Mecum Auctions, Las Vegas, November 15-17, 2018

The numbers below describe a typical Mecum auction with a mid-$30’s average and mid-$20s median.

Missing from that picture are the 39 cars from the Academy of Art University collection, a paltry 4 ½% of the lots offered that has an outsized position on Mecum Auction’s ambitions. 26 of the 39 offered from the collection were sold bringing a total of $2,780,080; the 13 that didn’t sell attracted bids of $2,153,000. They were in large part uncharacteristic of Mecum consignments, including a Bugatti Type 46 (“The Baby Royale”) with Faux Cabriolet coachwork (sold for $1,012,000), a Model J Duesenberg with replica LaGrande dual cowl phaeton coachwork (sold for $770,000), a delicious 1934 Packard Eight sedan (sold for $258,500), a Springfield-built Rolls-Royce Phantom II Town Car (sold for $101,750) and a Stutz Model M Town Car (sold for $97,900).

The Academy of Art consignment in Las Vegas followed Mecum’s successful sale of several other cars from the collection at Monterey in August. Great cars of the Classic Era have been rare at Mecum auctions, but the Academy of Art collection proves that auctions don’t have to follow a formula: great cars ambitiously promoted bring buyers no matter what the venue.

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2018 635/865 73.4% $38,161 $26,400

[69.2%]

$24,232,175
2017 553/887 62.3% $40,152 $27,500

[68.5%]

$22,204,275

Andrew Newton attended and contributed the photos and on-site observations. Rick Carey edited them and is responsible for the final content.

The 86 transactions that follow are sorted by Marque, Year and Model.


Lot #S20 1998 Acura NSX 3.0L Targa; S/N JH4NA1261WT000007; Silver/Black leather; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $35,000. – Automatic, power windows, air conditioning, Bose cassette stereo. – Small chip on the left headlight door but mostly very good paint. Significant wear on the driver’s side seat bolster. Otherwise good interior. With 89,229 miles and an automatic, this isn’t a collector-grade car and likely the cheapest way into NSX ownership. – High mileage on an NSX shouldn’t be too discouraging since VTEC Honda engines run forever, but the automatic can be a serious knock to value and in this case was a turnoff to the Vegas bidders. The reported high bid was quite modest. The car sold for $36,055 at Mecum Anaheim in 2013, but it’s a more valuable car than it was then and deserved to go home with its consignor.

Lot # T174 1966 AMC Rambler Classic 770 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N A6KA55F159850; Marquesa Mauve, White roof/Grey leather, Black cloth; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $6,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $6,600. – 232/145hp six, automatic, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, factory radio. – Tired but presentable chrome and brightwork. Good older paint with some touch ups here and there. Small dent on the trunk lid. Phenomenal original interior. A plain Jane car, but unbelievable preservation and attractive colors with California Black Plate 66RAMBR. – A remarkable surviving largely original example. Most plain Jane utilitarian family haulers like this have long since been driven into a field somewhere to return to the earth. That this one survived, and in such good condition, is something of a miracle, and at this price it’s a rather economic miracle, too.

Lot # F35 1968 AMC Javelin SST Fastback; S/N A8C797X232554; Red/Red, Black vinyl; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $19,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $20,900. – Automatic, wheel covers, power steering, power brakes, Grant GT steering wheel, pushbutton radio, bucket seats, floor shift. – Old tires. Unrestored but tidy and maintained underneath. Presentable old respray but no better than average quality. Lightly scratched windshield frame. Pitted door handles. Erratic gaps. Several cracks in the dash but good newer seat covers. A driver quality car, but can you really expect much better from an old Javelin? It’s cool regardless in that it’s such a rare sight these days. – AMC fans had a surprising amount to look at in Vegas this year, with three AMXs, this Javelin, a Hornet wagon and a Pacer to choose from. This Javelin was sold for a realistic price that takes both its strengths and weaknesses into account.

Lot # F7 1969 AMC AMX Fastback; S/N A9M397X265234; Blue, White stripes/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $27,500. – 4-speed, factory Go Pack 390/315hp, engine bored .30 over, roller rockers, forged pistons and crank, Edelbrock intake, MSD ignition, 3.54 limited-slip, Cragar mags, Radial T/A tires, Hurst shifter, AutoMeter tach mounted on the column. – Good paint but with masking errors around the grille. Decent chrome and brightwork with lightly pitted door handles and taillight trim. Lightly scratched rear glass. Very good, lightly worn interior. Tastefully modified and well restored in the `90s and holding up well. – The mods and the age of the restoration didn’t help this AMX and it sold for a modest price, giving the new owner a car that looks like a hoot to drive for not much money. It was reported sold at Mecum Indy a few months ago for $27,500, a remarkably consistent result given the price here and the $27,500 it sold for at the B-J Orange County sale in 2011. Such consistency is the exception, rather than the rule, but wonderful to see when it happens.

Lot # F120 2007 Aston Martin Vantage Convertible; S/N SCFBF04B37GD06456; Silver/Red leather; Red cloth top; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $37,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $40,700. – Alloy wheels, slotted rotors, navigation system. – Dull headlights and a tiny rip in the top. The paint and the interior, though, are like new. Represented with 60k miles and a clean CARFAX, but no service history. A used Aston. – Bought for about a third of what it cost new, but Astons depreciate like few others and this result is more or less in line with where prices are currently. It is a lot of car for the money, at least until it goes into the Aston store for service and comes out the other end of the service bay with 25% more invested.

Lot # S134 1929 Auburn 8-90 Cabriolet; S/N MD29424; Red, Burgundy/Tan leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $120,000 – $140,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $72,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $79,200. – Painted wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual sidemount spares, suicide doors, rumble seat, golf bag door, luggage rack. – From the Academy of Arts collection. Slightly dirty and stained top. Good and blemish-free but older paint and chrome that have been detailed one too many times. Good interior with light wear to the steering wheel. A straightforward aged restoration on a handsome Auburn. – Sold by RM at Hershey in 2009 for $99,000. The result here is modest and is more attributable to time and place than to a 20% decline in the attractive Auburn cabriolet’s underlying value. It is a very good value at this price.

Lot # F146 1930 Auburn 125 Deluxe 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 1254; Black, Light Yellow/Grey cloth; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $43,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $47,300. – Painted wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual sidemount spares with mirrors, wind wings, sun visor, wood dash and window trim, suicide rear doors. – From the Academy of Arts collection. Formerly owned by actor George Raft and Richard and Linda Kughn. Lightly used but restored underneath. Some lightly scratched brightwork but mostly good older paint and chrome. Some of the glass is delaminating. Slightly uneven gaps. Very good interior with some light wear on the steering wheel. Well restored years ago and still more than good enough to be proud of even if it doesn’t win any trophies. – Sold by RM from the Kughn collection in Arizona in 2010 for $48,400. Quick, name a movie that featured George Raft? I came up with “The Big Sleep”, but that was Bogart. Raft’s most memorable role (for car people) was in “They Drive by Night.” A tough guy to the end, and a tough guy’s Auburn.

Lot # T25 1959 Austin A40 Farina Hatchback; S/N AA2S6L25259; Light Blue/Blue vinyl, cloth; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $6,750 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $7,425. – Hub caps, aftermarket cassette radio, 948 engine. – Shiny, attractive paint but there is a touch up behind the left headlight, two more on the hood, and several chips around the door edges. Older restored underneath. Very good, lightly worn interior. A very pretty little car, and while BMC built tons of these things, they’re a rare sight in the States. This one is essentially in driver condition and nothing to take too seriously. – This is a handsome Pinin Farina-designed oddball and a sure conversation starter. It’s a ton of character for the money at this price.

Lot #S80 1963 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk II BJ7 2+2 Convertible; S/N HBJ7L20605; Red/Black; Black top; Estimate $45,000 – $55,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $33,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $36,300. – Centerlock wire wheels, dual mirrors, boot cover, banjo steering wheel, overdrive. – From the Ardell Brown Estate collection. The paint has no flaws but it’s starting to show its age. Scratched up bumpers. Erratic door fit. Older restored underneath. Light wrinkling to the seats and the carpets could stand a cleaning. Cracking in the steering wheel rim and original but well preserved gauges and switchgear. A driver quality Big Healey. – This car also sold for $35,200 at Bonhams Amelia Island last year. Both prices seem on the low side, but it’s hard to argue with that kind of consistency.

Lot # S139.1 1934 Bentley 3 1/2 Liter Drophead Coupe, Body by Park Ward; S/N B93AE; Burgundy, Maroon accent/Burgundy leather; Burgundy vinyl top; Estimate $140,000 – $160,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $105,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $115,500. – RHD. Disc wheels, suicide doors, landau bars, Flying B mascot, badge bar, wood dash and window trim, rear-mounted enclosed spare. – From the Academy of Arts collection. Formerly owned by Frederick Charles Stewart and Sid Craig. A few chips on the front of the car and some sizable cracks at the bottom of the A-pillars. Lots of cracking around the semaphores and several chips on the spare wheel cover. Clean and restored but lightly used underneath. Wrinkling to the seats but mostly good interior. A handsome, rakish little car with a lot of eyeball, but upon closer inspection it needs another round of restoration work. – Sold for $122,850 at Bonhams Quail Lodge in 2009 from Sid Craig’s collection (he’s the husband of weight-loss guru Jenny.) It hasn’t gotten any better in the ensuing nine years, as the result here indicates.

Lot # T116 1975 Bricklin SV-1 Coupe; S/N 00031BX5S002299; Safety Orange/Brown; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $15,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $16,500. – Ford 351/175hp, automatic, air conditioning, factory radio. – From the Ardell Brown Estate collection. Pretty beat up body with lots of cracking, scrapes, scratches and chips. The interior is tired and worn. The passenger’s door will not open all the way, so if you’re over three feet tall it will be tough to get in and out. One headlight won’t close. Bricklins are quirky and kind of neat but not easy to fall in love with and not worth very much. This one’s ratty condition isn’t doing it any favors. – Not easy to fall in love with, but not impossible. At least two bidders got excited over the bright color and the gullwing doors. There are plenty of better Bricklins than this out there, so this was expensive.

Lot #S98 1930 Bugatti Type 46 Faux Cabriolet, Body by Veth & Zoon; S/N 46293; Black/Brown leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $1,150,000 – $1,250,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $920,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,012,000. – Disc wheels, Silvertown blackwall, landau bars, fender-mounted horns, Marchal headlights, single spotlight, dual rear-mounted spares, luggage trunk, crocodile pattern leather, wood dash and window trim, Jaeger gauges. – Very good but not show-ready paint and chrome. The faux cabriolet roof could stand a cleaning. Excellent interior. Spotless underneath. Ordered new in Belgium and has all the great little details you get with a Bugatti like this. Restored over 10 years ago and not super fresh, but still a gorgeous car. – Bonhams sold this Type 46 in Paris in 2011 for $859,188 (Euros 632,500 at the time, this result is Euros 887,600) then at Scottsdale in 2013 for $951,000 in substantially the same condition as it is in today. The hammer result here is a little less that its last all-in price, but the all-in here is $61,000 more, surprisingly consistent for the amount of money and time involved.

Lot #S96 2012 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Convertible; S/N VF9SK2C2XCM795045; Red/Red leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,300,000. – Red wheels. – 6,069 miles. The driver’s seat is pretty flattened out, so given the mileage it could be a better but it’s pretty much like new. – A $2M car in 2012 and the going rate these days is more than the reported high bid, so holding out at this number is understandable. Las Vegas sounds like the right venue for a show-off car like this, but there didn’t appear to be any Whales on hand to take advantage of its appearance.

Lot # F96.1 1956 Buick Special Convertible; S/N 4C1117132; Red, White/Red, White leather; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $42,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $46,200. – 322/220hp, Dynaflow, wheel covers, whitewalls, hood ornament, pushbutton radio, dash clock. – Represented as a two-owner car. Sizable scrape behind the left front wheel well but mostly good older paint. Erratic panel fit. Tidy underneath. Good, lightly worn interior. Well restored, but finished a while ago and showing its age. – This car sold at Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas in 2012 for a then very strong $66,000, then hammered not sold here last year at a $45k high bid, which was more realistic to what the car is worth. The seller had more realistic expectations this time around and took the slightly smaller money on offer. If it had been better kept up it might have come closer to its 2012 result.

Lot #S45.1 1962 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible; S/N 62F089349; Yellow/White leather; White top; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $27,500. – Wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, fender skirts, Continental kit, power windows, pushbutton radio, dash clock, rear seat speaker, boot cover. – Small crack on the left front and a large chip at the front of the passenger’s door, but otherwise good older paint in an impossible to ignore color. Light wear and a little dirt on the seats. Original dash and switchgear. Discoloration at the front of the dash top. Looks mostly restored underneath. Definitely not perfect, but an easy car to like. A little more attention to the simple cosmetic issues was in order. – A near rock bottom price for a car that is much better than that even if it isn’t perfect. That the seller decided to lift reserve and let it go at this number is odd, considering it sold for $46,200 at Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas in 2015. Then again, it hammered not sold here last year at a $30k high bid and maybe the seller was just ready for it to go.

Lot # F146.1 1950 Chevrolet 3100 Suburban Carryall; S/N 5HPF19276; Black, Silver/Brown leather; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $40,000. – 217/92hp six, 3-speed, hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, sun visor, amber fog lights, dual mirrors, three-row seating. – Represented as a 2009 restoration but the paint, at least the black parts, looks way older than that. It’s faded, scratched and swirled. Clean and restored underneath, though, plus shiny chrome and a very good fully redone interior. Another round of paint would make all the difference in the world on this already very charming Suburban. – Sold by Barrett-Jackson here in Las Vegas in 2012 for $69,300. Despite that, the reported high bid this year was a perfectly reasonable offer, and really could have been taken even if it would have been painful.

Lot # F74 1953 Chevrolet Bel Air 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N C530018821; Cream, Green roof/Green vinyl, Beige cloth; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,150. – 235/108hp six, 3-speed, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, fender skirts, sun visor, hood ornament, fog lights, column shift, pushbutton radio, dash clock. – From the Ardell Brown Estate collection. Very good older paint aside from a few chips and touch ups around the edges of the hood. Some of the exterior brightwork is a bit dull. Erratic panel fit. Good but aged mostly original interior. Maintained but never fully redone underneath. It has gotten attention appropriate the car’s value. With a lot of eyeball in these colors and would make a neat driver. – A good driver bought for good driver money. Considering the extra equipment and the charm factor, it’s a solid value at this price.

Lot #S67 1957 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N E57S100757; Venetian Red, White coves, Red hardtop/Red vinyl; Estimate $85,000 – $110,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $62,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $68,750. – 283/270hp dual quads, 4-speed, spinner wheel covers, whitewalls, Duntov cam and solid lifters, power steering, fire extinguisher, hardtop only. – From the Ardell Brown Estate collection. Fairly dirty engine bay with fuel leaking out of the carbs and on top of the engine. Dull possibly original chrome. Imperfect gaps. Chips around the doors and filler cap and generally dull but presentable older paint. Some cracks on the dash top. The seats look newer, while the rest of the interior looks original and well kept. Never restored but not totally original, either. A driver that needs new carb gaskets and float adjustment before it turns into a cinder. – Considering the condition issues the buyers hedged their bets on this dual quad ’57 Corvette and arrived at a safe price that will allow needed maintenance and cosmetic attention to be done. It wouldn’t be a surprise to see it spiffed up and serviced at Kissimmee.

Lot # F187 1964 Chevrolet Impala 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 41847C137627; White, Light Blue roof/Blue vinyl, cloth; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $23,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $25,850. – 283/195hp 2-barrel, automatic, wire wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, dealer air conditioning, factory radio, rear seat speaker, dash clock. – Tidy and maintained but unrestored engine bay. Good older repaint. Some light scratches and sings on the body side trim, but the original chrome is quite well kept. Spotless trunk. Very good interior. Still arguably too good to restore, even though it doesn’t have particularly desirable equipment. – This is the sort of Impala a dealer would buy to fill up an order quota: looks good on the lot and not expensive, and that’s still what it is. It is somewhat surprising that it’s been this well-kept over the years, and that adds to its appeal. On the other hand, the car card says it is a “matching numbers 283/250hp engine” which Chevrolet didn’t offer in 1964. The only 2-barrel 283 was the base 195hp engine. Unfortunately, we don’t have the numbers (if and) off the block to verify.

Lot # S107.1 1967 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 194677S115911; Marlboro Maroon, Black stinger/Black vinyl; Black top; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $140,000. – 427/435hp L71, 4-speed, Rally wheels, side exhaust, Protect-O-Plate, tank sticker, F41 suspension, power brakes, tinted windshield. – Represented as matching numbers. Reportedly drag raced for a while and had its engine rebuilt at some point. Dull but presentable original chrome. Really good original paint with some cracks and crazing here and there as well as a few touch ups at the back of the hood. Very good original interior. Very tidy underneath. Far too good to restore, and lots of desirable original equipment. – Aside from the engine rebuild, this car is totally original and that should count for a lot, but it didn’t seem to for the Vegas bidders who put in modest offers. The car hammered not sold at a $160k high bid at Mecum Indy a few months ago, which was a more realistic offer and arguably should have been taken given today’s bid as a reference. It won’t be a surprise to see it on the Kissimmee docket in two months.

Lot # S104 1967 Chevrolet Nova 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N 114117W175049; Gold/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $38,500. – 283/195hp 2-barrel, 4-speed, hub caps, bench seat, floor shift, radio and heater delete, Protect-o-Plate and partial build sheet documented. – Very good paint and chrome. Restored, lightly used engine bay. Very good restored interior. Quite a rare, charming little car. Fully restored to appropriate standards without going overboard and a 2012 National Nova Gold Certificate award. Represented as the matching numbers engine. – The base 283/195hp V8 combined with the 4-speed and radio/heater delete is a strange combination, but there it is, with a restoration more appropriate to an SS 396, this car sold for $37,950 at B-J Scottsdale in 2011, then $34,560 at Mecum KC before going unsold at Dallas for $33,000 and Chicago for $32,500 a few months later. It made up for most of the lost ground here in Las Vegas and is a good value based on the thoroughness and quality of its restoration, but not on the mundane engine. Perhaps the original buyer found a drag racing class that fit, but why?

Lot # S185 1969 Chevrolet Camaro SS 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 124379N667804; Fathom Green, White side stripes/Green vinyl; Recent restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $38,500. – 350/300hp L48 engine, 4-speed, Rally wheels, red line tires, spoilers, Positraction, Hurst shifter, factory radio, power brakes, Protect-O-Plate. – Represented as matching numbers. Clean and restored but not overly detailed engine bay. Very good chrome and the paint finish looks bright and shiny, but there are tons of little blisters on and around the hood. Very good interior, restored other than little things like seatbelt buckles. Mostly very well restored and pretty, but they should really get a refund from the paint shop. – An attractive Camaro SS, desirably equipped but not overburdened with a big lump of an engine and the ensuing $5 or $10 thousand increase in cost. This result is appropriate, even factoring in the cost of a repaint on the hood.

Lot # S142.1 1969 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 124379N610241; Cortez Silver, Black stripes, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $90,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $99,000. – 302/290, cross ram dual quads (400+hp), power steering, power front disc brakes, 3.73 gears, limited-slip differential, chambered exhaust, vinyl top, console gauges, AM/FM radio, wood-rim steering wheel. – Light road wear and dirt underneath. Very good paint and chrome. Clean, straight roof vinyl. Excellent fully restored interior. Not done yesterday, but doesn’t really need anything. – This car sold at Mecum Chicago in 2014 for $66,960, which was pretty much a steal. It was just about the opposite here in Vegas, being a home run for the seller who, if the same person who bought in 2014, definitely had a fruitful four years of Camaro ownership. The cross ram adds $20,000 to the value.

Lot # F179 1970 Chevrolet Camaro Sport Coupe; S/N 124870L520890; Camaro Gold, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $30,000. – 350/250hp 2-barrel, automatic, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, console, power steering, power brakes, air conditioning, Protect-O-Plate, horseshoe shifter. – All original other than one repaint. Nearly like new original interior other than a faded dash top. Good original chrome. Tidy maintained engine bay. The glass isn’t great. It’s remarkable for any `70 Camaro to be this well preserved, let alone a base car like this. – At the end of the day, though, it’s still a base car with an automatic. To expect any more than the generous reported high bid is wholly unrealistic, and the offer should have been taken if there was money close to it.

Lot #S94 1980 Chevrolet Corvette Duntov Turbo Convertible; S/N 1Z878AS425217; White/Red leather, cloth; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $28,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $30,800. – Special Duntov Turbo Car with special wheels, special seats, wood dash and console, digital gauges, power windows, air conditioning, single turbo, automatic. – The engine bay is a little aged and dirty. Well-kept paint but it’s showing its age a little. Faded dash top. Lightly worn interior but not bad. Could be better given the rarity and the 15,973 miles showing, but still a neat if pretty obscure little piece of Corvette history. – There were 10 Duntov Turbo Corvettes in 1980, built by American Custom Industries in Ohio. Total production from 1978-81 wasn’t much more than that. They come up for sale every now and then, but haven’t tended to sell for very much. This one actually sold for just $11,000 at Mecum Dallas five weeks ago, a rare instance of a seriously overlooked car being bought advantageously enough at auction to be turned over a few weeks later for a generous profit. It made the consignor’s weekend, that’s for sure.

Lot # T159 1989 Chevrolet Camaro IROC-Z Sport Coupe; S/N 1G1FP2189KL130794; White, Black graphics/Black, Grey cloth; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $10,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $11,000. – 350/230hp, automatic, T-tops, air conditioning, power windows, factory cassette stereo. – Very good original paint. Very tidy underneath. Excellent seats. Other than some wear to the switchgear and a small chip on the right A-pillar, this car looks about a year old. Showing 44,202 miles but clearly always pampered like a much more interesting car than it is. – The result here is a serious bargain given the equipment, condition and originality.

Lot # S189 1999 Chevrolet Camaro SS Coupe; S/N 2G1FP22G2X2116782; Pewter, Black roof/Grey leather; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $17,600. – 346/320hp, 6-speed, alloys, factory CD stereo. – Represented with 10,200 miles and looks just about like new. These SLP-built Camaros are among the most collectible late F-bodies that don’t have a Pontiac badge. – Despite low miles, great condition and a 6-speed, this SS got little love when it crossed the block and sold at no reserve for a pretty weak price, all things considered. While not a steal, it’s a solid bargain for the new owner.

Lot # F215 2004 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 Commemorative Edition Hardtop Coupe; S/N 1G1YY12S045128899; Le Mans Blue, Silver stripes/Black leather; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $33,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $36,300. – 346/405hp, 6-speed, Z06 Commemorative Edition. – Represented with 1,708 miles and, other than some light wrinkling on the driver’s seat, it looks like a new car. – Despite some recent swings in value, the C5 Z06 is still one of the best performance bargains out there, and the Commemorative Edition gets you a carbon fiber hood in addition to the cosmetic treatment. This was a strong price, but a car with mileage this low deserves it. It was sold by Mecum in Denver in2017 for $38,500, so this price reflects a downtick.

Lot # S158 1931 Chrysler CG-8 Coupe, Body by LeBaron; S/N 7802358; Tan, Black cloth roof/Red leather; Estimate $140,000 – $160,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $132,000. – Wire wheels with hub caps, dual enclosed sidemount spares, radiator mascot, wood dash and window trim, rumble seat, luggage rack, dash clock. – From the Academy of Arts collection. Tidy underneath. Very good paint, chrome and interior. Slightly faded tires and a small rip in the cloth roof, but otherwise gorgeous and fresh-looking despite its 12-year-old restoration. – Sold for $170,500 at RM Amelia Island in 2007 and for $126,500 at RM Amelia Island in 2010. It is exceptionally handsome for a coupe but the restoration is starting to morph into patina despite adding only 45 miles to its odometer since 2007.

Lot # F67 1936 Chrysler Airflow Touring Sedan; S/N 8607444; Maroon, Black/Tan cloth; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $28,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $30,800. – Hub caps and trim rings, wide whitewalls, fender skirts, spotlight, suicide rear doors, floor shift, robe rail. – From the Ardell Brown Estate collection. Tired old paint. Beat up running boards. Yellowing tires. Older restored underneath. Long crack in the left rear window. Very good interior. Dry gaskets. A presentable driver, but just barely. – This Airflow has been sitting dormant in Ardell Brown’s collection for too long. It’s a quality car, and a milestone in American auto design and engineering (even if it fell on its face commercially) that deserves to go to a home that will give it the attention it deserves. It really needs a restoration, but that’s not in the picture financially, and at this point it is a weekend cruiser and winter project car bought for a realistic price.

Lot # S168 1947 Chrysler Town & Country 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 71001912; Red, Wood/Red, Tartan cloth; Estimate $150,000 – $175,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $110,000. – 250/114hp six, 3-speed, wheel covers, whitewalls, sun visor, wood roof rack, dual spotlights, heater, factory radio, dash clock. – From the Academy of Arts collection. AACA National First and People’s Choice at Amelia. A few small scratches on the bumpers and grille, and the paint is older. The wood is pretty fantastic. Mostly excellent interior. Fully loaded with the charming tartan interior and has an absolute ton of eyeball, but it has enough flaws to keep it from being an object of profound desire.. – This car sold for $121,000 at RM Amelia Island in 2012 when its restoration was fresher and it wasn’t worth any less than it was today. The reported high bid here was reasonable all things considered, and should have been taken if there was money close to it.

Lot # F22 1960 Chrysler 300F Convertible; S/N 8403133898; Rose/Beige leather; White vinyl top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $76,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $83,600. – 413/375hp cross-ram dual quads, automatic, chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, power steering, power brakes, swivel seats, console, power windows, dash clock, pushbutton radio. – Slightly dirty and used but restored engine bay. Very good older chrome and high quality paint. Light wrinkling and discoloration to the top. Light wrinkling to the seats and some scratches on the console, but mostly good interior. Lightly used restored underbody. A standard lightly aged but well done older restoration of a Letter Car convertible in pretty colors. – Not sold at a $120,000 high bid at Mecum Houston last year and then hammered not sold there again this year at an $80,000 high bid. It didn’t have better luck in Vegas, but the seller let it go at no reserve, letting the new owner swoop in and take it for a less than rock bottom price. This is a notable bargain.

Lot # S169 1964 Chrysler 300K Convertible; S/N 8443253130; Sand/Gold; Beige vinyl top; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $27,500. – 413/360hp, automatic, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, boot cover, power bucket seats, floor shift, console, tach, pushbutton radio, rear seat speaker, power windows, factory air conditioning. – Light road wear underneath. Older restored engine bay. Very good paint. Lightly scratched brightwork, especially the windshield frame. The doors stick out slightly. Light cracks in the steering wheel and the front seats are a little flat, but the interior is mostly gorgeous. The fins and most of the elegance and “banker’s hot rod” performance of the 300 was gone by the time the 300K rolled around, but this is still a very attractive car despite the age of its restoration and some cut corners. – This is a better car than the price it brought and the new owner has a bit left over to fix a few things. It previously hammered not sold at a $12k high bid at Mecum Monterey in 2012 and sold for $30,500 at Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas in 2015. Consider that this is no more than a reasonable price for a 352/250hp ’64 Ford Galaxie 500 XL convertible in comparable condition and the magnitude of this deal will be seen in perspective.

Lot # T62 1923 Citroen 5CV Cul de Poule Tourer; S/N 5130; Yellow, Black tourers/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $18,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $19,800. – Disc wheels, single spare, 856cc engine, MotoMeter. – From the Academy of Arts collection. Old driver quality paint with numerous chips and cracks. Worn top. Tidy frame. Used but maintained and complete engine bay with its little side-valve four that looks like it could almost fit in the palm of your hand. An adorable little car with a neat ducktail rear not visible in the photo. Worn condition aside, it’s one of the more charming cars in this entire auction and got just as much attention as the Duesenberg and the Bugatti displayed a few feet away. – In teaching about design it’s good to have examples of the ridiculous (or at least practical) to balance the sublime. This 5CV is a good example of the former, a solid, stolid, practical automobile that will function as family church transport as well as hauling milk, croissants or bags of potatoes to market during the week. If there is a symbol of the present gilets jeunes revolt in France over increased gasoline taxes “to save the environment” at the expense of rural farmers this is it. It was sold at Bonhams Greenwich auction in 2013 for $24,200 during the buildup of the Academy of Arts University collection and its price here, even considering the attention it got during the preview, is appropriate five years later.

Lot #S72 1930 Cord Front Drive L-29 Cabriolet; S/N 2926853; Engine # FDA499; Lilac, Purple accent/Grey leather; Grey cloth top; Estimate $200,000 – $225,000; Recent restoration, 1- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $185,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $203,500. – Hub caps and trim rings, Firestone wide double whitewalls, Woodlite headlamps, dual enclosed sidemount spares with mirrors, rumble seat, luggage trunk, golf bag door. – Excellent paint, chrome and interior. Some signs of wear underneath. Freshly restored and just about perfect, plus it’s impossible to ignore in these colors. Not the most valuable thing here, but arguably still the star of the show. ACD certified. Ardell Brown Estate. – There was a time when Lilac and Purple were chic among collectors and the lawn at Pebble Beach looked like a Spring Garden. A collector looking for other than a restoration preservation award will be quick to see this L-29 off to the paint shop where it can be toned down to look less like a Ruxton. That said, it is a superbly preserved three-decade old restoration and brought a price that reflects its rarity, style, design and condition.

Lot # F25.1 1957 Dodge D100 Sweptside Pickup; S/N 82429057; Coral, Cream/Grey vinyl, Black cloth; Enthusiast restoration, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $12,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $13,200. – 230/120hp six, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls. – Undercoated chassis, pitted brightwork. Tired cheap old respray. Scratched up bumpers. Dry, cracked weather stripping. The wood pieces in the bed have been painted black, and the wood itself is cracking severely. A few exterior trim pieces are missing. The taillight lenses are cracked. Tired interior. Has eyeball in these colors and this is a fairly rare truck, but it’s pretty rough. – These are fairly rare and valuable among vintage pickups and definitely stand out among the Ford and Chevy crowd. This one sold for $18,700 at Mecum Indy six months ago, needs a lot and sold for a deservedly low price. On the other hand, a similar condition ’57 D100 Sweptside (but with the 315 V8) sold at Branson a month ago for $32,450, making this look like the deal of the year even with the 6-cylinder power.

Lot # F99 1968 Dodge Dart GTS 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N LS23H8B260243; Avocado Green, Red tail stripe/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000. – 383/300hp, 4-speed, wheel covers, red line tires, bucket seats, console, factory radio. – Represented as matching numbers. Very clean lightly used engine bay. Very good but older paint and chrome. The passenger’s door sticks out quite a bit and the trunk is uneven. Heavily scratched original rear glass. Very good mostly restored interior. Basic but attractive and serviceable Mopar Muscle. – This car sold for the exact same $55,000 price at Mecum Indy a few months ago, so the market has spoken twice as to what his attractive Dart GTS is worth.

Lot # S221 1969 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N XS29J9G185522; Dark Green Metallic, White tail stripe/Tan vinyl; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $150,000. – 426/425hp Hemi, hub caps, red line tires, bucket seats, console, Hurst shifter, Tic-Toc-Tach, factory radio. – Represented as a matching numbers Hemi. Restored, lightly used engine bay. Very good older paint and chrome. Factory gaps. Very good restored interior. Not done yesterday, but still very attractive and doesn’t seem to need a thing. – Adding in a premium for the 4-speed, this car is worth more than the reported high bid, but the offer wasn’t totally unreasonable and it will only take a few more trips across the block to make refusing it seem like the wrong decision.

Lot # T168 1979 Dodge D150 Lil’ Red Express Utiline Pickup; S/N D13JS9S184373; Red/Black vinyl; Truck restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $19,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $20,900. – 360/225hp, automatic, Cooper Cobra tires, CB radio. – Restoration work underneath. Some overspray in the wheel wells. Dull and scratched original bumpers and grille. Average quality paint. Very good high quality wood. Well-kept original interior. A truck quality restoration that’s good enough to drive and enjoy but far from perfect. – When it came out, the Lil’ Red Express was the quickest American production vehicle to 100 mph, although that says more about the dim state of performance cars at the time than it does about the truck. Prices for these haven’t moved much like they have for many other vintage pickups and this perfectly fair price for a good driver quality example is about as appropriate as it would have been a year ago.

Lot # F256 1995 Dodge Viper RT/10 Roadster; S/N 1B3BR65E1SV200897; Emerald Green/Tan leather; Black cloth top; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $21,000. – 488/400hp, 6-speed, Michelin tires, factory cassette stereo. – Worn, dirty top. A few chips on the nose and generally tired original paint. Long scratch by the filler cap as well. Good interior. Neat, rare colors but with 63,959 miles it’s more driver than collector car. – Worth more than the reported high bid, even if it is a little worn out. It should arguably bring somewhere on the other side of 25 grand. It leaves its new owner with some intriguing possibilities since even at a bit more it’s not going to suffer much value loss from modifications. Can you say “track day car”?

Lot # S130.1 1930 Duesenberg Model J Dual Cowl Phaeton, Body after LaGrande; S/N 2407; Engine # J-402; Burgundy, Lilac/Red leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $950,000 – $1,050,000; Rebodied or re-created, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $700,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $770,000. – Wire wheels with hub caps, wide whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemounts with mirrors, dual spotlights, Pilot Rays, dual chrome horns, wood running boards, luggage trunk. – From the Academy of Arts collection. Light yellowing of the tires. The darker parts of the paint are showing their age but the lavender parts are still gorgeous. There are a few chips and cracks at the tops of the doors, plus some crazing on the rear fenders. The top is a little dirty. The seats are holding up very well for the age and the rest of the interior looks fantastic. A 1970s restoration and former show car. Not really a winner as it sits, but that doesn’t stop it being the car more likely than any other at this auction to really stop you in your tracks. – Someone got creative with the chassis number of this Duesenberg, portraying it in the auction listing as “J4022407”, an amalgamation of its engine number (J-402) and chassis number (2407) to obscure its actual identity as chassis 2407. It is a genuine J chassis, engine, bellhousing and firewall, originally bodied as a Rollston formal cabriolet, later as a Brunn convertible victoria and only in the 70’s as this LaGrande-style Dual Cowl Phaeton. It was sold by Worldwide at Houston with the current coachwork in 2005 for $781,000, which is sufficiently congruent with the result here to show the bidders knew what they were getting.

Lot # F210.1 1996 Ferrari F355 Spider Convertible, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFXR48A3T0105369; Rosso Corsa/Tan leather; Black cloth top; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $65,000. – P Zero tires, 6-speed. – Showing 14,587 believable miles. Good but not exactly like new original paint. Lightly worn top. Good interior. Low miles, but not quite like new and not represented with any recent service, so it’s very possible that the next trip to the shop will really hurt. – This car is a repeat appearance at Mecum over the past couple of years. It sold for $57,200 at Kissimmee in 2016, then sold again for $52,800 at Dallas at the beginning of October this year and for $55,000 at $50,000 at Chicago at the end of October. It’s not like 355 prices did anything in the intervening four weeks, so refusing a reported high bid this far above the previous numbers seems strange when the seller stands to make a convincing if not life-changing profit at the legendary high bid reported here.

Lot # F289 2003 Ferrari 360 Spider Convertible, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFYT53A230133988; Argento/Black leather; Black cloth top; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $60,000. – Red calipers, Potenza tires, 6-speed, Daytona-style seats, factory radio, SF shields – Big chip on the nose. Lightly detail scratched paint. Small scuff on the left rear fender. Good interior. The top is a little dirty. Neither mileage nor service history represented, and these colors aren’t the best, but it does stand out as a 6-speed car. – The reported high bid was practically salvage car money but this bid was endorsed by exactly the same result at Chicago three weeks ago and $55,000 at the Silver Arizona auction November 10. It’s being given rides in search of … what?

Lot # F192 1966 Ford Bronco Wagon 4×4; S/N U15FL754519; Turquoise, White top/Silver vinyl, Turquoise cloth; Truck restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $26,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $28,600. – 3-speed, wheel covers, 170/105hp six-cylinder engine, dual mirrors, floor shift, console, Alpine CD stereo. – Fully restored engine bay with light signs of use. Restored underneath. Truck quality repaint with some orange peel here and there. Tired original brightwork. Good newer upholstery and carpets. Fresh restored underbody. A truck quality restoration done on an early Bronco, which has gotten more and more valuable in recent years. They often get a lot more money thrown into them than this these days, so the condition here isn’t impressive, although it’s a good driver and the attractive colors help. – There were nine Broncos on offer at Mecum Las Vegas this year, but demand still doesn’t seem to be satisfied. This wasn’t a super strong price, but it is in line with what others like it are commanding these days and approaching restored Toyota FJ prices.

Lot # T114 1968 Ford Mustang GT/CS Coupe; S/N 8R01C156703; Canary Yellow, Black graphics/Black vinyl; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000. – 289/200hp, 4-speed, bucket seats, Hurst shifter, Philco radio. – From the Ardell Brown Estate collection. Good older paint with several scratches and chips on the hood. Several chips on the side of the body as well. Decent chrome, but the window frames are scratched up. Worn original seat belts and steering wheel, but the rest of the interior is quite well preserved. Lightly oxidized but mostly tidy original engine bay and underbody. Rare special model in a rare color, and reasonably well but not immaculately preserved. – The California Special and the similar High Country Special (for Colorado) models are fairly collectible oddballs that feature Shelby-style sequential taillights and rear fender intakes, deck lid spoiler, fog lights and GT hub caps. Despite this one’s rare color, desirable 4-speed and solid level of preservation, it sold for a pretty middle-of-the-road price that the buyer should be pretty happy with. It was a no-sale at a $19,000 high bid at Mecum Monterey back in 2014.

Lot #S29 2000 Ford Mustang Cobra R Coupe; S/N 1FAFP47HXYF223315; Red/Black cloth; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $38,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $41,800. – 330/385hp, 6-speed, alloy wheels, Brembo brakes with slotted rotors, side exhaust, Recaro seats, power windows. – Represented with 10,000 miles and looks like a new car. A little boy racer for some tastes, but about as quick and hardcore as this generation Mustang ever got. – Most Mustangs of this vintage aren’t particularly collectible. They weren’t all that good or all that attractive, and there are still a ton of them around. The Cobra R is a bit of an exception, with just 300 built. Quite a few, like this one, have been kept in more or less like new condition, but they’re still worth less than their 55 grand original price. In today’s market, this was a deservedly strong price given the condition and mileage.

Lot # T106 1947 Frazer Manhattan 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N F47C1013511; Grey/Blue cloth; Estimate $5,000 – $10,000; Enthusiast restoration, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $8,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $8,800. – Hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, overdrive, column shift 3-speed. – From the Ardell Brown Estate collection. Represented as a 1990s restoration but recently refreshed. Tired, dull original chrome. Decent but old paint. All the glass is delaminating. Dry and cracked weather stripping. Reasonably tidy underneath. Heavily worn steering wheel but mostly good interior. A very rare sight these days, but that doesn’t necessarily make it valuable and this car is a bit of an eyesore. – Sold at the Leake auction in OK City in 2014 for $5,060. In this condition, it’s a pretty much full retail price here, which leaves the new owner with no room to fix things. 1940s American cars like this are not an appreciating asset, and prices have actually been going down in general. It will be tough to sink money into this car while also watching its value go down. Although, at $8,800, how much can the value shrink?

Lot #S66 1954 Hudson Hornet Convertible Brougham; S/N 7283978; Yellow/Red; Red top; Recent restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $82,500. – 308/160hp Twin H-power, automatic, wire wheels with hubcaps, whitewalls, fender skirts, rear armrest, robe rail, spotlight, pushbutton radio, power windows, clock. – From the Ardell Brown Estate collection. Very good but not quite show-quality paint and chrome. The original grille is a bit dull. Imperfect gaps. Lightly wrinkled seats but mostly gorgeous interior. Restored and lightly used underneath. A 2015 restoration that isn’t a beauty queen but has a lot of eyeball and desirable equipment. – A huge price that is far more than the more realistic $66,000 it sold for at Bonhams Scottsdale last year but the appeal of a “Doc Hudson” Twin-H Hornet Convertible Brougham is hard to resist. The moon and the stars aligned here in Las Vegas to bring Ardell Brown’s estate a gratuitous result. The magic may linger to support a time at the craps table.

Lot # S153 1962 Imperial Crown Convertible; S/N 9223170409; Dark Red/White leather piled in Red; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $37,000. – 413/340hp, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, dual mirrors, boot cover, pushbutton automatic, added air conditioning, pushbutton radio, power windows. – Good older paint. Tired chrome and brightwork. Very good mostly restored interior with very light wrinkling on the driver’s side. Looks original underneath, but tidy. The wheel covers are a little beat up. A basic cosmetic restoration resulting in an attractive driver but a car with many needs. – A car like this with plenty of expensive-to-fix shortcomings is a hard sell, but this car deserves more than the reported high bid.

Lot # T108 1963 International (IHC) Scout 80 Pickup 4×4; S/N FC75836A; Red, White top/Dark Grey, Light Grey; Estimate $5,000 – $10,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $10,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $11,000. – 152/93hp four, 3-speed, steel wheels, bucket seats, pushbutton radio, Powr-Lok diff, rear-mounted spare. – From the Ardell Brown Estate collection. Tired, scratched and cracked up old respray that was cheap to begin with. Poor gaps. Newer exhaust and undercoated chassis but not restored. Good newer seats but the rest of the interior is pretty tired. A charming but worn out old Scout that you wouldn’t be all that proud to be seen in. – Even though they came first, Scouts will probably never be as popular with enthusiasts and collectors as the equivalent Broncos and Blazers because of name recognition and parts availability. That said, prices have picked up somewhat over the past year or so even for rougher ones like this. It was bought at a fair price here.

Lot # S174 1948 Jaguar Mark IV 3.5 Drophead Coupe; S/N 637251; Burgundy, Black fenders/Tan leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $200,000 – $250,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $80,000. – Painted centerlock wire wheels, wide whitewalls, dual wing mirrors, landau bars, badge bar, wood dash and window trim. – From the Academy of Arts collection. Very good older paint and chrome. The top has some soiled spots. Pretty much spotless underneath, but the wheels and tires are showing some age. Excellent interior other than a tiny bit of wrinkling on the driver’s seat. A gorgeous and well done CCCA Full Classic (TM) Jag, but not done yesterday. – This car sold for $159,500 at RM Monterey in 2010, and it can’t be in much worse shape today than it was then. The reported high bid in Vegas was too modest. This is a six-figure Jag even with its restoration’s advancing years and some cosmetic issues.

Lot # S135.1 1954 Jaguar XK 120SE Roadster; S/N S674424; Light Blue/Burgundy leather; Dark Blue cloth top; Estimate $220,000 – $240,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $155,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $170,500. – Painted centerlock wire wheels, Firestone tires, dual wing mirrors, Lucas driving lights, wind wings, Moto-Lita woodrim steering wheel. – From the Academy of Arts collection. Rare SE model. Spotless and fully restored underneath. Excellent fresh-looking paint. Lightly scratched rear light bezels. Excellent interior. Well and fully restored to appropriately high standards showing no age at all on its older restoration. – This car sold for a whopping $221,500 at Bonhams Quail Lodge in 2009, a record price for a steel bodied XK120 at the time and few prices have come close since. This result may be lower, but it’s still very expensive and quite favorable to the seller.

Lot # T153 1961 Jaguar Mark IX 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 793899BW; Black, Maroon/Tan leather; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Unrestored original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $23,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $25,300. – 3781/330hp, automatic, hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, fender skirts, dual wing mirrors, badge bar, Lucas fog lights, sunroof, factory radio, rear seat tables. – From the Academy of Arts collection. Bad, possibly original paint that is dull, scratched, cracked and blistered. The body isn’t totally straight. Decent chrome. Reasonably tidy underneath. Very light cracking on the front seats but the leather is mostly quite good. The wood is in quite good shape as well. Paint is really the only major need on this stately Mk IX, but there are surely lots of little things to fix as well. – This car sold for $20,900 at Dragone Greenwich in 2015. It hasn’t had any apparent attention paid to it since then and it’s not worth any more or less. Bought here for an appropriate price, but with big old luxury cars like this it makes a whole lot more financial sense to buy one that somebody’s already done. This car has some major expense ahead of it but the price it brought is appropriate to its condition.

Lot # S215 1965 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster; S/N 1E10675; Carmen Red/Black leather; Black cloth top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $150,000. – Centerlock chrome wire wheels, British Leyland stereo. – Very clean engine bay. Very good older paint and chrome. Clean top. Light wrinkling to the driver’s seat but mostly very good restored interior. A straightforward desirably configured XKE with light general age on a quality restoration. – This E-Type sold at RM Hershey in 2013 for $115,500, then hammered not sold at a $150,000 high bid at Mecum Monterey back in August. The same modest but fair offer was on the table in Vegas, and at this point should just be taken if there’s money close to it. It’s a good car, but no better than the money offered for it.

Lot # S176 1974 Jaguar XKE SIII V12 Roadster; S/N UE1S25920BW; Pale Primrose/Black leather; Black vinyl top; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $55,000. – Automatic, centerlock wire wheels, narrow whitewalls, boot cover, console, dash clock, factory air conditioning. – Handsome original paint with only a few chips at the back of the bonnet and doors. Some body filler on the right rear quarter. Well-kept original interior with only light wear to the seats and switchgear. Tidy underneath. Showing 15,100 believable miles. A solid, low-mile original final year E-Type. – This car has certainly made the rounds at Mecum sales. It was bid to $100,000 at Mecum Indy in 2016 then not sold at an $80,000 high bid in Harrisburg last year. It then did sell here last year for $92,400. As the previous results show, this car is worth more than the reported high bid and it was probably an easy number to refuse. This no-sale result means only that the bidders were looking elsewhere and paying no attention to this car.

Lot # F157 1949 Kaiser Virginian 4-Dr. Hardtop; S/N Engine No. KM808901; Indian Ceramic, Black cloth roof/Black leather; Estimate $50,000 – $65,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $31,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $34,100. – 226/112hp six, 3-speed, wheel covers, whitewalls, fender skirts, hood ornament, column shift, heater, pushbutton radio, dash clock. – Touch up on the right front fender, a few chips around the filler cap and a crack on the passenger’s front door, but mostly good eye-catching paint. Slightly erratic panel fit. The cloth roof is fraying a little at the edges. Original and aged but well preserved dash, gauges and steering wheel. Good newer seats, carpets and headliner. Mostly unrestored and a little rough underneath. Cosmetically restored and far from perfect, but it’s really neat and where are you going to find another one? – This Virginian (or one like it) has been around for a while, its B-pillar windows and the Black cloth covered roof looking like a convertible sedan. No one knows how many Virginians were built but this one was sold at Auburn Fall in 2005 for $30,240, then at Hershey two months later for $33,000 and at RM Monterey in 2007 for $38,500. This result falls right into line and is a conversation starter no matter where it appears.

Lot # S183.1 1999 Lamborghini Diablo VT Roadster; S/N ZA9RU31B2XLA12214; Red/Beige leather piped in Red; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $170,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $187,000. – CD stereo, air conditioning. – Light detail scratching in the paint. Light scrape on the rear wing and a big chip in the engine cover. Wrinkling and very fine cracking in the driver’s seat. No service history represented. Not a collector-grade Lambo and should be better given the 9,780 miles showing. Pretty much a used exotic. – A perfectly fair, even strong price given the issues with this car. It cost close to 300 grand when it was new and collectors have never turned on to its innovative viscous center differential directing power to the front or rear wheels that have traction. This result is desultory, but not unreasonable.

Lot # F25 1989 Lotus Esprit S3 Turbo Coupe; S/N SCCFC20A4KHF65296; Red/Tan leather; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $27,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $29,700. – 2,174/215hp turbocharged four, 5-speed, OZ wheels, factory cassette stereo, power windows, air conditioning. – Sound, lightly faded and detail scratched original paint with a few chips on the nose and mirrors as well as a large chip on the rear bumper. Cracking in the wood dash, which is common even on Lotuses this new. Significant wrinkling to the seats, more so than you would think given the 17,557 miles showing, but not terrible. No service history and the card both gets the interior color wrong and claims it has a two-barrel carb, none of which is encouraging. Then again, it looks quite good and the miles are low. – A strong price for a four-cylinder Esprit with some flaws, but not excessive and even at this number it’s a great value compared to other exotics of the era. Faced with competition from Ferrari and others, Lotus doubled down on “add lightness” to create their own definition of high performance. With legendary performance and psychic handling these Lotus Esprits lack only one thing, build quality. The buyer of this one is placing no small reliance on prior owners to deal with those issues but that is encompassed in the modest price.

Lot # S180 1959 Mercedes-Benz 300 Cabriolet D; S/N 189033129500367; Green/Black leather piped in Red; Black cloth top; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $222,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $244,750. – Automatic, whitewalls, landau bars, wood dash and window trim, column shift, power windows, dash clock. – Several scratches and scuffs around the hood as well as some chips behind the grille, but the rest of the paint finish is very good. Imperfect gaps. The doors are hard to open and some of the weather stripping is dull and loose. Dull bumper chrome. Very good top. Lightly wrinkled seats but mostly very good interior. Tidy and restored underneath. Represented as an award winner at Mar a Lago last year, but the car is in worse shape than that would lead you to believe. The 300D is an outstanding automobile, but this one has too many flaws to ignore. – This car hammered not sold at a $240,000 high bid at Mecum Monterey a few months ago, which was a sound offer that should have been taken, especially with this result (which is lower factoring in the seller’s commission) as a reference. Even this price is generous for a ponderous big M-B in this condition.

Lot # T192 1994 Mercedes-Benz SL600 Roadster; S/N WDBF976E7RE100964; Black, Grey/Black leather; Unrestored original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $9,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $9,900. – Hankook tires, factory cassette stereo. – Represented with 67,000 miles. Pretty tired original paint and dull headlights. Curb rash on all four of the wheels. Light road wear underneath. Light wear on the seats. Cracking in the wood console trim and dull switchgear. Represented with service records but no other details. These V-12 Mercs can really drain your bank account when in the shop, and given this one’s mediocre presentation, it probably hasn’t exactly gotten the royal treatment under the hood, either. – These were six-figure status symbols when they were new, but even though values have picked up over the past couple of years, even the nicest one in the world won’t crack 30 grand. And even though the price for this one is very low, it’s no less than it really deserves. Consider it a tithe to your local M-B mechanic.

Lot # F69 1951 Mercury 1CM Monterey 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N 51LA22987M; Teal, White vinyl roof/Green vinyl, cloth; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000. – 255/112hp, 3-speed, wheel covers, Firestone wide whitewalls, fender skirts, pushbutton radio, aftermarket under dash gauges. – From the Ardell Brown Estate collection. Fairly dull old chrome and brightwork. The body side trim doesn’t fit flush. Decent older paint. Uneven gaps. The tires are old and the wheel covers are a little beat up. Tired but presentable dash and switchgear. Paint chipping off the steering wheel. Restored on a budget, and a long time ago. – Tired and not very well done, but not disreputable, this is a sound and decent Mercury that has potential, not only as a restoration but also (purists forbid) as a sweet custom. It brought project money here, as it deserved.

Lot # F37 1967 Mercury Cougar XR-7 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 7F93C596531; Wimbledon White, Black vinyl roof/Black leather; Estimate $20,000 – $25,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $17,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $19,250. – 289/225hp, automatic, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, luggage rack, power steering, power front disc brakes, factory air conditioning, tinted glass, bucket seats, floor shift, later cassette stereo. – From the Ardell Brown Estate collection. Large chip on the right side of the nose. Another chip and a few scuffs on the right rear, but otherwise decent but older paint. Original roof vinyl holding up pretty well. Well kept, seemingly all original interior. Looks original but maintained underneath. A driver quality but well equipped XR7 Cougar. No show-stopper, but a neat car. – A straightforward, appropriate number for a good but not great XR-7, which sold for a similar $18,700 at Leake Tulsa back in 2013.

Lot # F136.1 1955 MG TF 1500 Roadster; S/N HDB369907; Red/Red leather; Beige top; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Modified restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $28,000. – Centerlock wire wheels, Lucas driving lights, rear-mounted spare, 5-speed conversion, woodrim steering wheel, wind wings, comes with matching trailer. – From the Academy of Art collection. Very clean engine bay. Good older paint and chrome. Very good interior. Restored a while ago and still very pretty if not exactly a show car. The trailer is a weird touch, and probably slows the car down quite a bit even when it’s empty. – This is a better car than the reported high bid, so holding out is understandable. It sold for $40,700 at Bonhams Greenwich in 2013, and it wouldn’t be unreasonable to expect something closer to that today with the trailer thrown in as a bonus.

Lot # T182 1992 Mitsubishi 3000 GT VR4 Hatchback; S/N JA3XE74C5NY023908; Red/Grey leather; Unrestored original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $7,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $8,250. – 2972/300hp twin turbo, 5-speed, aftermarket alloy wheels, Yokohama tires, rear window wiper, spoiler, aftermarket Pioneer stereo, power windows, air conditioning. – Looks mostly stock. Dull paint with numerous chips and scratches on the nose and hood. Significant wear to both seats. Reasonably tidy but worn underneath. No history represented with this car, and it shows a substantial 121,038 miles. These offer a lot of car per dollar compared to the equivalent Supra, for example, but they aren’t the most reliable cars on the road and this one’s tired condition doesn’t inspire confidence. – Prices for really good VR4s have picked up a bit as they have for most ’90s Japanese high-performance coupes, but the value for a car with needs (which are expensive to fix on these cars) has remained pretty much flat. This worn out example sold for an appropriate number that both parties can be happy with.

Lot #S70 1957 Oldsmobile Ninety Eight Starfire Convertible; S/N 579A02453; Banff Blue, Victoria White/White, Blue, Light Blue; Estimate $110,000 – $130,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $66,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $72,600. – 371/300hp J2 3×2 induction, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, fender skirts, boot cover, Continental kit, WonderBar radio, dual spotlights, power windows, dash clock. – From the Ardell Brown Estate collection. Very good but not fresh paint and chrome. The left reverse light lens is severely cracked. Imperfect gaps. The trim on top of the doors is pretty scratched up. A few smudges on the seats but mostly very good restored interior. Not a show winner, but still more than good enough to be proud of and draw a crowd wherever it goes, including local shows. – A modest result for a car with this kind of presence, but a heck of a lot more than the $59,400 it was reported sold for at Russo and Steele Scottsdale last year.

Lot # S140 1983 Oldsmobile Cutlass Hurst Coupe; S/N 1G3AK4799DM445975; Black, Grey sills, Red accent/Red cloth; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $17,600. – 307/180hp, automatic, Eagle GT tires, T-tops, spoiler, lightning rod shifter, factory radio, power windows, air conditioning. – Well-kept original paint. Light road wear underneath. Other than light wear to the switchgear the interior looks new. Showing 36,994 believable miles and not quite like new, but still a collector-quality example of the late, not quite great ’83 Hurst/Olds, a spiffed-up Monte Carlo. – On the modest side for such a well-kept example, but not quite cheap, just slightly favorable to the buyer.

Lot # S125.1 1934 Packard Eight-Series 1100 Sedan; S/N 76129; Dark Grey, Black fenders and coachline/Grey leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $235,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $258,500. – Grey painted wire wheels, hub caps, chrome lock rings, blackwall tires, dual enclosed sidemount spares with mirrors, Woodlite headlamps and cowl lights, dual chrome horns, glass eagle mascot, wind wings, wood dash and window trim, Waltham gauges. – From the Academy of Arts collection. The top is a little dirty. The paint is also starting to show its age, as is the chrome, but the seats look barely sat in. The rest of the interior is gleaming, and the underbody is gorgeous. Fully restored in the 1980s and needs a bit of cosmetic massaging before the show field, but a very striking automobile. – Sold by RM in Arizona in 2010 for $192,500 and if anything even a little better here than it was back then. It is a spectacular example of one of the best Packards built and it brought a strong but fully deserved price here.

Lot # S125 1934 Packard Twelve-Series 1108 Dual Cowl Sport Phaeton, Body by Roxas after LeBaron; S/N 902213; Beige/Burgundy leather; Estimate $450,000 – $550,000; Rebodied or re-created, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $360,000. – Chrome spoke wire wheels, hub caps, wide whitewalls, Pilot Rays, dual chrome horns, dual spotlights, suicide front doors, wind wings, wood steering wheel and shift knob, Waltham dash clock, fender skirts. – From the Academy of Arts collection. Coachwork by Fran Roxas in the style of LeBaron. Not represented as original engine. Slightly dull headlights. Imperfect panel fit. Very good older paint and chrome. Light wrinkling to the seats but mostly fantastic interior. Very clean underbody. Some smudges on the whitewalls. Probably not a concours winner as it sits, but an inherently gorgeous, regal car that with a round of basic cosmetic attention could probably take home a trophy. – Sold at Gooding & Co’s Scottsdale auction in 2009 for $352,000, a gorgeous car with teardrop front fenders and a sloping rear deck that minimizes its size. It is perhaps a little more aged than it was in ’09, but still spectacular and the reported high bid undercuts its eye-appeal even as it recognizes the reproduction aspect of its coachwork.

Lot # S220 1954 Packard Standard 8 Convertible; S/N 54792502; Dark Blue/Red, White leather; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $42,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $46,200. – Wire wheels, whitewalls, fender skirts, cormorant mascot, boot cover, heater, pushbutton radio, dash clock. – Good chrome. The body side trim is a little dull. The paint is shiny but quite detail scratched and swirled. Straight body with even gaps. Lightly smudged and discolored seats but it might all come out with a deep cleaning. Lightly worn steering wheel. Represented as a fresh restoration and it is a pretty car, but plenty of corners were cut and it’s not much better than an average driver. Very rare, though. – Sold for $56,100 at Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas in 2010, then not sold here last year at a $35k high bid. The $6,000 more it brought on the hammer here rightly convinced the consignor to see it on its way to a new owner.

Lot # S100.1 1958 Packard Hawk 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 58LS1312; Black, Gold/Tan leather; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $62,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $68,200. – 289/275hp supercharged V8, automatic chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, dual antenna, column shift, pushbutton radio, dash clock, Twin Traction, power steering, power brakes, dual mirrors. – Good but older paint with light detail scratches and swirls. The vinyl padding on top of the driver’s door is a little loose. Very good lightly worn interior. Tidy and restored underneath. Straightforward lightly aged older restoration. – Although it’s not much more than a rebadged Studebaker Hawk and not a ‘real’ Packard, the Hawk is at least the quickest car to wear a Packard badge, and with just 588 built it’s quite rare although not exceedingly valuable. This one was a no-sale at an $85,000 high bid at Mecum Monterey 2015, then sold for $93,500 at Mecum Anaheim in 2015. That was an expensive result not likely to be repeated any time soon unless the car gets more extensive restoration work. This result is more realistic to its actual value.

Lot #S93.1 1935 Pierce-Arrow Model 1245 Coupe; S/N 405002; Burgundy/Grey cloth; Estimate $250,000 – $300,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $195,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $214,500. – 462/175hp V12, 3-speed, artillery wheels with hub caps and trim rings, wide whitewalls, dual enclosed sidemount spares, archer mascot, dual chrome horns, dash clock, wood dash and window trim. – From the Academy of Arts collection. Older but very good paint and chrome other than a small bubble at the bottom of the right rear body seam. Slightly imperfect door gaps. Very tidy underneath and excellent interior. Restored in the 1990s and CCCA First. Clearly restored to the standards it deserves, just showing a little age. – Back in 1995 this Pierce was offered at Barrett-Jackson where it was bid to $110,000 but not sold. It is an outstanding example of a rare automobile of the highest quality and its fastback design is extremely attractive. It could have brought a bit more than the successful high bid and still not been expensive.

Lot #S61 1956 Pontiac Star Chief Custom Safari 2-Dr. Station Wagon; S/N C756H20023; Teal, Dark Blue/Blue vinyl, Black cloth; Estimate $50,000 – $60,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $37,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $41,250. – 317/227hp, Hydramatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, power steering, dash clock, aftermarket cassette stereo, vinyl wrapped steering wheel. – From the Ardell Brown Estate collection. Fairly tired but presentable old paint and chrome. Paint coming off the steel wheels and the tires are discolored. Looks older restored underneath and the engine compartment is aged and unkempt. Well kept, lightly aged original interior. A lot of eyeball and charm even if it isn’t a show car. – Sold by Mecum in Seattle in 2014 for $38,340, not much if anything has been done to or with it since and the age is starting to take a toll. This was Pontiac’s answer to the Chevy Nomad, with a bigger engine and the ungainly chrome silver streaks on the hood that would soon become a relic of a dull old Pontiac. The result here is a commendable compromise between this Safari’s condition and its rarity.

Lot # S170 1969 Pontiac GTO Judge 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 242379A122099; Carousel Red, Judge graphics/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $60,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $66,000. – 400/366hp 4-speed, Rally wheels, Polyglas tires, hood tach, Hurst T-handle shifter, factory radio, power steering, power brakes. – No readable engine number. Nearly spotless engine bay. Very good paint. Some light scratches on the rear windows. Light road wear underneath. Very good fully restored interior. Done to like new standards and lightly used since. – This car sold for $72,600 at Barrett-Jackson WPB in 2008, then for $49,820 at Mecum Houston in 2013. It has recovered well in this transaction from the market’s nadir in 2013 and brought a realistic price here.

Lot # F271 2001 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am SLP Firehawk Convertible; S/N 2G2FV32G112142983; Black, Gold graphics/Black leather; Black cloth top; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $22,000. – 10th Anniversary Firehawk with special paint and wheels, power windows, air conditioning, factory CD stereo, 6-speed. – Represented with 26,400 miles. The paint is showing its age and there is a wrinkle in one of the hood decals. Light wrinkling to the seats but mostly very good interior. Rare and inherently collectible as a Firehawk, but not quite like new. – The final generation SLP-modified Firebirds have caught quite a following over the past couple of years and prices have been on the rise. In 2016, this reported high bid could have seen this car off to a new home no problem, but today the consignor was reasonable to hold out for more.

Lot # F200.1 1965 Porsche 356C Coupe; S/N 218650; Ruby Red/Black; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $67,000. – Hub caps, gold brightwork, Blaupunkt pushbutton radio, Porsche CofA documented. – Represented as matching numbers with recent rebuild on the engine, one owner from 1973-2018. Decent older repaint other than some prep issues on the A-pillars. Scratched up original windshield frame. The badge on the tail is loose. Cracked steering wheel cap and the gasket around the right rear quarter window is hanging loose, but mostly good interior. Slightly uneven door fit. A restored late 356, but done quite some time ago and probably before these cars were worth very much, so done on a budget. – Another 10 grand probably would have done it on this good driver quality 356C.

Lot # F202 1989 Porsche 928 S4 Coupe; S/N WP0JB0920KS860636; Blue/Beige leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $19,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $20,900. – Automatic, Pilot Sport tires, rear spoiler, sunroof, power windows, power seats, air conditioning, Alpine stereo. – Represented with 61,037 miles but looks much better than that. Other than some dirt and grime in the engine bay, lightly faded paint with a handful of chips, and very light wear to the seats and switchgear, it’s gorgeous. Clearly always pampered even while being used fairly regularly. – With greater refinement and a lot more power, the later S4 versions of the 928 are worth considerably more than earlier models, and this car’s good original condition is impressive. It sold for $28,600 at this sale last year, also at no reserve. It didn’t have as much luck this time across the block, but for the new owner this price is a considerable bargain.

Lot # S163 1933 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Town Car, Body by Brewster; S/N 298AJS; Black, Grey/Black leather in front, Grey leather in back; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $92,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $101,750. – Wheel discs, blackwall tires, dual sidemount spares, dual mirrors, suicide doors front and rear, dash clock, division window, jump seats, luggage trunk. – From the Academy of Arts collection. Older repaint with too many scratches, chips and cracks to list but it’s not an eyesore. Unrestored but well preserved and tidy underneath. Lightly scratched brightwork. Light but consistent cracking in the seats. The division window is heavily delaminated. The trunk is a little beat up but not bad. An opulent car even in this worn condition, it’ll be a dilemma whether to give it a concours restoration or keep it as-is in this mostly original condition. – Sold by Christie’s at Monterey in 2004 for $99,875 in essentially the same condition as it is today. A sound, presentable and usable Phantom II that takes a hit for its formal coachwork but is a decent value as an admission ticket to RROC and CCCA events.

Lot #S71 1968 Shelby Mustang GT500 KR Convertible; S/N 8T03R21618404415; Special Yellow/Black vinyl; Black top; Estimate $140,000 – $160,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $132,000. – 428/335hp, automatic, alloy wheels, Polyglas GT tires, boot cover, power steering, power brakes, tilt steering column, power top, console, factory radio, rectangular grille-mounted driving lights. – From the Ardell Brown Estate collection. One of 43 in this color. Restored in 1995. Spotless engine bay that looks a lot fresher than it is. Very good paint, chrome and interior. The restoration may be very old, but it has clearly been used both sparingly and carefully over the past 23 years. – Sold at no reserve, this car brought a price that would ordinarily buy a much worse example. It could have brought over 150 grand without being expensive, so the new owner got quite a deal here.

Lot # F8 1952 Studebaker Commander State Starlight Coupe; S/N 8230096; Blue/Grey, Light Grey cloth; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $17,600. – 233/120hp V8, 3-speed, wheel covers, whitewalls, fender skirts, sun visor, dual spotlights, dual mirrors, factory radio. – Good older paint and chrome. Lightly scratched up rocker trim. Very good restored interior. Tidy and restored with light wear underneath. A charming little car with good equipment. – Studebaker introduced its overhead valve V8 in 1951, well ahead of many competitors. It’s probably heretical to think, but wouldn’t this be a pleasant surprise with a set of glasspack duals and a 4-barrel intake with a mild cam? It was offered by Mecum in Dallas in 2014 where it was bid to a healthy $35,000 without selling, then sold by Barrett-Jackson here in Las Vegas in 2015 for $29,700. At the price it brought here having some fun with it is entirely reasonable.

Lot # F130.1 1952 Studebaker Commander State Convertible; S/N 8260633; Yellow/Red vinyl; Black cloth top; Estimate $90,000 – $100,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $52,000. – 233/120hp V8, automatic, wheel covers, wide whitewalls, fender skirts, factory radio, dash clock, dual mirrors, spotlight. – From the Academy of Arts collection. Very good chrome and brightwork. Mostly good and shiny older paint, but there is a large crack at the bottom of the left A-pillar and some painted over cracks on the right rear. Good, clean top and restored top frame. Erratic but not terrible panel fit. Very good interior, but the knobs for the radio are missing. The clock works and is ticking away, loudly. Restored but used underneath. Inherently charming and definitely an unusual sight, it’s not perfect but probably still one of the best examples in existence. – Sold for $62,700 at Kruse Fall Auburn in 2005 and at RM Amelia Island in 2010 for $82,500. Considering those results and the $90,000 low estimate placed on this handsome Studebaker, refusing the reported high bid seems understandable although this is very much an out-of-favor car these days and it’s going to be difficult to get much more than this for it.

Lot # F115.1 1929 Stutz Model M Town Car; S/N M867CD19S; Black/Black leather in front, Beige cloth in back; Black top; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $89,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $97,900. – Wire wheels with hub caps, Firestone wide whitewalls, mascot, landau bars, suicide rear doors, division window, jump seats, robe rail, wood dash and window trim. – From the Academy of Arts collection. Light scratching on the headlights. High quality but old and detail scratched paint. Light wear to the steering wheel but mostly excellent interior. Represented as an older concours restoration and no reason to dispute that. – Sold at RM’s Arizona auction in 2010 for $82,500 and brought a little more here in a straightforward transaction that relies for much of its appeal on the flamboyant bodywork that is exceptionally handsome and sporting for a Town Car..

Lot # S105 1938 Talbot-Lago T120 Roadster, Body by Brandone; S/N 92007; Black/Red leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $1,050,000 – $1,150,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $900,000. – Chrome wire wheels with hub caps, Firestone wide whitewalls, wood dash and window trim, Wilson pre-selector transmission, suicide doors, Marchal headlights. – From the Academy of Arts collection. Very good paint and chrome. Spotless underneath. Light wrinkling to the seats but otherwise gorgeous interior. A really fantastic, sporty little car with special coachwork and the kind of restoration it deserves, even if it wasn’t done yesterday. – Sold by RM at Monterey in 2009 in a post-block transaction for $900,000 all-in. It’s still a gorgeous Talbot-Lago today with exceptional coachwork, but this bid is reasonable for it.

Lot # F231.1 1981 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ40V Hardtop 4×4; S/N FJ40336461; Red, White roof/Black vinyl; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $49,500. – Rear-mounted spare, added air conditioning. – Very good like new interior. Spotless freshly restored frame and engine bay. Very good paint. Fresh foreign market restored late FJ40 that’s not the world’s best but still better than most. – After hammering not sold at a $40,000 high bid (a reasonable offer) at Mecum Portland earlier this year, this late FJ40 surprisingly had much better luck in Vegas that is strong enough to be considered expensive.

Lot # F163 1959 Volkswagen Type 2 Deluxe Microbus, 23-Window; S/N 554117; Red, White/Grey; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $165,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $181,500. – 23-window, hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, roof rack, Blaupunkt radio, dash clock. – Right-hand drive Samba delivered new to South Africa. Excellent paint and brightwork. Spotless engine bay. There is some orange peel in the paint around the license plate. Excellent interior. Fully and recently restored, but not overdone. – 23-Windows just keep getting more expensive, and that includes this specific example. It hammered not sold at a $100,000 high bid here last year after hammering not sold at a $150,000 high bid a few months before at Mecum Monterey. This is an over the top result even among Bus prices that already seem over the top. For the curious, this works out to $5,041.67 per horsepower, and it is righthand drive, a curiosity in the U.S., but not driver friendly.

Lot # F230 1973 Volkswagen Type 181 Thing Convertible; S/N 1832421055; Blizzard White/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000. – Hub caps, wood shift knob. – Represented as original. The paint is mostly quite well kept for the age, although it’s coming off around the hinges and screws, with surface rust poking through. Good, probably newer top. Grimy, dirty engine bay and lightly oxidized underbody. Big scratch on the left rear hubcap. Newer seats, but otherwise decent original interior. A good 181 for somebody who wants one to drive and enjoy, but pretty rough around the edges and with sufficient work here and there not to qualify as “unrestored”. – While you can commend this Thing for its originality, it’s not exactly well preserved, and this price could ordinarily buy you a restored one, which would frankly be a more sensible purchase. For one with these needs, this is expensive.

Lot # T115 1973 Volvo 1800ES 2-Dr. Station Wagon; S/N 1836363005814; Yellow/Black vinyl with Grey cloth inserts; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $7,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $7,700. – 1,986/130hp four, Pirelli tires, fog lights, automatic transmission, aftermarket steering wheel, aftermarket cassette stereo. – From the Ardell Brown Estate collection. Slightly dull but blemish free older respray and brightwork aside from a large chip on the driver’s door. Newer seats and carpets but the rest of the interior looks original. Nicely restored wheels. Tidy and restored underneath. Done on a budget, and both the automatic and truly awful arcade game-style steering wheel don’t do it any favors either, but it has eyeball due to the ES’s elegant shape and the bright color. – One of the prettiest cars ever with a Volvo badge, the 1800ES is also one of the most valuable. You wouldn’t know it from this price, though. An automatic can be a huge knock to value on these, but even so this is less than project car money for a pretty good driver. One of the best bargains of the auction.

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  1. Reply

    Gosh, Rick: George Raft was in the classic comedy “Some Like It Hot,” a film consistently rated as one of the best movies made! Anyway, it is interesting to see the prices of Classic Era cars looks pretty much stalled over the last decade, at least for the examples shown from this auction. But, oh, that Stutz Town Car!

    • Rick Carey
    • December 16, 2018
    Reply

    Leslie,
    Although Raft’s typical role is, I think, more characteristic of “They Drive By Night” than “Some Like it Hot” I appreciate your observation.
    Your observation on Classic Era cars is on-point, but the Pre-War market (going back to antiquities, not just Classics) is unusually healthy at least in their sell-through.
    This analysis is superficial, taking in not only Duesenbergs and Stutzes but also street rods by their original build dates. But it is impressive.
    Since 1/1/2108 there have been:
    1,974 cars offered.
    1,506 of them sold, a 76.3% sale rate
    About half of them (718/1,506, 47.4%) are in my database with pre-sale estimates.
    104 of the ones with estimates changed hands on hammer bids over their high estimate, 14.5%.
    Speaking generally, prices in 2018 are off their peaks by enough to be noticed and only five recorded auctions (of 60 this year) had over high estimate sales above 14.5%: Worldwide’s sale of the Hostetler Hudsons, Artcurial Paris, RM’s Dingman Collection, Bonhams Goodwood Members Meeting and Bonhams Greenwich.
    Prices may be “off” (and I won’t dispute that), but there is a healthy market for pre-war cars, despite the skeptics.

    1. Reply

      Thank you, Rick, for the fulsome and informative reply! It is hard to get a good picture of trends in Classics, let alone Brass Era cars, when so much auction activity is focused on much newer vehicles. Nonetheless, I read all these auction reports very carefully and enjoy them very much. It is good to get a more honest appraisal of a car’s condition by someone present than from a catalogue description or simple “Condition 3” rating.

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