Mecum Auctions, Monterey, August 23-25, 2018

Mecum Auctions has been in Monterey now for a decade, growing from a $14.2 million sale in 2009 to this year’s $45.7 million with a peak sale in 2016 of $50.9 million.

They’re an important part of the Monterey car week scenery now, drawing a huge crowd of spectators to the Del Monte Golf Course and attracting an ever-stronger consignment which has evolved both with the collector car market and with Mecum’s Monterey presence.

Mecum has positioned themselves as “The Daytime Auction” and by keeping the consignment down to 680 or so lots have managed to hew to that schedule.

This year’s top Mecum sale was a 1933 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe by Bohman & Schwartz that brought $3,850,000 including commission. That headline hints at a shift in Mecum’s Monterey consignment. 97 of the lots offered were built pre-WWII; 66 of them sold, a 68% sale rate that was significantly better than the auction as a whole.

Just a few years ago, in 2015, there were 80 pre-WWII consignments of which 33 sold, a 41.3% sale rate, well below the auction’s overall performance.

Mecum Monterey also is notable for its concentration of late model high performance cars. 108 of the consignment were model year 2003 or newer. Only 41 of them sold, a 38% sale rate. Of the 25 modern Ferraris offered only 6 sold, a 24% sale rate. One of six McLarens were reported sold, which was better than the Lamborghinis did. None of the six Lambos offered found a new owner. [It’s OK to skim this paragraph and the two that follow as the thought process unfolds.]

Of 25 lots bid to $1 million or more, 14 were Model Year 2003 or newer including four Bugatti Veyrons and two Ferrari LaFerraris. None of the Veyrons sold.

At all five Monterey auctions there were 219 lots offered MY 2003 or newer, 105 were reported sold, a 47.9% sale rate. 24 of them were bid to $1 million or more (Mecum had 14) of which ten sold, a 41.7% sell-through.

Which leads to the fundamental question: If late model Bugattis, Ferraris, Lamborghinis and McLarens did so poorly, why are there so many of them? Yes, they draw traffic. And if by some miracle another one of them sells for a million plus dollars it adds to the sale total and commission income. But it’s a lot of wasted auction block time and a buzz killer to those in the room who see millions of dollars in lack of interest.

Based on the 2018 Mecum Monterey results the consignment ought to skew to more pre-WWII cars.

But that’s partly why this is interesting to follow.

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2018 362/688 52.6% $126,230 $51,700

[41%]

$46,695,265
2017 321/629 51% $104,374 $46,200

[44.3%]

$33,504,075
2016 305/679 44.9% $166,951 $55,000

[32.9%]

$50,920,125
2015 387/670 57.8% $117,148 $44,000

[37.6%]

$45,336,404

On-site observations are by Rick Carey, Andrew Newton and Greg Ingold; Rick has edited what’s presented here and is solely responsible for the contents.

This report is sorted by Marque, Model and Year. There are 88 reported of 688 consignments and it’s missing only one photo, although another one of the same car from Mecum Monterey 2016 had to be substituted; it looks the same.


Lot # S89 1936 Auburn 852 Supercharged Speedster; S/N 35364E; Cadet Grey/Beige leather; Estimate $850,000 – $1,000,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $925,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,017,500. – Beige wire wheels, blackwall tires, outside exhaust headpipes, Crosley radio, dual ratio axle. – Excellent paint, chrome and interior. Restored to better than new but not overdone. ACD Certified #A-248, 2006 restoration, Pebble Beach in 2006, 2007 AACA Senior National First Prize. Its presentation here is far better than the 2006 restoration would indicate and looks like it was done last year. – Offered here in 2012 when it was bid to $625,000 and again in 2015 with the odometer showing 28 more miles than it did in 2012. It is an outstanding example and it brought an outstanding price that should make the seller very pleased.

Lot # S192 1963 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk II BJ7 Convertible; S/N HBJ7L20374; White/Black piped in White; Black top; Estimate $70,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $55,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $60,500. – Centerlock wire wheels, dual mirrors, woodrim steering wheel. – Used but maintained engine bay. Sound but older paint and chrome. Big scratch on the windshield frame. Light but noticeable wear to the interior. Represented as a former concours winner, but that was a while ago. A used but maintained older Big Healey restoration. – This is a fair number to both parties for a car that, while no longer a show winner, has no real needs and will make a great driver.

Lot # S168 2015 Bentley Continental GT3-R Coupe; S/N SCBFS8ZA8FC048449; Glacier White, Green side stripes/Black leather; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $190,000. – 4-liter, twin turbo, 592hp V-8, automanual gearbox, rear wing, front splitter, titanium exhaust, carbon ceramic brakes, green calipers, carbon fiber interior trim. – Very good paint with no significant flaws. The interior is like new. Represented with 500 miles and looks like a new car. – Even though it still weighs over 4,800 pounds, the GT3-R is a lightened and more track-focused Continental, a fact that the car doesn’t try to hide with its wings and stripes. It cost over a quarter-million dollars when new, and although this one has hardly been driven, it’s still a used late model Bentley and the reported high bid seems fair this early in the depreciation curve. It’s also an observation on the difference in buyer’s approach to Bentleys as opposed to, say, Porsches where modern GT2 and GT3 cars with delivery miles sell for above MSRP. Bentley just doesn’t have that following (yet).

Lot # S129 1974 BMW 2002 Turbo 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N 4290376; White/Black vinyl; Estimate $175,000 – $200,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $155,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $170,500. – BBS wheels, fender flares, original pushbutton radio. – Italian market example. Very good paint. Lightly scratched window frames. Tidy and mostly restored underneath. Very good original interior with newer door panels. Restored recently and could be better given that these are solidly six-figure cars these days, but still just about like-new. – These cars just seem to keep getting more and more expensive, with every good one to come to auction over the last couple of years selling for more than the last. There is apparently still room to go higher, as this transaction shows.

Lot # S115 2012 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Convertible; S/N VF9SK2C25CM795051; Black, Red/Cognac leather; Estimate $1,700,000 – $1,800,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,700,000. – Puccini sound system, carbon fiber seats. – 850 miles and like new other than a slightly flat driver’s seat. One of four here, so bidders have their choice of year and color. – Mecum brought four Veyrons to Monterey this year, and not a single one sold. RM Sotheby’s sold this example at Amelia Island last year for $1,650,000 and it’s not really worth any more today than it was then, so for the consignor to hold out at the fair reported high bid doesn’t make much sense.

Lot # S153 1929 Cadillac 341-B V-8 Touring 6-Passenger, Body by Fisher; S/N Engine No. 331401; Engine # 331401; Blue, Black fenders/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $70,000 – $80,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000. – RHD. Chrome wire wheels, blackwall tires, dual cloth-covered sidemounts with mirrors, Trippe light, jump seats, luggage trunk, Dietz pedestal spotlight, folding windshield. – Poorly masked old repaint, worn, surface cracked upholstery, thin chrome. Oily, greasy, road grimy engine and chassis. Based on some engine parts it was in Argentina at some time. Superficially presented and aged but solid and all there. Tour it for a while before giving it the restoration it deserves. – This Cadillac was of a few serious classics with aged and deteriorated old restorations that Mecum presented just inside the general admission entrance at Monterey this year. With some serious mechanical work it’s capable of being toured with some pleasure but the steering wheel on the right makes that less enjoyable. At this price all is forgiven, however, and it’s a rewarding project for the right money.

Lot # S23 1958 Chevrolet 3100 Apache Fleetside Pickup; S/N 3A58S128158; Gold, Beige/Beige vinyl with Brown cloth inserts; Estimate $55,000 – $65,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $57,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $62,700. – Hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, column shift. – Formerly owned by Hank Williams Jr. The paint is very clean with no notable chips or scratches, and the weather stripping is in good condition apart from the driver’s side window. Small hole in the passenger’s side of the seat, but otherwise the interior is in clean shape with minimal to no wear. There is no surface rust on the underside and it is very clean. Mostly original but got major attention when needed. – This truck just sold at Spring Auburn for $35,200, an appropriate number for an Apache in this condition. There’s more money on the ground in Monterey than in Auburn, but apparently there are also more Hank Williams fans because that’s the only explanation for this pretty excessive price.

Lot # F14 1964 Chevrolet Chevelle 300 2-Dr. Station Wagon; S/N 45415L117934; Daytona Blue/Blue cloth; Estimate $45,000 – $65,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $130,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $143,000. – 283/220hp, floor-shift 4-speed, air conditioning, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, roof rack, bench seat. – Very good paint and chrome. Nearly spotless fresh and fully restored underneath. Very good fully redone interior. A high quality body-off restoration done recently enough not to need anything. It’s a treat to see a Chevelle wagon in almost any condition, but to see one that has gotten such a high dollar restoration is exceptional. A really interesting car, in a good way. – A jaw-dropping, confusingly high price. It is likely the best car like it in the world, but that doesn’t even come close to explaining this ludicrously expensive price that can only be the result of two or more bidders passionate about it to the point of losing touch with reality.

Lot # F90 1956 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N E56S003787; Engine # F56GV; Venetian Red, Polo White coves/Red vinyl; Beige vinyl top; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $90,000. – 265/210hp, 3-speed, WonderBar radio, spinner wheel covers, whitewalls – Restored like new about seven years ago, NCRS Top Flight, Bloomington Gold, Chevy Vettefest Gold Spinner in 2007 and still essentially perfect with excellent paint, chrome and interior. The engine compartment is clean, orderly and like new. – Sold at Auburn Fall in 2012 for $67,100 and why it was not cut loose at the reported high bid here makes little sense. Its older restoration is still very good, but not good enough to make it much, if any, better than the high bid.

Lot # F91 1966 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 194676S112675; Mosport Green/Fawn leather; Beige vinyl top; Estimate $115,000 – $130,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $100,000. – 427/425hp, 4-speed, AM-FM, teakwood steering wheel, side exhausts, power windows, centerlock alloy wheels, gold line tires, power brakes and steering. – Excellent clearcoat paint, chrome, interior and new top. The engine compartment and chassis are nearly like new, just a little aged. Good panel fits. Impressively equipped and nearly show ready. – Thoroughly done, desirably equipped and impressively maintained since the restoration, the car in fact deserves a little more than the reported high bid here and would still be a decent value for the money at the low pre-sale estimate.

Lot # F92 1966 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe; S/N 194376S106026; Engine # T1024IP; Nassau Blue/Blue leather; Estimate $115,000 – $130,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $80,000. – 427/425hp, 4-speed, power brakes, power windows, side exhausts, centerlock alloy wheels, gold line tires, AM-FM, woodgrain steering wheel. – Very good clearcoat paint, chrome and lightly stretched upholstery. The engine compartment and chassis are orderly but lightly oiled and a little road grimy. – Sold at Barrett-Jackson WestWorld in 2007 for $90,750, the consignor may think it’s worth more now but hasn’t maintained it consistently. Even at its worst, though, it’s worth more than the reported bottom-feeder bid.

Lot # S190 1967 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe; S/N 194377S102177; Elkhart Blue/Blue leather; Estimate $90,000 – $100,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $65,000. – 327/350np, 4-speed, narrow whitewalls, factory air conditioning, tinted glass, power steering, power brakes, power windows. – Older paint with a few cracks below the windshield. Several scrapes on the roof. Blisters on the left rear fender. Tired chrome. Grimy used engine bay. Old weather stripping. Good interior with some wear to the console. Never fully restored but has had paint and intermittent mechanical work. A driver quality car, but at least relatively well equipped. – Sold for $61,600 at Leake OKC in 2016, then sold for $68,200 at Mecum Dallas a few months later, it doesn’t appear to have had any major attention recently and isn’t worth any more than it was in 2016, so the reported high bid could have seen it off to a new home.

Lot # S137 1968 Chevrolet Corvette L88 Coupe; S/N 194378S415053; Polar White/Red; Estimate $400,000 – $500,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $325,000. – Rally wheels, red line tires, L88, 3.70 Positraction, documented by the original tank sticker still attached to the original tank and displayed with the car. – Good 2016 cosmetic repaint. The engine is aged and dull although not dirty. The exhaust has been repaired and the underbody is very clean and not terribly aged. Original interior with some wear and small rips in the seats. Visually maintained and generally good all around. “Period correct drivetrain” usually means it has a replacement engine and who knows what else. – This L88 sold at Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas in 2015 for $330,000. It was painted red at the time, and shortly after was redone in the correct original Polar White. It’s not restored but it’s not totally original, either, which along with the “period correct drivetrain” doesn’t make it the most desirable example. The reported bid here assimilates all those factors and is not unreasonable, just cautious.

Lot # S118 1969 Chevrolet Corvette L88 Convertible; S/N 194679S726291; Can Am White, White hardtop/Saddle; Estimate $550,000 – $650,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $410,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $451,000. – L88 427, 4-speed, hardtop, Rally wheels, red line tires. – Very good paint and body panel fit. The engine compartment is extremely clean and shows very little use. The underbody is immaculate and looks unused. The interior is well sorted and presents little wear. An excellent example that shows little use. Has received Bloomington Gold certification and NCRS Duntov Mark of Excellence. – Not sold at a $400,000 high bid at Mecum Kissimmee in 2012 nor in 2013 at the same venue with a reported bid of $450,000. The “430hp” (in reality more like 550hp) L88 is a legend, built in very small numbers and mostly used up in racing so finding one like this, complete and Bloomington Gold certified, is a rare opportunity and it is a sound value at this price.

Lot # S65 1961 Chrysler 300G 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 8413159853; Black/Tan leather; Estimate $95,000 – $115,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $88,000. – 423/375hp, dual quads, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, power steering, power brakes, swivel seats. – Featured in the Hemmings Muscle Machines June 2013 buyers guide for these cars and show awards before that. There’s a long, light scratch on the trunk. Otherwise the paint and chrome are gorgeous. Light wrinkling to the driver’s seat but mostly fantastic restored interior. Fully redone a while ago and other than a few forgivable flaws it still presents like a fresh restoration. – Sold twice by Russo and Steele in Monterey, in 2014 for $61,600 and in 2015 for $74,800, then at Mecum Kissimmee in 2017 for $110,000. Its condition seems to have deteriorated some in the past 18 months and the Kissimmee sale was seen at the time as unreasonably expensive; the result here makes more sense.

Lot # S9 1949 Crosley Hot Shot Roadster; S/N VC10001; Green/Red vinyl; Estimate $30,000 – $50,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $28,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $30,800. – Wheel covers, whitewalls. – Represented as the first production Hotshot. Slightly wavy body. Some cracks in the left front fender but mostly shiny paint. Very good interior. Clean underneath. Older restored and showing some age, but a lot of value in that it’s the first one. – After not selling here in 2009 at a $27,000 high bid, it’s back nearly a decade later and successfully sold at a similarly high price, with much of the money paid due to the fact that it’s the first production Hot Shot.

Lot # S90 2012 Dallara DW12 Honda Indy Car; S/N DW12037; Blue, Yellow, “NAPA, No. 98″/Black; Estimate $1,175,000 – $1,250,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,025,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,127,500. – No engine installed. – Alexander Rossi’s Indy winner at the 100th running May 29, 2016 in a memorable finish with an empty fuel tank. Previously driven at Indy by Alex Tagliani, Jack Hawksworth and Gabby Chaves. On display at the Indy Museum through the end of the year. Offered with a 99-year lease (after August 2020) of the Indy-winning engine from Honda (not including an estimated $125,000 rebuild and ECU) and a requirement the car be displayed at Indy annually April-June if the lease offer is taken up. – This is expensive, but not unprecedented, particularly after RM got $3,520,000 in 2013 for Johnny Rutherford’s 1974 Indy winning McLaren, but still a breathtaking result for a modern Indy car, even with the engine lease deal.

Lot # T123 1955 DeSoto Fireflite Sportsman 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 50359793; Blue, White/White leather, Blue cloth; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $21,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $23,100. – 291/200hp, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, power steering, power brakes, dash shift. – Tidy and restored underneath. Two very light scratches on the nose. The chrome is a little tired. Chip at the back of the hood. Light pitting on the window frames. Very good restored interior. Plenty of little flaws aside, it’s a body-on restored DeSoto done to reasonably high standards, and it has a lot of eyeball in these colors. – Barrett-Jackson sold this in Scottsdale last year for the exact same amount, a price that’s both consistent and fair. Lots of style per dollar.

Lot # S159 1969 Dodge Coronet Super Bee Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N WM21J9G174252; Yellow, Black/Black vinyl; Estimate $115,000 – $130,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $110,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $121,000. – 426/425hp Hemi, 4-speed, hub caps, red line tires, Super Track Pack, 4.10 Sure Grip. – One of 38 Hemis. Represented as having driven 25 miles in the past decade. Featured in Mopar Muscle magazine in 2006. Good older paint and chrome. Factory gaps. Clean underneath. Good restored interior. Nothing is super fresh but there’s not really anything to pick on, either. A real deal Hemi Super Bee with no needs. – Anything less than this for such a well-restored and maintained Super Bee Hemi hardtop would be unfair to either the car or its seller. The right car for the right money.

Lot # S116.1 1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Sedan, Body by Murphy; S/N 2284; Engine # J-262; Black/Beige leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $1,000,000 – $1,250,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,050,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,155,000. – Chrome wire wheels, Michelin blackwall tires, dual enclosed sidemounts with chrome bands, trunk rack, small Pilot-Rays, radiator stoneguard, polished hood side vents, Watson Stabilator rebound dampers, wood running boards. Firewall # 2284. – Excellent paint, chrome, aluminum brightwork, interior, top and glass. A twenty-seven year old restoration that still looks great and is holding up very well except for fading leather on the front seats. Beautiful coachwork, too. Academy of Art University Collection. – Sold by RM at Meadow Brook in 2006 for $907,500 and again there four years later for $825,000. Today the odometer shows only 218 more miles than it did in 2006. The car looks to all intents and purposes exactly as it did a dozen years ago aside from the mileage. The result may be a little generous, but the car’s history is clear and that counts for a lot.

Lot # S136 1930 Duesenberg Model J Torpedo Phaeton, Body by Roxas; S/N 2276; Engine # J-255; Black/Maroon leather; Estimate $1,000,000 – $1,200,000; Rebodied or re-created, 1- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $900,000. – Dual sidemounts with mirrors, chrome wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual remote ‘Sportlite’ spotlights, dual windshields, low profile cloth-covered luggage trunk, single Pilot-ray, outside exhaust headpipes, chrome mesh hood sides, rear clock and speedometer. Matching chassis, firewall and engine. – Originally a Judkins Limousine used by Mrs. E.L. Cord, later sold to Pacific Auto Rentals and used in numerous motion pictures through 1984, then rebodied by Fran Roxas in this Brunn Torpedo Phaeton style. An older show quality restoration with very good paint, bright chrome, upholstery and top. – Sold by RM at Meadow Brook in 2004 for $500,500, by Bonhams at Boca Raton in 2013 for $698,500 (after two no-sales in 2010 and 2011). Reported sold here by Mecum in 2013 for $1,016,500 but showed up a month later at the Dallas sale, then at Kissimmee in January 2014, both no-sales, before being reported sold by Mecum at Indy in 2014 for $1,350,000. A no-sale here in 2016 reportedly bid to $800,000. The body history is a little checkered and it is a replica body, but it also is a very pretty one. Expecting much if any more than the reported bid here, however, requires overlooking the replica body.

[2016 photo]

Lot # S93 1933 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe Disappearing Top, Body by Bohman & Schwartz; S/N 2421; Engine # J-386; Cream/Burgundy leather; Estimate $3,250,000 – $3,500,000; Concours restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $3,500,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $3,850,000. – Chrome wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual sidemounts with mirrors, rumble seat, outside exhaust headpipes, rumble seat, golf bag door, Pilot-Rays. – Excellent paint, chrome, upholstery and interior wood. Engine and chassis were show quality but the chassis has some grease residue and the panel behind the seats is sculpted from Bondo which does not lend credibility to the restoration’s quality. Rebodied in period by Bohman & Schwartz for movie director Roy Del Ruth. In Harrah’s for almost 20 years. Later owners include Dr. Terry Bennett, Ken Behring, Blackhawk Collection, Bob Gottlieb, Imperial Palace and Dean Kruse. Shown at Pebble Beach in 2007. – Offered here in 2016 with a reported bid of $3.6 million and got the deal done this year at only $100,000 less. It is a storied Duesenberg with a succession of high profile owners who knew what they were doing and had the resources to give it what was needed, all of which shows in its excellent condition. This is a lot of money, even for a Duesenberg, but this is a lot of Duesenberg.

[Matches that guy’s tee shirt.]

Lot # S56 1974 Ferrari 246 GTS Dino Spider, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 08070; Violo Metallizato, Matte Black roof panel/Black leather; Estimate $450,000 – $550,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $425,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $467,500. – Borletti air conditioning, power windows, Cromodora alloy wheels, Toyo tires. – Good new paint purported to be the original color (one of 31 delivered in Violo) and attractive new lightly stretched upholstery and mousehair style dash top. Engine and chassis are freshly done to like new standards. – Sold by Gooding at Amelia in 2014 before the restoration for $341,000. The price it brought here reflects its quality restoration and the unusual color, at least for those who like violet. No matter what your opinion of the color is, though, it will be impossible to miss even among rows of Dinos, mostly in Red/Tan.

Lot # S117 1965 Ferrari 275 GTB Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 06943; Red/Black leather; Estimate $1,900,000 – $2,200,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,500,000. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires. – Good paint and major chrome, flawed side window trim chrome. Dirty underbody with old undercoat. Good upholstery, interior trim and gauges. Originally a short nose, converted to long in 1981 with a Scaglietti part. Competently but not excessively restored, then driven. – Reported bid to $1.6 million here a year ago when the odometer showed five fewer miles than were displayed today. The reported bid here is realistic for its history, the altered body and its overall condition and could have been taken with minimal regret.

Lot # S79 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 10717; Grigio Mahmoud/Beige leather; Estimate $3,000,000 – $3,100,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $2,800,000. – Centerlock alloy wheels, dual mirrors, Blaupunkt AM/FM radio in addition to a later underdash AM/FM radio, dash clock, manuals, tool roll. – All original except for one repaint in the 1970s and a replacement odometer. Badly fading finish in some spots, particularly on the front. Big chips at the front of the driver’s door. Fairly worn original seats, but the rest of the interior is quite good and well preserved. Clean used engine bay and underbody. Purchased in 1970 by Ferrari mechanic Terry Myr and kept by him until 2015, so it is reasonable to assume it’s as sound mechanically as it is cosmetically. – Reported bid to $2.8 million at Mecum’s Kissimmee auction in 2016 and here later that year where it was passed on a reported high bid of $2,850,000. Its odometer has added some 660km since 2016 but otherwise the 275 GTB/4 is pretty much the same and the string of similar results isn’t getting any better with the passage of time.

Lot # S141 1967 Ferrari 330 GTC Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 9955; Red/Tan leather; Estimate $550,000 – $650,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $550,000. – Borrani wire wheels, Ansa exhaust, woodrim steering wheel, Becker Europa radio, power windows, air conditioning. – Represented with 1,000 miles on a rebuilt engine, but the engine bay needs a serious detailing. Good but not exceptional paint and chrome. Good seats and carpets. The cap on the steering wheel is cracked and cloudy. Light road wear underneath. A driver quality/event car, but not a great example by the standards of Enzo-era 12-cylinder Ferraris. – This is an undistinguished 330 GTC that has been making the Mecum auction circuit since 2016 drawing reported high bids of as much as $600K and never finding a home. Its most recent bid was $550,000, the same as both the low estimate here and the reported high bid. There’s no reason it shouldn’t have found a home except that the auctioneer forgot to stop polling the chandeliers at $525K.

Lot # S180 2001 Ferrari 360 Spider, Body by Scaglietti; S/N ZFFYT53A310123547; Yellow/Black leather; Black top; Estimate $125,000 – $100,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $75,000. – 6-speed, carbon fiber seats, clear bra on the nose and mirrors. – The car has a clear bra but appears to have flaws underneath. Rock chips are under the bumper behind both rear wheels and there are paint chips under the bottom right of the rear grille. The top is in good condition. The interior is generally good with driver’s side bolster wear and scratches to the driver’s inside door handle. A presentable 360 made more desirable with the 6-speed, but it could be better given the 14,875 miles. – It’s not a standout from a condition point of view but it’s yellow and it’s a 6-speed. The reported high bid undervalues the 6-speed.

Lot # S122 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 16109; Yellow/Black leather, Black bars; Estimate $625,000 – $675,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $625,000. – Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Ansa exhaust, Simpson lap belts, Momo leather-wrapped steering wheel, factory air conditioning, power windows, later Alpine cassette stereo. – Fully restored in the 1990s and 8,000 miles ago. Very good paint other than a chip at the back edge of the hood and two more small ones at the back edge of the passenger’s side door. Lightly scratched window frames. Very light wear to the steering wheel and seats but otherwise very good interior. Lightly used but tidy underneath. Well restored in the first place and quite well kept since. – Where has this Daytona been before? Many places, including Kissimmee, Monterey and Dallas in 2016, Kissimmee, Houston, Indy and Las Vegas 2017, Kissimmee and here as well as the Hollywood Wheels “auction” at Amelia in March of this year. Despite bringing bids equal to or above the low estimate on occasions including here it has never found a new owner and is window dressing to attract spectators. It is not seriously for sale and the “bids” it receives are meaningless.

Lot # F111 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 16701; Ice Blue/Black leather, Black bars; Estimate $625,000 – $700,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $750,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $825,000. – Centerlock Cromodora wheels, Michelin WXW tires, tool kit, manuals, Dinoplex ignition, Becker Mexico cassette radio, power windows, Borletti air conditioning. – Represented with a single repaint and as mostly original other than rebuilt suspension in 2015. Showing 17,505 miles. Lightly scratched front bumpers. Good, shiny wheels with older tires. Very good paint. Handsome, mellowed interior that shows age but charmingly so. With everything underneath pretty much all original, it would be an even more compelling car with original paint. – A post-block sale at Mecum’s Kissimmee auction in 2016, then passed at Indy three months ago on a reported $660,000 bid. What happened here is hard to fathom as this is by a meaningful margin the most expensive Daytona berlinetta among the four in the Monterey auctions. It’s a quality, mostly original car, but the originality is compromised by age and use and it was bought highly generously at this price.

Lot # S48.1 2003 Ferrari Enzo Coupe, Body by Ferrari; S/N ZFFCW56A630131240; Red/Red cloth; Estimate $3,100,000 – $2,900,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,600,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $2,860,000. – Potenza tires, Scuderia shields. – Good paint that shows some polishing marks. The engine is very clean and tidy. The interior has minimal wear only evidenced by negligible wrinkling on the driver’s seat. A practically new Enzo represented with 3,150 miles. – This is what it costs to own an Enzo, still an exciting and brutally fast Ferrari even if its performance is matched or exceeded by many later Ferraris including some that are decidedly more practical. 3,150 miles is rather high for an Enzo, though.

Lot # S146 2014 Ferrari F12 Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFT4UFA7E0202496; Red/Black leather, Alcantara inserts; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $235,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $258,500. – Carbon fiber everywhere (engine cover, driver zone, door panels, filter box, splitter, wing, cup holder), manettino steering wheel, bi-xenon headlights, carbon ceramic brakes, chipguarded nose, SF shields – 1,260 miles and like new. Reputedly has $162,626 in options. – Take out the options at their sticker price and the car brought under $100K. On the other hand, the car without the options is worth about this much and the options are free. Either way it is a sound and realistic transaction.

Lot # S125 2017 Ferrari F12 TdF Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFF81BFA7H0220566; Red, Black stripe/Black Alcantara; Estimate $1,000,000 – $1,250,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $950,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,045,000. – Signed by Sebastian Vettel. Carbon brakes with red calipers, carbon Scuderia shields, tinted glass, telemetry, carbon fiber trim, AFS system, chipguarded. – 1,157 miles and like new. Only $92,000 in options. – Offered by Mecum without success at Las Vegas in November of last year ($1 million bid), Kissimmee in January ($1.1 million bid) and Indy in May ($1,050,000 bid) and finally closed the deal here at this realistic price.

Lot # S97 2017 Ferrari F12 TdF Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFF81BFA8H0223170; Grigio Ferro Metallizato, Red, Black stripes/Black; Estimate $1,200,000 – $1,100,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,000,000. – Red calipers, Scuderia shields, P Zero tires. – No visible wear anywhere on this car and represented with just 446 miles and $104,000 in options. – Based upon other F12 TdF results this week in Monterey the offer here was realistic and could have been taken with satisfaction.

Lot # S184 1999 Ferrari F355 Serie Fiorano Spider, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFXR48A0X0115427; Red/Tan leather; Black top; Estimate $150,000 – $130,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $75,000. – Challenge rear grille, Scuderia shields, carbon fiber interior trim, automanual gearbox. – The car is serial number 1 of 100 Serie Fioranos. There are various rock chips in the paint around the wheel wells and nose. The driver’s seat bolsters are worn and beginning to show cracking. The passenger’s seat shows light wear around the bolsters, and the steering wheel suede is worn from being driven and is beginning to look tired. An engine-out service was performed recently. Overall a maintained but driven limited edition 355 represented as number 1 of 100 built in 1999. – Crossed the block here last year with a reported high bid of $125,000 and returned this year to a much less enthusiastic audience who didn’t much appreciate its condition. It looks like more wear than the 18,589 miles showing and the bid was reasonable for its condition, if not its “first of the Serie Fiorano” status.

Lot # S80.1 1995 Ferrari F50 Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFTA46B000103114; Red/Black, Red cloth; Estimate $3,700,000 – $4,200,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $3,000,000. – P Zero tires, Assembly # 19963, Ferrari Classiche certified, Grey market, books, soft top, car cover, luggage. – Displayed at the Frankfurt Motor Show. Showing 3,363 miles. Serviced in 2016 including new fuel bladders. A few tiny chips in the nose. Otherwise looks like a new car and the second of 349 built. – Still mostly analog, with a slick-shifting 6-speed manual gearbox and little used from new. Its status as the second built is significant, but not significant to make it work even close to the reported high bid when $2.5-$2.7 million will buy F50s with later builds and probably lower miles. At this bid it could have been sold with some satisfaction.

Lot # S111 2014 Ferrari LaFerrari Coupe, Body by Ferrari; S/N ZFF76ZFA5E0206523; Red/Red; Estimate $3,000,000 – $3,300,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,900,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $3,190,000. – P Zero tires. Red calipers, carbon-ceramic brakes, carbon fiber body trim, manuals, keys and original window sticker. – No sign of wear or use, and represented with 307 miles. – No longer today’s hypercar, but still hypercar-enough for any mortal drivers who are challenged to deal with 600hp, let alone 949 petrol/electric horses. This is a realistic price for the presentation, specifications, options and 307 miles.

Lot # S98 2015 Ferrari LaFerrari Coupe, Body by Ferrari; S/N ZFF76ZFA4F0209754; Yellow/Black, Yellow; Estimate $3,500,000 – $3,250,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $3,200,000. – P Zero tires, carbon fiber exterior trim and mirrors. – No indication of use anywhere on the exterior. Represented with 419 miles and looks like a new car. – Yellow is good, as are the 419 miles, but so is the reported high bid which recognizes both and could have resulted in finding a new owner at a value satisfying to both the seller and the buyer. S111 sold for $2.9 million hammer and had fewer miles (but it wasn’t Yellow.)

Lot # S14 1959 Fiat 600 Multipla Station Wagon; S/N 58779; Mouse Gray, Off White/Patterned cloth; Estimate $65,000 – $85,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $45,000. – Hub caps, whitewalls, roof rack. – The doors don’t want to close all the way. Very good paint and chrome. All new weather stripping. Very clean and fully restored engine bay. Restoration finished earlier this year and aside from a few forgivable things, it’s gorgeous, or at least as gorgeous as one of these awkward-looking Multiplas can be. – A charming little thing, like a cute little puppy that some people just want to take home and nurture. The bidders didn’t go all the way, just like the doors on the Multipla, to meeting the consignor’s expectations, and recent transactions in nearly-perfect Multiplas (and there are more than one meeting that criterion) suggest that this price is indeed light.

Lot # F115 2005 Ford GT Coupe; S/N 1FAFP90S45Y400606; Silver, Black side stripes/Black; Estimate $325,000 – $375,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $300,000. – BBS wheels, painted calipers, McIntosh stereo. – The paint shows excellent except for an oddly large number of chips on the right mirror housing. Otherwise looks like a new GT and is represented with 1,961 miles. – Reported sold at the Leake Tulsa auction in June for $302,500, this car also hammered not sold at a $300,000 high bid at Mecum Kansas City in March. There is no shortage of low miles Ford GTs, and a flood of 2017 GTs in the pipeline waiting for their 24-month holding periods to come due. That may very well decimate the ’05-’06 Ford GT market.

Lot # S110 2017 Ford GT Coupe; S/N 2FAGP9CW2HH200048; Ingot Silver, Black stripes/Black (“Dark Energy”); Estimate $1,700,000 – $1,900,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,600,000. – Forged alloy wheels, carbon ceramic brakes, carbon fiber rockers, titanium wheel lugs. – 9 miles and like new. – It had 7 miles when it was sold by Mecum at Indy three months ago for $1,815,000 ($1,650,000 hammer). The seller knows this is the time to get out from under a speculative acquisition of a model under disposition restrictions to the original buyers and based on this result the 2017 Ford GT buyers are keeping their powder dry for the coming turkey shoot.

Lot # S104 2006 Ford GT Heritage Coupe; S/N 1FAFP90S36Y400551; Gulf Blue, Orange/Black; Estimate $500,000 – $550,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $475,000. – BBS forged wheels, McIntosh stereo, includes window sticker. – 21 miles and like new. – 21 miles from new is impressive even by Ford GT standards so it should rightfully command top dollar, but top dollar was offered at the reported high bid and it should have been accepted.

Lot # S219 2005 Ford GTX1 Targa; S/N 1FAFP90S05Y400621; Black, Gold Stripes/Black; Estimate $350,000 – $425,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $275,000. – GTX1 model with special exhaust, custom wheels, removable roof panels, smoked lights, special interior. Autographed by Shelby, Penske, Gurney, Andretti and others on the tail. – Represented as the 24th of 30 GTX1s produced by Genaddi Design in Wisconsin and has 38,875 miles, making it the highest-mile GT we’ve ever seen. It has some light general wear to the interior and the paint isn’t as fresh-looking as we’ve come to expect from used GTs, but it’s still an attractive car. You’d have to love black and gold, though, because that theme extends to the interior as well. – This is a GT that you actually wouldn’t feel guilty about putting a few miles on and that makes it almost unique, but from a collectability standpoint it’s not hard to see why bidders weren’t enthralled with this car.

Lot # S214 1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 SportsRoof; S/N 0F02G124854; Medium Lime Metallic, Black/Black vinyl; Estimate $45,000 – $65,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $46,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $50,600. – 302/290hp, 4-speed, Polyglas GT tires, shaker hood, spoilers, rear window slats, Hurst pistol grip shifter, Philco radio, 3.91 Traction-Lok, power steering, power brakes. – Good older paint but the Boss decals are faded. The doors stick out slightly. Restored but used underneath. Newer seats and carpets. The rest of the interior looks original but well kept. A pretty good Boss 302 for driving and enjoying, but a way’s off from perfect. – Sold by Barrett-Jackson at Scottsdale earlier this year for a similarly modest $55,000. The seller was surely hoping for more, but the presentation on this car just isn’t great and there were plenty of other Mustangs in the sale to get excited over.

Lot # S200 1956 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N P6FH157009; Coral, White hardtop/Black, White; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $85,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $93,500. – 312/225hp, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, porthole hardtop, Continental kit, power steering, power brakes, pushbutton radio. – Spotless fresh and fully restored engine bay. Very good paint and chrome. Even gaps. Very good interior. Recently and fully restored in gorgeous colors. It’s a quick detailing away from a show field. – It also brought a generous price for its specifications and equipment, but 2-seat T-birds are easy to fall for and Coral is a glamorous Fifties color. This result is a bit of heart over brain, but no more than the condition of this T-bird deserved.

Lot # F110 1967 Ghia 450SS Convertible, Body by Ghia; S/N 4016; Yellow/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $200,000 – $225,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $110,000. – 273/235hp Mopar V8, automatic, power brakes and steering, chrome spoke Borrani wheels, console with floor shift, Kenwood CD changer stereo with giant Helix amplifier. – Very good paint and body. Shiny chrome and fully restored engine compartment with little use. The underbody has been undercoated with some bits flaking off and oxidized metal underneath. The interior has been redone with the seats creased from use. The engine compartment and chassis are oily and road grimy. A 10-year-old restoration that has held up quite well on this unusual Ghia, which is essentially a Plymouth Barracuda in an Italian suit. – Buttressed by design/build deals with Chrysler Corporation, Ghia considered itself something of a manufacturer in the late Sixties. The Ghia 450SS (an aggrandizing title for the 4.5 liter displacement of Chrysler’s diminutive 273 V-8) was the manifestation of this conceit. After testing the waters at Russo and Steele here in Monterey in 2016 with a $140,000 high bid, repeated at Mecum Anaheim in November of the same year with the same bid it showed up here with an absolutely fantabulous estimate range but a perfectly reasonable high bid that should re-educate the consignor.

Lot # S8 1977 Honda Civic CVCC Hatchback; S/N SGC3517370; White/Tan vinyl; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000. – Steel wheels, later radio, 4-speed. – Good original paint with minimal fading. The engine compartment is highly detailed and shows like new, with only some cracking to the strut tower rubber indicating the age. The interior is extremely clean and minor wear to the driver’s seat is the only thing noticeable. Showing 19,946 believable miles that are represented as actual. A beautifully preserved example of a an early Civic. – Mecum represented this as a one-owner car, but Barrett-Jackson has reported it sold twice, once at Scottsdale last year for $13,200 and again in Las Vegas last year for $15,400. Most of the value in this car is in the fact that there can only be a handful of early Civics in anywhere near this level of condition, and that really appeals to some collectors. In Monterey, it appealed a lot. The fuel economy and performance achieved by the Civic CVCC (Controlled Vortex Combustion Chamber) was pretty amazing, and in the aftermath of the 70’s fuel crisis the combination of fuel economy and performance meant most of these engineering triumphs were simply driven to death.

Lot # F99 1964 Iso Rivolta IR 300 Coupe, Body by Bertone; S/N 1R360303; Red/Black leather; Estimate $75,000 – $95,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $60,000. – 327/300hp Chevy, 4-speed, Borrani wire wheels, fog lights, pushbutton radio. – Older restored underneath. Sound and blemish-free but older paint and chrome other than some blisters on the filler cap. Tired and pitted original wheels. Fairly tired but presentable interior other than some cracks in the driver’s seat. A mostly restored Vette-powered Italian GT, but done a while ago and tired. – The Rivoltas are justifiably overshadowed by the later, faster, better looking Grifos and are one of the more affordably ways to get into a classic Italian-American hybrid. Even so, the reported high bid was light even for a used example like this, so holding out for more (but not much more) was understandable.

Lot # F153 1958 Jaguar Mark IX 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N STC792013; Dark Blue, Light Blue/Black leather; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $21,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $23,100. – 3781/220hp, automatic, wheel covers, blackwall tires, fender skirts, fog lights, dual wing mirrors, rear seat tables, factory radio. – Good older paint and chrome. Lightly worn but good original leather. Good mostly original interior wood. Undercoated chassis but pretty ratty unrestored engine bay. An intermittently restored Mk IX that’s presentable enough and has plenty of eyeball, but there are plenty of issues to address. – The last of the big ’50s Jaguars saloons, the Mark IX is a pretty good value in that it offers similar styling and equipment to the equivalent Rolls-Royce/Bentleys but a significantly less expensive buy-in price. Restorations are expensive and this car probably has some big bills ahead of it, but the new owner did well to be in it for a modest price and this seems like overall a solid buy. It hasn’t gone far since RM offered it at Meadow Brook in 2005 where it was bid to $20,000 with just under a thousand more miles showing on its odometer today.

Lot # S133 1962 Jaguar XKE SI 3.8 Flat Floor Roadster; S/N 875534; Black/Beige leather; Black top; Estimate $250,000 – $350,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $200,000. – Flat floor, centerlock wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, later CD stereo. – An original car. The original paint shows well with minor chips and raised paint bubbles. The brightwork shows light pitting and scratching but retains its shine, and the wire wheels are near perfect. The interior shows wear on the original seats with a large hole in the driver’s side bolster. The steering wheel wood is very worn and the window trim is cracking. An unrestored Flat Floor Roadster that’s very well preserved despite the years and the 84,103 miles showing. – Given this car’s level of preservation and the value premium that comes with it, the reported high bid here has little premium for this example’s originality. For reasons unknown to people with feet larger than size nine the appeal of the Flat Floor E-type remains strong.

Lot # S195 1965 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster; S/N 1E10675; Engine # 7E23779; Carmen Red/Black; Black top; Estimate $180,000 – $195,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $150,000. – Wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, factory radio. – Recent mechanical sorting by Classic Showcase on an older restoration that has held up very well. Represented as numbers matching. The paint has very few swirls from polishing. Newer tires. Clean engine with no rust or corrosion around it but discoloration on the headers. The interior has light creasing on the seats, and the wood steering wheel rim is lightly worn. The passenger’s grab handle is worn. A clean and desirably configured E-Type that is let down by a few minor things. – This E-Type sold at RM Hershey in 2013 for $115,500. It’s worth more today than it was then, but not so much more that it justifies rejecting the appropriate high bid here. It wasn’t generous but it was fair.

Lot # S66 1957 Kurtis Kraft 500G Indy Car; S/N Bill of Sale; Black, “Bardahl Special, No. 19″/Red; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $235,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $258,500. – 252 Offy, 2-speed, Halibrand centerlock alloy wheels, full width Plexiglas windscreen with smaller original windshield behind, driver’s head fairing, offset driver’s seat. – Well preserved but aged. 11th at Indy in 1957 driven by “Cactus Jack” Turner, restored by Phil Riley, but dormant long enough that it will take no small effort to set it up to turn laps on the Speedway in May. – Frank Kurtis’s cars filled much of the field at Indy in the Fifties. They were meticulously constructed, strong as the Brooklyn Bridge and retain the aura of fat drivers on skinny tires. Only experts know what other races this KK 500G ran, but no doubt there were some and this is a piece of history at a reasonable price.

Lot # S107 2017 Lamborghini Centenario LP770-4 Coupe; S/N ZHWUY5ZD4HLA06451; Nero Aldebaran, Red/Black, Red; Estimate $2,750,000 – $3,000,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $2,250,000. – Carbon fiber body, active suspension, carbon ceramic brakes, rear spoiler, books, air compressor, tools, battery tender, key box and “concept art on carbon fiber”. – 49 miles from new and no indication of use anywhere. Still a new car. – Built to celebrate the 100th birthday of the company’s founder, the Centenario is typical of limited production Lamborghinis in being over the top in every way, including price. The reported high bid was a little more than the car would have cost new, so it’s a little hard to see why the consignor would decide to refuse that number. There were enough similar cars at Mecum Monterey to dilute the potential market, even with waves of young Silicon Valley millionaires around, that the no sale results were meaningless.

Lot # S101 1999 Lamborghini Diablo VT Coupe; S/N ZA9DU01B7XLA12265; Blue/Snowcorn leather, Blue piping; Estimate $300,000 – $350,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $230,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $253,000. – Chrome OZ Racing wheels, climate control, power windows, carbon fiber interior trim, SV wing, books. – 7,915 miles. Alpine Edition VT, represented as one of 12 for the U.S. market. Looks like a new car other than some light wear to the driver’s seat. – A strong but reasonable result for a rare late Diablo. With Countaches just about fully priced, attention has been starting to turn to their successor, and it’s the limited edition Diablos like this one that excite collectors most even with the unusually high miles. It must have done some “Bull Runs”. The Diablo VT with its viscous drive transfer case for the all-wheel drive was a technological breakthrough, particularly in only partially electronic drivetrain management.

Lot # F114 1969 Lamborghini Miura P400 S Coupe; S/N 3802; Red/Gray leather; Estimate $1,300,000 – $1,600,000; Unrestored original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,050,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,155,000. – Cromodora wheels, power windows, air conditioning. – Represented as the second Miura P400 S made and earliest Miura S known to exist The original paint shows bubbling and cracking with large chips on the right wheel well lip. Under the front air dam shows poorly with heavy paint chipping on the frame and some corrosion, but the engine bay shows less corrosion. The wheels are in poor condition with corrosion and paint flaking. The interior has wear to the driver’s seat, parking brake and vents, and the dash shows light fading. A very original car that was not properly stored and looks pretty rough. – Hammered not sold at a $1,150,000 high bid at Hollywood Wheels Amelia Island earlier this year. Even taking its significance into account, this car isn’t worth much more than that and the seller got the message here in Monterey. This is a realistic price for a tired and flawed but inherently highly desirable Miura P400 S.

Lot # S30 1956 Lancia Appia S2 Furgoncino Van; S/N C801902; Engine # 29-58; Light Olive, Olive/Olive vinyl; Estimate $55,000 – $65,000; Truck restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $42,500. – RHD. 4-speed column shift, Light Olive wheels, Michelin X tires, Carello headlights, heater. – Cracked steering wheel rim, body cracked by a rear door hinge. Sound, lightly orange peely paint, good upholstery, dull gauge lenses. Aged engine compartment. Serviceably restored cargo compartment. Inconsistently restored but way cool. – Anyone who knows what the Lancia is worth (Donald?) should call immediately, but it is so cool, idiosyncratic and even practical it deserves to find a home. It’s a driver, but a vintage racer with a Lancia GP car should snap this up as a support vehicle (Peter?).

Lot # F71 1935 Lincoln Model K Roadster; S/N K3948; Bright Yellow, Mustard accent/Tan leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $120,000. – Body color wire wheels with hubcaps and trim rings, wide whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemounts with mirrors, Guide Super Ray driving lights, rumble seat, luggage rack, radio. – Broken license plate bracket. Very good paint, upholstery and chrome. The frame has been quickly resprayed assembled and is seriously unattractive. The restored engine compartment has been drenched in coolant. Overall, a disappointing and neglected car everywhere except the paint, upholstery and chrome, and they’re only marginal.. – It’s pointless to go further into all the attention this Lincoln K needs. Suffice to say that it’s serious and expensive. The owner should take any money offer from a dedicated collector/restorer who will give it the comprehensive restoration it needs and deserves.

Lot # S123 1909 Locomobile Model 40 Type I Demi-Tonneau; S/N 2376; Engine # 2376; Dark Blue, Black accent, Red coachlines/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $450,000 – $550,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $370,000. – RHD. Warner drum speedometer, Rushmore acetylene headlights and generator, Gray & Davis kerosene sidelights and taillight, dual right side spares, Rubes-style bulb horn, cream wood spoke wheels, 36×4 1/2 tires. – Class first at Meadow Brook in 2010. Very good older paint. Good upholstery and top. The brass needs attention but the Loco is terrific. – Locomobile is one of the great marques of the early 20th century. They were so well built using only the best materials that they frequently fell victim to scrappers in search of their steel, brass and bronze making this 1909 Model 40’s survival something of a miracle. It’s been peddled by Mecum since Monterey 2013 with a succession of high bids from $450,000 to today’s $370,000 without finding a home.

Lot # S77 1957 Maserati 3500 GT Coupe, Body by Touring; S/N 1011612; Blue/Tan leather; Estimate $250,000 – $275,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $157,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $173,250. – ZF 4-speed, AM-FM, Black center polished rim alloy wheels with hubcaps, Pirelli Carrier tires, front disc brakes, dual outside mirrors, Carello headlights and fog lights. – Very good clearcoat paint, new interior and chrome. The underbody is like new. A very good Maserati, let down by the appropriate size but hard compound truck tires. – A better Maserati 3500 GT for a lower price is not likely to come along anytime soon unless the collector car market takes a huge dump. Even then this 3500 GT is moderately priced and a good value.

Lot # S179 1969 Mercedes-Benz 280SL Roadster; S/N 11304412004654; White/Tan; Tan top; Estimate $70,000 – $85,000; Incomplete restoration, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $46,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $50,600. – Wheel covers, Becker Europa radio. – Partially refreshed original car that has new paint. The interior has refreshed leather, original trim, but the steering wheel is tired and cracked. The exterior brightwork is heavily pitted, faded and scratched. The engine is dirty and worn, and the aluminum is corroded, but the underside shows minimal rust. The rubber trim is missing from approximately half of the windows that are not installed. An unfinished project car. – A car with a ton of needs should be bought for as little as possible, because it will always need more time and money than optimistically planned. That’s not what happened here. This is basically driver money paid for a running project, so the new owner is already in this car for more than it’s worth.

Lot # S102 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Coupe; S/N 1980405500154; Fire Engine Red/Tan leather; Estimate $1,300,000 – $1,400,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,000,000. – Becker radio, Avon tires. – The paint shows wear around the driver’s door bottom as well as orange peel in a few places. The rubber around both side windows does not fit properly and the stripping under the doors is cracking. The interior is clean but aged with wear on the driver’s bolster and tub. Overall an older restoration that is starting to show its age up close but is ready to be driven. – Fantastic Gullwings are $1.3-$1.4 million. Tired Gullwings are not and this tired Gullwing could have been sold with no regret at all for the reported high bid here. It would not have been a great value at $900K.

Lot # S92.1 1937 Mercedes-Benz 540K Cabriolet B, Body by Sindelfingen; S/N 169350; Black/Burgundy leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $650,000 – $750,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $525,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $577,500. – Black wire wheels, Michelin tires, dual sidemounts with mirrors, Bosch headlights and dip beam light. Kommission # 257654 – Good older paint with plentiful edge chips, chrome, interior and top. The chassis has been restored but now is aged, as is the engine. The driver’s seat is surface cracked but the rest of the upholstery and the top are sound. Academy of Art University Collection – It’s a 500K Mercedes, with all the quality and performance that implies. It’s also erratically restored (if that term even applies) and has plentiful needs and wants. It was sold by Christie’s at Retromobile in 2007 for $520,560 (Euros 396,500 at the time, this result is an expensive Euros 496,800). It will give entry to the same events as 540K Special Roadsters, though, and is a realistic value at this price.

Lot # S72 1955 Mercury Montclair Convertible; S/N 55LA39456M; Blue/Blue, White leather; White vinyl top; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Recent restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $97,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $107,250. – 292/198hp, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, fender skirts, hood ornament, dual spotlight mirrors, Continental kit. – Older tires. Fantastic paint, chrome, interior and underbody. Fully redone top to bottom, fully loaded, great colors, and absolutely a show car. Phenomenal. – So is the price it brought, but if “the best car you can afford” and a ’55 Merc are on the list this is it. Even at an over-the-top price.

Lot # F73 1960 Mercury Park Lane Convertible; S/N 0Z55M506441; Medium Javelin Bronze Metallic/Bronze; Black cloth top; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Concours restoration, 1 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $104,545 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $115,000. – 430/310hp, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, fender skirts, dual mirrors, dash clock, power windows, pushbutton radio, air conditioning, power seat. – IMOA National Best in Show 2015. AACA Grand National first. Excellent paint and chrome. Spotless and show quality underneath. Excellent fully restored interior. A gorgeous, rare and proven show car with plenty of life left in it. Good luck finding one better than this. – This spectacular Park Lane sold at Auburn Fall last year for $86,900, which was itself a pretty spectacular price. The Monterey bidders rightly recognized it as possibly the best ’60 Park Lane Convertible in the world, and at least two people were willing to way overpay for it although it is curious that the reported all-in price doesn’t back out to a rational high bid.

Lot # T80 1953 MG TD Roadster; S/N 22381; Cream/Black leather; Black top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $12,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $13,750. – Hub caps, rear-mounted spare with cover, banjo steering wheel, badge bar, driving lights, heater. – Clean underneath. Handsome paint but there are a few chips in the fenders. Rough-looking exhaust. Lightly scratched brightwork, particularly around the grille. An attention-grabbing car that’s better than many TDs, but still not perfect. – This kind of money ordinarily buys you a fairly ratty TD, so for a car as solid as this one is, this was a pretty solid bargain that sold for $16,275 at Silver’s Ft. McDowell auction in 2003 and isn’t materially worse today than it was then despite having over 16,000 more miles on its odometer.

Lot # S54 1954 Morgan Plus 4 Roadster; S/N P3069; White/Black leather; Black top; Estimate $60,000 – $70,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $47,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $51,700. – 1991/90hp, wire wheels, two rear-mounted spares, woodrim steering wheel, wood dash. – Rough top frame with paint chipping off. Paint crack around the left front marker lens, but otherwise good quality paint. Fuel has leaked out around the filler cap gasket. Small ding in the left headlight bezel. Very good interior and dash wood with restored gauges. Restored underneath. An older restoration in better than average driver condition for the restoration’s age. – This is a relatively rare transitional model made when Morgan was changing from flat radiators to cowled ones, but that doesn’t make this car super valuable. It hammered not sold here last year at a $40,000 high bid after selling for $45,100 at Mecum Denver earlier last year. This year’s result is fair but not a very good value.

Lot # S191 1953 Nash-Healey LeMans Coupe, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N NHA1275; Gold, Beige/White leather; Estimate $75,000 – $125,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $70,000. – 253/140hp, 3-speed, wire wheel covers, dual mirrors, banjo steering wheel, pushbutton radio, dash clock. – Small dent in the left front fender. Chips around the edges of the hood. More chips around the edges of the doors. Tired chrome and brightwork. Dull gauges. The interior courtesy light is cracked and hanging loose. Decent upholstery. Newer exhaust. Some overspray in the wheel wells. Mostly unrestored underneath. An inherently handsome car and certainly rare, but these colors don’t really do the Pinin Farina coupe bodywork justice and the condition is seriously disappointing. – With just 500 built, the Nash-Healey is a rare car as well as a significant one, but it’s not worth as much as some of its contemporaries, especially those that also wore Pinin Farina bodies. For a car as rough as this, the reported high bid here was more than enough and it’s not likely to get any higher any time soon.

Lot # S5 1966 Oldsmobile Toronado Deluxe 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 396876M520954; Trumpet Gold/Parchment vinyl; Estimate $17,000 – $25,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000. – 425/385hp, automatic, whitewalls, armrest, air conditioning, power windows. – Old repaint with numerous chips plus a big touched up scrape on the right front fender. Tidy and unrestored underneath. Decent but original chrome and brightwork. Several split seams and rips in the driver’s seat but otherwise good original interior. An unrestored Toronado that isn’t anything to write home about but good enough to drive and enjoy. – A generous price, but not by enough in absolute dollar terms to make it extravagant. The premium is a couple thousand dollars, barely a wink and a nod from a bidder.

Lot # F22 1956 Packard Caribbean Convertible; S/N 56991271; White, Pink, Brown/Red, White leather; White vinyl top; Estimate $90,000 – $120,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $87,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $95,700. – Wire wheels, whitewalls, fender skirts, pushbutton transmission, 3.31 twin traction rear end, power steering, power brakes, power windows, power seat. – Good but older paint and chrome. Imperfect gaps. Light wrinkles and smudges on the top. Lightly worn seats but mostly good restored interior. Clean and restored but lightly used underneath. A lightly used older body-on restoration of a late Caribbean in great colors. Not perfect, but most of the expensive stuff has already been done. – Sold by Worldwide at the Weinberg auction in 2009 for $66,000, then not sold at Mecum Indy two years ago at an $80,000 high bid. It was reported sold by Mecum at Kissimmee in January for $71,500 ($65,000 hammer) then not sold at a $64,000 high bid at Hollywood Wheels Amelia Island two months later. It found a receptive audience here in Monterey, with the bidders rightly docking some value for the car’s age but fairly pricing it for its overall quality.

Lot # S152 1930 Packard Standard Eight Dual Cowl Phaeton; S/N 293301; Engine # 294024; Light Yellow, Copper fenders and accent/Black vinyl; Faded cloth top; Estimate $85,000 – $95,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $42,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $46,200. – Firewall # 110733. Light Yellow disc wheels, wide whitewalls, dual chrome wrapped sidemounts with mirrors, C.M. Hall spotlight and Depress Beam headlights, small Pilot-Rays, radiator stoneguard, dual windshields, luggage trunk, wind wings, Bijur chassis lubrication. – Faded paint, weak chrome, sound upholstery, old top. Restored long ago to the standards of the time and thoroughly used since then. It might be usable as is but will need plenty of work before being a reliable driver and the cosmetics will probably get done along the way, so, a restoration project that’s all there and sound. – The Packard is a classic, and so is its restoration, as well as the implication from the firewall number that this is a body swap with a 1934 1107. The Mecum bidders seemed to figure that out and paid a modest price for it.

Lot # S77.1 1936 Packard Super Eight 1404 Dual Cowl Sport Phaeton; S/N 941206; Engine # 757663; Maroon, Beige accent/Beige leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $375,000 – $425,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $410,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $451,000. – Dual spotlights, dual enclosed sidemounts, dual windshields, wide whitewalls, chrome wire wheels, radio, no heater. – An older concours-quality restoration still with excellent paint, interior, chrome and glass. Chassis shows some use but is otherwise in nearly like new condition. Academy of Art University Collection – Sold by RM at Meadow Brook in 2000 for $286,000, then by Gooding & Company at Pebble Beach in 2004 for $341,000. It’s added 150 miles to the odometer since 2004, but is largely neglected since them and is in need of detailing, but not a lot of remedial attention. This price is $110,000 more than 14 years ago, a generous increment for even a quality ’36 Packard. It is a seriously handsome car, however, and the bidders’ enthusiasm for it can be understood.

Lot # S53 1970 Pontiac GTO Judge 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 242370P160448; Black, Judge Graphics/Red vinyl; Estimate $65,000 – $75,000; Enthusiast restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $66,000. – 400/366hp Ram Air III, 4-speed, Rally wheels, Polyglas tires, hood tach, Hurst T-handle shifter. – Good paint with a large filled chip on the passenger’s side quarter panel near the bumper. The rear bumper has fine scratches. The driver’s side drip edge has small dents and the windshield trim has fine scratches. The engine compartment is completely redone, although the engine is overly glossy. The underbody has old undercoat, while the rear axle has been painted too glossy. The interior is complete with a few scuffs and scrapes on the door cards. An enthusiast’s cosmetic restoration with corners cut on the items that are not obviously visible and with little knowledge of how these cars were built. – This car sold for $58,300 at Mecum Indy in 2011, when muscle prices were right about at their bottom. This result is on the modest side in today’s GTO market, but this isn’t a great car and both parties can be satisfied with the price.

Lot # F120 1965 Porsche 356 SC Coupe, Body by Reutter; S/N 131469; Engine # 820938; Ivory/Black leather; Estimate $180,000 – $225,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $120,000. – Power sunroof, chrome wheels, Vredestein tires, woodrim steering wheel, Blaupunkt multiband radio. – Very good paint and interior. The underbody is restored and nearly like new. There is nothing to ask from this 356 SC Coupe. – Offered here in 2016 with a reported high bid of $180,000, then reported sold here in 2017 for $176,000 ($160,000 hammer). Why it was so unattractive in 2018 is unexplainable. It is a far better car, both inherently and in its condition, than the minimalist reported high bid. This result means nothing.

Lot # S51 1957 Porsche 356A Coupe; S/N 101465; Black/Red; Estimate $175,000 – $200,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $140,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $154,000. – Hub caps, gold brightwork, sunroof, Blaupunkt stereo. – On first observation this is a high quality restoration with black paint that has no chips. But there are light swirls and scratches from polishing. The chrome is all replated, but the brightwork is dull and worn, and the chrome steel wheels show wear with new tires. Recently refreshed interior appears excellent and fresh. A clean and well-restored 356 but with some oversights that call its underlying restoration into question. – Shiny and bright, but maybe not as good everywhere as it appears on top. The Mecum Monterey bidders figured it out and put a realistic price on this mixed condition 356A.

Lot # S67 1963 Porsche 356B Coupe; S/N 214397; Blue/Red; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $49,500. – Chrome steel wheels, pushbutton radio. – Looks great from 15 feet away but shows pitting on the rims, faded and scratched brightwork, orange peel in the paint, and poor fitment around the hood. The tires are very worn and severely cracked. The shifter boot is missing and the steering wheel is cracking, but the seats and door panels have been recovered and are very clean with no creasing or marks. The engine is clean, appears refreshed, and runs well. The underside has newer undercoating and shows minimal rust. No real history represented. A mediocre barely driver quality late 356. – Unremarkable in terms of both equipment and condition, this 356B changed hands at a pretty much spot on price that leaves the new owner a little bit left over to address the car’s most pressing needs.

Lot # S91 1958 Porsche 550A Spyder, Body by Wendler; S/N 550A0141; Polished Aluminum/Aluminum, Blue cloth cushions; Estimate $4,500,000 – $5,000,000; Rebodied or re-created, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $2,000,000. – 1,750cc 4-cam Carrera engine, Porsche 5-speed, woodrim steering wheel, Dunlop Racing tires, full-width Plexiglas windscreen, passenger’s seat hard cover, driver’s head fairing. – Impressive bare aluminum body with nearly invisible seams. New bare steel tubing braced driver’s paperclip rollbar. Dirty wheels. Raced when new by Ernst Vogel in and around Austria with unimportant results. New body panels and no mention of the engine’s originality. – There were three Porsche 550’s in Monterey. Gooding’s 550 sold for $4,455,000. RM’s 550A sold for $4.9 million. This hybrid went begging.

Lot # S186 2003 Porsche 911 GT2 Coupe; S/N WP0AB29933S696146; Silver/Grey leather; Estimate $145,000 – $175,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $125,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $137,500. – Yellow calipers, fog lights, power windows, power seats, air conditioning. – Represented with 12,607 miles and having been serviced four years but 85 miles ago. Some scrapes on the bottom front lip. Some surface rust on the wheel lugs. Like new interior. A few small details away from perfect, but still very good. – A lot of special high performance late model Porsches cost more now than they ever did new. Not so with these mid-2000s cars. They are, perhaps unfairly, a bit stigmatized along with the other unloved 996-generation cars. They’re solid and brutally quick cars, though, making them a rare good value in Porsche world. This was a straightforward and appropriate result.

Lot # S147 2008 Porsche 911 GT3 Coupe; S/N WP0AC29938S792296; Viper Green, Black/Black; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $275,000. – Yellow calipers, power steering, Sport Chrono, air conditioning, roll cage. – The paint is very good other than a few rock chips on the hood. The interior is clean and smells new, although the seat bolsters show minor creasing. Represented with 8,571 miles and nearly like new. – Bid to about twice its original price, this car should have gone home at the reported high bid. The lighter, wider GT3 RS is inherently collectible but the cars aren’t yet trading for higher than the number bid here, and this is a less than perfect car.

Lot # F148 1987 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe; S/N WP0EB0931HS070085; Guards Red/Cream leather; Black top; Estimate $110,000 – $130,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $75,000. – BBS modular wheels, snorkely brake light, Alpine stereo, power windows, air conditioning. – Showing 34,291 believable miles. Light wear to the seats. A handful of chips on the nose. The wheels could stand to be cleaned up. Otherwise a pretty well cared for unrestored 930 cab. – This isn’t a great car, but it’s definitely better than the reported high bid and arguably deserves somewhere on the other side of 100 grand.

Lot # F186 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe; S/N WP0AB29991S687948; Black/Black leather; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $55,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $60,500. – RUF Powerkit Rturbo equipment, sunroof, Bose stereo. – The nose has a few filled chips. The paint is generally good with some polishing swirls. The engine has been detailed. The interior is well kept with appropriate seat wear for the miles. A decent driver quality car. – A really high price for a modified 996 showing 55,744 miles, even when you consider the extra performance form the RUF kit and the fact that the work was professionally done.

Lot # S194 1965 Porsche 912 Coupe; S/N 350098; Ivory/Black; Estimate $190,000 – $230,000; Recent restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $145,000. – 5-speed, wheel covers, wood shift knob. – An older restoration that shows pitting and scratching on most chrome and a worn and cracked steering wheel, but the interior shows minimal wear otherwise and the paint looks high quality. This car is believed to be first 912 imported to the U.S., and was exhibited by the Petersen museum as 1 of 55 most significant Porsches. – The first 912 in the U.S., but is that worth a hundred thousand dollar premium? Not likely and the new owner will find it hard to establish a meaningful distinction for this 912 over similar ’65 912s worth $40,000.

Lot # F109.1 1987 Porsche 959 Komfort Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ95ZHS0900075; Silver/Plum, Grey leather; Estimate $450,000 – $550,000; Unrestored original, 5 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $425,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $467,500. – All-wheel drive, Blaupunkt radio, power windows, power seats, books and tools. – Hauled on a trailer that detached from its tow car and center punched (nearly) a tree. Right front wheel is missing, front bumper pushed back a foot or more. Every panel forward of the doors is damaged, both exterior and structural and no telling how far the damage extends while it’s sitting on the floor riding on a dolly. It will take a brave and extremely competent shop to take on this project. – That sounds like Richard Rawling and Dennis Collins, but there’s no indication they were on board for this crazy project. The economics don’t work, even at this price, mostly because even repaired and repaired well the finished 959 will be worth half of one with no stories, about $600-$700,000. On top of that the legend of 959s is increasingly being usurped by later Porsche supercars like the 918 and that is not helping 959 values.

Lot # S126 1989 Porsche 962 Endurance racer; S/N 962108C2; White, Gold, Green, “Miller”/Black; Estimate $2,000,000 – $2,500,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,000,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $2,200,000. – 3-liter single turbo, 830hp. – In highly presentable, complete condition, apparently not run to any extent since 2007. 1989 Daytona 24 winner driven by Derek Bell, Bob Wollek and John Andretti, 1988 Daytona pole winner, Palm Beach Grand Prix winner. The second of two honeycomb tubs built by Jim Chapman for this car, thus the odd “C2” chassis number. Highly modified bodywork for the 1989 season. – The third time’s the charm and this is 962108C2’s third appearance at Mecum Monterey. It started making the rounds at Kissimmee in 2016 then to Monterey in 2016 and 2017 and Indy in 2017 and 2018 with reported high bids ranging from $2.3 million down to $1.6 million before reportedly finding a new owner here at a price consistent with its race-winning history.

Lot # F75 1967 Scarbo Open wheel race car; S/N 001P; Red/Black vinyl; Estimate $105,000 – $135,000; Non-factory replica, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $74,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $81,400. – 425hp electronic fuel injected GM LS V8, 5-speed transaxle, Wilwood brakes, Braid 5-spoke alloy wheels, Racepak display – Orderly and presentable but dusty and a little dirty. It is the first of two built and is 1967 only in the builder’s dreams, a new car built to evoke an earlier time. Apparently raced in SVRA and HMSA events. – This is a generous result for a track day car with limited eligibility dependent on the whims of organizers.

Lot # F28 1929 Thomas-Ford Sprint Car; S/N Engine No. A2272546; Engine # A2272546; Black/Black leatherette; Estimate $25,000 – $40,000; Non-factory replica, 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $17,000. – Model A block, Thomas aluminum dual intake with Stromberg 97s, Thomas aluminum cylinder head, Ford 3-speed, 4-spoke woodrim steering wheel, Autogage instruments and tach, alternator, electric starter, Ford wire wheels, 4-wheel hydraulic drum brakes, homemade friction shocks. – Dull, orange peely paint, dusty and oily. – Made up recently to look old, and it meets that objective. The engine is intriguingly outfitted, enough so that it almost appears that the engine was built and then a car was created to use it. It is hard to argue it is worth much if any more than the reported high bid.

Lot # F49 1987 Toyota Land Cruiser Utility Vehicle 4×4; S/N JT3FJ60G0H1139854; White/Beige cloth; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $31,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $34,100. – Factory air conditioning, power steering, front and rear heaters, cassette stereo. – Tired bumpers and a little oxidized underneath but not bad. Good repaint. Very good original interior considering the 147,973 miles showing. Sold new in Colorado and kept in the Aspen area by three owners. Extensive recent servicing. A used FJ60 to be sure, but a very good one all things considered. – This good but used FJ60 was reported sold on Bring a Trailer a little over a year ago for $8,400. It looks like it has been cleaned up and detailed since then, but nothing too major. If the buyer there was the seller here, they hit the jackpot. This was an over the top price for a model that has seen some interest lately, but not enough to justify 34 grand for one with almost 150,000 miles.

Lot # S43 1969 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ40 Soft Top 4×4; S/N FJ4067128; Red, White/Black vinyl; Beige cloth top; Estimate $65,000 – $85,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $50,000. – Hub caps, rear-mounted spare. – California black plate car in original, unrestored condition. Lots of rock chips and paint wear. The underbody shows surface rust on most surfaces, and the rubber running boards are cracking and faded. The seats are in excellent condition but the floor pan and trunk paint is worn. The engine hasn’t been detailed and shows use, grime and surface rust. An original 28,946-mile U.S. market soft top FJ, but used and not pampered. – The preservation of this unrestored soft top FJ is admirable, yes, but the reported high bid put an appropriate premium on that preservation and could have been taken without second thoughts. There are so many high quality restored and updated FJs out there that the appeal of an original one like this is negligible.

Lot # S6 1972 Triumph TR6 Convertible; S/N CC80647; Saffron/Black vinyl; Estimate $17,000 – $25,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $10,000. – Steel wheels, red line tires, hardtop, woodrim steering wheel, later stereo, luggage rack. – Significant pitting on the original bumper. Big blister on the left front fender and several big touch ups on the driver’s door, plus some cracks below the windows. This is not original paint. Tidy and unrestored underneath. Newer valve cover. Very good original interior. Light cracking on the dash but that is pretty much inevitable on these cars. Represented as a one-owner car and pretty remarkably well kept for an unrestored TR6, but there is plenty to pick on. – Paint and chrome would make a massive difference on this otherwise well-kept and well equipped TR6, but it’s a little disappointing as it sits. Even so, it’s a lot more solid than the ratty TR6s that you see selling for the kind of money offered at this reported high bid, so holding out for more was understandable here.

Lot # S209 1961 Volkswagen Type 2 Microbus; S/N 652790; Mango Green, Sea Gull Grey/Tan vinyl piped in White; Estimate $75,000 – $90,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $55,000. – Hub caps, roof rack, later 1600 twin port engine, 3-row seating – Freshly restored by Deutschland Metal and Body, the underside shows as an undriven body-off restoration, and the paint and body show no wear. The interior was restored by Lenny Copp of West Coast Classic restoration and shows no wear except for large scratches on the rear passenger grab handle. Some body seams around the rear trunk and hinges have evidence of rust holes and corrosion. The engine and mechanicals have all been rebuilt. Quite well restored and ready to show or drive. – It’s more windows, more money in the world of early VW Buses and this one has only eleven. So although it has been mostly very well restored, its base configuration doesn’t make it worth more than the reported high bid, which already seems crazy high if you remember the days when these could be had for a few hundred bucks.

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