips near the doors and the rumble seat deck lid. The brightwork is good, but there is some light to medium pitting, specifically on the windshield. All four tires have begun to yellow and the chrome wheel covers are fairly scratched. The interior is excellent. The dashboard, gauges and instruments are bright and in great condition. Very clean and complete engine bay. An older restoration dating back to the Naughts that has begun to show its age on the exterior, but seems ageless in the inside at least. – It is hard to fault this magnificent Marmon in any meaningful way despite the age of its restoration. It has been meticulously maintained and while far from pristine will respond to careful cosmetic attention to reach a higher plane of presentation. This is a munificent price for a closed coupe, but it bought a magnificent automobile and that is what counts.

Lot # 269 1959 Maserati 3500GT Coupe; S/N AM101530; Light Blue/Beige leather; Estimate $280,000 – $340,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $230,000. – Hub caps on Borrani steel wheels, Audiovox radio, triple Webers, Koni shocks. – Some light waviness in the chrome in the front bumper. Very good older paint. Tidy underneath but with thick old undercoating. Good original dash and gauges, but the leather and carpets are newer. Clean and restored but not overly detailed engine. A solid carbureted 3500 with light restoration work where necessary but never fully taken apart and redone. – This is a good car, but it isn’t a great one. Gooding tried to sell it here last year and it hammered not sold at a $240,000 high bid. That was a sound number for a good driver-quality 3500, and so is this high bid.

Lot # 151 1960 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster; S/N 19804210000205; Engine # 19898010002537; Graphite Grey/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $1,100,000 – $1,250,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $950,000. – Hub caps, Michelin tires, Talbot Berlin mirror, Becker Mexico radio, tools, spare. – Very good older paint and chrome. Light cracks in the taillight gaskets. Light wear to the seats. Very clean underneath. A straightforward, well restored 300SL Roadster that has been lightly enjoyed since it was finished in 2009. – 300SL Roadsters were not doing well at Scottsdale with only two of the four offered finding new homes. This result for a good but not gorgeous older restoration is typical of the bidding and under the circumstances might have been given serious consideration by the consignor.

Lot # 237 2006 Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren Coupe; S/N WDDAJ76F96M000981; Crystal Laurite Silver/Berry Red leather; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $240,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $268,800. – Pilot Sport tires. – 5,400 miles and like new, as most of these are. Described in the catalog, inter alia, like this: “engineers were able to place [the engine] more than three feet aft of the front bumper and nearly 20-in. behind the rear axle”. Unless the cataloger meant “front axle” that works out to a wheelbase of about 16 inches with the rear axle weight bias of a skid steer front-end loader. – Still no surprises with SLR McLarens. Despite being a halo car for an iconic brand and the McLaren connection, these SLRs haven’t seen their prices move much in recent years. This result is right in line with other recent prices.

Lot # 283 1961 Oldsmobile Dynamic 88 2-Dr. Hardtop Holiday; S/N 612K12229; Azure Mist, White roof/Blue vinyl; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $52,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $58,800. – A Bubble Top Holiday. 394/250hp, automatic, hub caps and trim rings, narrow whitewalls, fender skirts, tissue dispenser, pushbutton radio, dash clock, power steering, power brakes. – Represented as 34,802 miles from new. Very good newer paint and chrome other than some very light scratches around the hood and a few small chips on the tail. Good, even gaps. The well-kept original interior was wisely left alone. There is only mild discoloration on the seats and light wear to the steering wheel but it nearly looks new for the most part. Unrestored but maintained underneath. All original other than a repaint. Lovingly maintained and gorgeous. – This is a nifty Olds, a rare survivor in largely original condition. It is also egregiously expensive for an ordinary Oldsmobile even taking into account the claimed original mileage and preservation.

Lot # 256 1941 Packard Custom Super 8 180 Convertible Victoria, Body by Darrin; S/N 14292015; Green/Tan leather; Tan cloth top; Estimate $325,000 – $400,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $275,000 plus commission of 11.82%; Final Price $307,500. – Hub caps and trim rings, wide whitewalls, fender skirts, cormorant mascot, column shift, original radio, heater, dual mirrors, fog lights, grille and trunk guards. – Reportedly one of 35 built. First Prize winner CCCA. Formerly owned by Malcolm Pray and Chuck Swimmer. The paint is very good, but there are very light surface scratches on the hood and fenders as well as four small chips located on the deck lid and bumper. The brightwork is decent with light scratches and pitting. The front buckets and rear bench seats are in great condition without any significant signs of wear. Both the front and rear bumpers are in good condition as well. The wheels are in good condition with very light pitting, although there is a very small dent on the front passenger’s wheel. A well-kept but aged 1980s restoration. – The Darrin-bodied Packard Custom Super Eight One-Eighty was daring for its introduction in the final years of the Great Depression in 1940. It was all about style, with few concessions to practicality. But, like a 734 Speedster, a Packard Darrin is an essential piece of any collection of classic prewar Packards. With a quality provenance and similar quality older restoration this is a solid car bought at a realistic price.

Lot # 259 1941 Packard One Ten Station Wagon, Body by Hercules; S/N 14832172; Maroon, Wood/Maroon; Estimate $80,000 – $120,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $95,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $106,400. – Hub caps and trim rings, Goddess of Speed mascot, pushbutton radio, running boards, heater. – The paint is good, but there is some underspray where panel edges meet, as well as light surface scratching. All of the wood surfaces have been refinished but do not fit perfectly. The dashboard is also very good other than a little peeling where the edges meet. The seats look new. Well restored a while ago, but done to high standards and doesn’t have any major needs. – Sold at Mecum Indy in 2009 for an eye-popping $108,650 it then cycled through RM Arizona, Worldwide Houston and RM Meadow Brook in 2010 before selling for $127,400 at Branson Fall in 2010. It appears to have had some attention since then, particularly the seats, and brought an enthusiastic price from the bidders at the Biltmore. Had it been a Ford Woody in comparable condition, it might be noted, it would have brought more, which puts the Packard’s price in perspective.

Lot # 165 1937 Packard Super Eight Coupe; S/N 1018292; Regatta Blue/Light Grey cloth; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $95,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $106,400. – Dual enclosed sidemount spares with mirrors. Golf bag doors on both sides, luggage rack, Trippe safety lights, wide whitewall tires, hub caps and trim rings. – Showing 713 miles after an early 2000s full restoration. The paint is very good and shiny. There are defects caused during the base coat clear coat painting process, but they’re subtle. The brightwork is excellent everywhere, except on the luggage rack where there is medium pitting and surface oxidation. The interior is excellent. So are the wheels and tires. Overall an excellent example of a Packard Super Eight, with a great restoration, great fit and finish, and a quite attractive color, upholstery and trim combination. – Attractively presented and conscientiously kept up since its restoration, this is a highly attractive closed Packard that gives a good account of itself and brought a deserved price.

Lot # 164 1929 Pierce-Arrow Model 125 Roadster; S/N 2004504; Engine # 200617; Tan, Brown/Tan leather; Tan canvas top; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $89,600. – Artillery wheels, hub caps, whitewalls, side-mounted spare tires with canvas covers, rumble seat, golf bag door, archer mascot, Waltham dash clock, luggage rack. – Replacement engine, but the original block is included. The paint is very good, with only light peeling along the edge of the driver’s side door and the cowl. The brightwork is very good, with very light pitting on the light fixtures. The canvas is top is clean and doesn’t show much wear minus a few wrinkles here and there. A mostly lovely older restoration that is starting to show its age. – This is a fine car for local shows and even better for touring events where its 125hp inline eight will power it right along with traffic. Bought for 20% under the low estimate, it is a good value.

Lot # 277 1934 Pierce-Arrow Model 840A Coupe; S/N 2580180; White/Grey cloth; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $150,000. – Artillery wheels with hub caps and trim rings, wide whitewalls, fender skirts, archer radiator mascot, fog lights, dual chrome horns, dash clock. – Restored but not spotless underneath. Good older paint. Light pitting on the engine cover handles. Light paint cracks above the windows, and the door gaps are a little erratic. Very good interior for the most part, but there is some odd discoloration in the rear. An inherently gorgeous and desirable car, but restored quite a while ago and not a show winner. In its current state, best for vintage tours. – Barrett-Jackson sold this car at WestWorld in 2005 for $108,000; it was bid to $120,000 at RM Meadow Brook seven months later; passed at Gooding’s Palm Beach auction in January 2006 on a reported bid of $90,000, then sold at RM’s Boca Raton auction in a month later for $98,975; and sold at Barrett-Jackson WestWorld in 2013 for $258,500. It has returned to its value curve here with this price, which is realistic for a gorgeous, aerodynamic Pierce Arrow Silver Arrow.

Lot # 134 1970 Plymouth ‘Cuda Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N BS23R0B146705; Tor Red, Black/Black vinyl; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $155,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $173,600. – 426/425hp Hemi, 4-speed, Argent shaker hood, Track Pack, 3.54 Sure Grip, Rallye wheels, bucket seats, wood grain console and steering wheel, Rallye instruments, tach, hood pins, pistol grip shifter, original broadcast sheet and Galen Govier documented – Good paint with some detail scratches from polishing. The trim and brightwork are all very good. The engine compartment is very clean and great care was taken to have all the factory components. The underbody does show some use. The interior is in very good condition. An older restoration to high standards with minimal use since. – Once again, dear catalogers, this ‘Cuda is not “Hemi Orange”. That’s a Dodge color. On a Plymouth ‘Cuda the EV2 color is “Tor Red”. This is a Hemi, no doubt, although nowhere in the catalog description does the cataloger or consignor claim it is the original Hemi, nor even a “date-coded” one. The Biltmore bidders didn’t pay for an original engine even though they seem to have done at Barrett-Jackson in 2010 when the same car sold for $231,000.

Lot # 250 1958 Porsche 356A Speedster, Body by Reutter; S/N 84759; Engine # 602699; Silver Metallic/Red; Estimate $300,000 – $400,000; Modified restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $280,000 plus commission of 11.79%; Final Price $313,000. – Bored out 1750cc engine from a 1960 car, Weber carbs, 6-volt electrics, hub caps, Michelin tires, gold brightwork, Kardex, tool kit, jack, CoA. – The paint and body are very good and straight. Very good upholstery. The dashboard, gauges and instruments are also very good and complete. A relatively recent and high quality restoration with a more potent but incorrect engine out back. – Discounted fairly for its incorrect engine but given plenty of credit by the bidders for the quality of the restoration. Both buyer and seller should be happy with this result.

Lot # 172 2016 Porsche 911 Coupe; S/N WP0AB2A9XGS123388; Fashion Grey, Black stripes/Black; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $180,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $201,600. – One of 25 Rennsport Reunion Editions with red calipers, 7-speed manual, Bose stereo, carbon fiber interior trim, Sport Chrono. – Hardly used and still shows like new with just 50 miles. – The Carrera GTS was introduced for 2015 to slot between the Carrera S and the hotter GT3. The Rennsport Reunion package was just a cosmetic treatment with special order paint in celebration of Rennsport Reunion V, but just 25 were built and they were snatched up immediately. This result is a little over twice the original MSRP for a standard GTS.

Lot # 234 2011 Porsche 911 Carrera Speedster; S/N WP0CB2A90BS795669; Custom Metallic Black/Black leather; Black top; Estimate $350,000 – $375,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $380,000 plus commission of 11.32%; Final Price $423,000. – Fuchs style wheels, paint to sample color, PDK, Sport Chrono Plus, carbon-ceramic brakes. – 12 miles. A like-new 997 Speedster, #002 of 356 built with aluminum doors and tonneau,. Almost all of them were finished in either blue or white, so this one’s custom order finish adds to the low mileage to make it particularly special. – The humpback rear on the 997 Speedster somehow manages to look even more awkward than the earlier 911 Speedsters, but this is a rare model in a unique color and with close to zero miles. It’s a very big price, but it bought a unique car.

Lot # 150 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ96ZNS490645; Engine # 62N81114; Midnight Blue Metallic/Black, Blue leather; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $225,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $252,000. – Yokohama tires, factory sports seats. – Rare genuine Carrera RS, only recently importable to the US. Originally delivered in Japan. Some light scratches on the left front wheel. Light wear on the driver’s seat. Showing 40,909 km, so it’s been driven, but doesn’t look like it’s seen the track. Instead well-kept like a typical limited production 911. – A strong result for the mileage, but not unreasonable given the rare colors and the fact that there aren’t many 964 Carrera RSs in this country and more attractive livery than the similar “Rubystone” 911 RS Lightweight that brought $324,500 at Barrett-Jackson.

Lot # 271 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS Coupe; S/N WP0AE2A95JS185392; GT Silver Metallic, Black/Black leather, Alcantara; Estimate $450,000 – $550,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $415,000 plus commission of 11.20%; Final Price $461,500. – Weissach package, front axle lift system, Bose surround sound, voice control, extended range fuel tank, carbon fiber interior trim. yellow calipers, magnesium wheels (aluminum wheels included – 55 miles and like new. – The list price for this car with the Weissach package would have been somewhere around 330 grand, but for a rare second-hand special Porsche to turn around like this for more than MSRP is certainly not unheard of. It even has “illuminated carbon fiber door sills.”

Lot # 209 1973 Porsche 911 S Coupe; S/N 9113301032; Engine # 6331585; Silver Metallic/Black leather; Estimate $175,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $140,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $156,800. – Fuchs wheels, Blaupunkt radio, tinted glass, sunroof, tools, spare, includes Porsche Certificate of Authenticity. – Great paint with only a few small chips on the hood. The door window frames have a few scratches. The underbody is clean with minor aging and the mostly original interior is very good with only slight wear to the driver’s seat. Sympathetically restored in the early 2000s, used sparingly since and represented as having 26,657 miles. – Sold for $187,000 at Gooding’s Scottsdale sale in 2015, when the 911 market was a little bit hotter than it is now. The seller shouldn’t be too discouraged, though, because this result is fair and about as much as the car could have hoped for.

Lot # 215 2010 Porsche 911 Sport Classic Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ99ZAS794067; Sport Classic Grey, Grey stripes/Grey leather, cloth; Estimate $400,000 – $500,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $590,000 plus commission of 10.85%; Final Price $654,000. – Fuchs style wheels, yellow calipers, Pirelli tires, duck tail, Power Kit, carbon-ceramic brakes, PASM sports suspension. – Rare Sport Classic model with both cosmetic and performance improvements. Number 002 of 250 built. Just 150 miles from new, but that doesn’t really matter since it was imported under Show and Display. – This is an insane price for a car with limited utility, especially one that is essentially just a standard 911 with performance tweaks and a vintage-look treatment. Everyone in the room looked surprised when the hammer fell. It’s certainly a collectible car, but this result was way ahead of the curve.

Lot # 210 1987 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe; S/N WP0JB093XHS050528; Engine # 68H00537; Silver Metallic/Blue leather; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $67,200. – Air conditioning, sunroof, Fuchs wheels, newer Blaupunkt radio, upgraded air conditioning. – There are numerous paint chips on the front bumper and hood as well as several small scrapes around the driver’s door handle. The underbody is clean but shows aging. The interior is well cared for and has less wear than the 161,000 miles showing would suggest. The engine has been rebuilt two times, the most recent being less than 10,000 miles ago. A heavily used but not necessarily abused later 930. – Porsche 930 prices have been softening lately, and when that kind of thing starts to happen it’s the lower-quality examples like this car that tend to fare the worst. It’s the lowest-priced 930 we’ve seen in a while, but the given the age and mileage it’s not too surprising.

Lot # 212 1987 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe; S/N WP0JB0931HS051163; Engine # 68J00872; Black/Black leather; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $72,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $81,200. – Black painted Fuchs wheels, store brand tires, sunroof, climate control. – Slightly dull exterior plastic. A few light scratches on the rear bumper. Slight wear on the seats. Showing 40,771 miles, but has a replacement engine. Some mild suspension upgrades. Older repaint. With the miles, engine, repaint and general wear, this is definitely not a collector-grade 930, but if you want one to drive and enjoy this could be a good choice. – This is a mediocre 930 without good options, finished in unexciting colors and fitted with a replacement engine. The price it brought is very low for a 930, but not any less than the car deserved.

Lot # 156 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe; S/N WP0AC2992VS375831; Viola Metallic/Black leather; Estimate $300,000 – $350,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $290,000 plus commission of 11.72%; Final Price $324,000. – Turbo Twist wheels, yellow calipers, Potenza tires, sunroof, CD stereo, silver face gauges, power sport seats, power brakes and steering, Porsche CofA documented. – Represented to have 22,894 original miles and supposedly one of three finished in this color. Despite the mileage, it looks almost like a new car since it has clearly always been babied. – The Turbo S was the last air-cooled turbocharged model to be introduced, and they’re quite rare. People have paid more than 400 grand for one in recent years, but despite this one’s rare color combination and full service history it brought a no better than average result.

Lot # 245 2018 Porsche 911 Turbo S Exclusive Coupe; S/N WP0AD2A9XJS156764; Golden Yellow Metallic, Carbon stripes/Black; Estimate $375,000 – $450,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $400,000 plus commission of 11.25%; Final Price $445,000. – Carbon brakes, contrast stitching, carbon fiber interior trim, active suspension, rear wheel steering, adaptive cruise control, lane change assist, front axle lift system. – Like new with 51 miles. One of 500 built worldwide and 200 for the American market. – The 991 Turbo S is fast enough, and the Exclusive Series adds another 27 horses. It doesn’t add much else, though, and apparently only 120 of the initial 200 cars for the U.S. market sold right away, so this result was quite surprising since pricing started at less than 300 grand for these when new.

Lot # 213 1970 Porsche 911E Coupe; S/N 9110200496; Engine # 6201428; Conda Green/Black leatherette; Estimate $75,000 – $85,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $89,600. – Fuchs wheels, Yokohama tires, gold brightwork, Blaupunkt radio, 911S suspension, CoA, tool kit, owner’s manual. – Paint peeling off mildly at the tops of the doors. Small scratch below the left headlight. The wheels are a little dirty. Some chips around the door edges. Very good interior with newer seats and carpets. Restoration work underneath, but likely never fully taken apart and redone. A basic restoration, done on a budget and likely before the big boom in prices for all things 911 a few years back. – This car sold for $71,500 here in 2014, then for a fairly modest $70,000 at RM Sotheby’s St. Johns in 2016, had better luck with an $82,500 result at Worldwide Pacific Grove in 2017. This price is on the strong side for what is essentially a driver-quality 911E, but it isn’t excessive.

Lot # 249 1973 Porsche 911S Targa; S/N 9113310296; Engine # 6330726; Gemini Blue/Black leatherette with houndstooth cloth inserts; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $112,000. – Fuchs wheels, Pirelli tires, sports seats, CoA. – European delivery model but imported to Florida many years ago and then restored in 2007. There are no significant scratches, dings or dents, and no signs of overspray. There is some waviness in the targa roof and the latch mechanism looks aged. A lightly used but attractive matching numbers 911S Targa in attractive colors. – Bought for a then-fair $88,000 at RM Phoenix in 2012, then sold for an over-the-top $203,500 at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale in 2017. Its actual value should arguably a lot closer to the Barrett-Jackson result, though, as this result is very modest for a restored car with no needs.

Lot # 211 1969 Porsche 911T Coupe, Body by Karmann; S/N 119122288; Engine # 6196358; Polo Red/Black leatherette; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $72,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $81,200. – 5-speed, Fuchs wheels, Pirelli tires, Becker Europa radio, CoA, tool kit, manuals. – Good older paint and brightwork, but there are scratches on all the window frames. Newer tires, and the brakes look brand new. Slightly faded original gauges, but the rest of the interior is very good and restored. Small cracks in the marker lenses. Showing 23,890 miles, which is are represented as original. Cosmetically restored to decent standards a few years ago, but not perfect. – Early 911 prices are still quite high, but people aren’t clamoring for them like they were a few years ago. This result is still a rather strong price even if it is well below the staggering $121,000 it brought here four years and 69 miles ago.

Lot # 217 1987 Rolls-Royce Camargue Convertible, Body by Niko-Michael; S/N SCAYJ42A9HCX10402; White/Red leather piped in White; Estimate $100,000 – $150,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $225,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $252,000. – Alloy wheels, narrow whitewalls, Pioneer CD stereo, vanity set with combs in the rear, shot glasses and flasks, power-operated hardtop. – The only retractable hardtop Camargue built. 927 miles. Small chip on the nose, but otherwise very good paint. Very good interior. Several unique features and like new condition make this a very interesting car, but the Camargue was never pretty and it doesn’t look any better as a convertible. – This car sold at Kruse Fall Auburn way back in 2006 for $109,080. Since then, it has mercifully had a power-operated top fitted and been driven 602 miles. It’s hard to place a value on a not exactly pretty but also charming and unique car like this, but this was a surprisingly high result. Sure, the price goes up when the top goes down and there is only one of these, but is it really worth five times the price of a fixed roof Camargue? Apparently, since the hammer bid is 50% more than the pre-sale high estimate, it is.

Lot # 233 1989 Rolls-Royce Silver Spirit Landaulet, Body by Hooper; S/N SCAZS00A1KCH26441; Engine # 67111L41019; Mason’s Black, Royal Claret/Grey leather in front, cloth in rear; Black cloth top; Estimate $275,000 – $350,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $170,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $190,400. – RHD. Hub caps and trim rings, narrow whitewalls, gold Spirit of Ecstasy, cassette stereo, power windows, air conditioning, crystal, refrigerator, television, Toshiba laptop, printer, wood trim. – Built by a revamped Hooper on a stretched Silver Spirit frame and comes with all sorts of neat period goodies. Lightly scratched window frames and lightly faded cloth roof. The paint has a few light scuffs and scratches but it’s mostly good. Lightly wrinkled driver’s seat, but the interior is otherwise immaculate, and as an added bonus this must have the most immaculate 1980s Toshiba laptop around. It’s condition is good enough to be presentable, and that’s all that really matters since all this car’s appeal is almost entirely in its personality and unique features. But why it’s flying a Rwandan flag even though it was meant for an Australian buyer is still a mystery to me. – A unique and charming car to be sure, it had people fawning over it for two straight days during the preview days, most of them reaching inside with a cell phone to snap a picture of the crystal set and ’80s computers. But the number of people who would actually shell out over a quarter-million dollars for this car is much, much smaller and while it is less than RM estimated and probably less than the seller was hoping for, it’s not unrealistic.

Lot # 231 1952 Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith 4-Dr. Sedan, Body by James Young; S/N WOF23; Engine # W22F; Dark Grey, Black/Green leather; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $92,500 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $103,600. – RHD. Chrome wheel covers, Dunlop tires, badge bar, Lucas driving lights, dual wing mirrors, suicide rear doors, pushbutton radio, power division window, full wood in the rear with tables, vanity with silver accessories, full bar including Martini shaker, electric tea kettle, original tools. – 1951 Earls Court show car for the James Young stand. Very good paint and chrome other than some light scratches on the B-pillars around the semaphores. Light scratches on some of the window frames. Slightly uneven gaps. Very good, lightly worn interior. Excellent wood, and there’s a lot of it. Tidy and restored underneath. A very pretty, rare coachbuilt postwar Rolls in good enough condition to show casually and to take on tours, it’s just no longer super fresh. – It is hard to imagine a better way to tailgate than with this Wraith. There’s probably even room in the boot for a grille and cooler. There’s also room in the price for party expenses.

 

Lot # 161 1963 Shelby Cobra 289 Roadster; S/N CSX2195; Metallic Blue/Black leather; Estimate $725,000 – $900,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $675,000. – Chrome wire wheels, Pirelli tires, grille and trunk guards, four Weber carbs. – First owned by Ford and used for display and promotion. Drag raced for several seasons later. Given a lengthy restoration only recently completed. Excellent paint, chrome and interior except for a scratched up windshield frame. The underbody and engine compartment are like new, or better. – Restored to “correct” appearance but in the process losing some of the early features of its racing career as well as its appearance when exhibited by Ford. That should have had little effect on its value, however, and the amount offered for it here is truly parsimonious.

Lot # 265 1967 Shelby Cobra 428 Roadster; S/N CSX3281; Green/Black; Estimate $1,350,000 – $1,450,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $995,455 plus commission of 10.50%; Final Price $1,100,000. – 427 engine, Shelby registry notes this car was originally a 428, centerlock alloy wheels, formerly in the Otis Chandler collection. – Excellent paint, consistent panel gaps and straight body. The brightwork is all in excellent condition. The underbody is spotless and has no aging. The interior is well sorted and appears unused. A beautiful fresh-looking restoration of a big-block Cobra in its attractive original colors, although it was originally a 428 and not a genuine 427 and the restoration is now a dozen years old. – Sold for $332,750 at RM Monterey in 2003 and sold at this sale nine years ago for $632,500. The 428/427 swap is common and the 90 more horses make it even more exciting to drive. It is something very special to own and is realistically priced in this post-block transaction.

Lot # 145 1965 Shelby Mustang GT350 Fastback; S/N SFM5S363; Wimbledon White, Blue Stripes/Black vinyl; Estimate $325,000 – $425,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $320,000 plus commission of 11.56%; Final Price $357,000. – Cragar Shelby wheels, radio delete, tachometer, wood-rim steering wheel. – Excellent paint and body. The panel gaps are consistent throughout. The brightwork is very good and has no significant deterioration. The engine and underbody have been redone to a high standard and has little use indicated. The seats and interior are all excellent as well. A great example of a first-year Shelby Mustang, restored in the 1990s but the work was high quality and it has been only lightly used. – Sold for $335,880 at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale in 2006, then for $247,500 at RM Monterey in 2010 with 192 miles added to its odometer since 2010. The price here is generous, but not unrealistic.

Lot # 162 1992 Spice Ferrari SE 92C GTP; S/N SE92C014; Rosso Barchetta/Black cloth; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $190,000. – RHD. Gold center BBS modular wheels, Dunlop slicks, four spare BBS wheels, Ferrari 355 V8 engine, slide throttle fuel injection, said to make 475hp. – FCA 2017 participant sticker. Rough, very used, dusty from neglect and not overcome by a fresh coat of paint. New clutch and fuel cell. Raced in IMSA GTP until it was damaged at Sebring in 1996 and unused until a fairly recent resuscitation for club events and track days. – With its mediocre condition and lack of any compelling racing history the reported high bid here seems appropriate.

Lot # 243 1948 Tucker 48 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 1040; Engine # 33579; Waltz Blue/Light Blue cloth; Estimate $1,500,000 – $1,700,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,450,000 plus commission of 10.34%; Final Price $1,600,000. – Pushbutton radio, wheel covers, whitewalls, upgraded Ypsilanti preselector gearbox. – Very good blemish-free paint. The brightwork is also very good. The only blemishes are light surface scratches on the vent window trim. The interior is also very good. All the trim and upholstery have superb fit and finish and do not show any wear. The vents located on the rear quarter panels are very dull and show wear. Heavy undercoating on the underbody. Restored twice, initially in the 1980s. It’s no longer super fresh but for the most part is a very attractive car. – The longevity of the Tucker phenomenon, ever after being refreshed by the 1988 movie, is noteworthy. They had seriously handicapped engines and transmissions, not to mention the handling challenge of the rear-mounted water cooled powerplant. They are cherished, even revered, artifacts and this is what it takes to own one this good.

Lot # 110 1952 Willys M38-A1 Jeep Universal; S/N 65476; Green/Green/White; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 12.00%; Final Price $67,200. – Machine gun mount with M2 .50 cal. machine gun set up for simulated fire, pair of M1903 practice rifles, additional ammunition pouches and medic bags. Display paraphernalia included. Auctioned to benefit charity. – Excellent paint and body, all chassis and drive components have been restored. This is probably one of the most detailed M38 Jeep restorations seen at auction in a long time. It is both over-accessorized in its display and overrestored in its condition, but most of the extra items are merely strapped on. – Sold at RM’s Hershey auction in 2011 for $49,500, it’s a home run here in Arizona where someone will probably resuscitate the Browning .50 to work and blow up wilderness hillsides with it.

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Comments

    • Thomas Long
    • February 14, 2019
    Reply

    Hey Rick,

    You and your staff do an awesome job reporting the auctions. My question is: in lot # 110 you first tell the “hammer price”, then the “commission price”. Later you say “Sold at RM’s Hershey…for $49,500”. Which price is the $49,500 ? Cheers, Tom

      • rickcarey1
      • February 14, 2019
      Reply

      Tom,
      Good question, short answer: unless it says “hammer” or refers to a no-sale transaction the prior sale numbers always include the buyer’s commission.
      So, $49,500 at RM Hershey is all-in based on a $45,000 hammer bid and 10% commission.
      Rick

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