Mecum Auctions Spring Classic, Indianapolis, May 15-20, 2018

Mecum Auctions’ signature sale is the Spring Classic. It’s traveled across mid-America since the Eighties, alighting in Indianapolis at the State Fairgrounds in 2008 with a four-day sale.

In recent years the Spring Classic has been eclipsed by Mecum Auction’s magnum opus at Kissimmee in January.

These two auctions define, in large part, the vast middle of car collecting values with sub-$50,000 average and sub-$30,000 median transactions.

Yeah, there are curve-bending transactions at Kissimmee and the Spring Classic, but the vast majority of the vast number of transactions are concentrated at the sweet center-spot of the market where collectors of ordinary means can hope to acquire a quality car at a realistic price.

It says something about car collecting and the American economy that that sweet spot is in the mid- to high-twenty-thousands for the median and under $50,000 for the average, taking into account six- and seven-figure Corvettes, Hemis and Ferraris that highlight the sales.

The phenomenon deserves more study, not least to appreciate why so many plumbers, attorneys and machinists are walking around with $29,700 (this year’s Spring Classic median transaction) to drop on a Ford F100 pickup, ’66 Nova, Bentley Continental Flying Spur or ASC McLaren Mustang, among many others.

The Spring Classic was heavily weighted with Corvettes, from Keith Busse’s collection of all 14 years of Corvette Indy Pace Cars to ordinary C3 Corvettes and high performance late models. There were over (well over) 200 Corvettes at Indianapolis, enough to make a good-sized auction on their own.

This year Andrew Newton and Eric Nelson outdid themselves at Mecum Indy with 174 cars viewed, described and rated. I don’t always agree with them so the final observations and comments are attributable only to me, but far and away they “get it” and scope out the important attributes.

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2018 1328/1850 71.8% $49,580 $29,700

[59.9%]

$65,842,294
2017 1204/1650 73% $44,997 $28,600

[63.6%]

$54,176,356
2016 1098/1557 70.5% $45,044 $26,000

[57.5%]

$49,458,062
2015 882/1274 64.5% $49,694 $32,400

[65.2%]

$40,848,613

Here are the cars, sorted by Marque, Model and Body Style.

Lot # S27 1992 Acura NSX Coupe; S/N JH4NA1154NT001014; Red, Black roof/Black leather; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $57,000. – Alloy wheels, Continental tires, power windows, air conditioning, aftermarket Pioneer stereo. – The plastic bottom front lip has a few scuffs, but otherwise the exterior of the car shows no significant signs of age. The driver’s seat has some wear on the bolsters that corresponds with the 16,312 miles showing. An early, unmolested and low mileage car in classic colors, this is a collector-grade NSX. – Somewhat overshadowed by the 183-mile 1994 NSX (Lot S104) in the sale, this car was nevertheless bid to a reasonable price that could have seen it sold with only limited regret.

Lot # S104 1994 Acura NSX Coupe; S/N JH4NA1152RT000059; Dark Green Metallic/Black leather; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $120,000. – Alloy wheels, Yokohama tires, Bose stereo, power windows, air conditioning. – Rare color, showing 185 miles and looks like it just rolled out of the factory. An outstanding NSX, but with this kind of mileage it’s destined for a life of static display rather than the open road. – Counting for inflation, the reported high bid was about as much as this car cost new. It’s a huge number even for very good unmodified NSXs, but this is a blue chip example in a rare and interesting color. On the other hand, this many dead presidents would buy a garage full of S2000s, Datsun 1600s and 240Zs, nearly one for each day of the work week.

Lot # T52 1968 American Motors AMX Fastback; S/N A8M397T268712; Playmate Pink/Black; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $27,500. – 390/315hp, automatic, side exhaust, upgraded with Go Package, bucket seats, console. – Built to replicate the famous 1968 Playmate AMX. Paint looks very good, as does the panel fit. The brightwork is good other than some pitting around the taillights. The interior looks good with some wear on the driver’s door panel and the steering wheel. The engine compartment is very clean and complete. Underneath looks to have been freshly undercoated. An attractive and reasonably well done AMX for the lady classic car enthusiast or the very secure male. – Sold for $16,500 at Barrett-Jackson Orange County in 2012 the for $33,550 at B-J Las Vegas three months later and for $31,460 at Mecum LA three months ago. It isn’t what it purports to be and why it’s worth even this much, let alone what it sold for before, is a mystery. The seller should be happy to get out from under it, even at this price. As a consolation prize for the significant other of a buyer of an N03 Big Tank Corvette this is reasonable, otherwise it’s a fake that isn’t worth what it brought.

Lot # G277 1966 American Motors Marlin Fastback; S/N A6KA97W100047; Blue, White stripe/Teal, White vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $10,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $11,550. – 327/270hp, automatic, wheel covers, tinted glass, bucket seats, floor shift. – Early production 1966 Marlin. Paint is OK with some flat spots on the front of the hood and chips on the panel edges. Uneven gaps. The brightwork has some pitting and scratches. The window weather stripping is dried and cracked everywhere. The interior looks original with cracks in the dash, discoloration and cracks in steering wheel. The engine compartment looks original with paint peeling from the engine. Underneath is showing a lot of wear and tear, with surface rust on the rocker panels. It’s unusual to find a Marlin in any condition, and this one is worth restoring. – And at this price it can get pretty much everything it needs without becoming an unreasonably expensive proposition. It doesn’t appeal to everyone, but at pretty much any car show it’s going to be unique on the field.

Lot # T116 1969 American Motors SC/Rambler Hurst 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N A9M097X289416; Red, White, Blue/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $40,000. – Red line tires, T-handle shifter, under dash gauges, column-mounted Sun tach. – One of 1512 SC/Ramblers made. The paint looks very good with only a few very minor blemishes. The brightwork looks very good, although the trim around the side windows is showing some age and the side windows themselves have some scratches. Panel fit is very good with the exception of the hood. The interior is very good, but the driver’s door panel does not fit quite right and the steering wheel has some pitting. The engine bay is very clean and restored. Underneath is excellent and very well restored. Not a show car, but quite good by AMC standards and a Hurst S/C Rambler is an attention-grabbing car in any condition. – It may be impossible to ignore a S/C Rambler, but nobody was falling all over themselves to bid on this one. Prices haven’t done much in the last few years, with most affection for the cars coming from dedicated AMC folks and not many others. The high bid on this pretty good example was pretty light, and refusing it was understandable.

Lot # S134 1934 Auburn 850Y Custom Phaeton; S/N 2441H; Red/Red leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $130,000 – $150,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $110,000. – Wire wheels with hub caps and trim rings, Firestone wide whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemount spares, dual mirrors, suicide front doors, robe rail, Bosch underdash fuel and temp gauges. – Recent show history and magazine features. Large paint crack and two touch ups on the nose. Two more small cracks on the hood and several more on the rear passenger’s door. A few chips at the front of the doors A few smudges on the top. Excellent interior. Very clean underneath. It has a lot of presence, and while it is not a show-winning car anymore, pretty much all its issues would be fixed with a repaint and cleaning of the top. – The seller may be holding out for more, but that’s not in the cards for this Auburn and the reported high bid, if there was money, was sufficient to see it on its way to a new home.

Lot # T217 1958 Austin-Healey 100-6 BN4 Cabriolet; S/N BN4LS49611; Seafoam, White/White piped in Teal; Estimate $45,000 – $65,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $38,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $41,800. – Hub caps, Kumho tires, dual mirrors, banjo steering wheel. – Good older paint. Uneven door gaps. Older restored underneath. Very light wrinkling to the seats but otherwise good older interior. A basic older restored driver in eye catching colors. – Sold for $33,345 at Bonhams Fairfield auction in 2010, then for $33,550 at RM Fort Lauderdale in 2011. Healey prices have appreciated a bit since then but not by as much as much of the rest of the market. This was an appropriate price for the age of the restoration.

Lot # W211 1960 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk I BN7 Roadster; S/N HBN7L1977; White/Black; Black top; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $24,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $26,950. – Painted centerlock wire wheels, dual mirrors, banjo steering wheel, overdrive. – Rough, dirty engine bay and underbody. Tired old paint that looks almost original but isn’t. Body filler in spots. Surface rust poking through on the wheel spokes. Tired interior with worn carpets but good seats. Uneven gaps. A running project that’s not good enough to enjoy as is. – Discounted appropriately for the long list of needs that comes along with this car, a car worth saving but not a project to be undertaken lightly.

Lot # F222 1967 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III BJ8 Roadster; S/N HBJ8L39179; Blue/Dark Blue; Blue vinyl top; Estimate $110,000 – $135,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $95,000. – Painted centerlock wire wheels, banjo steering wheel, overdrive. – Nearly spotless fully restored engine bay. Very good paint and newer top. Very good restored interior. The passenger’s door sticks out slightly at the bottom. Thorough and relatively recent restoration on a final year Big Healey. – A real Mecum veteran, with no actual successful sales to show for it. Not sold at Mecum Kissimmee five years ago at a $115,000 high bid, not sold there again the following year at a $97,000 high bid, not sold again at Mecum Austin in 2014 at an $85,000 high bid and finally one more time at Mecum Las Vegas last year at a $70,000 high bid. The owner seems to really want six digits on that hammer price, but the record shows that the bidders are of a different opinion. Today a six-figure Healey is a rare sight and it’s time to adjust expectations. The reported high bid here, if there was money anywhere close to it, should have been grabbed tenaciously.

Lot # F180 1973 Buick Century Gran Sport 455 Stage I Coupe; S/N 4D37V3H241071; Medium Blue/White vinyl; Estimate $45,000 – $60,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Post-block sale at $42,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $46,200. – Stage I 455/270hp, 4-speed, Firestone narrow whitewalls, factory air conditioning, Positraction, power steering, power brakes, factory AM/FM radio, power windows. – Engine rebuilt to 1970 Stage I specs. Tired but presentable original chrome. Excellent newer paint. Very good underneath with newer exhaust and some other light restoration work. Very good original interior with only very light discoloration on the white seats and door armrests. An unusual and highly optioned example of one of the last hoorahs in American muscle. As an added bonus, the engine has been built up to better non-smog-choked performance. Neat, unusual and fast. – This car sold here last year for $55,000, but even at this lower result it’s still a very strong number that reflects the quality of the restoration and the rarity of its equipment.

Lot # S18 1938 Buick Century Model 60-C Convertible Sedan; S/N 13258969; Ivory/Red leather; Black cloth top; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $39,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $42,900. – Hub caps and trim rings, Firestone wide whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemount spares, dual mirrors, suicide rear doors, dash clock, floor shift. – Restored 100 miles ago. Very good fresh paint, chrome and interior. Even gaps aside from the trunk. Clean top. Very tidy underneath. Fresh and gorgeous. One of just 208 built in this rare body style. – This is rare car with an impressive restoration that combines the protection of rollup windows when the weather is poor with the pleasure of a fully open car when it is good. It is effectively better than new in all respects, cost far more than what was paid for it here to restore and is a very good value despite not being accepted by CCCA as a Full Classic ™.

Lot # F142.1 1959 Buick Electra 225 Convertible; S/N 8F4006011; Black/Red leather; Black vinyl top; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $125,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $137,500. – 401/325hp, Dynaflow, power steering, power brakes, wheel covers, whitewalls, power windows, factory air conditioning, Autronic Eye, speed safety buzzer, Sonomatic radio. – Show awards at the beginning of the decade culminating in an AACA Grand National Senior in 2016. Excellent chrome. The paint looks great at first but shows detail scratches up close. Straight body with even gaps. Excellent tight-fitting top. Light wrinkling to the seats but mostly very good interior. A former concours car holding up well and lots of great equipment, but it would no longer be a contender for a trophy at a major car show. – Sold by RM at Amelia Island in 2004 for $92,400 showing 13 miles on the odometer, then at Monterey in 2006 for $93,500. Today the odometer has 74 miles showing and the car is, surprisingly, in nearly identical, nearly fresh condition and the Indy bidders stepped up for it in a big way. The price isn’t as staggering as the $330,000 New Yorker that preceded it by a few lots, but is ample endorsement of its quality and eye-catching presence.

Lot # F177 1970 Buick GSX Stage I 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 446370H121924; Fireglow Pearl/White vinyl; Estimate $150,000 – $175,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $120,000. – Polyglas GT tires, power steering, power brakes, power windows, tilt steering column, Sonomatic radio, horseshoe shifter. – Factory prototype show car, one of two built for exhibition in 1970 by the factory. Good paint and underbody. Tired brightwork. Good original interior. Slight discoloration of the seats and a scuffed up steering wheel rim, but not bad. Aside from the equipment, there’s a lot of collectability in this car’s life as an official exhibit car. – Not sold here in 2011 at a $125,000 high bid, then not sold at Mecum Dallas last year at a $120,000 high bid.

Lot # U55 1984 Buick Regal Grand National Coupe; S/N 1G4AK4799EH582355; Black/Gray; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $20,000. – 231/200hp, automatic, power seats, Delco AM/FM radio. – Represented as a one-owner car with 26,311 miles. The paint looks OK other than a lot of small scratches and chips. A few flat spots in various places. The interior looks very good and is showing very little wear. The engine compartment is showing some age and grime. There is surface rust around the turbocharger and the hood insulation is ripped up. Underneath is pretty clean other than some spots of rust starting. An unimpressive driver despite the low miles and one of the less desirable, less powerful early Grand Nationals. – While known miles and known history account for a lot when it comes to preservation this GN hasn’t had the best and the reported high bid is a realistic compromise between condition and originality. It could have been taken with only twinges of remorse.

Lot # G248 1971 Buick Riviera 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 494871H911596; Turquoise, Black vinyl roof/Black cloth; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $17,600. – 455/315hp, automatic, narrow whitewalls, power windows, dash clock, Sonomatic radio, heater. – Dull older paint and chrome. Some very light surface rust on the wheels. Very loose door handles and window glass. The fender lips don’t fit flush. Mostly good original interior. Sound but a little tired underneath. Represented with an overhauled engine and transmission. A Riviera of this vintage has an inherently attractive shape with its boattail rear, but this one isn’t finished in the best colors and its condition is uninspiring. – The bidders were inspired, however, and paid generously for a car that in pristine condition isn’t worth much over $30,000. This Riviera is far from pristine.

Lot # W251 1958 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz Convertible; S/N 58E089896; Desert Bronze Iridescent/Brown leather; Brown cloth top; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $82,500. – Wheel covers, whitewalls, power top, pushbutton radio, power windows, dash clock. – Big scratch on the front bumper and mostly tired older chrome and brightwork. Good older paint with a few light scratches here and there and some chips at the back of the doors. Pitted window frames. Good replacement top. Lightly wrinkled seats. Lightly pitted and cracked original steering wheel. Oxidized original underbody. A presentable but flawed driver quality Biarritz in unusual muted colors. Not bad, and would make a rewarding project. – It was reported sold at the Atlantic City auction in 2004 for $59,280 and has added over 10,000 miles to the odometer since then while remaining in essentially the same highly presentable condition, an accomplishment of no mean caliber in itself. Even with this results the Indy bidders heavily discounted it for the age of the work and a few prominent issues, making it a good value even taking that into account.

Lot # T218 1959 Cadillac Fleetwood 60 Special 4-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 59M092405; White/White leather, Black cloth; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $91,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $100,100. – Wheel covers, whitewalls, fender skirts, power windows, pushbutton radio, dash clock, air conditioning, Autronic eye, power seat. – Very good older paint and chrome. The door gaps are a little bit uneven. Very clean engine bay and underbody. Very good fully restored interior. AACA First Junior and Senior in the mid-2000s. Needs nothing even if it isn’t fresh. It’s at that level where it’s still gorgeous, but not so perfect that you’d be afraid to take it out and enjoy it. – This car had people scoping it out all week, and bidding skyrocketed as soon as it got onto the block. It’s an astronomical price for a four-door car, but there’s no telling when another one this good will come up for sale.

Lot # S55 1960 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible; S/N 60F122052; Black/Black leather; Black vinyl top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $57,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $63,250. – Wheel covers, whitewalls, power windows, power seat, WonderBar radio, fender skirts, Autronic eye, cruise control, factory air conditioning. – Aged but presentable paint and bumpers. Significant pitting on the body side trim, which also doesn’t quite fit flush. Dull badges. Good older Top. Good but older interior. Older restored underneath. A basic older redo on a car that arguably deserves better, but as it sits it’s still a decent driver you wouldn’t be embarrassed to be seen in. – Sold for $46,440 at Mecum Kissimmee in 2015 and for $50,600 at Kissimmee last year, which was strong money for a car in this condition even if it does have desirable options. This result is just expensive by comparison. Cadillacs had a good week in Indy this year for the most part, this being yet another big result.

Lot # T142 1958 Chevrolet Bel Air Impala 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N F58L148776; Cay Coral, White roof/Coral vinyl with cloth inserts; Estimate $60,000 – $75,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000. – 348/280hp added Tri-Power, automatic, spinner wheel covers, whitewalls, fender skirts, dual antenna, Continental kit, tissue dispenser, dash clock, later cassette stereo, rear seat speaker, power steering, power brakes, tinted glass, heat and defrost. – Tidy older restored engine bay and underbody. Tired older chrome and brightwork. The paint is better but still a little faded. Imperfect gaps. Good, lightly worn interior. A straightforward, honest, lightly aged older restoration of a first year Impala. In these colors, it’s impossible to ignore. – The added Tri-Power helps both performance and the underhood display, not necessarily the value, but even that reservation isn’t sufficient to make this result anything less than a solid buy and good value.

Lot # S162 1969 Chevrolet Camaro COPO 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 124379N624797; Hugger Orange/White vinyl with houndstooth cloth inserts; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $180,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $198,000. – COPO 427/425hp, cowl induction hood, automatic, Rally Sport hidden headlights, horseshoe shifter, Protect-O-Plate and COPO Connection documented, power steering, power front disc brakes, spoilers, COPO 9561 and 9737. – Represented as the matching numbers engine. A little bit of dirt and faded decals in the engine bay, but mostly spotless underneath. Erratic door fit. Very good restored interior. Most importantly, it’s a genuine COPO 427 in good colors. Not quite a show car, though. – Sold for $102,290 at Auburn Fall in 2003, then bid to $185,000 at Kissimmee last year. The result here is a strong but realistic result that reflects its rarity, documentation, condition and, most of all, performance.

Lot # T199 1969 Chevrolet Camaro RS/SS 396 Convertible Pace Car; S/N 124679N628682; Dover White, Orange Pace Car graphics/Orange vinyl with houndstooth cloth inserts; White vinyl top; Estimate $55,000 – $65,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $88,000. – 396/325hp, automatic, Rally wheels, Polyglas tires, hidden headlights, cow induction hood, spoilers, power steering, power brakes, factory air conditioning, tilt steering column, later cassette stereo. – Replacement date code correct engine. Paint crack in the center of the nose. Slightly dirty but presentable restored engine bay. Slight discoloration on the top. Mostly good older paint and chrome. Light but visible wear on the driver’s seat as well as a scuff on the headrest. A presentable but unexceptional Pace Car with a replacement engine. Even if it isn’t perfect, it’s as eye-catching as ever. – This price is appropriate for condition, equipment and the replacement engine, a thoroughly enjoyable convertible.

Lot # F228 1969 Chevrolet Camaro RS/SS Indy Pace Car Convertible; S/N 124679N614601; Dover White, Orange Pace Car graphics/Orange vinyl with houndstooth cloth inserts; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $110,000. – Rally wheels, Wide Oval tires, hidden headlights, 12-bolt rear with 3.07 gears, cowl induction hood, Hurst shifter. – The paint is excellent. Panel fit is good, although the doors could be adjusted a little bit better. Brightwork all looks new. The interior looks brand new. The engine compartment is spotless with no signs of use. Underneath is restored to better than new. A fresh, showable genuine Z11 Pace Car represented as restored 200 miles ago. – This Camaro Pace Car sold for $56,100 at Mecum’s Chicago auction in 2015 and for $79,200 at B-J Scottsdale in 2016. Its result here is huge money even for a Pace Car as good as this one is.

Lot # T209 1968 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 124378N428889; Corvette Bronze, Black vinyl roof, Black stripes/Black vinyl; Estimate $55,000 – $65,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $46,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $50,600. – 302/290hp, 4-speed, Rally wheels, Wide Tread GT tires, hidden headlights, power brakes, bucket seats, Hurst shifter, factory radio. – One year only Corvette Bronze. Lightly used restored engine bay. Lightly scratched bumpers. Very good paint. Dull switchgear and original steering wheel. Lightly worn seats. Fully restored, but it’s been a while. – A little more than the result here wouldn’t have been excessive but bidders reluctance to go farther than this price reflects the restoration’s age and some condition issues. On balance this is fair to both parties.

Lot # S52.1 1970 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 RS Coupe; S/N 124870L505689; Mulsanne Blue, Black stripes/Blue vinyl; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $50,000. – 350/360hp, 4-speed, Rally Sport, Wide Oval tires, spoilers, 3.73 Positraction, F41 suspension, power steering, power brakes, Hurst shifter, factory AM/FM radio, Protect-O-Plate. – Tired but presentable and charming original paint. There is some light crazing and a few small scrapes on the right side of the tail. Tidy maintained engine bay with newer belts and hoses. Sound original chrome. Well preserved original interior. A genuine RS Z/28 with good options and in used but very well kept condition. An ideal preservation class kind of car and really too good to restore. – Not sold at a $65,000 high bid at Mecum Las Vegas last year, then not sold at a $64,000 high bid at Kissimmee this year and six miles ago. The seller is right to expect a premium for originality, but the car is getting it, and the offers are unlikely to get any higher than the $65,000 that has already been presented twice. It is time to accept the bidders’ considered and repeated judgment and take a realistic offer.

Lot # S21 1966 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 396 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 138176K134116; Black, Black vinyl roof/Black; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $41,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $45,100. – 396/375hp, 4-speed, power brakes, power steering, red line tires, heavy duty boxed frame, dog dish hub caps, Hurst shifter, knee knocker tach. – The paint looks decent but with a lot of swirls and particles throughout. Panel fit is very good. The brightwork looks good with some pitting around the side windows. The interior looks very good with some wear showing on the console and steering wheel. The engine bay is showing some wear and grime, but the block and cylinder heads look to have been touched up. Underneath looks spotless. A well-restored car with a few corners cut and no representation of matching numbers. – This result is appropriate for the caliber of restoration and highly desirable drivetrain, a realistic investment in an enjoyable weekend driver.

Lot # F235 1969 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 396 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 136379K436379; Dusk Blue, White vinyl roof, White side stripe/Blue vinyl; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000. – 396/325hp, 4-speed, power brakes, Delco AM radio, bench seat, SS Rally wheels, Protect-O-Plate documented. – Represented as numbers matching. The paint looks good. The brightwork looks original and is showing some age and wear. The bumpers look new. Panel fit is a little uneven. The interior looks very good and is showing no wear. The engine bay is spotless. Underneath is spotless and showing no wear. It wouldn’t have taken much to bring this body-off restored car up to the next level. – This car sold for $33,000 at Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas in 2016, then did the rounds of the Mecum tour, selling for $39,050 in Los Angeles in February 2017, selling for $44,000 at Portland, a $35,000 no-sale in Monterey, a $37,000 no-sale in Dallas last September before selling for $42,350 at Louisville two weeks later. All that work and transport costs has achieved essentially nothing in value.

Lot # F269 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 396 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 136370R217167; Astro Blue, White stripes, White vinyl roof/Ivory vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000. – 402/350hp, Hydramatic, 12-bolt rear, power steering, power disc brakes, added air conditioning, Protect-O-Plate documented. – Claimed to be a true Super Sport Chevelle. The paint shines well, but has some small scratches and particles in it. The brightwork looks excellent. Panel fit could have used a little more attention. The interior is very good with some slight discoloration on the seats. The engine bay is very clean and well maintained. Underneath is very clean and well restored. Not much in the way of history, but a clearly well restored and cared for SS. – Bid to $48,000 on the block and worth a bit more than the wholesale offer made for it, even with the Hydramatic. It closed later with this marginally higher result, still wholesale, but not as wholesale as on the block.

Lot # F59 1965 Chevrolet Corvair Corsa Convertible; S/N 107675W145151; Cypress Green/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $26,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $28,600. – 140hp 4-carb engine, 4-speed, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, factory radio, Protect-O-Plate. – Sold new in California. Single repaint. Unrestored but maintained underneath. The engine bay is clean and gotten significant work but not fully restored and the engine sounds healthy. The badges aren’t quite flush with the body. Good older paint and chrome other than a crack on the left rear fender. Clean, straight top but the rear window is pretty cloudy. Lightly worn but good replacement seat upholstery. Sound original dash. A neat, honest little Corvair in just about the most desirable configuration. Quite good by the standards of these cars, but not really much better than driver quality. – Reported sold by Mecum at Kissimmee last year for very strong $42,900 and offered at RM Ft. Lauderdale a month ago where it was reported bid to $23,000. This result is appropriate for what it is, but an inherently enjoyable and unusual affordable entry into car collecting.

Lot # S132 1955 Chevrolet Corvette Roadster; S/N VE55S001474; Harvest Gold/Yellow vinyl; Green vinyl top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $170,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $187,000. – 265/195hp, Powerglide, spinner wheel covers, Firestone whitewalls, pushbutton radio. – Rare Harvest Gold, one of 120, and from the first year of the V-8 Corvette. Light scratching on the headlight bezels. A few cracks around the doors and panels. The gaps are normal for these early Vettes, as in they’re terrible. The rear bumper is a little dull. Excellent newer top. Some cracks in the steering wheel rim. Bloomington Gold Certified and NCRS Top Flight. An interesting car and inherently collectible, but an older restoration that you probably wouldn’t put it on a show field. – 1955 is the second rarest year for Corvettes, with 700 total built. This one’s rare and attractive color plus documentation more than made up for its older condition and supported an otherwise very strong result.

Lot # F296 1957 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N E57S102646; Arctic Blue, Inca Silver coves/Red vinyl; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $72,000. – 283/245hp hydraulic cam, dual quads, Powerglide, both tops, WonderBar radio, power windows, heater, wheel covers, whitewalls. – NCRS Top Flight 1957 Corvette. Very good paint. The brightwork looks excellent. Panel fit is slightly uneven. The interior looks excellent with some wear in the steering wheel and around the shifter. Underneath looks to be freshly undercoated. A sound older restoration with light wear. – This car just sold for $79,200 at Mecum’s Houston sale back in April after it was bid to $95,000 there two years before. The two modest bids in 2018 reflect its lack of representation of matching numbers and the Powerglide transmission.

Lot # F301 1962 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 20867S102182; Roman Red/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $65,000. – 327/340hp, 4-speed, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, both tops, WonderBar radio, 3.70 Positraction. – The paint looks good with a few chips on the panel edges and some particles in paint from poor preparation work. The brightwork looks very good. The passenger’s side door window has a crack through it. The interior looks new. The engine bay looks good but could use a good detail. The underneath is very clean and well restored with factory markings. Slightly better attention to detail would make a huge difference on this car. – Sold for $92,400 at B-J Scottsdale in 2010, then sold at Mecum’s LA auction in February for $84,700 ($77,000 hammer) and bid to $75,000 at Mecum Houston five weeks ago. The differing perceptions of this Corvette’s value are surprising and it really should be worth what was paid for it three months ago, but there’s no profit left in it after paying $84,700.

 

Lot # S54.1 1962 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 20867S111326; Roman Red/Red vinyl; Black vinyl top; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $125,000. – 327/360hp FI, 4-speed, big brakes, WonderBar radio, heater, body color wheels, hubcaps, bias ply blackwall tires. – Represented as matching numbers. Lightly used restored engine bay. Very good older paint and chrome. Excellent like new top. Very clean underbody. Very good interior. Fully restored and, while finished a while ago, has been only lightly driven since and needs nothing. – This car sold here last year for a fair $143,000 and it was bid to the same $130,000 at the Leake auction in Oklahoma City two months ago. It’s in essentially the same condition today, but the hammer price last year was just 5 grand more than the reported offer this year. Consignment and transport fees for another auction or two can close that gap pretty quickly. Regardless, the owner is hoping for better luck in Oklahoma, where the car has been consigned for Leake Tulsa. It’s going to take $200,000 all-in for the seller to net enough to cover the 2017 cost and the cost of trotting it around the country, and $200,000 all-in is asking a lot.

 

Lot # G259 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 30867S108064; Engine # FI29P6; Red, Red hardtop/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $38,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $41,800. – 327/250hp, 4-speed, centerlock alloy wheels, Continental tires, two tops, power brakes, modern alternator, aluminum radiator, vintage-style aftermarket radio. – Good and restored but not highly detailed engine bay and underbody. Light scratch in the middle of the nose and a scuff around the right headlight door but otherwise sound older paint. The Corvette badge on the tail is faded. The doors don’t quite fit flush with the body. Dull original interior trim and switchgear. Lots of scratches on the rear window. A very attractive car at first glance, but has lots of little flaws. Represented as the matching numbers engine, but no mention of Bloomington Gold or NCRS. Not ideal in body style (not a Split Window), equipment or condition, it’s nevertheless a neat car to tool around in. – The 327/250hp engine is as basic as it gets in a Corvette and the equipment suggests it was a driver from its earliest days, as it is today and an affordable way to experience a mid-year Corvette

Lot # S156 1965 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe; S/N 194375S119890; Engine # 5119890; Silver/Black vinyl; Estimate $325,000 – $450,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $335,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $368,500. – 396/425hp, 4-speed, centerlock alloy wheels, narrow whitewalls, 36.5-gallon tank, J50 power brakes, F40 suspension, transistor ignition, 3.08 Positraction, tinted glass. – From the Richard Cohen Big Tank collection. Very good correct engine bay. Not quite show quality but essentially spotless under there. Very good paint and chrome. Very good fully restored interior. NCRS Top Flight. One of just 41 1965 Corvettes fitted with the 36.5-gallon tank. Essentially like new and lots of good options. – Few Corvettes got the N03 Big Tank option, at $202.30 almost as expensive as the 396/425hp engine. Some were endurance road racers, but probably more were daily drivers crossing gas station-less stretches of middle America. Richard Cohen assembled one of every year the Big Tank was offered from 1963-1967, an obsession that was liquidated in at Mecum’s Spring Classic. There were one 210 Big Tanks of which five were offered here and they were recognized with superior prices like this.

Lot # T196.1 1965 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe; S/N 194375S103047; Ermine White/Black leather; Estimate $50,000 – $60,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $48,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $52,800. – 327/350hp L79, 4-speed, added side exhaust, MSD distributor, power windows, centerlock wheels, red line tires. – Mostly unrestored and a little dirty but maintained underneath. Side exhaust added recently. Other than a crack behind the right headlight door, the paint is quite good if a little older. Same with the chrome. The door gaps are a little erratic. Newer upholstery and carpets, and the rest of the interior is original but quite good. Cracked window gaskets. Not much represented in the way of history, not represented as matching numbers, and a somewhat inconsistent presentation, but more than good enough to go out and enjoy for the driver rather than the collector or show field. – This result is fair for both buyer and the seller, neatly tying together condition and equipment to arrive at a realistic compromise.

Lot # U134 1966 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 194676S127608; Milano Maroon/Tan vinyl; Tan top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $49,500. – 327/300hp, 4-speed, centerlock alloy wheels, gold line tires. – Represented as matching numbers. The paint looks very good with only a few flaws and chips on the panel edges. The panel fit is a little uneven. The brightwork looks very good, but the vent window frames have some pitting on them. Most of the interior shows a little wear except for the seats, which have been recovered. The engine compartment looks original and has been detailed. Underneath is very clean and showing very little wear. An attractive driver. – A bit of a bargain for an L79-powered 4-speed car with original centerlock wheels, but not a steal. It is a rerun of Tuesday G266, also reported sold for $50,600.

Lot # U82 1966 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 194676S110228; Nassau Blue/White vinyl; White vinyl top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $69,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $75,900. – 427/425hp, 4-speed, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, side exhaust, power steering, power brakes. – The paint looks good other than flat spots behind the top and a few various chips. Slightly uneven panel fit. The top looks good and fits well. The brightwork looks good with some pitting around the windows. The interior looks very good with some wear on the console and driver’s door panel. The engine compartment is clean other than signs of leakage around the intake. Underneath is clean with very little signs of wear. This is an older body-off restoration that will be a great cruiser and to take to local shows. – This Corvette could have brought another $10 thousand and not been expensive, even with its issues.

Lot # F162 1967 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 194677S120233; Goodwood Green/Black vinyl; Black top; Unrestored original, 4 condition; With Reserve; Post-block sale at $129,545 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $142,500. – Rally wheels, red line tires, telescopic tearing wheel. – Given new to MVP Bart Starr at the very first Super Bowl. Rough, ratty engine bay. Dull chrome. Badly crazed paint. Sound interior. Whichever Packards fan decides to buy this car will have a difficult decision of whether to restore this objectively bad but historically somewhat significant car. – Hammered not sold on the block at a $150,000 high bid, then reported sold post-block for $142,500 all-in, both massive numbers for a base engine ’67 in such rough shape to all but mature Packers’ fans who will regard with reverence Bart Starr’s bum prints in the scroungy seats.

Lot # F227 1968 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 194678S402249; Rally Red/Black vinyl; White vinyl top; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $49,500. – 327/350hp, 4-speed, Rally wheels, red line tires, factory air conditioning, power steering, power brakes, power windows. – Represented as matching numbers. The paint looks very good other some small chip repairs. Panel fit is a little uneven. The brightwork looks very good. The interior is very good with some signs of wear on the driver’s seat and steering wheel. The engine bay is clean with wear beginning to show since the restoration. Underneath is showing some signs of wear and tear as well. An older restored with non-negligible miles since it was done. – This is strong money even considering the desirable options. It would not be surprising to see this price buying a more recent restoration, but it’s not an excessive number, either, just optimistic.

Lot # U131 1969 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe; S/N 194379S711421; Fathom Green/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $34,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $37,400. – 427/390hp L36, 4-speed, Rally wheels, red line tires. – Represented as matching numbers. The paint looks very good with a few very minor scratches in the hood and front fenders. The brightwork looks very good with some light scratches around the windshield. The panel gaps and fit are very good. The interior is very good with newer seats, but there is some wear showing around the shifter and steering wheel. The engine compartment is clean and restored with some signs of wear and age. The underbody looks older than the top and there are some spots with light surface rust. Represented as a body-off restoration done in 2012, but seems to have been done on a budget and then driven a fair bit. – Sold at Auburn Fall last September for $37,950, the result here is straightforward and realistic for a lower tier big-block C3 that is attractive but more suited for driver duty than for show fields.

Lot # T153 1970 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe; S/N 194370S412893; Glacier White/Saddle vinyl; Estimate $45,000 – $65,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $45,000. – 350/370hp LT1, 4-speed, Rally wheels, Wide Oval tires, pushbutton radio, 4.11 rear, factory alarm system, power brakes, Protect-O-Plate documented. – Represented as matching numbers. Rough paint with crazing and small cracks around the hood as well as cracks behind the doors. Loose, scratched door handles. Worn interior. Represented as body-off restored in 2006, but presents like a used car. Whatever work was done, it wasn’t extensive and the car is a little disappointing up close. At least it’s an LT1 from the first and most desirable year. – This car coming to Indy is practically tradition. It was bid to $41,000 in 2010, to $38,000 in 2011 and $37,500 in 2012, but didn’t sell until 2016 when it went for $37,400. The upward movement from that result to the 2018 high bid is more than the LT1 market has made in that time, and the car doesn’t seem any better. Having reached its pre-sale low estimate it should have gone to a new home at this price.

Lot # F284 1975 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 1Z67J5S423744; Bright Green/Saddle; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $18,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $19,800. – 350/165hp, automatic, Radial T/A tires, hardtop. – One of 1,664 Corvettes in this color. The paint looks good, but there are a few chips in the front. The brightwork is good but showing some age. The interior looks good with some wear showing on the steering wheel and console. The engine bay looks original and is very clean. Underneath is original and is showing some wear and tear. A good, largely original but consistently maintained driver. – This car features the L48 engine, which translates to a paltry 165hp, but makes up for it with sound presentation and an attention-grabbing color. Sold here four years ago in 2014 for $22,680. This was a fair result that takes all the pluses and minuses into account. The color must have been more chic in 2014.

Lot # U23 1986 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 1G1YY6787G5902970; Yellow/Black; Black top; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $18,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $19,800. – Automatic, power seats, pace car graphics applied. – One of 1,464 1986 Corvette convertibles painted yellow. Paint looks very good with some light scuffs on a few panel edges. Panel fit is very good. The convertible top is in excellent condition and fits very well. The interior is good, but the driver’s seat has some wear and the console is showing some as well. The engine compartment is clean, but the valve covers have some very strange discoloration to them. Underneath is all original and showing some wear and tear. Mileage not represented, but a very lightly used original car. – A pretty astounding price for an imperfect car. Perhaps there were enough people wanted the ’86 out of the Keith Busse Pace Car collection but didn’t want to shell out for the whole collection and turned their attention to this car instead. For whatever reason, this is a generous result for a Yellow non-Pace Car.

Lot # W50 1986 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 1G1YY6787G5905481; White/Red; White top; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $13,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $14,850. – Power driver’s seat. – Represented as a one-owner car with new tires. Good but slightly dull original paint. Lightly wrinkled and flattened seats. Otherwise pretty good interior. A Pace Car edition, but all ’86 convertibles were technically Pace Cars, this one just happens to have had its decals applied. A good early C4 with just 15,741 miles, but not perfect. – Indy is a good place to sell just about anything associated with pace cars, especially this year. This car probably couldn’t expect to get much more than this number, so it was a good sell. The buyer did even better, flipping it on Sunday as U145 for $15,000 hammer, $16,500 all-in.


Lot # S91 Chevrolet Corvette Indy Pace Car Collection;  With Reserve; Hammered Sold for $1,600,000 plus commission of 10%; Final Price $1,760,000. – Keith Busse’s collection of 16 Indy 500 Pace cars comprising all 14 years when Corvettes paced the race plus two others with special connections to the race. – Offered first as a single collection with the individual cars to be offered later individually if the collection didn’t sell. They were eventually sold as a collection with this result. The aggregate pre-sale high estimates were $1,565,000 which places a substantial premium on the collection as a whole. Several Corvette Pace Cars were never available to the public, placing a notable premium on them. It was an epic moment as Dana Mecum moved through the assembled cars putting “Mecum Sold” stickers on them. The individual cars are reported below.

Lot # S91.1 1978 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe Pace Car; S/N 1Z8748S902901; Black, Silver, Red/Silver leather; Estimate $50,000 – $65,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Included in the Keith Busse Corvette Pace Collection, Lot #S91. – 350/220hp L82, 4-speed, air conditioning, power steering, brakes, locks and windows, tilt steering column, cruise control, rear window defogger, 8-track AM-FM stereo, power antenna. – Rare 4-speed car. 999 miles. 1996 Bloomington Gold, 2016 NCRS Top Flight. The paint is pretty tired and there are some scratches on the rocker trim. Still good enough to be quite collectible, though. –

Lot # S92 1986 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible Pace Car; S/N 1G1YY6786G5905438; Yellow/Charcoal; Black cloth top; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Included in  the Keith Busse Corvette Pace Collection, Lot S91. – Pace car graphics. – 4,983 miles and presents like new aside from light wrinkling to the seats and scuffed steering wheel. –

Lot # S92.1 1995 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible Pace Car; S/N 1G1YY32PXS5112679; Dark Purple, White/Purple, Black leather; White vinyl top; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Included in the Keith Busse Corvette Pace Car Collection, Lot S91.– 350/300hp LT1, automatic, power steering, brakes, windows, sport seats, locks and mirrors, cruise control. – 64 miles and clearly treated as collectible from new. NCRS Top Flight in 2014, Bloomington Gold in 2015. –

Lot # S93 1998 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible Pace Car; S/N 1G1YY32G5W5120534; Purple, Yellow/Yellow, Black leather; Black top; Estimate $40,000 – $60,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Included in  the Keith Busse Corvette Pace Collection, Lot S91. – 346/345hp LS1, 6-speed, Bose CD stereo, Yellow alloy wheels, air conditioning, power steering, brakes, windows, locks sport seats, mirrors. – 905 miles and looks new. This is a retina-searing color scheme, but these cars are collectible. 2016 Bloomington Gold and NCRS Top Flight. –

Lot # S93.1 2003 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe Pace Car; S/N 1G1YY22G335100014; Crystal Red, Pace Car graphics/Shale leather; Estimate $50,000 – $90,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Included in  the Keith Busse Corvette Pace Collection, Lot S91. – 346/350hp LS1, 6-speed, air conditioning, Bose CD stereo, power steering, brakes, windows, locks, seats and mirrors. – A legit track-driven car, one of five used in 2002. 3,515 miles and looks like a new car. One owner from new after touring the U.S. on a Chevy 50th anniversary promotion. One of five track driven examples built during the pilot run, four surviving. –

Lot # S94 2004 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible Pace Car; S/N 1G1YY32GX45112068; Arctic White, Le Mans Blue Metallic/Red leather; White vinyl top; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Not evaluated; With Reserve; Included in  the Keith Busse Corvette Pace Collection, Lot S91. – 346/350hp LS1, automatic, polished alloy wheels, air conditioning, heads-up display, Bose stereo, power steering, brakes, windows, locks, sport seats and mirrors. – One of only three official 2004 Pace Cars, none sold to the public, three owners, GM Heritage, Bob McDorman and Keith Busse. 579 miles. –

Lot # S94.1 2004 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible Pace Car; S/N 1G1YY32G445121025; Arctic White/Red leather; White vinyl top; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Not evaluated; With Reserve; Included in  the Keith Busse Corvette Pace Collection, Lot S91. – 346/350hp LS1, automatic, polished alloy wheels, air conditioning, power brakes, steering, seats, and everything else. – Festival car given to 500 winner Buddy Rice and purchased from him by Keith Busse with 115 miles from new. –

Lot # S94.2 2004 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible Pace Car; S/N 1G1YY32G145126909; Le Mans Blue/Shale leather; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Not evaluated; With Reserve; Included in  the Keith Busse Corvette Pace Collection, Lot S91. – 346/350hp LS1, automatic, etc. – Le Mans commemorative Indianapolis 500 Parade lap driven track car. 442 miles from new. –

Lot # S95 2005 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible Pace Car; S/N 1G1YY34UX55124161; Victory Red, Machine Silver stripe/Black leather; Black vinyl top; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Not evaluated; With Reserve; Included in  the Keith Busse Corvette Pace Collection, Lot S91. – 346/400hp LS2, automatic, air conditioning, power Sport seats, brakes, steering, mirrors, locks, windows, top, steering column tilt, Bose stereo, heated rear window. – One of eight track cars, 1,384 miles from new. –

Lot # S95.1 2006 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe Pace Car; S/N 1G1YY26E965108213; Arctic White, Victory Red, Cobalt Blue/Ebony leather, Red stitching; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Not evaluated; With Reserve; Included in  the Keith Busse Corvette Pace Collection, Lot S91. – 427/505hp LS7, 6-speed, power steering column, brakes, steering, seats, and mirrors, heads-up display. – Never released to the public, and only three built. This one was duplicated by Keith Busse with permission from GM and the Speedway with paint by the original Pace Car painter and decals from the original supplier. –

Lot # S96 2007 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible Pace Car; S/N 1G1YY36U875139855; Atomic Orange/Black leather; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Not evaluated; With Reserve; Included in  the Keith Busse Corvette Pace Collection, Lot S91. – 346/400hp LS2, 6-speed, air condition, power everything. – One of 500 built, 160 miles. –

Lot # S96.1 2008 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible Pace Car; S/N 1G1YY36W585124295; Black, Silver/Grey, Black leather; Grey vinyl top; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Not evaluated; With Reserve; Included in the Keith Busse Corvette Pace Collection, Lot S91. – 378/430hp LS3, paddle shift 6-speed, heads-up display, CD stereo, power steering column, steering, brakes, seats, etc. – One of 60 Indy 500 Track and Festival cars, autographed by Emerson Fittipaldi. 1,767 miles. –

Lot # S97 2013 Chevrolet Corvette ZR-1 Coupe Pace Car; S/N 1G1Y62DT5D5800098; Arctic White, Silver Blue Pearl stripes/Diamond Blue leather, Grey stitching; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Not evaluated; With Reserve; Included in  the Keith Busse Corvette Pace Collection, Lot S91. – 378/638hp supercharged LS9, 6-speed, carbon fiber body panels, clear engine cover, air conditioning, lightweight aluminum wheels, heated sport seats, power steering column and more. – Never released to the public, duplicated by Keith Busse with permission from GM and the Speedway, a 2012 Indy pace car replication.

Lot # S97.1 2014 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe Pace Car; S/N 1G1YM2D7XE5105903; Laguna Blue/Black leather, Suede; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Not evaluated; With Reserve; Included in  the Keith Busse Corvette Pace Collection, Lot S91. – LT1, paddle shift automatic, polished alloy wheels. – Duplicated by permission of GM and the Speedway with decals by the original manufacturer.

Lot # S98 2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 Coupe Pace Car; S/N 1G1YS2D67F5605385; Arctic White/Red leather, Blue; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Not evaluated; With Reserve; Included in  the Keith Busse Corvette Pace Collection, Lot S91. – Supercharged LT4 with 650hp, Black alloy wheels, Red Brembo calipers, carbon discs, carbon fibre trim bits. – Not released to the public, duplicated by Keith Busse with permission from GM and the Speedway with decals from the original manufacturer. –

Lot # S99 2017 Chevrolet Corvette Grand Sport Coupe Pace Car; S/N 1G1Y125D78H5100907; Arctic White, Blue stripe, Red fender flashes/Red leather; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Not evaluated; With Reserve; Included in  the Keith Busse Corvette Pace Collection, Lot S91. – 378/460hp LT1, 8-speed automatic, etc. – Duplicated with permission from GM and the Speedway, 57 miles from new. And if the buyer is up for it, Keith Busse has an option on a 2019 model Indy 500 Pace Car Corvette from the 2018 race.


Lot # F201 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427/435 Convertible; S/N 194677S116381; Engine # 7116381; Sunfire Yellow, Black stinger/Black leather; Black top; Estimate $120,000 – $149,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $115,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $126,500. – 427/435hp, 4-speed, Rally wheels, red line tires, side exhaust, L71, Positraction, Soft Ray tinted glass, AM-FM. – Represented as a matching numbers L71. Nearly spotless engine bay and underbody. Very good paint, chrome and interior. Restored relatively recently. Nothing overdone, and essentially like new with great equipment and good colors. – And a solid value, too, for the combination of features, condition and attractive livery. This result is appropriate for an L71 like this, but at the bottom of the reasonable range and the new owner should be very happy with both the Corvette and the price paid for it.

Lot # F154.1 1957 Chevrolet Corvette FI Convertible; S/N E57S105073; Onyx Black, Black hardtop/Red; Black top; Estimate $400,000 – $600,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $400,000. – 283/283 fuel injection, 4-speed, big brake, airbox, hub caps, Firestone blackwalls, hardtop, power soft top, WonderBar radio, 4.11 gears. – Raced in period, then body-off restored at some point. Tired but tidy engine bay. Dull old paint with detail swirls. Flat seats but mostly good interior. Good chrome. All very desirable equipment and a good year, the first for fuel injection. The car deserves another round of restoration work or fresh paint at the very least, and it is worth more than enough to throw some serious money into it. – Sold for $310,300 at Mecum’s Dallas auction in September 2013, then for $495,000 at Kissimmee last year, Bid to $395,000 here last year and not sold again at a $475,000 high bid at Mecum Monterey last year. This reported high bid equals the low estimate and should have seen the car change hands.

Lot # T168.1 1965 Chevrolet Corvette FI Convertible; S/N 194675S120148; Engine # F5I3HG; Glen Green/White leather; White vinyl top; Estimate $115,000 – $125,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $90,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $99,000. – 327/375hp Fuelie, 4-speed, original centerlock alloy wheels, gold line tires, side exhaust, radio delete, teakwood steering wheel, telescopic steering column. – Some rub through in the paint on the left front fender. Large crack in the hood. Fully restored but lightly used engine bay. Somewhat tired older chrome. Very good interior with negligible wrinkling to the driver’s seat. Lightly scratched exhaust surrounds. A loaded ’65 with matching numbers and Bloomington Gold certification, but not done yesterday and starting to show its age. – Discounted reasonably for the age of its restoration, but given the sum of desirable original options fitted to this ’65 Fuelie, this was something of a bargain.

Lot # S6 1996 Chevrolet Corvette GS Coupe; S/N 1G1YY2254T5600553; Admiral Blue, White, Red/Black leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $24,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $26,400. – 350/330hp, 6-speed, factory CD stereo. – One of 810 1996 GS Coupes. Represented as a two-owner Florida car with 21,000 miles. Light road wear but tidy underneath. A handful of tiny chips on the nose but otherwise very well maintained original paint. Hardly any wear in the interior. Not insignificant mileage for a GS, but nevertheless a babied and unmodified example. – For a GS to bring big prices of 40 or 50 grand or more at auction, it needs to be in like-new condition with like-new miles. This example isn’t a bad car by any means, but it’s lightly used and that seems to have put off enough bidders. At this price, it’s a solid value for the new owner.

Lot # F134.1 1969 Chevrolet Corvette L88 Convertible; S/N 194679S710170; Engine # 19S710170; Maroon, Black vinyl hardtop/Black vinyl; Black top; Estimate $525,000 – $600,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $500,000. – 427/’430′ hp L88, 4-speed, Rally wheels, red line tires, J56 power brakes, transistor ignition, heater delete, hardtop, side exhaust, two tops, tank sticker documented. – Represented as a genuine matching numbers L88, NCRS Top Flight, Bloomington Gold and more. Restored twice. Tidy engine bay. Good older paint and chrome. Very good, lightly worn interior. In solid but unexceptional condition overall. What’s exceptional is what’s under the hood. – Not sold by Auctions America at Santa Monica in June 2016 at a $450,000 high bid. and at Bonhams Scottsdale in January 2017 on a reported bid of $490,000. The bidders are ganging up at half-a-million. The seller isn’t listening and keeps trying to squeeze out a little more while the low estimate has dropped from $650K at Sta. Monica and $550K at Scottsdale to $525K today. Why would the consignor not take $500K or Mecum make a deal on commission sharing to put the deal together? The most obvious answer is that the real money was somewhere in this L88’s rear view mirror.

Lot # S154.1 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 (big tank) Coupe; S/N 30837S108065; Riverside Red/Red vinyl; Estimate $425,000 – $600,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $390,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $429,000. – 327/360hp fuel injection Z06 big tank, 4-speed, centerlock wheels, Silvertown blackwalls, radio delete, 4.11 Positraction. – From the Richard Cohen Big Tank collection. Fine cracks and crazing in the paint. Good chrome. Some odd yellowing on the transmission tunnel trim. Tidy but used underneath. Restored many years ago and has long since started to show its age, but solid overall and with very desirable equipment. – Hammered not sold at a $355,000 high bid on the block, which really was too light and reported sold by Mecum post-block but without an amount later on Mecum’s website. This result was observed earlier before being obscured. The reported post-block price is fairer to the car’s strengths but still realistically takes into account the age of the restoration.

Lot # U76 1990 Chevrolet Corvette ZR-1 Coupe; S/N 1G1YZ23JXL5800331; Red/Red leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $33,000. – 350/375hp, 6-speed, factory cassette stereo. – Represented with 357 miles. The paint is decent but there are scuffs on some of the panel edges. Panel fit is very good. Weather stripping on the windows has seen better days, but that tends to deteriorate quickly on these cars. The interior looks new and shows very little wear. The engine compartment could use a good detailing. The mileage would have you believe that this is a time warp car, but it’s not quite that good. – And it’s certainly not too good for the reported high bid, and only would be if it looked as fresh as the mileage would suggest. ZR1s that were put away new and have delivery miles are far from rare, in fact they’re probably more common that ZR1s that have been driven. Expecting much if any premium for the low miles is a pipe dream when the car has been neglected like this.

Lot # S54 1969 Chevrolet El Camino SS 396 Pickup; S/N 136809Z352221; Black, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $54,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $59,400. – 396/325hp, automatic, Polyglas tires, rosewood steering wheel, horseshoe shifter, factory air conditioning, power steering, power brakes, tach, bucket seats, console. – Represented as matching numbers. Clean, straight bed. Very good paint and chrome. Spotless engine bay. Good roof vinyl. Fresh and fully restored interior. A gorgeous, thoroughly treated genuine El Camino SS that’s better than many Chevelles, but not overdone. – Most ’69 El Caminos are $20-$30,000 vehicles, but have neither the 396/325hp engine or the meticulous restoration of this one which makes the bidders enthusiasm understandable and the price, while expensive, not unreasonable.

Lot # F266 1962 Chevrolet Impala SS Convertible; S/N 21867B104550; Roman Red/Black vinyl; Black top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $53,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $58,300. – 409/409hp dual quads, 4-speed, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, column-mounted tach, bucket seats, floor shift, factory radio. – Represented as matching numbers. The paint looks very good from a distance, but there are some runs in the hood as well as chips on trunk and door edges. The brightwork looks good with some scratches on the front bumper and around the windshield. There is pitting on the bumpers as well. Panel fit is a little uneven. The interior looks very good and shows little wear. The engine bay looks good with slight leaking around some gaskets. Underneath has fairly fresh undercoating with a few signs of road wear. Good equipment, and a solid older restored cruiser. – Sold for $31,270 here in 2012 followed by no-sales at Austin 2014 ($65,000), Leake Tulsa 2014 ($62,000) Dallas 2014 ($60,000), Houston 2015 ($50,000) $58,850 at Leake Tulsa in 2015 and Mecum Dallas 2015 ($60,000), then sold for $60,500 at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale in 2016. This kind of consistency is hard to argue with and clues you in to what this car’s value range really is, which is about what it brought here.

Lot # F203 1963 Chevrolet Impala SS Convertible; S/N 31867F255563; Ember Red/Red vinyl; White vinyl top; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $52,000. – 409/400hp, 4-speed, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, 3.36 Positraction, power steering, power brakes, tach, dash clock, bucket seats, floor shift, console. – Very good new top. Unrestored but cleaned up engine bay and underbody. Newer exhaust. Very good mostly original paint. Very good original interior with an unbelievably small amount of wear. A remarkably equipped and incredibly well maintained Impala SS. – ‘Rare’ hardly begins to describe this highly original 409 Impala SS convertible and its power steering and brakes mean it will be fun to drive and cruise even at low in-town speeds. The low estimate is more reasonable than the reported high bid.

Lot # S158.1 1970 Chevrolet Nova Yenko Deuce 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 114270W349459; Forest Green, White/Black vinyl; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $88,000. – 350/360hp, 4-speed, Rally wheels, Wide Oval tires, Yenko hood tach, power brakes, Hurst shifter, 12-bolt rear with 4.10 gears, bench seat, factory radio. – Excellent paint and graphics. The panels fit very well and doors close effortlessly. The vent windows are old and mildly pitted while the rest of the brightwork is like new. The engine and underbody have been restored to a high level and have little deterioration. The interior is complete and unused. A stunning example of one of Don Yenko’s lesser known creations. – Not sold here in 2016 at a hammer bid of $100,000. If anything, the price of this car should be higher, making this an exceptionally good value. Getting into a well restored genuine Yenko for under six figures is a pretty good buy.

Lot # S79 1970 Chrysler 300 Hurst 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N CM23U0C226726; White, Gold/Tan vinyl; Recent restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $51,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $56,100. – 440/375hp, automatic, power steering, power brakes, air conditioning, Polyglas tires, column shift, factory radio. – Very good paint, chrome and interior other than light wear to the seats. Very clean underneath. Freshly restored and a very rare 300 Hurst, which is one of 485 built and looks really sharp in these colors. – Arguably the last of the Chrysler 300 letter cars after Chrysler devalued ‘300’ by making it a trim level in 1966. The 300 Hurst returned to the letter car tradition both with the standard 440/375hp engine and upgraded suspension, not the tire-smoking letter cars of the past but still fast enough to make a banker proud. They don’t carry anywhere near the premium of the letter cars but are rare, fast and distinctive. This is a reasonable result for a quality example with a fastidious restoration.

Lot # F135 1957 Chrysler 300C Convertible; S/N 3N571001; White/Tan leather; Black vinyl top; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $195,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $214,500. – 392/390hp, dual quads, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, pushbutton automatic, pushbutton radio, bucket seats, power windows. – Serial no, 001. One of 484 built. Show awards about 10 years ago. A few light scratches on the front bumper. The headlight bezels don’t quite fit evenly, and there’s a paint chip behind the right one. Paint chips around the left taillight as well. Good older paint otherwise. Excellent tight-fitting top. Very good interior. An eye-catching and rare open top banker’s hot rod, but starting to show its age and no longer a show car. – By most standards this is generous price, but it is so appealing a car that the desire of the Indy bidders for it can be understood. It humbles mainstream performance cars in 1957 and does it with luxury and comfort. Chrysler built only 484 of these and owning a surviving example today is instant status.

Lot # F136 1959 Chrysler 300E Convertible; S/N M591100459; Black, Red grille/Tan leather; Black vinyl top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $260,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $286,000. – 413/380hp, cross-ram dual quads, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, dual mirrors, factory air conditioning, power windows, power antenna, power swivel seats, power mirror, pushbutton automatic, pushbutton radio. – One of only 140 built. Numerous show awards to its credit dating back to the early 2000s. Very good paint and brightwork. Perfect clean top. Light wrinkling to the seats but otherwise great interior. Mostly exquisite, but not super fresh and not quite the showstopper it once was. – Nevertheless, the quality of the work translated to this monumental price that is a far cry from almost anything with a Chrysler badge and certainly a long way from the $71,280 that this car sold for at Barrett-Jackson back in 2001.

Lot # F136.1 1962 Chrysler 300H Convertible; S/N 8423137021; Black/Tan; Black top; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $150,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $165,000. – 413/380hp dual quads, automatic, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, tinted glass, pushbutton automatic, pushbutton radio, power bucket seats, console, power windows, factory air conditioning, Sure Grip. – Show awards at the beginning of the 2000s. Excellent chrome. Light detail scratches in the older paint. Excellent tight-fitting top. Very good, lightly worn interior. A gorgeous former show car for the most part, but the paint looks like it has been buffed a few too many times on concours mornings. – This is letter car magic, a generous price for a good but not exceptional example that would have been fully priced at its low estimate, or even below.

Lot # F140 1958 Chrysler New Yorker Convertible; S/N LC31809; Matador Red/Red vinyl, White pattern cloth; Black vinyl top; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $300,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $330,000. – 392/345hp, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, dual mirrors, dual antenna, dual spotlights, pushbutton automatic, pushbutton radio, tissue dispenser, dash clock, power windows, power steering and brakes, air conditioning, cruise control, Highway Hi-Fi, optional Benrus clock in the steering wheel hub. – Multiple show awards in the mid to late naughts. Very good paint and chrome. Even gaps. Perfect tight-fitting top. All brightwork is excellent and fits flush. Excellent interior. No longer super fresh, but still showable. – This sharp-looking New Yorker was generously estimated, then bid to a third over the high estimate, a staggering price by any standard. The restoration, its preservation and the list of options are impressive but neither that nor rarity can explain a third of a million dollars for it. This is a outlier price, but Chryslers did well at Mecum’s Spring Classic this year.

Lot # F300 1956 Continental Mark II 2-Dr. Coupe; S/N C56C2607; Blue/Blue, White leather; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $35,000. – Air conditioning, power steering, power brakes, tinted glass, power windows, wide whitewall tires, full size wheel covers, original shipping invoice. – The paint shines very well, but there are a lot of flaws and cracks in it. Panel fit is a little uneven. The brightwork is decent with a few scratches throughout. Vent window glass is delaminating. The engine bay could really use a good detailing. The interior looks good with some cracks in the steering wheel. The driver’s door armrest has a lot of wear. Underneath looks to be original and showing quite a bit of wear. A decent driver quality Continental. – Sold at Kissimmee in January for $44,000, then bid to $42,000 ($46,200 all-in) at Mecum Houston in April, which was a modest number but one that should have at least been considered given this lowball offer. The Kissimmee result was all this tired Continental Coupe can expect. There’s nothing left and the seller is chasing a will-o-the-wisp looking for more.

Lot # G285 1972 Datsun 240Z Coupe; S/N HLS3092889; Silver/Red vinyl; Enthusiast restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $31,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $34,100. – Wheel covers, Bridgestone tires, Clarion cassette stereo. – Lightly used but fully restored engine bay. Spotless frame and restored underbody. Straight body. Good paint other than some rub through on the right front fender. The plastic strips on the bumpers are a little dry and wavy. There are a few small scratches on the rear glass. Very good interior, mostly restored other than sound original dash and switchgear. A very attractive and correct Z car that isn’t the world’s best, but was still a labor of love and better than the majority of the ones still on the road. – The original Z Cars have gradually gained appreciation as the groundbreaking, handsome, quick and reliable cars that they are. Rust and modification have taken a lot of them, so really good correct cars can be on the expensive side. This was a big result, but it wouldn’t be easy to find another one quite this good.

Lot # S86.1 1956 DeSoto Fireflite Convertible; S/N 50382665; Plum, Mauve accent/Mauve cloth, White leather; Plum cloth top; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $125,000. – 300/320hp Adventurer dual quad engine, automatic, chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, dual outside mirrors, hood ornament, boot cover, bat wing air cleaner, DeSotomatic steering wheel hub Benrus clock, pushbutton radio, power windows, heater, Highway Hi-Fi. – Very clean fully restored engine bay. Excellent paint and chrome. Slightly uneven door gaps. All fantastic brightwork. Very good interior. Gorgeous engine compartment and chassis but with some compromised interior chrome and details. A gorgeous car with great equipment and cool colors. Very good and very purple. – It is easy to argue that this Fireflite convertible with its Adventurer dual quad engine and meticulous restoration has few if any equals among DeSotos and that makes the reported high bid here light enough that the consignor has reasonable hope of finding the collector who will appreciate it as much as the person who spent untold dollars restoring it to this condition did. It is a spectacular car.

Lot # W256 1945 Diamond T 414 Estate Wagon; S/N F41405281; Cream, Wood/Red; Estimate $45,000 – $65,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $28,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $30,800. – Hub caps and trim rings, bench seats, floor shift. – Dull, somewhat splotchy old paint with numerous cracks and chips. Tidy older restored underneath. Dinged up hub caps. Any serious money in this car was spent on the wood, which is very good without any major cracks or warping. Newer seat covers and carpets, and the interior wood has been redone as well. A weird, endearing car if not exactly graceful. New paint and straightening the body out would go a long way, but it’s a neat driver as is. – Diamond T pickups bring much more but this is a real, rare, outstanding unicorn that stands alone in auction history. Described as one of three built, this “Diamond Traveler” was built for company president C.A. Tilt. It brought far less than a Ford Woody in comparable condition and will thrill truck enthusiasts wherever it appears. Obscure and overlooked, this is a real value in bragging rights.

Lot # S157 1970 Dodge Challenger T/A 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N JH23J0B296627; Panther Pink, White vinyl roof, Matte Black hood, Black stripes/White vinyl; Estimate $135,000 – $155,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $180,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $198,000. – 340/290hp, automatic, hub caps and trim rings, Polyglas GT tires, hood pins, rear spoiler, hood tach, bucket seats, column shift, factory pushbutton radio, side exhaust, heavy duty suspension, power steering. – Represented as matching numbers engine. Very good like new engine bay. Very good paint and chrome. Even gaps. Excellent restored interior. This car grabs your attention and keeps it. The colors are good, the equipment is good, and the presentation is impeccable. It ticks almost all the boxes. – This is an astonishing result. The pre-sale estimate was astonishing enough, but the final bid at 16% over the high estimate is eye-watering. The colors are arresting, however, but this arresting? It is a curve-setting result.

Lot # F148.1 1969 Dodge Charger 500 Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N XX29J9B248656; Bright White, Black tail stripe/Black cloth; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $125,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $137,500. – 426/425hp Hemi, automatic, hub caps, red line tires, Hemi, power steering, power brakes, power windows, rear defrost, tinted glass, AM 8-track stereo, bucket seats, console, floor shift, Tic-Toc-Tach, original window sticker, dealer and sales invoice documented. – Represented as a genuine Hemi Charger 500 with 44,260 miles from new. Used but tidy engine bay. Looks like an original but maintained underbody. Very good older paint. Very good mostly original interior. Light age on a well-kept and unrestored but not totally original car. – Sold for $145,800 at Kissimmee in 2015, $165,000 at B-J Palm Beach three months later, $101,200 at B-J Scottsdale last year and bid to $120,000 here last year. It’s a sweet Hemi in nearly flawless condition showing only a little age and a few miles on its odometer (410 since it was offered at Auburn Fall in 2000.) It could have brought a little more without being unreasonable and is a good value at this result even if the Hemi gloss has worn thin.

Lot # F166 1969 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N XS29J9B215858; Black/Black; Estimate $125,000 – $140,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $140,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $154,000. – 426/425hp Hemi, automatic, hub caps, red line tires, A32 Super Performance Axle, 4.10 Dana 60 rear, power brakes, bucket seats, console, floor shift, factory radio. – From the Harold Messner collection. Restored but used engine bay. Slightly dull chrome. Sound older paint. Chip on the passenger’s door. Scratched up window frames. Good mostly restored interior. A real deal Hemi Charger that doesn’t need anything before going out to burn some rubber, but it deserved a little more attention to cleanup and details. – The combination of power, equipment and condition worked together to bring a handsome but fully deserved price for this Charger R/T Hemi and demonstrated yet again that the ‘Hemi’ appellation dusts a car with magic in the market.

Lot # U28 1967 Dodge Coronet 500 Convertible; S/N WP27G77224115; Red/Black; Black top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000. – 383/270hp upgraded with a 4-barrel to 325hp specs, automatic, power top, bucket seats, floor shift, factory radio, tach. – Paint shines well, but has a lot of small scratches throughout and small chips on the panel edges. The brightwork looks very good. The top fits well, but has a tear on the rear. Slightly uneven panel fit. The interior looks very good with slight wear showing on the steering wheel and console. The engine bay looks original with some discoloration on the intake. Underneath is showing road wear with undercoating coming off in a few spots. A solid weekend cruiser. – Sold for $26,500 here in 2012, then for $23,450 here in 2013, the car is doing nothing, but it is nothing and deserves what it brought.

Lot # S27.1 1970 Dodge Coronet Super Bee 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N WM23N0A135757; Top Banana, Black vinyl roof, Black tail stripe/Black vinyl; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $47,000. – 383/335hp, 4-speed, Rallye wheels, pistol grip shifter, functional ram charger hood. – The paint looks good with a few runs and blemishes in it. Panel fit and gaps are slightly uneven. The roof vinyl looks new. The brightwork looks good, but there are some scratches and dings around the windows. The interior looks new, but the fake wood sticker on the console is peeling up. The engine compartment is very clean and well restored. Underneath is spotless. A recently and mostly well restored Super Bee that’s lacking a bit in attention to detail, but it wouldn’t take much to bring it up another level. – This Coronet Super Bee should have been loose and selling waaay before the reported bid here. The 4-speed counts, but not enough to make up for the aged presentation and the mundane engine.

Lot # F216 1969 Dodge Dart GTS 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N LS23M9B300679; Blue, White tail stripe/Black vinyl; Estimate $85,000 – $105,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $63,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $69,300. – 440/375hp Magnum, automatic, hub caps, Firestone narrow whitewalls, bucket seats, floor shift, radio delete. – Represented as matching numbers. Some heat rash on the exhaust but mostly very clean and fresh engine bay. Very good high quality paint and chrome, although the rear bumper looks original. Factory gaps. Newer seats and carpets. The rest of the interior is original and more than good enough. Fully restored in 2014 and needs nothing. Just about as good as it gets in the world of Dodge Darts, both in terms of equipment and condition. – Sold here last year for $60,500. Dart values haven’t done much in a year and there is no major work apparent, so this is on the expensive side but it still bought a gorgeous, fast and unusual piece of Mopar muscle.

Lot # S247 1969 Dodge Dart Swinger 340 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N LM23P9B309440; Bright Red, White vinyl roof, White tail stripe/Black vinyl; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $31,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $34,100. – 340/275hp, 4-speed, 3.55 Sure Grip, Rally wheels, Firestone tires, Scat Pack, bench seat, AutoMeter column-mounted tach, factory radio. – Represented as matching numbers. Spotless but not overly restored engine bay and underbody. Very good paint, chrome and interior. Fresh and gorgeous genuine Swinger 340. – Essentially flawless and done to high standards, this is a rare opportunity to acquire a real Muscle Car, comparable with the best Nova SS that is largely unrecognized and obscure, but a storming performer. The Indy bidders didn’t miss its value, as obscure as it is, and paid real retail money for it.

Lot # T207 1996 Dodge Viper GTS Coupe; S/N 1B3ER69E7TV200041; Viper Blue, White stripes/Black leather; Estimate $60,000 – $65,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $54,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $59,400. – 8 liter/450hp, 6-speed, power steering, factory CD stereo, air conditioning, chrome wheels. – Represented with 5,670 believable miles and finished in the requisite Viper GTS colors. Some forgivable detail scratches in the paint and flatness on the driver’s seat, but otherwise a fantastic collector grade early GTS. – Low-mileage early Vipers have done very well at auction over the past year. This has led Mecum to consign more and more of them, but the demand is certainly still there, as yet another very strong result demonstrates.

Lot # G145 1950 Dodge Wayfarer Roadster; S/N 37105427; Red/Red; Beige cloth top; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $24,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $26,950. – Wheel covers, whitewalls, hood ornament, amber fog lights, spotlight, fender skirts, pushbutton radio, dash clock, heater, column shift 3-speed. – Good older paint, chrome and top, but nothing is super fresh. Erratic door gaps with some chips around the edges. Fresh paint on the top frame. The interior is mostly done other than a handful of original dash and trim pieces. Represented as a cosmetic restoration but the frame has been painted and the engine bay has gotten significant work. Very handsome even if it isn’t a show car. – The sellers expectations were realistic when refusing the $21,000 high bid at Mecum Kansas City earlier this year, and patience was rewarded with a fairer offer this time around. A good result for both parties.

Lot # T134.1 1967 Dodge WM300 1 Ton Power Wagon Chassis & Cab 4×4; S/N 2161717959; Orange/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Truck restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $46,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $50,600. – Off-road tires, winch, side exhaust, wood bed. – Unrestored but mostly tidy underneath. Very good paint and chrome. Good truck quality paint with a little orange peel. Very good restored interior. A handsome cosmetic restoration but nothing to take too seriously. – Except when it came time to take it home and then all bets were off with a startling result.

Lot # F138 1960 Edsel Ranger Convertible; S/N 0U15Y702534; Silver/Red, Silver; Black vinyl top; Estimate $85,000 – $125,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $110,000. – Super Express 352/300hp, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, spotlight mirrors, dual antenna, bench seat, column shift, factory radio, dash clock, power windows. – Built on the last day of Edsel production. Done to the nines and loaded with good equipment. Excellent paint and chrome. Even gaps. Perfect top. Excellent spotless interior. Would be a highlight in just about any car collection, and king among a group of Edsels. – Hammered not sold at $100,000 and then reported sold post-block at the same result. This is lot of money for a ’60 Ford with an ugly grille and hemorrhaging chrome trim, but it’s an historic Edsel for which a generous but not unreasonable price was paid.

Lot # S241 1979 Ferrari 308 GTS Spider, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 28725; Yellow/Black, Beige leather; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000. – Power windows, air conditioning, factory tool roll, aftermarket CD stereo. – Quick touch ups on the vents behind the headlights. Body paint does not appear original. Chip on the right front fender and a large touch up on the passenger’s door. Scuff on the roof. Added Scuderia shields. Tired looking engine bay and underbody. Factory tools included. A more desirable early carbureted 308, but that’s the only thing special about this car with no service history and mediocre presentation. – Sold for $63,800 at Auctions America’s Santa Monica sale in June 2016, bid to $62,500 high bid at Mecum Monterey in 2016, to $60,000 at Dallas in November 2016, the same bid at Leake Dallas three weeks later, fell way short at Spring Auburn last year with a bid of $40,000, then sold for $48,950 at Fall Auburn last year and not sold again at a $50,000 high bid at Mecum Kansas City this year. It is long since past time to accept the judgment of the bidders and take money on the block, which this transaction represents. Not for no reason do market watchers maintain ‘You make your money when you buy’ and this 308 GTS was seriously expensive when it was bought two years ago.

Lot # S174 1967 Ferrari 330 GTC Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 9955; Engine # 9955; Red/Tan leather; Estimate $550,000 – $700,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $550,000. – Borrani wire wheels, Ansa exhaust, woodrim steering wheel, Becker Europa radio, power windows, air conditioning. – Represented with 1,000 miles on a rebuilt engine, but the engine bay needs a serious detailing. Good but not exceptional paint and chrome. Good seats and carpets. The cap on the steering wheel is cracked and cloudy. Light road wear underneath. A driver quality/event car, but not a great example by the standards of Enzo-era 12-cylinder Ferraris. – Reported bid to $600,000 at Mecum Kissimmee in 2016, $550,000 at Monterey 2016, $575,000 at Dallas in 2016, $580,000 at Mecum Kissimmee last year and to $575,000 high bid at Mecum Indy last year. Its odometer has added just 90km since January 2016 and the reported high bids are remarkably consistent, even if they were contrived. Having reached its pre-sale low estimate it is unreasonable that it did not sell.

Lot # F22 1990 Ferrari 348ts Spider, Body by Straman; S/N ZFFFG36A3L0087079; Rosso Corsa/Tan leather; Black cloth top; Original, with non-original appearance items, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000. – Speedline wheels, P Zero tires, power windows, air conditioning. – Represented as the only 348 converted by Straman, but that is made less significant by the fact that Ferrari came out with their own 348 Spider and that this VIN decodes as a 348ts, so the Straman connection is dubious. Light wear to the driver’s seat, especially on the left bolster. Clean top. A few chips and scratches on the nose and bottom lip, but mostly decent original paint. Slightly dirty engine bay. No representation of service history. Showing 3,187 miles but looks used. – Sold for $66,000 at B-J Scottsdale in 2016, then at Mecum’s Dallas auction last September for $56,100

Lot # S130 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 16701; Azzuro/Black leather; Estimate $800,000 – $900,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $660,000. – Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Ansa exhaust, Becker Mexico stereo, power windows, air conditioning. – Represented with a single repaint and as mostly original other than rebuilt suspension in 2015. Showing 17,502 miles. Lightly scratched front bumpers. Good, shiny wheels with older tires. Very good paint. Handsome, mellowed interior that shows age but charmingly so. With everything underneath pretty much all original, it would be an even more compelling car with original paint. – Reported sold for $770,000 in a post-block transaction after being bid to $660,000 at Mecum Kissimmee in 2016 where its odometer showed 17,361 miles against the 17,502 seen today. 141 miles is not enough to compensate for this kind of hit, even though the Daytona market today is not what it was even 16 months ago and the seller could have given this offer serious consideration. It may take a few more trips across the block or ads in FML to reach the conclusion that this is a realistic offer, and that the 2016 transaction was expensive even for this Daytona’s originality and condition.

Lot # S103 2012 Ferrari 458 Italia Coupe, Body by Scaglietti; S/N ZFF67NFA5C0185896; Black/Black; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $185,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $203,500. – Red calipers, Michelin Pilot Super Sport tires, carbon fiber engine cover, wing, diffuser and interior trim, front end lift, carbon brakes, backup camera, car cover, books, tools, battery tender, tire inflator. – Represented with 566 miles, like new, and finished in a color that’s not red. Described as having $102,748 in options on top of an MSRP over $200,000. – This is a menacing and purposeful automobile in black and its result here is depreciation only on the order of 35% from new, a realistic compromise between the startling options list and low miles.

Lot # S265 2013 Ferrari 458 Spider, Body by Scaglietti; S/N ZFF68NHA0D0189415; Red/Black; Unrestored original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $110,000. – Manettino steering wheel, matte grey alloy wheels, SF shields, air conditioning – Rebuilt flood damaged title with no mileage or other history represented. Likely a Hurricane Harvey victim. Otherwise looks like the five year old Ferrari that it is. – It takes a confident buyer with a good relationship with an experienced Ferrari shop to take on a risk like this, even for a car potentially worth a quarter-million dollars. That buyer was not in attendance in Indy.

Lot # S107 2002 Ferrari 575M Maranello Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFBV55A220129483; Silver/Brown, Blue leather; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $160,000. – 6-speed, red calipers, luggage, roll bar, Daytona-style seats. SF shields, leather-covered roll bar. – The wheels are dirty but look like they would clean up fine. Otherwise it looks like a new car despite its 17,845 miles, and what really sets it apart is the 6-speed. – Hammered not sold at a $220,000 high bid at Mecum Los Angeles in February of this year, the offer here gives short shrift to the highly desirable 6-speed and was probably declined with little if any consideration. The LA bid is more realistic.

Lot # S103.1 2011 Ferrari 599 GTO Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFF70RCA4B0177209; Black/Cognac leather; Not evaluated; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $510,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $561,000. – — A late addition, stated to have 1,900 miles. –

Lot # S102 2014 Ferrari F12berlinetta Coupe, Body by Scaglietti; S/N ZFF74UFA7E0202496; Rosso Corsa/Black leather, Alcantara; Estimate $275,000 – $325,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $280,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $308,000. – Red calipers, P Zero tires, carbon fiber trim everywhere, carbon brakes, Manettino steering wheel – Represented with 1,260 miles and like new with a $323,745 MSRP and $162,626 in options. – That’s $486,371 in total, and highly unlikely there was any discount for cash or being a regular customer, making this a $178,371 discount for the 1,260 miles: $141.56/mile which makes $0.50/mile for running over the limit on a low mileage lease look pretty reasonable. This is an impressive Ferrari, even for this price.

Lot # S101 2017 Ferrari F12tdf Berlinetta, Body by Scaglietti; S/N ZFF81BFA7H0220566; Rosso Corsa, Black stripe/Black; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,050,000. – Signed by Sebastian Vettel. Carbon brakes with red calipers, carbon Scuderia shields, tinted glass. – Just 1,157 miles and like new, as it should be. – Hammered not sold at an even $1M at Mecum’s Las Vegas auction in November, then crossed the block at Kissimmee at the beginning of this year with a reported $1.1 million bid. Based on this history it seems to be on the Mecum “headline car” program and we can look forward to seeing it in Monterey.

Lot # S106 2006 Ferrari F430 Spider Convertible, Body by Scaglietti; S/N ZFFEW59A760151053; Rosso Corsa/Beige leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $200,000 – $225,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Post-block sale at $180,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $198,000. – Red calipers, Potenza tires, power Daytona-style seats, paddle shift, carbon fiber interior trim, SF shields, books, keys, manettino steering wheel. – Just 167 miles and essentially a new car, which is a bit unusual for a model like a standard F430 Spider that tended to get driven. – Bid to $150,000 on the block, closed later with this result bringing a premium on the order of 50% for the low miles and originality.

Lot # T150.1 1971 Ford Bronco Wagon 4×4; S/N U15GLL24800; White, Black, Orange, Blue/White vinyl; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $92,000. – 302/205hp, automatic, Stroppe Baja Bronco with Kumho tires, factory radio, rear-mounted spare, Simpson lap belts, fender flares, padded roll bar, trailer hitch, power steering, Deluxe Marti report. – First year Stroppe Baja, one of 100 built for 1971. There is some road wear underneath but it is dry and rust free. Partially repainted. Sound mostly original interior with reasonable wear and tear for the age appropriate to the 42,012 miles showing on the odometer. Dull brightwork. An unrestored California Stroppe Baja Bronco, which is really something special even if it fairly aged. – Mecum has sold restored Stroppe Bajas for well over six figures, including one in Kissimmee this year for $143,000. In that context, neither the high bid nor the consignor’s refusal of it on this unrestored example seem crazy.

Lot # F190 1977 Ford Bronco Wagon 4×4; S/N U15GLY51092; Cinnamon, White/Tan vinyl with houndstooth cloth inserts; Estimate $65,000 – $75,000; Truck restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $77,000. – 302, automatic, wheel covers, power steering, power brakes, factory air conditioning, bucket seats, floor shift, factory radio. – Some microblisters on the hood and a chip on the right front fender. Most of the paint is shiny and nice, but the white top is older and has chips around the bottom edges above the windshield. The doors don’t fit flush with the body. Very clean and fully restored underneath. Some dings and scratches on the body side trim. Paint chipping off the steel wheels. Good interior with newer upholstery, but everything else is original. Body-off restored and a correct final year first gen Bronco, but done to not much better than average truck standards. This thing is worth enough these days to warrant some more thorough treatment, – This final year first gen Bronco hammered not sold at a $59,000 high bid at Mecum Dallas in September of last year. At the time, we called the consignor’s expectations ahead of the curve. Now, the market seems to have caught up and then some with this massive price for a very good but imperfect example.

Lot # G173.1 1994 Ford F-150 SVT Lightning Pickup; S/N 1FTDF15RXRLB10742; Black/Gray cloth; Unrestored original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $7,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $8,250. – 351/240hp, automatic, Mastercraft tires, Comp Cams camshaft, cowl induction hood, power windows, air conditioning, Pioneer CD stereo. – The bed is a little beat up and dull. The original paint is on the dull side as well, and there are a few chips in the nose. Lots of oxidation underneath. A few scratches on the wheels. Some odd scratches on the steering wheel but mostly very well kept interior. Inherently interesting as a first gen Lightning and an early part of SVT history, but this one looks to have been ridden hard and put up wet, plus no mileage represented. It’s not a collector-grade example. – This is fair money for a presentable but mediocre early Lightning, which curiously hasn’t seen the same kind of growth in interest as other hot ’90s trucks like the GMC Syclone or Chevy 454 SS. This one is a Home Depot truck and brought an appropriate price, then crossed the block on Sunday as U155 where it sold for an even more reasonable $7,150.

Lot # S110 1966 Ford Fairlane 500 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 6A43R249561; Wimbledon White/Black vinyl; Estimate $275,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $250,000. – 427/425hp, dual quads, 4-speed, hub caps, blackwall tires, 3.89 Traction-Lok, bench seat, floor shift, radio delete. – Represented as 6,107 miles from new and the original drivetrain but with no period history at all. Spotless engine bay and underbody. Decent older paint. Very good fully restored interior. AACA Senior award in 2002. Not done yesterday, but a genuine R-Code with no major needs. – Without some recognized hot shoe having pressed its accelerator to the firewall in racing when it was new this R-Code Fairlane is more of a curiosity than an historical object and the amount offered for it here, even as one of 57 built, should have been sufficient to see it clear the block with a new owner.

Lot # T123 1966 Ford Fairlane GTA 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 6A40S202507; Butternut Yellow/Black vinyl; Estimate $60,000 – $70,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $43,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $47,300. – 390/335hp, automatic, Magnum 500 wheels, red line tires, dual mirrors, floor shift, bucket seats, factory radio. – Light use underneath. The grille trim is a little dull. Good older paint with some orange peel and a small scuff on the hood. Good interior that is mostly restored other than some worn switchgear and light pitting on the steering wheel. A basic but attractive older restoration with plenty of eyeball for what it is. – Indy is the place to sell this GTA: $37,100 in 2010, $32,400 in 2015 and this generous result today. All-in, this is nearly 50% more than it brought just three years ago and it should be one very happy consignor as a result.

Lot # F121 1963 Ford Galaxie 500 Sunliner Convertible; S/N 3U65R183043; Viking Blue/Blue vinyl; Blue vinyl top; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $135,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $148,500. – 427/410hp, 4-barrel, 4-speed, wheel covers, Silvertown blackwalls, floor shift, factory radio, column-mounted tach. – Totally unrestored but tidy and maintained engine bay and underbody. A little bit of oxidation underneath but nothing bad. Dull but presentable original paint and chrome. Excellent tight-fitting original top. Very good original interior. A genuine R-Code convertible with just the right amount of patina. Definitely charming as it sits, and way too good to restore. – Sold for $115,500 in Kissimmee this year and turned here for a healthy premium that validates some bottom-feeders’ search through the consignments of big auctions for the cars others overlook. It can be done, but it more often than not results in misjudging bidders’ willingness to pay more than before. No matter, this is a whopping great Galaxie Sunliner and it is not unreasonably priced.

Lot # T136 1961 Ford Galaxie Sunliner Convertible; S/N 1G55Z181371; Aquamarine/Light Blue vinyl; White vinyl top; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $66,000. – 390/401hp three 2-barrels, column shift 3-speed, hub caps, whitewalls, Z-Code engine, pushbutton radio, dash clock. – Tidy and maintained original engine bay with newer hoses and wires. Faded but sound original paint and top. Freshly painted steel wheels and newer tires. Very good mostly original interior. The 19,469 miles on the odometer are represented as original, and it’s a believable claim. Never restored because it never needed to be, and still too good to do so. Rarely seen in any condition, and has a lot of eyeball in these colors. – Sold for $110,000 at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale in 2012 and for $88,000 at RM Sotheby’s Arizona in 2017, a trend that is continued with this result. The tide is going out under this Sunliner.

Lot # S122 2006 Ford GT Coupe; S/N 1FAFP90S26Y401996; Black/Black; Estimate $350,000 – $400,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $340,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $374,000. – BBS wheels, painted calipers. – One of 55 built with stripe delete that year. Just 2.3 miles, which even for a GT is excessively low. Almost more interesting for its lack of stripes, even though that technically makes it worth less. – The effect of the ‘new’ Ford GT on the values of the ‘old new’ Ford GT isn’t clear, but prices have remained high while the mileage has remained low. This one, which at this point is destined for a life of sitting still, sold for an appropriately strong price that puts great weight and dollars on its odometer reading.

Lot # S43 1965 Ford Mustang 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 5R07A128570; Red/Black vinyl; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $25,000. – 289/225hp, 4-speed, Pony interior, air conditioning, GT appearance package added, power steering. – Paint looks excellent other than a handful of blemishes on the hood and front fenders. The brightwork looks very good, with slight pitting on the side quarter windows. Panel fit and gaps are very good with the exception of the trunk lid. The interior looks new and has no signs of wear. The engine compartment is very well restored and looks better than new. Underneath looks just as clean as the rest of the car. Almost a show car. – Hammered not sold at a $32,000 high bid at Mecum Houston six weeks ago. Even this high bid was fair, so the Houston bid really was an opportunity missed.

Lot # F257 1973 Ford Mustang Convertible; S/N 3F03H159850; White, Black/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $27,000. – 351/177hp, automatic, tilt steering column, power steering, power brakes, power windows, air conditioning, power top, alloy wheels, AM/FM radio, Firestone Wide Oval tires. – The brightwork looks excellent. The wheel trim has a few very small dings. The paint looks very good, although some more prep work before spraying would have helped. Panel fit is good. The interior looks very good, but the steering wheel shows a little wear and the console lid is original. The engine bay is very clean with small signs of use. Fresh undercoating underneath. This is a very well restored car for a ’73 Mustang, done to appropriate standards for what it is. – This car sold for $29,700 at Auburn Fall in 2016 then brought $42,900 at Mecum Kissimmee last year, which was an excessive price that is not likely to be repeated any time soon. The reported high bid here was closer to the car’s actual value with a hammer bid identical to 2016’s.

Lot # W59 1990 Ford Mustang ASC McLaren Convertible; S/N 1FACP40E7LF132918; Blue/Blue; Dark Blue cloth top; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $27,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $29,700. – 5.0/302hp, automatic, ASC McLaren wheels, Goodyear tires, radar detector, remote entry, power windows, air conditioning. – Very rare, very late ASC McLaren with 3,239 miles and like new presentation. With Fox-Bodies well on their way up, special models like these with low odometer readings are going to be what gets collectors’ attention most. – Other, less rare low-mileage Fox-body Mustangs have sold for more at auction in recent months, so this high price makes more sense than it might seem at first glance.

Lot # S175 1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 SportsRoof; S/N 0F02G169601; Medium Blue Metallic, Black/Black vinyl; Estimate $80,000 – $95,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $78,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $85,800. – 302/300hp, 4-speed, Magnum wheels, tinted glass, tachometer, intermittent wipers, power brakes, power steering, rear window slats, spoilers, Hurst T-handle shifter. – The paint looks good other than some chips at the panel edges, some of which have been touched up. There are quite a few small scratches and some cracking on the roof. The brightwork looks very good, but the panel fit could have used a little more attention. The interior looks excellent and is showing no wear. The engine compartment looks good with some signs of use around the valve covers and intake. Underneath is clean with a little surface rust showing on the fuel lines and exhaust. An older restoration holding up quite well but nonetheless still showing some age. – Auctions America offered this Boss 302 in 2016 at Ft. Lauderdale where it was reported bid to $50,000 without selling. Five months later it showed up at Fall Auburn and was sold for $61,600 in essentially the same condition as it appeared here and showing just 12 fewer miles than the 3,479 it displays today. It was a good deal then. It isn’t today, but isn’t silly money, either.

Lot # F146 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 429 SportsRoof; S/N 9F02Z195381; Wimbledon White/Black vinyl; Estimate $275,000 – $325,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $230,000. – 429/375hp, 4-speed, Magnum 500 wheels, Polyglas GT tires, front spoiler, hood scoop, 3.91 Traction-Lok, power steering, power brakes, Philco radio. – Represented as matching numbers with single repaint and otherwise original. The paint is older and a little tired. Very tidy underneath. Clean wheels. Very good original interior. Well-kept and never restored because it never needed to be and still shouldn’t be. – Sold by Auctions America at Ft. Lauderdale four years ago for $209,000. The only movement in the Boss Nine market since then is sideways and this was a reasonable bid for a very good, mostly original, example.

Lot # G166 1978 Ford Mustang II Hatchback Coupe; S/N 8F03Z224346; Silver, Red stripes/Red; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $8,250 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $9,075. – 171/90hp V6, 4-speed, Kumho tires, T-tops, hood scoop, cassette stereo. – Represented with new exhaust, tires, paint, gas tank, fuel pump and starter. Two-owner car. Fairly rough but cleaned up engine bay. Shiny newer paint with a few masking errors in the stripes and a scratch on the hood. A few small dents in the left side of the body. Some painted over chips on the driver’s door. Tidy underbody. Small rip in the driver’s seat but mostly good interior. A mediocre enthusiast restoration, but by Mustang II standards it’s a beauty queen. – It may be a four-figure price, but this is pretty much top dollar for one of these cars.

Lot # T198 1969 Ford Mustang Mach 1 SportsRoof; S/N 9F02R180904; Silver Jade, Black hood/Black vinyl; Estimate $65,000 – $75,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $45,000. – 428/335hp, automatic, shaker hood, hood pins, Wide Oval tires, power steering, power brakes, console, Philco radio, Marti report. – Very good paint and chrome. Factory gaps. Nearly spotless underneath. Mostly original interior but it’s very good and never really needed to be restored. Restored to high standards and finished in attractive colors. – This Mach 1 would have been a realistic buy at $60,000 and this bid is less than disappointing. Or, it’s showing us a new direction in Mustang, and specifically Mach 1, values.

Lot # T110 1970 Ford Mustang Mach 1 SportsRoof; S/N 0T05M129966; Calypso Coral, Black stripe/Black; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $48,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $52,800. – 351/300hp, 4-speed, spoilers, added air conditioning. – The paint looks very good with next to no blemishes. The brightwork looks good with some scratches around the windows and chips in the front bumper. The panel gaps are a little uneven on the doors. The interior is very good and fresh without discernable wear. The engine compartment is very clean but not overly restored. Underneath has been freshly undercoated. A good Mach 1 with a very good but not immaculate restoration ready to go out and enjoy. – This Mach 1 brought $34,100 at Auburn Fall eight months ago. The result here is a major turnaround, but colors like Calypso Coral can have that effect when the stars and planets are aligned and this was an opportunity seized by an astute seller who recognized this Mach 1’s potential and took advantage of it.

Lot # F208 1971 Ford Mustang Mach 1 SportsRoof; S/N 1F05J154989; Black, Silver hood/Red, Black vinyl; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $90,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $99,000. – 429/375hp SCJ-R engine, 4-speed, Magnum 500 wheels, Wide Oval tires, Hurst T-handle shifter, factory 8-track stereo, dash clock, Drag Pack, 3.91 Traction-Lok, power steering, power brakes, Elite Marti report. – Clean, fully restored but not show quality engine bay. Very good fresh paint and chrome. Mostly restored interior but the steering wheel, dash top and original windshield are a bit dull. Restoration finished just last year and a very desirably equipped car, but not a totally thorough job. – The bidders paid more attention to the underlying Mustang than to the somewhat spotty details overlooked (or rushed) in completing the restoration. The equipment list is impressive, as is the price, keeping in mind this is the inline valve 429, not the ‘semi-hemi’ Boss 429.

Lot # T147 1988 Ford Mustang Saleen Convertible; S/N 1FABP44EJF241671; Black, Gray/Gray cloth; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $28,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $31,350. – 5.0/225hp, 5-speed, Racecraft suspension, Monroe shocks, strut tower brakes, American Racing alloy wheels, Momo steering wheel, Hurst shifter, Pioneer cassette stereo. – Showing 14,208 believable miles. Light detail scratches in the paint and a few chips and scratches on the nose, but mostly good original paint. Very clean underneath. Excellent tight-fitting original top and nearly like-new interior. A pampered early Saleen that was never driven hard like so many of these were. – Low-mileage Fox-bodies have done particularly well at auction this year, and this was no exception. While not exactly like new, the fact that it’s a relatively rare and special Saleen with its handling and cosmetic upgrades makes the price understandable.

Lot # F239 1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N D7FH152060; Willow Green, White hardtop/Green, White; Estimate $45,000 – $60,000; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $24,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $26,400. – 312/245hp, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, porthole hardtop, Town and Country radio, alternator, tinted windshield. – Originally ordered by an American diplomat in Venezuela, where the instruments were switched out for metric ones. Tired and lightly crazed but presentable paint. Rough but complete and maintained engine bay. The hardtop looks to have been repainted, but the headliner is original and tired. Good, lightly worn interior. Old tires. Paint is chipping off the wheels. This car must have stuck out like crazy in Maracaibo, and the metric instruments make for a neat distinguishing feature, but this is otherwise a tired old T-Bird that is ready for restoration. – A project car bought for project car money. The new owner is already into this car for a fairly low price, making the lengthy restoration in needs a bit less daunting, and when it’s finished the metric instruments will make for a good conversation starter.

Lot # S219 1970 Ford Torino GT Convertible; S/N 0H37J167506; White, Yellow/Burgundy vinyl; White vinyl top; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $67,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $74,250. – 429/375hp Cobra Jet, automatic, Magnum 500 wheels, red line tires, shaker hood, power steering, power brakes, factory air conditioning, power windows, factory AM/FM radio, Elite Marti report documented. – Lightly scratched original chrome. Touch ups on the left front fender. Chips around the edges of the doors. Light discoloration to the top. Very good original interior. Maintained and recently detailed but not totally restored engine bay. Rare equipment and mostly preserved condition. – Offered at Russo and Steele in Scottsdale in 2015 where it was reported bid to $76,000, this is a quality Torino GT (aside from the automatic) that brought an impressive price for its inline valve cooking 429, not the exotic Mustang Semi-Hemi.

Lot # F114.1 2002 Honda S2000 Convertible; S/N JHMAP11492T006306; Formula Red/Black; Black top; Estimate $65,000 – $75,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $50,000. – Potenza tires, air conditioning. – Represented with just 505 miles. Like new from top to bottom and looks like it could be on the showroom floor back in 2002. The S2000 is a sure future collectible and prices for them are already strong. This is an ideal delivery model car to put into a collection. – Mecum sold an 885-mile S2000 in Kissimmee this year for an eye-popping sum of $71,500, so the presale estimate on this red 505-mile one didn’t seem all that outrageous. Then again, this was barely a $30,000 car when new and other good examples with more realistic mileage aren’t trading at anywhere near this number. It is one of the most satisfying cars on the road and deserves to have many more miles put on it.

Lot # T111.1 1975 International 1110 Pickup 4×4; S/N E0330EHB16389; White, Red/Red vinyl; Truck restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $26,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $28,600. – 345/158hp, 4-speed, American Racing wheels, factory air conditioning, factory radio. – Very good paint. Mostly straight bed. Even gaps. Lightly run but mostly gone through engine bay. Older exhaust but tidy underbody. Slightly tired original gauges. Very good newer interior otherwise. A very attractive but truck quality job of a very rare full-size International from the last year they made them. – Internationals were serious working trucks, prone to be run into the ground on farms and ranches, especially the 4x4s, an expensive option that wasn’t ordered for show as it so often is today. Very few survive, and even fewer are rewarded for their survival by getting the restoration treatment this one has had. It’s worth what the Indy buyers said.

Lot # S215 1969 Jaguar XKE SII Roadster; S/N 1R9390; Black/Black; Black cloth top; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $95,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $104,500. – Chrome centerlock wire wheels, Moto-Lita steering wheel, Pioneer CD stereo, BMIHT Certificate. – Lightly scratched front bumper, the gaskets for which are a little wavy. Same on the rear bumper. Very good paint on a straight body. Very good replacement top. Some wear and dirt on the underbody and suspension bits but it has received restoration work and the engine bay is mostly tidy. Slightly cloudy original gauges and the seats are lightly wrinkled, but the interior is mostly good. Better than driver quality and an attractive all black car, but quite a way off from perfect. – You wouldn’t know if from looking at this price, though. E-Type buyers had slim pickings in Indy (just two examples to choose from), but six figures for this car was generous and should leave the seller a very happy camper. The buyer may wake up on Sunday with buyer’s regret.

Lot # S55.1 1970 Jaguar XKE SII Coupe; S/N 1R25784; Black/Black leather; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000. – Centerlock wire wheels, Series I headlights, Koni shocks, aftermarket exhaust and radiator, factory radio. – This car has a stop and go history. Put away from 1975-82, then again from 1991-06. It’s had some restoration work intermittently, including mechanical sorting about 10 years ago and covered headlights added in the 1980s, which do look good but are of course incorrect. The paint and chrome are original and on the tired side but presentable. Chips at the back of the hood. The doors are tough to open and don’t shut flush with the body. Significant wrinkling to the seats and some faded switchgear but mostly sound original interior. Tidy underneath, but unrestored. An honestly presented driver quality SII. – Jaguar purists would be put off by this car with some of its incorrect and aftermarket bits as well as its inconsistencies, but for an enthusiast who wants to get into an XKE for driving and enjoying at a reasonable price, this was a pretty solid value.

Lot # T66 1984 Jeep CJ-7 Utility Vehicle 4×4; S/N 1JCCM87E0ET002269; Bronze, Orange graphics/Tan vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,150. – Goodyear Wrangler tires, power steering, power brakes, console, factory radio, rear-mounted spare. – Unrestored but clean and maintained underneath. Chips on the front and several scratches on the hood. Several chips in the hardtop. Slightly wavy body sides and a handful of shallow dents in the right rear. Very good original interior. A charming, attention-grabbing vintage Renegade, but up close it reveals itself to be pretty much just a driver. – Jeeps defy logic, not least to old guys like me who drove them through the fields of eastern Long Island long before I could even attempt to drive on the rural roads. This is a characteristic result and a passel of fun for the money driving it on weekends with grandkids and wet dogs. It’s hard to beat that for this price.

Lot # W143 1974 Jensen Interceptor III Coupe; S/N 22109302; Green/Green, Beige leather; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $38,500. – 440/230hp, automatic, narrow whitewalls, Sony CD stereo, power windows, air conditioning, dash clock, aftermarket speakers in the doors. – Represented with recent tune up. Decent older paint with rub through at the front of the hood and some cracks behind it. Well-kept but original interior with some light wear to the seats and slightly dull switchgear. Slightly dull bumpers. Some overspray on the rear suspension and spare tire. Mostly tidy underneath otherwise. This isn’t a show car, but it’s solid and attractive, and more than good enough to enjoy driving and getting lots of attention. – The earlier Interceptors are a lot faster and quite a bit more valuable, but any Interceptor in serviceable condition is a real find. This one isn’t missing anything and isn’t rusty, and the Indy bidders recognized its strengths with a strong but fair number.

Lot # S220 1954 Kaiser-Darrin 161 Roadster; S/N 161001133; Black/Maroon vinyl; Burgundy cloth top; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $106,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $116,600. – Wire wheel covers, whitewalls, wind wings. – Thoroughly and correctly restored underneath. Very good paint and chrome. Very good and straight new top. The trademark pocket doors on these cars are cool but they rarely work very well. On this car, though, they open and shut easily with a pleasing smoothness. The interior has also been fully restored to very high standards. Barely over 400 of these cars were built, and this has to be one of the very best. – Beautifully done and presented, this Kaiser-Darrin is a standout example that could have brought considerably more without being expensive. The new owner may not appreciate its 90hp and sedan chassis but will proudly show its exceptional condition.

Lot # S81 1997 Land Rover Defender 90 Sport Utility Vehicle 4×4; S/N SALDV3243VA124925; Slate Grey, White roof/Gray; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $140,000. – Alloy wheels, All Terrain T/A tires, step plates, roof rack, rear-mounted spare, Warn winch, roof lights. – Very rare final year North American Spec model. Represented with 13,800 believable miles. Two small dents in the passenger’s door. Very good paint. Very good interior. Tidy with light road wear underneath. Desirable configuration, extra goodies like the roof rack and lights, and low mileage. A good mix and solid presentation for a collectible NAS Defender 90. – North American Spec (NAS) Defenders are fairly rare and they can be shockingly expensive. Something is only worth as much as what someone will pay for it, and apparently plenty of people are willing to pay six figures for one of these despite it being slow and unreliable. Even for a good low-mileage example like this, though, 140 grand is a huge offer and should have been more than enough to see it off to a new home.

Lot # G171 1975 Land Rover Series III 88 Soft Top 4×4; S/N 90408063A; Green/Tan; Tan cloth top; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $15,000. – Fog lights, tow hitch, overdrive, Blaupunkt cassette stereo, diesel engine. – Dull paint and exterior plastic. Light rust on the fasteners for the door hinges. Shiny, freshly painted steel wheels. No major rust underneath but it’s a little dirty. Good newer top. Mostly original interior with newer seats. Not restored, but not totally original either, so it looks ready for the kind of off-road antics it was meant for. – Not sold at a $15,000 high bid at Kissimmee in 2016 and at $12,000 there this year. Although bidders have spoken twice now, 15 grand will normally buy you a worse classic Land Rover than this one, so holding out is understandable. The metric instruments and smokey diesel engine suggest it spent some time in Latin America and that it’s time for the owner either to take a reasonable offer like this or begin to spend even more money on a restoration.

Lot # W257 1978 Lincoln Continental Mk V Diamond Jubilee Coupe; S/N 8Y89A831889; Champagne Gold/Gold cloth; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $27,500. – 400/166hp, automatic, narrow whitewalls, sunroof, vinyl roof, console, Cartier dash clock, power seats, tinted glass. – Showing 2,671 believable miles. Lots of light little scratches brushed across the passenger’s door. Otherwise good original paint. Good, straight, supple roof vinyl. Good, like new interior. Light oxidation underneath. Not quite a showroom fresh mothballed car, but close. – Kruse sold this car in 2007 for $24,200 and today’s result can be viewed either as successful (no depreciation in 11 years) or unsuccessful (no appreciation in 11 years.) It is primarily valued for its low miles, but it also retains an undeniable air of elegance and luxury.

Lot # G141 1984 Mazda RX-7 Coupe; S/N JM1FB3318E0821526; White/Red cloth; Unrestored original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $3,900 plus commission of 12.82%; Final Price $4,400. – Aftermarket alloy wheels, body kit, sunroof, air conditioning, Kenwood CD stereo. – Represented with new tires, radiator, starter, belts and hoses plus a rebuilt carburetor. The engine bay is pretty grimy. The body kit was somewhat crudely tacked on. Lots of paint cracking on the nose. Lots of oxidation on the rear brake drums and underbody. The seats are very faded but the interior is sound. A driver quality, mostly unmolested first gen RX7. – The first gen RX-7 was a significant car, but Mazda sold approaching half a million of them and condition ranges from barely drivable hulks to low-mile garage queens to track and drift cars. This one is pretty much average and the price seems cheap, but it’s about what the car is worth and is about what was paid for it at Mecum’s winter Kansas City auction in December, $4,750.

Lot # T255 1983 Mercury Capri Hatchback; S/N 1MEBP79FXDF616777; Burgundy/Black vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $12,000. – 5.0/175hp, 5-speed, alloy wheels, Michelin TRX tires, hood scoop, AM/FM/cassette stereo. – Both window handles are off and on the floor. Very good fresh paint and exterior bits. Extensive mechanical work but solid underneath regardless. Very light wear to the seats and faded gauges, but mostly good inside. Capris are a very rare sight compared to the equivalent Mustang, so seeing one this good and with a 5-speed to boot is a real treat. – The Capris may be a rarer sight than the equivalent Mustang, but that means that they are also more obscure and the target audience for them is smaller. This one got a fair amount of attention, but to expect much more than the reported high bid doesn’t seem all that reasonable.

Lot # F80 1966 Mercury Comet Cyclone GT Convertible Pace Car; S/N 6H28S627186; Red/Ivory vinyl; White top; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000. – 390/335hp, automatic, Pace car edition with Magnum 500 wheels, Radial T/A tires, boot cover, bucket seats, floor shift, dash-mounted tach, factory radio. – One of 100 Pace cars built. Some scratches and cracks on the hood but mostly good shiny paint. Very good recent chrome. Very good newer seats, door panels and carpets. The dash and gauges are original. Restored underneath with fresh undercoating. Redone recently to good enough but not excessive standards, and the pace car features are icing on the cake, especially since it’s from back when Pace Cars just had tasteful lettering rather than the garish graphics found on later Corvettes. – Without considering no-sale appearances, this Cyclone sold for $23,850 at Mecum Des Moines in July 2012, then $21,200 at Mecum Dallas two months later. It’s a choice piece and a bit obscure but done to high standards and attractively liveried and equipped. There is no quibble with the price it brought.

Lot # U52 1961 Mercury Monterey Convertible; S/N 1E65X532335; Black/Red; Black vinyl top; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $15,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $16,500. – 390/300hp, automatic, narrow whitewalls, bench seat, column shift, factory radio. – The paint is decent with lots of chips and scratches as well as a few spots where rust is bubbling up. The brightwork is original and has a lot of blemishes as well. The gaps are uneven. The interior looks original. The seat shows some discoloration and there are cracks in the dash. The engine compartment looks mostly original and showing a lot of grime and rust except that it is described as a 390/300hp engine and the VIN is coded for a 352/200hp 2-barrel. The valve covers and air cleaner look like they were painted a long time ago. The underbody looks to be freshly undercoated. It is a just barely a presentable cruiser or a fairly straightforward project. – With the swapped engine spending much time and money on restoring this Monterey is probably ill-advised. It was bid to $11,000 eight months ago at Mecum’s Louisville sale and the seller did very well by waiting to bring it to Indy where it brought this generous price.

Lot # W198 1969 MG MGC Roadster; S/N GCN1U6036G; Primrose Yellow, Black hardtop/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $21,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $23,650. – Centerlock wire wheels, Michelin XZX tires, hardtop, banjo steering wheel, Kenwood cassette stereo. – Fully restored, lightly run engine bay. Very good but not show quality paint. Big cracks in the hardtop side window. Slightly dull but presentable steering wheel, dash and switchgear. Newer seats and carpets. A solid restoration finished in 2003 to appropriate standards for the time and only showing a little age. – A major failure when it was new, the MGC now commands a healthy premium over the B on which it is based thanks to its rarity and lots of extra power. This is a fair price for one in this condition. The hardtop is a bit of a bonus, although the side windows will need to be replaced.

Lot # G193 1976 MG Midget Mk IV Roadster; S/N GAN6UG183996G; Red, Black/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Enthusiast restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $6,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $6,600. – Trim rings, boot cover, luggage rack, aftermarket cassette stereo. – The hood won’t open and the switch for the defroster is missing. Recent but average quality respray with poor prep on the hood as well as some black overspray on it. There is also a small dent on the left front fender. Driver quality interior with dirty, flat seats and dull switchgear. Decent underneath. A driver quality rubber bumper Midget that looks a lot better than it is just thanks to the freshness of the paint. – Still a lot of fun per dollar, but this was a few bids too expensive for a Midget with this many flaws.

Lot # G102.1 1951 MG TD Roadster; S/N TD4032EXLU; Bronze/Brown vinyl; White vinyl top; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $9,750 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $10,725. – Hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, dual wing mirrors, fog lights, rear-mounted spare. – Grimy engine bay and the engine itself is painted incorrect colors. Very dull old paint and brightwork. Lots of chips on the body. Dull gauges. Decent seat. Newer top but really rough top frame. A running project car. Not a complete dog, but you would feel a little self-conscious driving it, and you probably wouldn’t feel confident about making it home. – Better TDs can probably be bought for less than this, but this is still a fair number for both parties and it bought what will be a rewarding, fun project for the new owner.

Lot # W105 1991 Mitsubishi Delica Star Van; S/N P25W0607874; Blue, White/Gray; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $9,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $9,900. – RHD. 2476cc diesel, 5-speed, all-wheel drive, gigantic front bumper guard, alloy wheels, Dunlop tires, CD stereo. – Very good paint other than some light scratches on the driver’s door. Some light oxidation underneath. Very good interior. A solid example represented to have 125,497 km from new – You could have put together a respectable JDM collection with some of the offerings in Indy this year and done it for not much money, either. This adorable mid-engine diesel van, which has something of a cult following in cities like Portland, would be a neat people carrier for the hipster with a family. Given the equipment and mileage, this was a fair price compared to what others sell for but still a lot of exclusivity per dollar. The Roo-bar front end, though, is a bit much.

Lot # G200.1 1969 Nissan Patrol Sport Utility Vehicle 4×4; S/N L6021085; Orange, White roof/Black vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $9,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $9,900. – Rear-mounted spare. – Rare US model. Really rough paint with lots of cracks and masking errors. Severely dried out window gaskets. Surface rust underneath. Really tired engine bay and rough interior. Replacement floors welded in. Just a pretty ratty thing overall. – While rarer than an FJ40, the Nissan Patrol doesn’t tend to command a very high price. That, combined with the fact that it doesn’t have anywhere near the following of the Toyota means that many examples are in rough and rusty shape like this one. It’s a tired project that will eat up more than it will ever be worth to get it right again.

Lot # W196 1983 Oldsmobile Cutlass Hurst Coupe; S/N 1G3AK4798DM433879; Black, Gray, Red graphics/Gray cloth; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $19,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $20,900. – 307/180hp, automatic, Eagle ST tires, rear spoiler, power windows, Kenwood cassette stereo. – Showing 41,408 believable miles. Represented with original tires, which all look great. Very good blemish-free original paint. Tidy underneath. Like new interior. Presents like a delivery mile time warp car, but because it’s actually been driven over the years, you can be confident that everything actually works. – Despite the fact that you could actually get out and drive this car without feeling guilty, it didn’t command a crazy-high premium that a delivery-mile example in the same condition might bring. And given how strong 1980s domestic cars have been in general at auction so far in 2018, this was a fairly sound value for an example in such good condition.

Lot # F128 1955 Oldsmobile Super 88 4-Dr. Hardtop Holiday; S/N 558M65320; Green, Beige/Beige leather, Green cloth; Estimate $45,000 – $65,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $27,000. – 324/202hp, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, hood ornament, pushbutton radio, dash clock, heater, power steering, power brakes. – Represented with new tires, shocks and exhaust. Unrestored but recently cleaned up engine bay. Sound original chrome. The beige parts of the paint aside from the hood are newer, but the rest of the paint is original and remarkably good. The original interior is fantastic. It shows 17,692 miles and looks like it. For someone to pamper and save a sedan is pretty unusual, and for a car to have held up this well in rust-prone Indiana (where it has been since at least 1980) is amazing. It also has recent mechanical work to boot. – Despite its 4-door configuration and the mundane 324/202hp engine this is a sweet old car with exceptional preservation and it does deserve a higher price, even if not even close to as much as the pre-sale low estimate. It has bragging rights at a $30,000 bid.

Lot # T205 1932 Packard Light 8 Coupe Roadster; S/N 5591009; Paquin Green, Olive/Brown leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $200,000 – $215,000; Recent restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $195,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $214,500. – Wire wheels with hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemount spares, Goddess of Speed mascot, rumble seat, golf bag door, Waltham dash clock. – Very good fresh paint and brightwork. Very good, tight newer top. Spotless underneath. Slight discoloration on the rear tires. The speedometer and clock are original and slightly faded, but the rest of the gauges are replacements. The rest of the interior is mostly good but there are a few flaws in the door trim. Represented as a recent restoration and a very attractive car, but in the details it’s just not up to the kind of standards that would win it a major show trophy. – This is an excellent car, and we’ve seen Light 8 Coupe Roadsters bring more than this in not much if any better condition. It’s a quality, beautiful Packard with succulent coachwork at a realistic price.

Lot # S108.1 1933 Pierce-Arrow Model 836 Sport Coupe; S/N 2075114; Yellow, Light Yellow, vinyl roof/Tan leather; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $182,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $200,750. – Wire wheels with hub caps and trim rings, wide whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemount spares with mirrors, fog lights, dual chrome horns, archer radiator mascot, golf bag door, rumble seat, luggage trunk, dash clock. – Best in class at Meadowbrook, but doesn’t say when. Upgraded with a Pierce-Arrow (Seagrave fire engine) V-12 engine. Big scratch on the right front fender. Otherwise in very good if no longer fresh condition, and impossible to miss in these colors. – For a Pierce-Arrow eight with a Seagrave firetruck engine this is a healthy price. On the other hand, for a magnificent Pierce-Arrow twelve with coupe coachwork this is a reasonable price. The combination comes out in favor of reasonable – or at least realistic – and puts the new owner of this award-winning Pierce behind the wheel of a magnificent automobile.

Lot # S128 1966 Plymouth Belvedere Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N RL21H61272299; Black/Red vinyl; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $72,000. – 426/425hp Hemi, 4-speed, power brakes, split bench seat, floor shift, heat and defrost, hub caps, radio delete, hub caps. – Very clean but not perfect engine bay. Tired bumper chrome. Good older single repaint with a small scratch at the bottom of the driver’s door. Lightly scratched body side trim. Very good restored interior. The washer fluid reservoir is cracked. A rare genuine Hemi Belvedere that is not perfect but will take only a little effort to be made much better. – The Indy bidders appropriately handicapped the price of this Belvedere Hemi for its apparent, but not major, shortcomings and arrived at a price that’s fair to both the buyer and the seller.

Lot # S125 1970 Plymouth ‘Cuda AAR 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N BS23J0B294123; Tor Red, Black/Black vinyl; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $82,500. – 340/290hp, automatic, Eagle ST tires, spoilers, hood pins, Sure Grip, power steering, power brakes, side exhaust, spoilers, Rallye instruments, pushbutton radio, remote driver’s mirror. – Fully restored, lightly run engine bay. Excellent paint. Even gaps. Excellent fully restored interior. High quality, real deal AAR Cuda with nothing to pick on, except the automatic. – Sold for $46,980 at Barrett-Jackson in 2004, $51,840 at B-J Palm Beach in 2005 and $61,600 at B-J WestWorld in 2012. For a more handling-oriented version of the Cuda like an AAR to be an automatic is a bit more disappointing than in some of the larger-engined cars, which may partly explain why this otherwise fantastic car didn’t go for even more money. Then again, it sold for within its estimate range and wasn’t exactly a steal, so both parties can be satisfied with the result. Some resources value ‘Cuda AARs much higher than this, but this result is comparable with an automatic Z/28 or Boss 302 of the period.

Lot # F109 1967 Plymouth GTX Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N RS23J77128057; Blue/Blue vinyl; Estimate $70,000 – $90,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $67,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $74,250. – Rally wheels, red line tires, power steering, power brakes, bucket seats, console, Hurst pistol grip shifter, pushbutton radio, Sunpro under dash gauges. – One of 733 Hemi GTXs in 1967 and one of 312 with a 4-speed. Tidy older restored engine bay. Good older paint and chrome. Lightly scratched door handles. Factory gaps. A few cracks in the steering wheel but mostly very good restored interior. Desirably equipped and attractive real Hemi GTX. It needs nothing, but isn’t a show car. – A no-sale at Mecum Harrisburg in 2015 at a reported bid of $65,000, then sold here in 2016 for $69,300. It is impossible to divine any market movement in the price it brought today except that the market’s not doing much of anything in terms of growth (or contraction.)

Lot # F165 1969 Plymouth GTX Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N RS23J9A186123; Limelight Green, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $77,000. – 426/426hp Hemi, 4-speed, red line tires, air grabber hood, 3.54 Track Pack, Hurst shifter, woodrim steering wheel, factory radio. – One of 98 1969 Hemi GTX hardtops. Clean restored engine bay. Slightly tired chrome. Light pitting on the trim on the tail. Chips at the back of the doors. Some lightly worn switchgear but mostly good restored interior. A genuine car in great colors and that counts for a lot, although this isn’t a show car. – While this isn’t the best GTX Hemi out there it is more than good enough and with its 4-speed manual transmission could have brought another $10-15,000 without being expensive.

Lot # F104.1 1941 Plymouth P12 Special Deluxe Station Wagon; S/N P12484389; Maroon, Wood/Tan leather; Estimate $70,000 – $85,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000. – Hub caps and trim rings, wide whitewalls, hood ornament, three-row seating, column shift 3-speed. – Slightly tired engine bay with paint coming up here and there. Dull older paint. Yellowed tires. Long scratch on the right rear fender. Very good wood that seems fresher than the rest of the car. Good driver quality older interior. Older restored underneath. A rare and inherently handsome Plymouth woody in driver condition that would still get plenty of positive attention. – Not as good as it might be, but more than good enough to be driven and enjoyed which at this price it can be with some confidence that a few years from now it can, if maintained and cared for, be flipped for something else. Grandkids will love the way-back seating although the self-appointed protectors of everyone will decry the lack of seat belts.

Lot # T145 1999 Plymouth Prowler Convertible; S/N 1P3EW65G6XV504126; Red/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $46,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $50,600. – Matching trailer. – 134 miles and still showroom fresh, as you’d expect. – This Prowler would have sold new for about 40 grand, with an extra $5,000 added in for the optional trailer. This is big money for a Prowler but, counting for inflation, it still costs less than it did nearly 20 years ago.

Lot # F108.1 1970 Plymouth Road Runner Superbird 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N RM23U0A169457; Alpine White, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Estimate $190,000 – $225,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $170,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $187,000. – 440/375hp, 4-speed, hood pins, Hurst pistol grip shifter, factory radio, A33 Track Pack, power steering, power brakes. – Represented as matching numbers. Spotless fully and freshly restored engine bay. Excellent paint and brightwork. Even gaps. Straight, fresh roof vinyl. Very good, fully restored interior. A fresh, show quality Superbird that looks better now than it probably ever did when it was new. – An ideal result for a better-than-new Superbird. A Mecum auction wouldn’t be complete without a few and this is the place to find educated buyers who pay responsible prices for Magnum Superbirds.

Lot # S28 1966 Plymouth Satellite 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N RP23G67152073; Bronze, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000. – 383/325hp, 4-speed, Rally wheels, Cooper Cobra tires, bucket seats, 3.23 gears. – The paint shines well, but there are scratches, runs, fish eyes and particles in it evidence of very poor prep work before it was sprayed in a dirty environment. Panel fit and gaps are uneven all around. The brightwork looks to be original with lots of scratches and dings. The vinyl roof looks new, as does most of the interior. Underneath looks original and well cared for but a bit dirty. A cosmetic restoration and a decent but unimpressive driver as is, or a solid restoration candidate. – A mediocre Satellite, aside from the 4-speed, that brought an appropriately mediocre price. There is limited headroom after this investment for putting it in much better condition, which requires a competent body shop to fix the fits and a working paint booth to make the awful paint go away.

Lot # S255 1960 Pontiac Bonneville 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 860S7834; White/Maroon vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $38,000. – 389/281hp, automatic, eight-lug wheels, whitewalls, power steering, power brakes, bucket seats, column shift, factory radio. – Very good paint and chrome aside from two chips at the right edge of the hood. Big chip in the right quarter window. Very good, like new fully restored interior. A straightforward, handsome Bonneville that has been fully restored in good colors but falls short of perfect. – Sold for $53,000 at Mecum Dallas in 2012, for $44,000 at Mecum Kissimmee this year, then not sold at a $42,000 high bid at Mecum Houston a month ago. The reported high bid here was on the modest side, but consignment and transport fees are starting to add up and it’s time to realize that within a +- 10% band there’s little consistency between venues. The seller needs to get real and take a reasonable offer, which this was and would have been $41,800 after commission. Lightning doesn’t strike very often and right not it isn’t hitting the ground close to this Bonneville.

Lot # F138.1 1959 Pontiac El Catalina Prototype Pickup; S/N 259P108; Ivory/White, Red, Silver; Recent restoration, 1 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $340,000. – 389/300hp, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, power bench seat, column shift, power steering, power brakes, air conditioning, AM radio, tissue dispenser, power windows, Sportable radio. – The prototype for Pontiac’s take on the concept initiated by the Ford Ranchero and Chevy El Camino, but never put into production. After being discarded when the model didn’t go into production, the El Catalina was used as a delivery vehicle at a Pontiac dealership and as college transportation for the manager’s son. Subsequently restored to way better than new and still gorgeous. Fresh, documented and repeated show award winning restoration of this truly unique car. A real labor of love and better than it ever was when it was just a prototype, not to mention a parts runner. – Any guess about the value of this car-truck is as good as any other, but apparently this isn’t enough to satisfy the seller. It will be informative to see if it shows up again, and at what bid it brings.

Lot # S82 1973 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Coupe; S/N 2V87Y3N117033; Brewster Green, Green graphics/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $47,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $51,700. – 455/250hp, 4-speed, Rally wheels, Radial T/A tires, Hurst shifter, console, factory air conditioning, Safe-T-Track, power steering, power brakes, PHS documents. – One of 146 built in very attractive Brewster Green. Good older paint and brightwork. Good restored interior other than original dash and steering wheel. Older underneath. An attractive older restoration. – Sold for $41,800 at Kissimmee in 2016, then bid to $50,000 at Mecum Louisville last September. It was time to go away and a sound value for the new owner at this price.

Lot # F240 1979 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Coupe; S/N 2X87Z9L176780; Silver, Charcoal/Silver leather; Estimate $60,000 – $75,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $60,000. – 400/220hp, WS6 suspension, 4-speed, limited slip, power windows, air conditioning. – Claimed to have 897 original miles. The paint looks very good with a few small chips in the nose. The windshield glass is delaminating. The panel fit is a little uneven (i.e., factory fits.) The interior looks good with the exception of the driver’s seat, which has lots of wear and cracks in it. The engine bay is showing quite a bit of grime and rust on the engine. Underneath has a decent amount of rust on the subframe and rear springs. With 895 represented, you would expect this car to look showroom fresh. It doesn’t. Either the odometer is inaccurate, or someone kept this car outside for a long time and spent many hours just sitting in it. – A sub-1,000-mile original Trans Am is one thing, but this car was not carefully stored and the reported high bid was more than fair and arguably generous as well as meeting the low estimate and the same bid it brought at Mecum’s Louisville auction last September. It could have easily sold at this number if there was money close to it.

Lot # U79 1979 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Coupe; S/N 2W87K9L100344; Mayan Red/Oyster White vinyl; Cosmetic restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $13,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $14,850. – 403/185hp, automatic, Rally wheels, Radial T/A tires, 8-track stereo. – Looks to be an original car with a more recent paint job and shows 48,923 believable miles. Paint shines well, but has a lot of chips on the panel edges and blemishes in the rear bumper. Panel fit is uneven. The weather stripping around the door windows is dry and cracked. The interior is decent with lots of wear to the driver’s seat, door panel and steering wheel. The engine compartment has a fair amount of grime and surface rust on the block and intake. The rubber seal on the shaker is worn and has tears. Underneath is pretty clean. A driver, but one that doesn’t evidence any special care or attention. – Ok, look, no one really knows what this Trans Am is worth, but it’s fairly settled it’s worth about this much. It was reported sold at Leake Tulsa in June 2014 for $6,875, at Mecum Austin in December 2014 for $16,200, and at Indy last year for a whopping $17,050. This result sets the bar $2,200 lower, a big difference in percentage terms, but not a lot in dollars, and looks like a reasonable buy for the new owner.

Lot # T213 1999 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am 30th Anniversary Convertible; S/N 2G2FV32G9X2217972; Arctic White, Blue/White leather; Blue cloth top; Estimate $40,000 – $45,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $44,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $48,400. – 346/320hp, 6-speed, Blue tinted wheels, air conditioning, factory CD stereo. – Represented with 99 believable miles and in like new condition. A collector car in every sense of the term, it will probably never move more than a few feet except on a trailer to keep the odometer under 100. – The 30th Anniversary package was a WS6 with the blue stripes, wheels and trim. 536 convertibles and 1065 coupes were built. Fourth gen Firebird prices started to rise last year and are still outpacing their Camaro cousins, so this car’s massive price was noteworthy but not shocking given the limited production, immaculate condition and collectors’ recent exuberance for delivery-mile cars.

Lot # U82.1 1967 Pontiac Grand Prix 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 266577E107002; Signet Gold, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $24,500. – 400/350hp, automatic, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, bench seat, column shift, factory 8-track, factory air conditioning. – Some touch ups around the edges of the hood but mostly good older respray. Good roof vinyl that looks newer. Very good interior that looks original. Represented with 69,979 actual miles, which is believable. Light surface rust on the frame in spots and on some of the fasteners, and fairly grubby underneath in general. Very pretty on top, but the Indiana climate has made itself known underneath. Even so, it’s still not a bad driver. – Not sold at a $21,000 high bid at Auburn the previous weekend, which was really a fair offer for a car in this condition. That this even more generous offer was refused reveals the owner’s expectations to be on the lofty side, if not entirely delusional.

Lot # F226 1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible; S/N 242677Z122896; Regimental Red/Black vinyl; Black top; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $73,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $80,300. – 400/335hp, automatic, red line tires, woodrim steering wheel, Hurst dual gate shifter, tilt steering column, power steering, power brakes, power windows, power driver’s seat, older upgraded stereo, PHS documents. – Represented as matching numbers. GTOAA National award winning GTO in 2012. Paint looks amazing with only a couple very small blemishes. Brightwork all looks brand new. Panel fit is spot on. Engine compartment is very clean and showing very little wear. The interior looks brand new with no wear. Underneath looks just as good as above. An older body-off restoration that is still holding up quite well. – Sold by Mecum in the December Kansas City auction in 2013 for $73,830 fresh from restoration and showing 12 miles on its odometer against 3,600 today. The fact that it looks just as good today as it did five years and 3,500 miles ago is a real credit to the intervening owner(s) and the car the car has received. The price it brought, up by 5.8% (taking into account the 7% commission in 2013 and the 10% commission today) pretty much reflects the GTO market and it is still as good a value today as it was then.

Lot # F94.1 1971 Pontiac GTO Judge 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 242371P100019; Cardinal Red, Judge graphics/Black vinyl; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $62,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $68,200. – 455/335hp, 4-speed, snowflake wheels, Wide Oval tires, power steering, power brakes, Hurst T-handle shifter, bucket seats, console, 8-track stereo, rear spoiler, PHS documents. – First known 1971 GTO Judge Hardtop and the 19th Pontiac built for 1971. A few cracks and chips on the hood and nose as well as a few cracks on the roof, but otherwise sound mostly original paint. Fairly tired original interior with a small rip in the driver’s seat. Paint coming off around the steering wheel and a faded dash top. Plenty of road wear underneath but nothing terrible. Hasn’t been started in 20 years. A used car, noteworthy in its early production date but not necessarily crazy desirable. – The early build is at least free with this GTO Judge, a sweet car bought for no more than reasonable retail money with no premium for its first Judge status.

Lot # T132 1965 Pontiac LeMans GTO 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 237375Z129443; Iris Mist, White roof/White vinyl; Estimate $45,000 – $65,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $44,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $48,400. – 389/335hp, 4-barrel, 4-speed, Eagle ST tires, Rally I wheels, bucket seats, floor shift, Hurst shifter, Rally gauges, factory radio, PHS documents. – Fantastic original interior with hardly any wear. Good older repaint. Slightly tired original chrome and lightly scratched rocker trim. Restoration work underneath but not fully redone. Straight body. Represented as one of two in these unusual but attractive colors. Never fully restored because it didn’t need it. – Sold here two years ago for $36,300, then again in Kissimmee earlier this year for $49,500. The latest two results are more realistic to what the car is worth, with the 2016 sale something of a bargain. With a trainload of astute buyers at places like Kissimmee or Indy it’s hard to find an opportunistic purchase, and appropriate that results for two quite different sales four months apart are consistent.

Lot # S190 1961 Pontiac Ventura 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 561P4534; Bristol Blue/Blue, Light Blue vinyl; Estimate $90,000 – $125,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $90,000. – 389/348hp Tri-Power, 4-speed, eight-lug wheels, whitewalls, power steering, tinted glass, WonderBar radio, bucket seats, floor shift, column-mounted tach, PHS documents. – Good older repaint and chrome. Newer seats and carpets. The dash is original but very good. Looks partially restored underneath. It’s rare to see a Ventura this loaded and in essentially new shape, so this car is fairly special and a sure hit among the Pontiac fans. – Having hit its pre-sale low estimate and being bid to a seriously healthy number this Ventura could have been sold without regret. The reserve should have been off well before the reported high bid to take advantage of its exceptional specifications and condition.

Lot # S65 1985 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa; S/N WP0EB0910FS160257; Guards Red, Black/Black; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000. – Black painted Fuchs wheels, factory cassette stereo. – Full service records from new. A handful of chips on the nose and hood. The paint is a little tired but mostly good for the age and the 51,951 believable miles showing. Paint is coming off the wheels in a handful of spots. Light but visible wear to the seats. Clean and maintained engine bay. Not the best car cosmetically, but an honest and clean Carrera Targa that has been well cared for from new, which counts for a lot in Porsche world. – Recognized for its solid and honest presentation and sold for a strong price.

Lot # S106.1 1996 Porsche 911 GT2 Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ99ZTS392194; Speed Yellow/Black; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,050,000. – Speedline wheels, Pilot Sport tires, power steering, power windows, factory cassette stereo. – One of 194 street versions. Tiny touch up above the right headlight. Some flattening and wrinkling to the driver’s seat but otherwise fantastic. Despite the 41,912 km showing, it’s not really significantly worse than other mothballed low-mileage GT2s. – Hammered not sold at a $1.3M high bid at Mecum Monterey last year, then hammered not sold at an $880,000 high bid at Bonhams Amelia Island in March. The 993 GT2 is arguably the king of the air-cooled Porsches when it comes to performance, and it’s one of the most valuable 911 models as well, but the bids aren’t likely to get higher than the Monterey bid, which was a very fair offer and peddling it around is only devaluing it. It’s time to take the money and run.

Lot # S236 1992 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe; S/N WP0AA2961NS480176; Guards Red/Tan leather; Estimate $100,000 – $130,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $91,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $100,100. – Alloy wheels, Sumitomo tires, factory CD stereo, chromed gauge bezels. – Light wrinkling to the seats. Cracking paint all below the stone guards on the rear fenders. Some light detail scratches on the front. Slightly yellowed headlight lenses. Showing 62,037 miles but no service history represented. Presents like a used and reasonably well cared for (but not pampered) 964 Turbo. A driver. – Even with a reserve, this car was let go for a surprisingly low price that leaves you wondering what might be wrong with it or what the story is. The new owner may soon find out, but is also in it for a bargain price by current 964 standards.

Lot # T9 1971 Porsche 914/4 Targa; S/N 4713905003; Dark Green/Black vinyl; Estimate $15,000 – $25,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,550. – Alloy wheels, store brand tires, custom woodgrain dash with some aftermarket gauges, later Alpine stereo. – There is a big scratch and a few chips on the hood. Otherwise average quality older paint. Slightly worn carpets. Several very large cracks in the dash top. Maintained but unrestored underneath. Newer exhaust. Pretty much just a driver quality 914. Not bad at all, but nothing special. – Estimated by Mecum as quite a bit more valuable than it arguably is, and sold that way as well. This price, for a 1.7-liter 914, should have bought a much better example.

Lot # T86.1 1984 Porsche 928S Coupe; S/N WP0JB0922ES863008; White/Beige leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $23,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $25,300. – Chromed wheels, Cinturato tires, power windows, air conditioning, power seats, Blaupunkt CD stereo, sunroof. – Belt service done last year and 1,000 miles ago. Represented with more extensive service history. Very good original paint other than a chip on the sunroof. Very tidy underneath. Light but notable wrinkling on the front seats. Otherwise very clean inside. The gaps on the hood are slightly uneven. Lots of 928s out there were cheap enough for long enough that they suffered neglect and deferred maintenance. This is not one of those cars. – Sold for $29,700 at Barrett-Jackson Northeast in 2016 with 39,954 miles showing, then for a bargain $16,500 at the same sale last year. It’s done 889 miles since 2016 (now showing 40,883) and is in essentially the same condition. Sold here for an appropriate number that takes into account the age and wear but also the consistent care that will make for fewer headaches down the road. The result is generous, but not unreasonable.

Lot # T256 1989 Porsche 944 Coupe; S/N WP0AA0947KN450239; Guards Red/Black vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $9,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $10,450. – 2.7/165hp, 5-speed, phone dial wheels, Falken tires, aftermarket CD stereo, power windows. – From the Lingenfelter collection. Tidy engine bay, but it shows age commensurate with the 84,567 miles showing. Very good repaint. Very well kept interior. The mileage is more or less average for a 944, but the condition is fairly remarkable. It’s also a more desirable late car, which has more power and fewer problems. – A fairly light number for a 944 this good, especially since most examples out there have been neglected to some degree or had their maintenance deferred. Compared to other recent 944 prices, this one could have brought closer to 15 grand without being expensive and the new owner came off well, even with 165 horsepower.

Lot # S272 1960 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud II 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N LSRA235; Black/Black leather; Visually maintained, largely original, 4- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000. – Wheel covers, whitewalls, Lucas driving lights, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, rear seat tables, power windows. – Just looking at the engine bay almost makes one’s wallet start to feel lighter. It’s dry, dusty, corroded and needs to be completely gone through. It looks like it hasn’t run for a long time. Decent chrome. Dull, possibly original paint that’s tired but free of major blemishes. Bent radio antenna. The leather and wood are quite good, probably too good to be original. This is not the way to buy one of these, but at least the expensive interior bits can be left alone. This will be a labor of love and a lot of money, but it’s worth saving and too good to just be a parts car. – And at this price, it’s too expensive to be a parts car as well. The Silver Cloud II, with its V-8 engine and additional power features, is considerably more valuable than the Cloud I, but this was a high price for one that is so rough mechanically. It’s nasty, and it’s expensive.

Lot # W252 1953 Rolls-Royce Silver Dawn 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N LSLE47; Gray/Red leather; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $29,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $31,900. – Column shift automatic, wheel covers, wide whitewalls, spotlight, Lucas driving lights, sunroof, rear seat tables, comes with original tools. – Tired but presentable older paint with touch ups on the nose as well as small chips throughout, particularly around the panel edges. Tired, probably original chrome. The chassis looks like it got some undercoating at some point. Signs of a little rust at the bottom of the seam between the doors, which is not unusual on these cars. Lightly cracking original leather up front. Wrinkled but pretty good in the back. The wood is a little tired but mostly quite good for original. The lens on the left fog light is severely cracked. An unrestored and pretty tired old Silver Dawn, but well worth keeping around and enjoyable as is provided the mechanicals are sound. – The Silver Dawn was the first Rolls-Royce with a factory-built body, and 760 were made. It’s nearly identical to the Bentley MK VI but typically sells for well above the Bentley, making the restoration of one more financially sensible. This one was bought way at the bottom end of the price spectrum even though it doesn’t have any truly severe problems, so there is quite a bit of money left over for a lot of much-needed cosmetic work and mechanical freshening if not a full restoration.

Lot # G127.1 1976 Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow Sedan; S/N SRH22702; Black, Gold/Black leather; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $10,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $11,000. – RHD. Wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, badge bar, power windows, Pioneer cassette stereo. – Comes with books and service receipts. Long scrape on the roof. A few light scratches on the nose and hood. Dull brightwork. The interior wood has definitely seen better days, as has the switchgear. Light wrinkling to the seats. Reasonably tidy underneath. Some body work appears to have been done. A pretty tired car in less desirable RHD configuration, but not terrible. – The Silver Shadow was a mass-market car by Rolls-Royce standards, so it’s always going to be one of the more affordable ways to get into a Rolls. Because of that, buying one can be a gamble, and service or restoration bills for this one could add up to the purchase price in short order. At this price, though, at least the new owner isn’t into it any more than the car is really worth and it’ll probably just take up position in front of some mediocre restaurant trying to bring it a little dishabille chic.

Lot # F10 1964 Saab 96 Coupe; S/N 226697; Silver/Beige vinyl, Red cloth; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $30,000. – Ronal alloy wheels, Falken tires, dual wing mirrors, spotlight on the roof, leather hood strap, dash clock, VDO gauges, sunroof, headlight stone guards, woodrim steering wheel. – Rally prepped with bored cylinders and rebuilt crank. Very good silver metallic paint. Slightly dull bumper chrome. Tidy engine bay. Very good interior. Almost too pretty to take on the vintage rally circuit, but just almost. A neat and unusual car for the eccentric who wants to do vintage driving events and stand out with funky styling, front drive and a two-stroke engine. The rally accessories might not be to everyone’s taste, but they could all be removed relatively simply. – While this car has a lot of personality and got lots of attention all week, the target audience for actually buying it in Indy was quite small and would be anywhere. The car was deservedly bid up high thanks to its remarkable condition, but it could have sold at this price.

Lot # S44 1968 Shelby Mustang GT500 Fastback; S/N 8T02S143521-01663; Wimbledon White, Blue/Black vinyl; Unrestored original, 4 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $62,000. – 428/360hp, automatic, Shelby wheels, narrow whitewalls, Philco radio, original line ticket, factory order, body tags, Marchal fog lights. – Represented as the matching numbers engine, sitting in a grubby engine bay with dry belts and plenty of dirt. It probably wouldn’t run for very long if at all. The original paint has several sizable chips on the front and is dull overall. Touched up scrapes on the driver’s door. Tired, lightly scratched chrome. No major rust visible underneath. Well-kept original interior. An unrestored GT500 is a real find, but this is a project car that probably sat in some garage or carport for a long time with boxes and furniture piled atop it. It needs a lot and is not a preservation candidate. – A disappointing Shelby that requires a committed enthusiast to see through its many issues to suss out the car that lurks within. That enthusiast wasn’t here today, only realistic bottom feeders looking to buy right with headroom to support all the attention it needs. Bought at the reported high bid or even a little more it would be a great value.

Lot # S153 1968 Shelby Mustang GT500 Fastback; S/N 8T02S129533; Acapulco Blue, White stripes/Black vinyl; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $115,000. – 428/360hp, 4-speed, power steering, power brakes, tilt steering column, Philco radio. – Fully restored underneath now with light dirt and grime. Very good, lightly worn and mostly original interior. Good older paint and chrome. An honestly represented and well-kept older restoration, but not a stunner. – Sold here three years ago for $145,800. Given the unusual and desirable 4-speed, that was a mostly solid price that makes the consignor’s decision to hold out at this high bid understandable. The pre-sale estimate is exaggerated for effect.

Lot # T216 1986 Shelby Omni GLHS Hatchback; S/N 1B3BZ18E1GD267267; Black, Gray graphics/Gray cloth; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $34,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $37,400. – 2.2/175hp turbo four, 5-speed, alloy wheels, Dunlop Direzza tires. – Showing 23,097 miles but for the most part looks like a car with a tenth of that. Clearly babied from new and has lots of documentation. There are a few small chips and scratches on the nose and hood, a few chips on the right side of the tail, and a scratch on the left side of it. Otherwise, this looks like a practically new Shelby Dodge. One of 500 built. – The Shelby name has a lot of cachet and this is a very good example, but this is still a ton of money for an old front-wheel drive Dodge hatchback and quite a bit more than prices for other examples recently. On the other hand its preservation is exceptional, as is the documentation, a car that deserves to be taken seriously and the Indy bidders responded. Besides that, how much less is it than the other ways to acquire a piece of Carroll’s legacy?

Lot # F15 1929 Talbot 14-45 Tourer; S/N 25065; Blue, Black fenders/Blue; Black cloth top; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $38,500. – RHD. Wire wheels, Excelsior tires, single sidemount spare with an older Firestone, tach, floor shift. – Tired old paint with lots of light scratches and nicks throughout. Tidy underneath. Faded top. Worn but intact seats. Lightly faded gauges. Restoration completed in 1996. It wasn’t done to very high standards and has been enjoyed plenty since. It’s a neat, honest driver and it’s rare to see a Talbot this old. – There’s no lack of auction history for this Talbot, which sold for $40,005 at Bonhams auction at Hendon in London in 2006, for $49,508 at RM’s Paris auction ten years later in 2016, and $47,300 at Worldwide’s Pacific Grove sale last August. Those results show are largely consistent but this is a substantial discount and a good value.

Lot # W50.1 1972 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ40V Hardtop 4×4; S/N FJ40120097; Light Grey, White roof/Grey vinyl; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $19,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $20,900. – 3878/155hp, 3-speed, hub caps, dual mirrors, rear-mounted spare. – Represented as a one owner Texas FJ from new. Rough interior with surface rust poking through in several spots and a ripped up driver’s seat. Beat up body with surface rust poking through in lots of spots. Same on the wheels. Lots of oxidation and surface rust underneath. Surface rust on the air cleaner and several spots in the engine bay. Definitely worth fixing up, but a little too rough to apply that ‘charming patina’ label that auction companies love so much. – There are better vintage 4x4s to buy with this kind of money, but in terms of FJ40s this was an appropriate number that takes into account this example’s needs in the paint, body and engine departments. A $40,000 restoration will make it worth $60,000.

Lot # T137 1976 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ40V Hardtop 4×4; S/N FJ40211003; Yellow, White roof/Black vinyl; Estimate $55,000 – $65,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $47,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $52,250. – 4230/125hp, 4-speed, hub caps, rear heater, rear-mounted spare. – Spotless fully restored and detailed engine bay and underbody. Fantastic paint. All new fasteners throughout. The interior has been fully redone from top to bottom. Better than new with no corners cut. A gorgeous, fresh U.S. market FJ. Fantastic. – It’s not as common to see such fresh and overdone FJs as when these were briefly six-figure auction stars in 2015. In the current FJ market, the price here was high but deservedly so, and the seller surely has a lot more than this amount put into the restoration. The restoration got started late and missed the market peak.

Lot # S260 1976 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ45 Pickup 4×4; S/N FJ45116799; Yellow, White roof/Black vinyl; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $38,500. – Hub caps, power steering, custom rear bumper, air conditioning, aftermarket stereo. – Spotless engine bay and underbody restored to a little better than new. Light scratches on the rear quarter windows. Excellent paint. Spotless interior. Fresh and gorgeous, plus a rare body style. The kind of FJ that will grab collectors’ attention. Too big and too bright to ignore. – After not selling at a $37,000 high bid at Mecum Los Angeles this year, it had no better luck in Indy but the seller decided to cut it loose at a light but reasonable number. Is the bloom off the Land Cruiser market as dozens appear at auctions and dealers? This result would suggest that it is.

Lot # F18 1962 Triumph TR4 Roadster; S/N CT2966L; Red, White hardtop/Black vinyl piped in White; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $38,000. – Painted centerlock wire wheels, Coker blackwalls, hardtop, solid rear axle, chrome valve cover, tonneau cover, banjo steering wheel, factory radio. – Gorgeous engine bay with fully redone original engine. No leaks. Fantastic fresh paint and chrome. Even gaps. Even and tight-fitting hardtop. Gorgeous interior. By TR4 standards, this is a show car. Few have gotten so thorough or so high quality a treatment. – This is a top dollar TR4, but a nearly top dollar price was offered and it’s not likely to bring much if any more than the reported high bid. There has surely been a ton of money spent on this car, but that isn’t money that the seller is necessarily going to get back. That’s just how the hobby works.

Lot # W127.1 1973 Triumph TR6 Convertible; S/N CF2974U; Carmine Red/Tan vinyl; Black vinyl top; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $18,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $20,350. – Painted wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, factory radio. – Dirty engine bay. Dirty underneath but no major rust. Dull paint with some scratches on the hood. Lightly pitted mirrors. Flat driver’s seat but mostly good interior with refinished wood dash. Ratty top with several small rips. A tired driver quality slim bumper TR6, but nothing more. – Sold for $22,000 at Kissimmee this year and 2,002 miles ago, but in essentially the same condition. It was rerun in Kissimmee but could only find $12,000 and was no-saled. This is a strong result for this superficially redone car and the Kissimmee “sale” is a chimera.

Lot # F163 1959 Volkswagen Type 2 Samba Microbus, 23-Window; S/N AZ362595; Green, Light Green/Green vinyl piped in White; Estimate $100,000 – $150,000; Modified restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $140,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $154,000. – German market Samba with hub caps, whitewalls, roof rack, banjo steering wheel, dash clock, 2100cc engine with dual Webers. – Several paint chips throughout and a large crack on the driver’s door. Dull brightwork. Lightly worn interior. Uneven door gaps. Nowhere near as good as many of the overrestored 23-Windows to come to auction recently, and powered by an incorrect (though much more powerful and usable) engine. – 23-Window Volkswagens are on an absolute tear, and it seems that it’s not just the concours-ready examples that get the bids rolling in. It looks like any genuine 23-Window in decent condition is a six-figure vehicle these days.

Lot # G170 1984 Volkswagen Type 2 Vanagon Campmobile Wagon; S/N WV2ZB025XEH082467; Brown, Beige/Tan cloth; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,150. – Hub caps and trim rings (original wheel covers included), stove, tables, refrigerator, sink, camping equipment, air conditioning. – Left front bumper rub strip is hanging loose. The window gaskets are dull and cracked. Looks like a repaint with orange peel. Tidy underneath. Very good, nearly like new interior. Slightly dirty but maintained engine bay. Showing 82,474 believable miles. Seemingly all the stuff that matters and attracts people to these Vanagons seems to be in good working order. Still looks ready to tackle another cross country road trip, even if it’s at no higher than the speed limit. – Hammered not sold on the block at a $16,500 high bid but reported to sell after the fact at this amount. Vanagons have a pretty dedicated cult following and thanks to rust as well as wear and tear from high miles and long trips, there aren’t many left to go around. For one with under 100k on the odometer and in mostly solid condition, this was a pretty good buy.

Lot # T128 1963 Willys Jeep Tuxedo Park Soft Top 4×4; S/N 57548153839; Pink, White grille/Black vinyl; Estimate $30,000 – $45,000; Truck restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $22,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $24,200. – 135.72hp four, 3-speed, wheel covers, single spare. – Tidy unrestored engine bay and chassis. Lightly pitted headlight bezels. Average quality older paint. Very good new seats. A decent, truck quality cosmetic restoration. Not great, but still cute to a fault and it’s hard not to be drawn to it. – No Jeep should ever be restored better than this, they are too much fun to wail around in and worrying about a stone chip shouldn’t be part of the ownership equation. This one is expensive, or maybe it’s not. It’s hard to argue with the bidders’ decision to place excitement ahead of rarity and performance.

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Comments

    • 1935Packard
    • June 13, 2018
    Reply

    Rick writes: “Represented as a recent restoration and a very attractive car, but in the details it’s just not up to the kind of standards that would win it a major show trophy and it’s a Light 8, thus not a CCCA Full Classic.”

    The 1932 Light 8s are full classics, actually. From the CCCA list, ” All 8-cylinder
    1923-1934″ are included.
    http://www.classiccarclub.org/grand_classics/approved_classics_2018.html

      • rickcarey1
      • June 19, 2018
      Reply

      You are correct. I think I was working from an older CCCA list.
      The reference has been corrected, thank you.

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