Mecum Auctions, Harrisburg, August 2-4, 2018

Earlier this summer I observed in the Barrett-Jackson Northeast auction report that B-J has demonstrated that it is possible to hold a successful collector car in the Northeast, an area where many others have foundered over the years.

And I’m here to add that so, too, has Mecum. After arriving in Harrisburg in 2014, they set a $19.3 million benchmark and built momentum to this year’s record $23 million total. It’s an impressive performance by the Mecum Auctions crew.

In the 93 transactions that follow (observed on-site by Andrew Newton) there are some rather notable deviations from expected values, both over and under. That suggests a transitioning marketplace where bidders are infused with a certain optimism that confers the confidence to bid with their hearts – or with the budding conviction that the collector car market’s recent contraction in values is correcting.

But there also was some skepticism or at least inattention during parts of the three-day auction which saw cars sell notably below what they’ve been bringing lately.

And now Monterey is upon us when all will be revealed(?).

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2018 742/982 75.6% $30,962 $22,000

[71.1%]

$22,973,775
2017 636/848 75% $30,281 $20,900

[69%]

$19,258,507
2016 562/817 68.8% $29,192 $20,900

[71.6%]

$16,405,626
2015 620/1008 61.5% $30,933 $23,100

[74.7%]

$19,178,196

On-site observations by Andrew Newton with editing and comments by Rick Carey who is solely responsible for the content.

The descriptions that follow are sorted by Marque and Model. “T” lot numbers are Thursday, “F” are Friday and “S” are Saturday.


Lot # T257 1976 Alfa Romeo 1750 Veloce Spider; S/N AR3048120; Red,/Black; Black top; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $6,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $7,150 – Alloy wheels, store brand tires, Alpine cassette stereo, Ansa exhaust. – Several big touch ups on the hood. Dull paint otherwise. Small dent in the driver’s door. Showing 97,819 miles and pretty rough. Also a ’76 with its attractive body festooned with the ungainly big plastic bumpers. – Not a lot of money, but not any less than the car really deserves.

Lot # T178 1968 American Motors AMX Fastback; S/N A8M397X239841; Rally Green Metallic, White stripes/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000 – 390/325hp, 4-speed, Go Package, factory pushbutton radio, red line tires, factory air conditioning. – Desirable 390 4-speed car. Some particles in the paint on the hood. Light road wear underneath. Unrestored brightwork. Very good restored interior. A handsome well equipped AMX. Restored to good enough standards, but nothing special. – AMCs often fly under the radar at auction and sell for prices well under what equivalent cars from the Big Three bring. AMX prices haven’t been doing much lately, but this one brought very strong money and is the most expensive AMX seen at auction so far this year, in large part attributable to the 4-speed and factory air conditioning.

Lot # T305 1983 BMW 633CSi Coupe; S/N WBAEB8407D6995028; Silver,/Black leather; Unrestored original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,100 – 3,210/174hp six, automatic, alloy wheels, sunroof, later Kenwood stereo. – Rough original paint with tons of light scratches on the hood as well as a small dent. Lots of scratches on the roof as well. Dull bumpers. Tired wheels. Dirty and a bit oxidized underneath. Decent interior but a lot of the switchgear is a bit worn and in general it could use a detailing. CARFAX shows an accident in 2003 but it appears to have been repaired well. Interest in these early sharknose 6-Series cars is on the rise, but this is not a particularly good one. – Sold by Barrett-Jackson in 2016 in essentially the same condition for $6,820, and again by them earlier this year for $6,600. One of the last lots on day one in Harrisburg, it crossed the block at no reserve when nobody was around and it was practically given away. Tough luck for the seller, but if the new owner is a Bimmer fan looking for a neat restoration project, they’re already in it for practically nothing.

Lot # F236 1988 BMW M5 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N WBSDC9308J2791420; Black,/Beige leather; Unrestored original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $23,000 – 3,453/256hp, 5-speed, alloy wheels, Yokohama tires, sunroof, heated seats, CD stereo. – Showing 188,486 miles. That considered, this is a well-kept car but things always happen over that many miles. Two small dents in the driver’s door and another on the roof. Two scrapes on the left passenger’s door. Dull switchgear and worn seats on the inside. Tidy but used engine bay. These early M5s have a bright future from a collectability standpoint and are very rare in this country, but this is very far from the best one around. – The first (E28) M5 was the fastest sedan in its day and it’s very rare with less than 2,200 built. Prices haven’t gone as crazy as they have for the equivalent E30 M3, but they’ve nevertheless risen and these M5s are already considered quite collectible. That said, this one is pretty worn out and it’s not likely to get any offers much higher than this reported high bid any time soon.

Lot # F172 1937 Buick Century Model 61 Trunk Back 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N C3123054; Green,/Tan cloth; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $27,000 – 320/130hp, hub caps and trim rings, dual enclosed sidemount spares, fog lights, dual mirrors, dash clock. – Small chip on the nose and some orange peel on the roof. Shiny, fresh paint otherwise. Original steering wheel but the rest of the interior is restored. The vents on the hood are dull, but mostly good chrome. Freshly restored, but done on a budget and not a show winner. – In 1937 Buick advertised its Century as capable of 101mph, the fastest production car in America at the time. The presentation of this example is credible if not brilliant but its 4-door body and general limited recognition are a heavy burden reflected in the high bid.

Lot # S115 1971 Buick GSX Stage I 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 434371H185307; Cortez Gold, Black/Black vinyl; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $88,000 – Cooper Cobra tires, Stage I engine, 3.42 gears, rear spoiler, Hurst shifter, factory radio, power brakes, power steering. – Clean fully restored engine bay. Very good paint, chrome and interior. A body-off restored Stage I GSX finished recently enough not to need anything. Done to like new standards without overdoing anything. – Hammered not sold at a $40,000 high bid in Kissimmee last year, an oversight that this result corrected. Even at this price this is a sound value in a quality, carefully and freshly restored GSX.

Lot # T244 1961 Buick LeSabre Convertible; S/N 4H1059682; Light Blue,/Blue vinyl; White vinyl top; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $17,600 – 364/235hp, automatic, Firestone Wide Oval tires, spoilers, factory air conditioning, tilt steering column, power steering, power brakes, column shift, factory radio. – Original chrome with some light scratches and a small dent in the front bumper. Good but old repaint, the top is older and yellowing. Oxidized underbody. Paint coming off the wheels. Fairly dull original interior. It is a casual cruiser that could use some straightforward restoration work, both on top and underneath. – A Robin’s Egg Blue Buick convertible in sound and presentable condition even with the needs of this one is a sound value.

Lot # T245 1985 Buick Regal T-Type Coupe; S/N 1G4GK4795FP423530; Black,/Gray cloth; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $7,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $7,700 – 231/200hp, automatic, Eagle GT II tires, alloy wheels, dual exhaust, armrest, cassette stereo, power windows. – Scratches on the front bumper. Tired but presentable original paint. Scratches on the wheels. Well-kept interior, but it is over 30 years old. Represented with an engine rebuild 300 miles ago, so despite the wear cosmetically it should at least be good to go mechanically. – A Grand National on a budget. It’s not quite the same thing, but close enough in these colors and most people won’t know the difference. It’s a pretty serious bargain at this price, too, especially with the recent engine overhaul.

Lot # S192 1953 Buick Skylark Convertible; S/N 17133219; White,/Red, White vinyl; Black vinyl top; Unrestored original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $47,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $51,700 – 322/188hp, Dynaflow, Kelsey Hayes chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, dual mirrors, power windows, power seat, power top, power steering, power brakes, tinted glass, factory radio, dash clock. – Dull original chrome and brightwork. Light rust spots on the wheels that would probably clean up fine. Lots of large paint blisters at the bottom of the passenger’s door. Otherwise good original paint. Light cracking in the seats front and back, but mostly well preserved original interior. Replacement top has small rip in it but is mostly presentable. Clean but original underneath. Unrestored and arguably too good to restore. A solid preservation class type of car. – ’53 Skylarks command six-figure money when they’re showcar restored but the cost of getting there from here is prohibitive. Continued preservation with some attention to its cosmetics are its destiny and it is appropriately priced for that.

Lot # T242 1963 Buick Skylark 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 3J2513709; Rose, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $9,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $9,900 – 215/200hp, automatic, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, bucket seats, column shift, pushbutton radio. – Some particles in the paint, but it’s otherwise good and eye-catching. Uneven gaps. Pitted taillight trim. Blistered paint on the wheels. Good mostly original interior. Light restoration work underneath but not fully redone. A neat driver in cool colors. Far from perfect, but you wouldn’t expect any ’63 Skylark to be. – This is a better car than the price it brought and an excellent starter car for a new collector highlighted by the aluminum V-8 and attractive styling. It is a good value in this transaction and the new owner has every reason to be satisfied by the value and the car.

Lot # F177 1955 Buick Special 2-Dr. Hardtop Riviera; S/N 4B5032138; Cadet Blue, Dover White/Gray vinyl, Dark Gray cloth; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $24,000 – 322/188hp, 3-speed, chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, Fireball V-8, Vintage air conditioning, dash clock. – Spotless fresh engine bay. Some pitting and scratches on the hood ornament. Pitted window frames. Uneven door gaps. Good older paint and chrome. Mostly good interior, but the original dash and gauges are a little dull, plus the steering wheel has some light pitting. A well restored car for what it is, but only in driver condition. – It’s an attractive Buick, but not sufficiently attractive to be worth even the reported high bid. The consignor would have been well-advised to take the money, if there was any.

Lot # S036 1951 Buick Super Convertible; S/N 56073893; Cream,/Maroon cloth; Tan cloth top; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $47,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $52,250 – 261/124hp, automatic, chrome Kelsey Hayes wire wheels, whitewalls, dual mirrors, hood ornament, factory radio, dash clock, power windows. – Uneven door gaps. Decent older chrome. Very good paint. Very good, tight convertible top. Very good fully restored interior. Represented as single family owned and fully restored in the early 2000s. Not a show winner, but a gorgeous car nonetheless. – While this is restored-like-new money, it’s also a one family owned car and that figured significantly in this price. A mid-Thirties hammer bid is more appropriate for its condition.

Lot # T303 1964 Buick Wildcat Convertible; S/N 6K1226895; Red,/Black vinyl; Black top; Enthusiast restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $23,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $25,300 – 401/325hp, automatic, narrow whitewalls, Flowmaster exhaust, boot cover, bucket seats, floor shift, console tach, later radio, rear seat speaker, power windows. – Undercoated chassis. Tidy but not fully restored underneath. Budget older paint with numerous chips and quite a few light scratches. Lightly scratched up window frames. Pretty tired-looking body side trim. The interior is much better than the rest of the car. A basic driver quality cruiser with a cool name. It has plenty of eyeball but nothing to write home about. – This result is generous by several thousand dollars, but the appeal of a red Wildcat is hard to overlook and the bidders bought the eyeball factor.

Lot # T293 1970 Cadillac DeVille Convertible; S/N F0260140; Black,/White leather with patterned cloth inserts; White vinyl top; Enthusiast restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $10,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $11,550 – 472/375hp (bored to 508 cid), automatic, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, fender skirts, power windows, climate control, pushbutton radio, under dash gauges. – Engine bored out to 508. Last year for rear-wheel drive. Very dull original bumpers. Lightly pitted brightwork. Dull old paint. Good replacement top with a few scuffs. Lightly scratched window frames. Unrestored underneath, although the engine has been rebuilt. Represented as restored, but the work was intermittent and incomplete. As it sits, it’s just a decent driver. – It would not have been a surprise to see this very large car bring more than the result here and the new owner took home a lot of car – for the money, by the pound or by the square foot.

Lot # S183 1956 Cadillac Eldorado Seville 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 5662049420; Blue, White vinyl roof/Blue, Gray leather; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $49,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $53,900 – 365/305hp, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, factory air conditioning, pushbutton radio, dash clock, power windows. – Older paint. Chrome flaking off the left exhaust surround and in the interior. Restored but used engine bay with a little grime as well as heat rash on the exhaust. The interior looks original other than older replaced upholstery. Represented as restored, but likely done a long time ago and before these cars were worth much. – Sold for $33,550 at Motostalgia Amelia Island last year, which was more realistic to this car’s actual value. This price should have bought a significantly fresher and more consistently presented car.

Lot # S009 1959 Cadillac Fleetwood 60 Special 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 59M089006; White,/White leather, Black cloth; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $27,500 – 390/325hp, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, dual mirrors, fender skirts, pushbutton radio, power windows, air conditioning, Autronic Eye. – Dull old paint and chrome. Masking errors around the brightwork, so the paint is not original even though it looks old enough. A little rough underneath but not bad. Wavy dash top and some general wear throughout the interior, but it’s original and reasonably well kept. A rarely seen four-door with a lot of presence and plenty of eyeball from far away, but in need of restoration work to make it anything noteworthy. – Someone paid the princely sum of $100,100 at Mecum Indy earlier this year for a ’59 Fleetwood that from 50 feet away looks exactly like this car. Up close, though, that Fleetwood was a proven show car and quite possibly the best one around. This one has many more needs, and the price paid was reasonable even if it was a little modest.

Lot # S008 1959 Cadillac Series 62 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 59G126260; Dover White, Turquoise roof/Blue; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $26,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $28,600 – 390/325hp, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, fender skirts, pushbutton AM radio. – Small ding in the front bumper, but otherwise good chrome. Pitting on the side trim spear. Paint chip at the front of the passenger’s door but otherwise good older paint. Good, lightly worn interior. Restored 10 years ago and showing its age, but still an attractive big fin Caddy in interesting colors. – The bidders seem to have balanced the quality of the work and presentation with its age in coming up with the realistic price.

Lot # S182 1969 Chevrolet Bel Air 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 155119D052296; White,/Black; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $40,000 – 427/425hp L72, M22 4-speed, hub caps, red line tires, 12-bolt rear, power brakes, bench seat, radio delete, floor shift. – Very clean engine bay with date-correct but not original engine and no indication if it was built with the L72 or it was retrofitted. Lightly pitted Bel Air badges. Very good restored interior. Good paint and chrome although they’re starting to show their age a little bit. Restored 10 years ago and lightly driven since. – Not sold at a $30,000 high bid at Kissimmee last year, then sold for $35,200 at Mecum Indy last year. Given the prior auction results and the uncertainties over the driveline the bid here is appropriate.

Lot # F024 1958 Chevrolet Bel Air Impala Convertible; S/N F58B202497; Colonial Cream,/Green; Green top; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $72,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $79,200 – 283/185hp, Powerglide, Spinner wheel covers, whitewalls, Continental kit, boot cover, fender skirts, pushbutton radio, rear seat speaker, dash clock. – Some of the brightwork and trim is a little scratched up, and there are some paint chips above the rocker trim. Some scratches above the left headlight. Otherwise shiny but older paint and chrome. Excellent interior. Unusual but gorgeous colors that really work on this car. It’s showing its age in quite a few spots and it’s not ready for the show field, but it has a ton of eyeball and will get tons of attention wherever it shows up. – This car sold for $66,780 at Mecum Kissimmee in 2012, and despite seemingly seeing a fair bit of use over the past six years, it still brought a surprisingly high price given that first year Impalas aren’t worth a lot more than they used to be and this one has a mundane drivetrain. The seller did very well.

Lot # F257 1994 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 Coupe; S/N 2G1FP22P3R2173155; Black,/Gray cloth; Unrestored original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $5,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $5,500 – 350/275hp, automatic, alloy wheels, Eagle GT tires, cassette stereo, air conditioning, power windows, automatic. – Has 64,769 miles and was babied by nobody in that time. Tons of chips and scratches on the nose and hood. The front bumper is faded. Dirty underneath. Light wear to the interior. A used car. – Offered at Indy in May where it brought a high bid of $4,250. It is a performance per dollar value, but not a whole the result is all this tired old Z/28 deserves.

Lot # S098 1967 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 124377N246851; Rally Red, White stripes/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $125,000 – 302/290hp, 4-speed, Rally wheels, red line tires, bench seat, Hurst shifter, factory 8-track. – Unusual 8-track and bench seat, but those aren’t performance bits that carry the most weight. AACA Senior in 2016. Scored 100 points at Camaro Nationals in 2009. Gorgeous engine bay. Very good paint, chrome and interior, but nothing is super fresh. A proven but older show car. – The 1967 Z/28 is particularly collectible because only 602 were built that year compared to several thousand in ’68 and ’69. But while this car has some interesting features, those don’t necessarily translate to value and given the age of its restoration the high bid here seems like more than enough to see the car off to a new home.

Lot # S106.1 1973 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 Coupe; S/N 1Q87T3N182451; Antique White, Black stripes/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $38,500 – 350245hp, automatic, Firestone Wide Oval tires, spoilers, factory air conditioning, tilt steering column, power steering, power brakes, column shift, factory radio. – Spotless engine bay. Decent but older chrome. Touch up on the passenger’s door but otherwise very good paint. Very good interior with newer seats and carpets. A genuine Z/28, and for a ’73 it has gotten the royal treatment. – This is a pretty remarkable price for a ’73 Z28, but then again it is in pretty remarkable condition.

Lot # S157 1969 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 124379N625923; Le Mans Blue, Black stripes and vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $80,000 – 302/290hp, cross-ram intake, 4-speed, JL8 brakes, cowl induction, spoilers, Hurst shifter. – Formerly in the Reggie Jackson collection. Cross-ram added, not original. Very clean, correct engine bay. Very good paint and chrome, but nothing is fresh and there are some detail scratches. Good, lightly worn interior. A handsome and well equipped Z/28, but not done yesterday and showing its age just a little bit. – All the cross-ram intakes were sold at dealer parts counters and installed after the Z/28 left Norwood. This one sold for $99,000 at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale last year. That was an expensive result, and even with the premium added for the JL8 brakes, the reported high bid here isn’t far off and probably could have been taken without too much regret.

Lot # S212 1992 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 Convertible; S/N 1G1FP33F6NL152502; Purple Haze Metallic,/Gray leather; Black cloth top; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $21,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $23,100 – 350/245hp, 5-speed, alloy wheels, Eagle GT tires, tinted glass, power windows, service records, owner’s manual, window sticker. – Very rare color, represented as one of 16 convertibles in this color combination, and a 5-speed to boot. Showing 2,825 miles and looks like a new car top to bottom, inside and out. – It seems like pretty crazy money for any ’92 Camaro, but good luck finding one anywhere near this good and in this color, plus the prices that Fox-body Mustangs in similar condition have been commanding lately makes this seem like a better value.

Lot # S087 1967 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 396 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 138177G107913; Royal Plum,/White vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $49,500 – 396/325hp, 4-speed, Rally wheels, red line tires, factory air conditioning, power steering, power brakes, bucket seats, console, floor shift, tach, later radio, 12-bolt Positraction rear end, tilt steering column. – Clean and fully restored but clearly used engine bay. Lightly scratched chrome. Very good Royal Plum paint. Even gaps. Good interior. Body-off restored a while ago, but very desirable equipment and neat colors make any flaws easier to accept. – This Chevelle SS has the aura of a quality car that’s received good and consistent care and attention as well as a quality restoration. It would have been better if somewhere they’d said, “This is the original engine” rather than “Correct code 396” but even with that uncertainty this is a sound value.

Lot # T138 1963 Chevrolet Corvair 500 Club Coupe; S/N 30927W209020; White,/Red; Enthusiast restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $13,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $14,850 – 145/80hp, Powerglide, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, factory radio, dash clock. – Several chips on the tail with surface rust poking through, but otherwise good older paint and chrome. Tidy and restored underneath. Restored interior with newer headliner, seats and carpets, while the dash is original but good. Restored to essentially enthusiast standards, and that’s just fine for a Corvair. – The result, however, is extravagant even with Corvairs recently showing signs of being a market darling. Inexpensive and fun to own, but not at this price which hints at buyer’s remorse on Friday morning.

Lot # T196 1964 Chevrolet Corvair Monza Convertible; S/N 40967W141044; Red,/Black; Enthusiast restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $8,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $8,800 – 164/95hp, 4-speed, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, boot cover, bucket seats, factory radio. – Several chips on the nose and around the panel edges as well as some long cracks on the left side of the body, but the paint is shiny and looks good from a short distance. Uneven gaps. Tidy but used engine bay. Some scuffs on the seats and the dash is a bit dull, but the interior is decent. A charming Monza convertible, but could stand a round of cosmetic attention, which would make a huge difference. – Contrast this transaction for the higher trim Monza, a convertible and a 4-speed with the mundane Corvair 500 coupe that sold a few hours earlier for $14,850 and this looks like one of the buys of the auction. Sometimes it pays to wait: this was one of those times and the seller took this Monza convertible home with $5,000 still jingling is his jeans.

Lot # S128.1 1958 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N J58S105027; Panama Yellow, White coves/Charcoal vinyl; Black vinyl top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $71,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $78,100 – 283/230hp, 4-speed, spinner wheel covers, whitewalls, Hurst shifter, Sun tach, later cassette stereo. – Very clean but lightly run engine bay. The driver’s door has a hard time shutting all the way. Good older paint and chrome. Dull original gauges and switchgear. Light road wear underneath. An older restored driver quality ’58 with the base engine. – 455 ’58 Corvettes came in Panama Yellow of which only 190 had White coves and it is the attractive color scheme and a sound if aged restoration which make the value of this one. The new owner paid full retail for its attributes.

Lot # S163 1967 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe; S/N 194377S115847; Engine # 7115847; Marlboro Maroon, Black stinger/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $115,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $126,500 – 427/400hp L68 three deuce engine, 4-speed, Rally wheels, narrow whitewalls, power steering, power brakes, power windows, headrests, telescopic steering column. – Represented as matching numbers. Very clean fully restored engine bay. Older and not quite show ready but high quality paint. Very good interior. The weather stripping is a little dry. Multiple Top Flight awards in the back. Not done yesterday, but the quality is apparent and this car has no real needs. The odometer shows 332 miles, which is probably all it has covered since the restoration. – Appropriately discounted for the age of the restoration but a strong enough price for its quality as well as the generous options list. This is a straightforward and fair result for both parties.

Lot # F031 1988 Chevrolet Corvette 35th Anniversary Coupe; S/N 1G1YY218J5114629; White,/White; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $10,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $11,550 – 350/245hp, automatic, Potenza tires, glass roof panels, power seats, cassette stereo. – Represented with 48,900 believable miles. The paint is a little dull, and there are scuffs and scratches on the rub strip and headlight doors. Curb rash on the wheels. Good interior. A lightly used C4 Corvette, but a used one nevertheless. – Like any special edition Corvette, the 35th Anniversary cars are inherently collectible and worth more than their standard counterparts and good ones can bring 20 grand or more. Serious collectors aren’t going to pay much attention to more heavily used examples, though, and this car certainly falls into that category. It was fairly bought at this price.

Lot # S175 1970 Chevrolet El Camino SS 396 Pickup; S/N 136800B170427; Fathom Blue, Black stripes, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $44,000 – 396/350hp, 4-speed, 12-bolt rear, 3-inch exhaust, power steering, power brakes, MSD ignition, Hurst shifter, later radio, SunPro underdash gauges. – Very good fresh paint, chrome and interior. Gorgeous underbody. Factory gaps. Clean, straight bed. Very well done, although it isn’t represented as matching numbers. – The quality of the restoration is exceptional and the seller’s unwillingness to see it go away at the reported high bid is entirely reasonable. Maybe it’ll try again in Monterey.

Lot # S127 1962 Chevrolet Impala SS 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 21847F232081; Silver Blue/Blue vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $58,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $63,800 – 409/409hp dual quads, 4-speed, spinner wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, power brakes, bucket seats, console, column mounted tach, floor shift, factory radio. – Several chips on the hood and another on the passenger’s door but high quality older paint. Good older chrome. Good interior with newer seats and carpets but original dash and gauges. Fresh, almost totally restored engine bay. Restored frame. Not represented as matching numbers. A sharp-looking 409/409 that’s not a show car but a good one to cruise around in. – Not sold at Mecum Indy this year at a $42,000 high bid. The seller’s decision to hold onto it at Indy made sense and paid off here in Harrisburg with a result appropriate to a re-engined Impala SS and a price that means the new owner can drive and lay rubber with it.

Lot # T119 1940 Chevrolet KB Pickup; S/N 9KC014441; Black/Brown; Truck restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $21,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $23,650 – Hub caps and trim rings, Firestone wide whitewalls, wood bed, floor shift. – Average quality paint with orange peel on the nose and headlights. Clean restored chassis. The body isn’t perfectly straight and the gaps are uneven. Dull dash and gauges as well as some scratches on the inside of the doors and below the rear window, but good new seat. A standard truck quality restoration that’s more than good enough for what it is. – Inexpensive, practical, not so good it can’t haul plywood or a canoe, this is a heck of a lot of enjoyment for a reasonable price.

Lot # T160 1973 Chevrolet Monte Carlo Landau 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 1H57K31610612; Gray, Black vinyl roof/Blue cloth; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $11,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $12,650 – 350/175hp, automatic, narrow whitewalls, factory air conditioning, factory radio. – Showing 53,453 believable miles. The original wheels are pretty beat up. A few light scratches on the front bumper. Good roof vinyl. Good older repaint. Original but well maintained underneath. Very good, lightly worn original interior. A very well kept and mostly unrestored car. In the world of Monte Carlos, it’s a gem. – The second generation isn’t really a remarkable car and it’s not worth all that much, but it’s unusual to see one this well preserved and for that reason it’s a pretty good value at this price.

Lot # F280 1987 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS Aero Coupe; S/N 1G1GZ11G6HP120841; White, Red/Maroon cloth; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $15,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $16,500 – 305/180hp, automatic, alloy wheels, Eagle ST tires, console, air conditioning, power windows, cassette stereo. – Relatively rare Aero Coupe with the hatch homologated for NASCAR racing. Plenty of dirt and dust in the engine bay. Some chips, scratches and scuffs on and around the nose but nothing bad. Some pitting and scratches on the interior trim, but the interior is quite good for the most part. Not a collector grade car but still well-kept for a 30 year old Monte Carlo. – The Aero Coupe can be worth about 50% more than a normal Monte Carlo SS. This result was about right for a car with this mileage and condition.

Lot # F131 1966 Chevrolet Nova SS 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 118376N144538; Lemonwood Yellow,/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $41,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $45,100 – 283/192hp, Powerglide, wire wheel covers, gold line tires, Protect-O-Plate, bucket seats, console, floor shift, factory radio. – Good paint. Light scratches and a ding on the front bumper. Some brightwork is newer, and some is original. Very good mostly restored interior. Very clean underneath. Handsome in these colors and restored to standards that are plenty good enough for a Nova with a 2-barrel 283 and Powerglide. – This car sold for a quite modest $27,500 at Barrett-Jackson Palm Beach earlier this year, and this is a big swing in the other direction. A more realistic price would be somewhere in the middle. At this price something more than the 283 lump could be expected to be under the hood.

Lot # S074 1970 Chrysler 300 Hurst 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N CMZ3U0C232833; White, Beige/Brown; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $40,000 – 440/375hp, automatic, Cooper Cobra tires, power steering, power brakes, bucket seats, floor shift, console, factory radio. – Filthy, oxidized engine bay. Looks reasonably cleaned up under there, but there are pieces missing and it’s not a pretty sight. Rough original paint and chrome. Lots of scratches, cracks and discoloration, the interior, by contrast, is quite good with only light wear on the seats. All original and represented to be 49,362 miles, but it was clearly put away wet and looks like it lived outside for a while. Not the way to treat a relatively rare 300 Hurst. – All the originality premium in the world can’t justify declining this bid for a scruffy, neglected car that is otherwise worth $30,000.

Lot # T166 1976 Datsun 280Z Coupe; S/N HLS30282695; Green,/White vinyl; Cosmetic restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $17,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,700 – 4-speed, gold alloy wheels, factory radio, air conditioning. – Tidy engine bay. Very good paint and bumpers. No rust underneath. Very good interior with newer seats and carpets. Not fully restored, but a very solid and tastefully upgraded car. Especially for a 280, it’s very good. – The later, slightly more bloated Z-cars have gotten more expensive over the last couple of years as good 240s have moved out of the realm of affordability for some. This is a fair price for a 280 in this condition, so both parties should be satisfied.

Lot # S065 1956 DeSoto Fireflite Convertible; S/N 50381576; Red, White/Black, White; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $90,000 – 330/255hp, automatic, chrome wire wheels, whitewalls, dual antennae, boot cover, pushbutton automatic, pushbutton radio with HighWay HiFi, dash clock. – Older restored engine bay. Dull older chrome and original grille. Good older paint. Original door handles and window frames. Newer seats and carpets but the rest of the interior is original. An older cosmetic restoration that left a few stones unturned. It’s still a flashy and handsome car, but it won’t win any shows. – Sold by Brooks Auctioneers at Quail Lodge in 1999 for $46,000, at Barrett-Jackson WestWorld in 2007 for $79,200 and by Worldwide at the Weinberg auction in 2009 for a nearly unbelievable $154,000. Based on that result it’s no surprise the consignor decided to take it home but further trips across the block aren’t going to make up for the fact it’s a Fireflite that has seen better days. This is an offer that was imprudently declined.

Lot # S152 1970 Dodge Challenger T/A 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N JH23J0B284021; In Violet, Black stripes/Black vinyl; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $110,000 – 340/290hp Six Pack, 4-speed, Polyglas GT tires, rear spoiler, hood pins, hood scoop, power steering, power brakes, bucket seats, console, Hurst pistol grip shifter, factory radio. – Represented as matching numbers. Spotless fresh engine bay. Excellent paint, chrome and interior. All new everything underneath. Fresh and gorgeous with nothing to pick on at all. – This is a gorgeous Challenger in the most famous of the High Impact colors. It offers no excuses in its extensive equipment list and it is worth every penny of the retail price it brought here.

Lot # S198 2006 Dodge Viper SRT-10 VOI.9 Coupe; S/N 1B3JZ69Z86V101816; White, Blue stripes/Dark Blue leather; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $50,000 – Side exhaust, CD stereo. – VOI.9 edition. Represented with 780 miles, still has plastic on the seats, and presents like a new car. – Sold at Mecum Dallas in 2016 for $80,300, then sold for $63,840 at Bonhams Amelia Island earlier this year, so the reported high bid here was easy to refuse. It’s actually been driven 93 miles since Amelia, at least according to the odometer reading. The only concern is the trend line established by this result and the earlier sales.

Lot # S185 1994 Ferrari 348 GTS Spider; S/N ZFFRG43A2R0098543; Red,/Tan leather; Black cloth top; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000 – Store brand tires, power windows, air conditioning. – Pretty tired paint with plenty of detail scratching. Lightly cracked seats, and the E-brake handle is scratched up. Crack on the right rear steering wheel cap. No service records offered. A Ferrari with 31,000 miles, even a 348, should be better than this, although even just a thorough detailing would make a big difference. – Mecum Indy last year. “Unrestored original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $39,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $43,450 – Power windows, air conditioning, tan boot cover. – Represented with 30,000 miles. Paint is bright with only moderate swirling. No rock chips or deep scratches. Rubber is good. Top is good. Engine bay looks a bit dirty and neglected with heavy discoloration on the aluminum and light rust on the exhaust. Interior is dirty with stained carpet and small tears in the driver’s seat. No representation of service history. A used car and a rough one by Ferrari standards. – The Indy bidders as well as the seller recognized this 348 for what it is and what it isn’t, and it sold at a price that reflects both the noticeable wear and the mechanical unknowns. The problem for the new owner is that while he may have gotten a cheap Ferrari for now, it will only take a few services before it’s not cheap anymore.” It was offered at the Saratoga auction last September [but they don’t report results] and the consignor should be more than satisfied with the result here.

Lot # S109 2007 Ferrari F430 Spider Convertible; S/N ZFFEW59A770151183; Blue/Tan; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $125,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $137,500 – 20-inch modular wheels, SF shields, Sony CD stereo, red calipers, Daytona-style seats. – Light wrinkling to the seats. Otherwise serviced and well kept. – Sold at Auctions America Fort Lauderdale in 2016 for $112,750, when it was fresh from accident repair. Strong money for a car with a red flag like that, over 21k miles and a set of wheels that definitely aren’t to everyone’s taste.

Lot # S169 1988 Ferrari Testarossa Coupe; S/N ZFFSG17A1J0078489; Rosso Corsa/Tan leather; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $120,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $132,000 – Mismatched tires (Michelins in back, Yokohamas in front), Momo steering wheel, Blaupunkt radio. – Light detail scratches in the paint. The wheels could stand to be cleaned. Flat, wrinkled seats. For a Ferrari showing 12,744 miles, this car really should look better but it’s not bad. – This is a strong result for a Testarossa of no distinction at all. It has low miles but no history, no service history and mismatched brand tires, the sign of an expediently and carelessly maintained car. Anything in six-figures is a gift to the seller.

Lot # F178 1970 Ford Bronco Wagon 4×4; S/N U15GLG71310; Yucatan Gold, White roof/Dark Green, Light Green vinyl; Truck restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $36,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $39,600 – 302/205hp, 3-speed, wheel covers, custom shifter, later radio, 9-inch rear, side exhaust. – Clean restored engine bay. Restored frame. Good truck quality paint. Uneven gaps. Good interior. A truck quality restoration of a collectible early V-8 Bronco. Good enough to be used on the weekend, but not too good to be taken off-road. – This would have been insane money only two or three years ago for any Bronco, but even examples like this that are decent but unremarkable are bringing surprisingly big money and there’s still tons of demand for them. Count Broncos among the coming things as Land Cruisers cool off.

Lot # F034 1950 Ford Custom Deluxe Convertible; S/N B0SP184244; Red/Black piped in Red; Black cloth top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $23,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $25,300 – 239/100hp, 3-speed, wheel covers, Firestone wide whitewalls, fender skirts, dual spotlights, dual mirrors, factory radio, dash clock, column shift, Continental kit, amber fog lights. – Some light chips, scratches and cracks on the hood that are only visible up close. Uneven panel gaps. Paint blisters on the tail and left side of the body. Faded older top. Good interior with very light wear to the seats. Older restored underneath. A little paint is flaking off the wheels. A higher quality paint job would make a big difference on this charming and well-appointed little Ford convertible. As it sits, it’s still a neat driver. – And it is a superior value at this price, a car that could have brought twice as much with only a few second thoughts. Cruising on a weekend in this ’50 Ford is as rewarding as having a tire-ripping muscle car when it comes to quality family time.

Lot # S005 1958 Ford Fairlane 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N H8NV118774; Seaspray, Silverstone Green/Light Green vinyl, Dark Green cloth; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000 – Wheel covers, whitewalls, power steering, AM radio, column shift, dash clock. – Grubby engine bay. Dull, possibly original chrome. Lightly scratched brightwork. Light particles in the older paint. Good partially restored interior. It’s unusual to see a Ford of this period that isn’t a T-Bird or a Sun/Skyliner, but otherwise this hardtop Fairlane is nothing special. – The quad headlights and oval taillights of ’58 Fords find few enthusiasts: a ’57 is cleaner, a ’59 is more sleek even if it’s goobered up with chrome gew gaws. A mediocre ’58 by any standard, this is a generous price.

Lot # F012.1 1966 Ford Fairlane 500 Convertible; S/N 6H45C100814; Tahoe Turquoise/Aqua, White vinyl; White top; Enthusiast restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $44,000 – 289/200hp, automatic, chrome wheels, Silvertown red line tires, boot cover, power steering, power brakes, power top, later CD stereo, under dash gauges. – Good paint and chrome. Lightly scratched headlight bezels. A few painted over chips around the door edges. Light scratches on the rear bumper. Good interior. Newer seats and carpets but original dash and gauges. There has been restoration work underneath with newer exhaust. A little bit of road wear. An enthusiast restoration that’s more than good enough for what this car is even if it isn’t exactly like new. – There’s a message coming through here in Harrisburg that the values that have been seen over the past two or three years are being eclipsed by more generous concepts like this. A little while ago this 2-barrel 289 automatic Fairlane 500 Convertible was a $20,000 car and it took a 390 to be worth this much. That rationale seems to have been left in the dust for something that looks good and catches bidders’ attention.

Lot # F063 1963 Ford Galaxie 500 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N 3P61G108973; Black/Blue vinyl; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $31,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $34,100 – 406/405hp, three deuces, 4-speed, spinner wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, bench seat, floor shift, pushbutton radio, dash clock, Stewart Warner column-mounted tach. – Lightly scratched paint throughout and rub through on the roof. Dull brightwork but the bumpers have been rechromed. Well-kept original interior. Older restored underneath. Represented as an original 406 car but not with matching numbers. – Someone paid $22,000 for a ’58 Fairlane 352/300hp hardtop early on Saturday and this 406/405 Galaxie is just $12,100 more? The comparison defies logic, but the new owner got serious bragging rights in a competently restored and presented car for a modest price.

Lot # S120 2006 Ford GT Coupe; S/N 1FAFP90S86Y401386; Red/Black; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $300,000 – BBS wheels, painted calipers, McIntosh stereo, stripe delete. – Like new, as usual, but even for a GT 138 miles is a low number. – Just about all of these cars have low miles, but three digits on the odometer is nevertheless a standout and this car deserved at least a few more bids after being sold at Mecum’s Houston auction in April for $368,500.

Lot # S133 2006 Ford GT Coupe; S/N 1FAFP90S26Y401206; Yellow, Black stripes/Black; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $275,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $302,500 – All four options. – 1,165 miles and like new, just like they all are. – This is about the going rate for a GT with four digits on the odometer and all four options. The color is the only thing unusual about the car, and it doesn’t seem to have affected the otherwise straightforward transaction here. Every auction has one, or two, or three, or four and supply really does mitigate demand and price. Current owners need either to accept the fact of oversupply or pickle the car for another ten years when their value will start to recoil.

Lot # F175 1993 Ford Mustang 5.0 SVT Cobra Hatchback; S/N 1FACP42D7PF136610; Red,/Black cloth; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $36,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $40,150 – 302/230hp, 5-speed, alloy wheels, rear wing, fog lights, factory cassette stereo. – Rare first year SVT, from the only year they did a Fox-body Mustang. One of 1,784 built. Represented as a one owner car and showing 1,624 miles. The front bumper paint is a lot duller than the rest of the car. The paint, wheels and interior are otherwise fantastic and commensurate with the miles. A prime car for Mustang collectors. – These cars are rare, but there were two in Harrisburg this year. They both did well, with the teal Lot F91 selling for $39,050 and this red car selling for $40,150. Low-mile Fox-bodies have consistently brought big money at auction this year, and this is yet another example.

Lot # F073 1988 Ford Mustang ASC McLaren Convertible; S/N 1FABP40E2JF220705; Blue/Blue leather; Unrestored original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $9,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $10,450 – Alloy wheels, Recaro seats, fog lights, later Alpine CD stereo. – A rare ASC McLaren convertible but it’s a used car. Showing 93,411 miles and looks like it. The paint is shiny and well-kept but there are some small chips in the front. The seats are tired and flat, and the switchgear is dull. A rare Fox-body Mustang variant, but any serious collector will pass this over for a much more well preserved example. – And more well-preserved examples are emphatically not rare. This might prove to be one of the more prescient acquisitions at Harrisburg, despite the high mileage.

Lot # S001.1 1976 Ford Thunderbird 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 6Y87A137835; Cream, Gold/White leather; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $6,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $7,150 – 460/202hp, automatic, narrow whitewalls, air conditioning, power windows, cassette stereo, cruise control. – Pretty poor old single repaint with particles in it. Discoloration on the dash top. Cracked weather stripping. Lightly cracking seats. Pretty dirty underneath. A pretty rough car, but could make a fun project. – Bought for about what it deserves, which isn’t much. Some malaise era luxury cars have garnered appreciation in recent years, but these later T-Birds haven’t seen much movement.

Lot # S123 1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N E7FH395805; Thunderbird Bronze, White hardtop/Burgundy vinyl; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $75,000 – Wire wheels, whitewalls, 312/270hp E-Code engine, automatic, porthole hardtop, factory radio, fender skirts. – Just 101 miles on a body-off restoration. Represented as matching numbers. Some residue fuel below the carbs but otherwise spotless show quality engine bay. Excellent paint, chrome and interior. Spotless trunk. The driver’s door sticks out a little and the driver’s seat has a few very light wrinkles. Otherwise, it’s a remarkable T-Bird with show awards to prove it. – This is arguably a six-figure T-Bird, so the reported high bid was probably easy to refuse. The audience for ’57 T-birds is not expanding, however, and prudence might indicate taking real money when it’s on the block.

Lot # S150 1972 GMC K2500 3/4 Ton Pickup; S/N TKE242Z514815; Orange, White/Black vinyl with houndstooth cloth inserts; Truck restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $38,500 – 350/175hp, automatic, lift kit, power steering, power brakes, tilt steering column, column shift, wood bed, factory radio. – Tired original chrome and grille. Mostly restored engine bay. Restored but used frame with newer exhaust. Original brightwork and badges. Good newer paint. Very good mostly restored interior. Restored, but just scruffy enough that you’d feel comfortable actually using it like the big truck that it is. – But not at this price. The bidders apparently overlooked the little details and afforded this truck a top dollar price. A 3/4-ton is unusual, but really a handful to drive, not to mention get in and out of with the lift kit. The buyer gets the benefit of the doubt, particularly since there was an underbidder somewhere.

Lot # F145 1936 GMC T14 Pickup; S/N 8031638; Cream, Green fenders/Brown; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $32,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $35,200 – Hub caps, Goodyear wide whitewalls, single sidemount spare, wood bed, floor shift, crank-out windshield. – Good older paint with some chips around the hood. Uneven gaps. Good restored frame. The body is a little wobbly. Light road wear underneath. Tons of eyeball in these colors, plus you hardly see GMC trucks of this period. – This result contains a GMC-premium of a quarter just for its rarity but if the buyer is a modern GMC dealer it is more than worth it for the promotional value. It’s 50% more than the ’40 Chevrolet KB sold on Thursday, however, a generous GMC-premium.

Lot # F179 1992 GMC Typhoon Utility; S/N 1GDCT18Z0N0812396; Forest Green,/Black leather; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $27,500 – 262/280hp V-6, automatic, roof rack, power windows. – Single repaint in rare Forest Green paint. Represented with 43,000 miles. The engine bay is maintained but a little dirty. Good paint. A little grimy underneath but not bad. Very well kept interior other than lightly wrinkled seats. Not a collector grade Typhoon, but more than good enough to be proud of and one of 82 in this color for 1992. – A lot of people think of the Typhoon and the Syclone pickup as being black trucks only, but the Typhoon could be had in nearly 10 other colors over its two-year run. The rare Forest Green Typhoon seems to have gotten a lot of people’s attention, because the bidders didn’t much take this car’s wear and tear into account and instead bid it to a really strong price that could have bought a better example.

Lot # F068.1 2001 Honda S2000 Convertible; S/N JHMAP114X1T009259; Silver/Black; Black cloth top; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $18,000 – Continental tires. – Represented with 57,034 miles, which is nothing on a VTEC Honda. A handful of chips and scratches on the nose. Some scuffs in the top. Light wrinkling to the seats but mostly very good interior. Low-mile S2000s have been doing remarkably at auction these days, but although there isn’t much wrong with this one, it’s a more heavily used car. – There were four S2000s in Harrisburg this year, only one of them sold, and this wasn’t it. The successful sale was a strong $37,950 for a 9,400-mile white car with a hardtop. That kind of money or anywhere near it is for the like-new cars with under 10k on the clock. This S2000 could have gone home at the reported high bid. And if you’ve never driven one, you should: an S2000 is a delight.

Lot # S047 1952 Hudson Hornet 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 180957; Red, White roof/Brown leather with Tan cloth inserts; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $56,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $61,600 – 308/145hp Twin-H, automatic, hub caps and trim rings, whitewalls, factory radio, dash clock, tissue dispenser. – Mostly restored underneath. Older average quality repaint with some particles in it. Lightly scratched window frames and brightwork. Good, mostly restored interior. The only Hudson of the sale, desirably equipped and in good colors, although it hasn’t been redone top to bottom and there are some shortcomings that can’t be ignored. – Step-down Hudsons with Twin-H power are seriously charismatic automobiles, but this charismatic? This is an exceptional price by any standard for a Hudson with a mediocre restoration with obvious flaws, enough for a show-quality example, which this isn’t.

Lot # S204 1966 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster; S/N 1E13061; Red,/Black vinyl; Black top; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $70,000 – 4-speed, centerlock wire wheels, red line tires, woodrim steering wheel. – Maintained but grimy engine bay. Old tires. Tired paint and brightwork. Dull interior. Tired looking steering wheel. Old, chipped top frame. Uneven gaps. Not much history represented. A driver quality SI Roadster, which these days almost seems rarer than an immaculately restored car. With values where they are now, this car should really be better. – Sold at Bonhams Greenwich this year for $90,720. That was an appropriate result for an inherently desirable SI 4.2 Roadster in decent condition, so the reported high bid here would be easy to turn down but it is unrealistic for the consignor to expect enough more after the Greenwich result to make it worthwhile to try to flip. It is not a six-figure XKE.

Lot # S172 1983 Jeep CJ-8 Scrambler Pickup 4×4; S/N 1JCCN88E4DT011504; Black, Scrambler graphics/Black; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $28,000 – 258/115hp six, 5-speed, All Terrain T/A tires, rear-mounted spare, console, factory radio, bed liner sprayed on the roof, power brakes. – Decals on the hood are chipping off. There is rub through in the paint in a few spots and paint coming off the fenders. Scratched up door handles. Tidy undercoated frame. Fresh finish in the bed and on the roof in bed liner. The hinges on the tailgate are a little rusty. Reasonably well kept original interior with some dull switchgear. An intermittently cared-for, mostly unrestored Scrambler. A driver. – No one should feel reluctant to take this Scrambler down a rocky or dusty trail. It is presentable but in a fashion that befits its utilitarian roots. The reported high bid is appropriate for its condition and specifications.

Lot # T322 1969 Jeep Jeepster Commando Roadster 4×4; S/N 87020170343; Yellow/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $22,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $24,200 – 225/155hp V-6, 3-speed, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, floor shift, radio. – All original. Presentable but tired paint. No major rust on the frame but dirty and oxidized underneath. Well-kept interior. Good enough as it sits for beach cruising, but arguably deserves a basic restoration. – Aww, why bother? It has years of happy beach runs and parades before it really needs more than some serious cosmetic attention. As it is the grandkids can romp on the seats, the dogs get their muddy paws all over it and who cares? It is a fun vehicle, and its price reflects that, if not its condition.

Lot # F183 1991 Jeep Wrangler Islander Utility; S/N 2J4FY39S4MJ155583; Blue, Islander graphics/Black; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $9,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $9,900 – 242/180hp six, 5-speed, American Racing wheels, 4-inch lift, later Pioneer stereo, modern bucket seats. – Unusual Islander Edition. Grubby but reasonably well maintained engine bay. Lightly scratched bumpers. Good repaint other than cracks below the passenger’s door. Older partially restored frame. Dull screws and hinges. Incorrect new bucket seats. The rest of the interior is a little tired with dull gauges and switchgear. Good newer top. A driver quality early Wrangler. Neat but nothing crazy. – Sold at Barrett-Jackson Palm Beach last year for $12,650. The result here is a lot more realistic.

Lot # T238 2000 Mazda MX-5 Miata LS Convertible; S/N JM1NB3537Y0147657; Burgundy/Beige leather; Beige vinyl top; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $6,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $7,150 – Special Edition Miata with chromed wheels, leather seats, wood shift knob and E-brake handle, woodrim Nardi steering wheel and white face gauges. Also has a Bose CD stereo. – Represented with 61,000 miles but could be better. The paint has plenty of detail scratches and the headlights are a little yellowed. The wheels are a little scratched up. The interior is mostly good and handsome, but the seats are cracked. Special Miata models like this do have a future as collector cars, but used ones like this aren’t going to be coveted. Nevertheless, it’s a handsome little convertible with a ton of life left in it. – A lot of fun, dead reliable and has a much nicer interior than a standard Miata. It’s still pretty much just a used car, but it’s hard to call this anything but a serious bargain.

Lot # S108 1959 Mercedes-Benz 190SL Roadster; S/N 1210428502683; Black/Cream vinyl; Black cloth top; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $70,000 – Hub caps and trim rings, dual mirrors, pushbutton Becker Highway radio. – Hardtop included but not present. Grimy, rough engine bay. Tired old paint and chrome. Dull brightwork. Decent interior other than a wrinkled dash. A reasonably presentable driver, but far from perfect and a car that certainly missed out on the high dollar restorations often lavished on 190SLs when they were worth more a few years ago. – 190SL prices have dipped down to more reasonable levels after a big spike a few years ago, but a mediocre example like this is worth no more than the reported high bid. There are so many 190SLs that got over-the-top restorations during the hype that marginal examples like go begging. The problem is that at a price like this the cost of the nut-and-bolt restoration needed to bring top dollar will leave it permanently underwater.

Lot # F258 1978 Mercedes-Benz 280CE Coupe; S/N 12305312009713; Silver,/Black; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $6,250 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $6,875 – 2,746/142hp, automatic, wheel covers, sunroof, power windows, air conditioning, Blaupunkt cassette stereo. – A few tiny chips on the hood. Small crack in the right taillight lens. A few scratches on the body side trim. That said, the paint and brightwork is all fantastic considering the 116,726 miles showing. The interior is fantastic as well with hardly any signs of wear. A little dirty underneath but well-kept and with no signs of rust. Further proof that an old Mercedes will last forever if you take care of it. This one has been babied and has many thousands of miles left. – If you just look at the mileage and call it a day, this transaction makes a little more sense. When you look at the details and see how well this car has been kept over the years, however, it looks like a serious bargain for a robust, reliable and handsome vintage luxury car.

Lot # T259 1976 Mercedes-Benz 300D 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 11511412050079; Butterscotch, White roof/Brown; Unrestored original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $3,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $3,850 – 3.0/77hp, automatic diesel, wheel covers, sunroof, factory radio, power windows. – Quite a bit of surface rust underneath. Light dents in the wheel covers. Really tired and scratched brightwork. Pretty tired original paint, especially on the roof, and you probably can’t be sure that the sunroof doesn’t leak. Decent but old interior with cracks in the dash. Supposedly imported from the German market at some point. Old Mercedes diesels will outlive the apocalypse, and this one has quite a bit of charm even if it is really rough around the edges. Nevertheless, it is not at all a nice car and could use a thorough going through before driving it with confidence. – This 42-year-old car could have been bought for less, but it deserves some TLC regardless because once sorted and lightly refurbished it could last for another 42 years.

Lot # T161 1999 Mercedes-Benz SL500 Roadster; S/N WDBFA68F4XF186568; Silver/Gray leather; Unrestored original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $8,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $9,350 – Yokohama tires, hardtop, power seats, factory stereo. – Several chips on the hood and a few small scrapes on the front bumper, plus a little curb rash on the wheels, so this looks like it was parallel parked in the city a few times. Mostly well-kept interior but there are some notable cracks in the seats. Road dirt underneath. A lot of car, and these were made back when Mercedes took build quality seriously. This one nevertheless has some scars and no represented service history. That doesn’t inspire confidence. – Bought prudently considering the age and unanswered questions here, and still a lot of car for the money considering it cost over 80 grand when it was new.

Lot # S100 1955 MG TF 1500 Roadster; S/N HDE439569XTE63363; Red/Tan; Beige top; Older restoration, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $70,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $77,000 – 1,466/63hp, centerlock wire wheels, dual wing mirrors, wind wings, rear-mounted spare, cloth boot cover, banjo steering wheel. – Tidy used engine bay. Decent older paint. Lightly wrinkled seats. Dull wheels. The whole car could benefit from a major detailing, but its restored and not at all bad. Formerly owned by Lee Iacocca, who reportedly had it for 30 years. – Despite being incorrectly represented by Mecum as a TD, this TF grabbed a lot of attention thanks to the Iacocca connection. Cars owned by famous people aren’t always worth more, but sometimes they are, and in this case the car sold for about three times what an ordinary TF 1500 in this condition could expect to bring.

Lot # F070 1991 Nissan Figaro Convertible; S/N FK10017504; Gray, White/White; White top; Unrestored original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $14,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $15,950 – Hub caps, CD stereo. – The paint and chrome are presentable and well-kept but almost 30 years old. The mirrors are faded and lightly pitted. There is notable cracking in the seats and some smudges on the dash. The rocker trim doesn’t quite fit flush. No rust. Charming, but has plenty to pick on and there are likely quite a few better ones on the market, but the new owner will have to be brave to drive it on streets full of Suburbans and Expeditions. – The Figaro was Nissan’s cute retro-mobile, but now they’re old enough to be classics in their own right and are coming to this country in greater and greater numbers now that they’re legal to import. This was a strong price compared to others that have been selling recently, but it wasn’t excessive. It’s still a ton of charm per dollar.

Lot # F143 1970 Oldsmobile 4-4-2 Convertible Pace Car; S/N 344670M302708; White, Pace Car graphics/Black vinyl; Black top; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $55,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $60,500 – 455/365hp, automatic, Eagle ST tires, black vinyl boot cover, bench seat with armrest, factory radio, woodgrain dash. – Pace car edition. Represented as a one owner car. Single repaint in the 1990s. Tidy engine bay. Well-kept paint but there is light orange peel on the mirrors. Factory gaps. Good original interior. Inherently collectible as a rare Pace Car version, but in quality driver condition. – This isn’t the best 4-4-2 ever to cross an auction block, not even close, but it is a Pace Car and more than presentable, a good value at this price.

Lot # F011.1 1987 Oldsmobile Cutlass 4-4-2 Coupe; S/N 1G3GR1192HP323783; Gray/Gray cloth; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,150 – 307/170hp, automatic, Eagle GT II tires, sunroof, air conditioning, cassette stereo, power windows, power seat, console, floor shift. – Tidy maintained engine bay. Very good original paint. New weather stripping, very good interior with no real wear. Showing 9,786 believable miles. – The somewhat unremarkable cars of the ’80s have been getting more attention lately, and it’s the like new low mile examples like this one that are driving prices. This is not the thundering, tire-smoking 4-4-2 of legend, just a sedate but distinctive variation on a Monte Carlo theme. It looks the part even if it is challenged to light up a tire and bought right at this price.

Lot # T235 1956 Packard Four Hundred 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 56871776; Salmon, White roof/Maroon, White leather; Unrestored original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $9,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $9,900 – Wire wheels, whitewalls, dual mirrors, hood ornament, pushbutton radio, dash clock, power windows. – Really tired paint, chrome and brightwork. Not charmingly patinated or any of that, just dull and tired. Some oxidized pieces underneath and generally dirty, but no major rust visible. The seats are in decent shape, but the rest of the interior is dirty and faded. Too scruffy to enjoy as is, and Packards are expensive to restore, so it looks like an intimidating project. – Sold for $14,850 at Mecum Indy in 2016, which was far too expensive. Even this is a strong price given the task ahead, and it’s a task that apparently proved too daunting for the seller who wisely got out at a modest $5,000 loss.

Lot # F023.1 1928 Packard Six-Series 526 Runabout; S/N 147721; Maroon, Red/Black leather; Black cloth top; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $46,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $51,150 – Disc wheels, wide whitewalls, rumble seat, golf bag door, MotoMeter, Waltham dash clock, rear-mounted spare. – CCCA Full Classic ™. Light road wear underneath. Old tires. Dull brightwork and paint with several small scratches, chips and cracks. Dirty running boards. Noticeable wrinkling on the driver’s side of the seat. The original leather around the gauges is starting to disintegrate. A better car than it sounds like, but nevertheless restored many years ago and only suitable for driving events and casual enjoyment at this point. – Sold at Mecum’s Dallas auction in 2013 for $46,010, then at Kissimmee in 2014 for $54,000 and no-saled here two years ago at a $50,000 high bid. It is reasonable to infer that the successive buyers have been daunted by the magnitude of turning this sound but aged Packard into a reliable tour car, much less a show winner. It needs a good home.

Lot # S211 1969 Plymouth Barracuda ‘Cuda 340 Fastback; S/N BH29P9B366228; Alpine White, Black hood stripes/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $38,500 – 340/275hp, 4-speed, steel wheels, Sumitumo tires, Rallye gauges, bucket seats, 3.23 Sure Grip, tinted glass, radio, column mounted SunPro tach, Broadcast sheet documented. – Rare A56 fastback Cuba 340 in interesting colors and represented with matching numbers engine. Fully restored 1,500 miles ago. Very good paint and chrome. Factory gaps. Scratched up door handles. Good interior with newer seats and carpets but otherwise original and well preserved. An unusual, somewhat obscure but desirably equipped bit of Mopar history. Supposedly only 402 were equipped like this in 1969. – This is a seriously rare piece of Mopar history, sympathetically restored with retained original interior trim. It’ll be a delight on cruise-ins and even at this generous price is a realistic value. Show up with this at a Mopar event and ‘Cuda Hemi owners will be bemused and appreciative.

Lot # S170 1963 Plymouth Belvedere 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 3231137546; Black/Red vinyl; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $35,000 – 426/415hp, dual quads, 4-speed, black wheels, hub caps, Firestone tires, Max Wedge Stage II, bench seat, pushbutton automatic, factory radio. – Fresh engine bay. The chrome is on the dull side and the grille is a little scratched and dinged up. Older paint with a scratch near the radio antenna. Unrestored body trim and badges. Factory gaps. Good interior, mostly restored other than the dash. A cool and rare car, to be sure, but given how collectible it is it could use a bit more high quality cosmetic attention and some attribution for its original configuration. – Not sold at a $46,000 high bid at Kissimmee earlier this year, which was a modest but reasonable offer that could have (and arguably should have) been taken now that the offer on the table is even lower.

Lot # F090.1 1968 Pontiac Bonneville Convertible; S/N 262678X151113; Verdoro Green/White vinyl; White vinyl top; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $42,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $46,200 – 428/390hp, 4-speed, Rally wheels, narrow whitewalls, hood tach, 4-speed, Safe-T-Track, power steering, power brakes, power windows, bucket seats, console, floor shift with Hurst shifter, factory radio, dash clock, build sheet documented. – Represented as matching numbers. Very light pitting and scratches on the front bumper. Lightly scratched window frames. Very good older paint. Very good interior with age on the console and steering wheel, but otherwise restored. Fully restored and lightly used underneath. Good equipment and good colors on a car rarely seen in this condition, close enough to perfect not to make much difference – A big, powerful, exciting car with enough power to light up its skinny little tires at the touch of the throttle, and the top goes down. The equipment list is comprehensive and its condition it hard to fault. It’s a bragging rights car and it deserved every dollar it brought in Harrisburg.

Lot # S051.1 1959 Pontiac Bonneville 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 859C10689; White/Turquoise vinyl; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $27,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $29,700 – 389/300hp, automatic, wheel covers, whitewalls, power steering, power brakes, bench seat, column shift, pushbutton radio, rear seat speaker. – Good, lightly used restored engine bay. Older chrome. Fairly dull original brightwork, some of which is pitting a bit. Dull older repaint but it’s free of major blemishes. Well preserved, mostly original interior. Uneven gaps. Handsome colors and a neat car, but driver condition. – Sold for $33,550 at Mecum Monterey in 2013. Given the five years of enjoyment since, this result seems reasonable.

Lot # F077 1965 Pontiac Catalina 2+2 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 252375C154923; Mission Beige, Red pinstripes/Black vinyl; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $23,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $25,300 – 421/376hp with added Tri-Power, 4-speed, steel wheels with hub caps, red line tires, added Tri-Power, bucket seats, floor shift with Hurst shifter, dash clock, factory radio, tach, PHS documented. – Old tires. Fairly dull but presentable chrome and brightwork. Good older paint with a small scuff on the tail, but otherwise no blemishes. Lightly scratched door handles. Mostly original interior, not restored because it didn’t need to be, although the seats look new. Rebuilt engine and transmission, but used underneath. A basic restoration, but the good equipment and the fact that you hardly see hot Catalinas in a sea of GTOs adds to this car’s charm. – Why Pontiacs don’t get the respect, and values, accorded their Chevy counterparts is a mystery known only to car collectors. This is a thundering Poncho. Disregarding its retrofit Tri-Power it has chops as it was built and is, simply, a massive value at this price even in this mediocre condition.

Lot # F002.5 1978 Pontiac Firebird Esprit Coupe; S/N 2T87U8L129321; Lombard Blue/Blue cloth; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $17,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $19,250 – Snowflake wheels, Radial T/A tires, pushbutton radio, air conditioning. – All original and single family ownership. Showing 23,685 believable miles. Well preserved paint other than some chips in the mirrors and a small dent behind the right rear wheel. Tidy underneath. Good, lightly worn interior. Aged, but sympathetically preserved. It’s not unusual to see a Trans Adam this well-kept after 40 years, but for a lower tier Esprit model Firebird it’s remarkable. – Something is only original once, and that counts for a lot in the collector car world. In this case, it counts for several thousand dollars. While not a perfectly preserved car, it would be tough to find a better one.

Lot # F136.1 1970 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Coupe; S/N 228870N126637; Polar White, Blue/Black vinyl; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $56,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $61,600 – 400/345hp, 4-speed, Rally wheels, Polyglas GT tires, Hurst shifter, cassette stereo, Ram Air III, power steering, power brakes, PHS documents. – Quite a few large cracks in the nose. Small cracks on the front fender vents. Crazing and cracking on the trunk lid. The blue stripes are discolored in a few spots. All these problems are only visible close up, however, and this is original paint. The engine bay is very tidy and well maintained. The original interior is excellent. Not quite perfect, but a time warp car. – Sold by Mecum at Rockford’s Spring Classic in 2004 for $25,988, at Kissimmee earlier this year for $51,700 and reported bid to $47,000 at Indy three months ago. The premium for its originality was a lot bigger this time around but not entirely undeserved. It’s a sweet Trans Am and deserves to be expensive like this.

Lot # F049 1998 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am WS6 Coupe; S/N 2G2FV22GXW2227970; Blue,/Gray leather; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $17,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $19,250 – 350/320hp, automatic, WS6, T-tops, cassette stereo. – Negligible wear to the seats and could use a detailing, but otherwise this 15,088-mile WS6 Trans Am essentially looks like a new car. – Firebirds have long offered a heck of a lot of car for the money, but they’re getting more expensive. Whether it’s the cachet of having a now defunct badge or something else, Firebirds have seen value growth that’s outpacing their Camaro siblings. This price would have bordered on outrageous a couple of years ago, but today it’s about right.

Lot # F184 2009 Pontiac G8 GXP 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 6G2EP57W79L307550; Sport Red Metallic/Black leather; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $39,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $42,900 – 6-speed. – Remarkably well kept and just about like new with 4,300 miles represented. A 6-speed GXP is a real sleeper, and 10 years after Pontiac’s demise people are starting to appreciate these cars with values creeping up. – Sold for about what the G8 GXP’s original price was. Objectively, not very good from an investment standpoint, but pretty remarkable when you remember that this is a 10-year-old sedan from a defunct carmaker. This is a low mileage bonus of significant magnitude even if dropping the kids of at school in it and doing a burnout is, selective.

Lot # S257 1964 Porsche 356 SC Coupe; S/N 217836; Red,/Brown; Older restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $35,000 – 1,582/95hp, 4-speed, Cooper tires, gold brightwork, Nardi woodrim steering wheel, later radio, accessory shift knob. – Rough paint with orange peel, particles and scratches. Uneven gaps. Very clean engine bay. The seats are a little loose and lumpy but the interior is mostly quite good. Restoration work underneath at some point. Dull brightwork. Even just a new paint job would make a huge difference, but this is still just a mediocre late 356 SC. – Even a project-condition late 356 deserves more than the reported high bid here, and this car is better than that.

Lot # T227 1984 Porsche 928 S Coupe; S/N WP0JB0924ES861812; Blue,/Dark Blue leather; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $10,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $11,000 – Pioneer cassette stereo, power windows, air conditioning. – Good 2005 repaint. Recent timing belt, water pump and tensioner service. Scratches around the door locks. Scuffs on the console lid but otherwise well-kept interior with seat wear that’s better than the 42,624 miles showing would suggest. Light road wear underneath. Not the best 928 in the world, but better than most and reasonably low mileage. – Snatched up at no reserve later in the day on Thursday by lucky buyer who got a recently serviced 928 at a serious bargain. This car could have brought over 15 grand without being expensive.

Lot # S193 1960 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud II 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N SYD184; Maroon, Black/Gray leather; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $3,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $3,850 – Wheel covers, wide whitewalls, dual wing mirrors, Lucas driving lights, badge bar, tables in the back. – From the Kline collection. Grimy, dirty engine bay. Bad paint that is cracking and flaking in most places. Dull brightwork. Represented with a rebuilt transmission. Rough interior. Lightly cracking seats and water spots behind the back seats. Light rust but nothing terminal underneath. A nasty Roller and unless it’s a labor of love (and it would be a rewarding project), buying a Silver Cloud with this many issues is not a great idea. – Sold at no reserve, and bidding just never went anywhere because nobody wanted this thing. For someone looking to for a restorable Rolls project, this car was practically free. Alternatively, the new owner could part the car out for quite a bit more than was paid here.

Lot # T326 1979 Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow II 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N SRK36403; Cream,/Saddle leather; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $24,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $26,950 – Wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, Alpine CD stereo at the bottom of the dash (original Blaupunkt still in place), air conditioning, power windows. – Dirty engine bay. Dull brightwork. Crack in the hood but otherwise good paint. Decent interior with some light wrinkling to the seats and some small cracks in the wood. No service history represented. A standard driver quality big bumper Silver Shadow. – There’s no other way to put it, this was expensive. The Silver Shadow was one of the company’s most prolific models, and because they’re still expensive to maintain they’re still not worth all that much. This price could have bought one of the best ones around and it was sold at Spring Auburn in 2014 for $11,275.

Lot # S135 1967 Shelby Mustang GT500 Fastback; S/N 67402F2A01284; Nightmist Blue, White stripes/Black vinyl; Older restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $197,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $217,250 – 428/335hp, 4-speed, Shelby wheels, Goodyear Speedway tires, pushbutton radio. – Represented as matching numbers. Gorgeous show ready engine bay. Excellent paint. Not a spec of dirt or grime under the body. Spotless trunk. Even gaps. Restored top to bottom with no stones left unturned. A rare 4-speed 500 in great colors and ready to show. It’s gorgeous. – This was the second most expensive car of the sale (after a Ford GT) as well as probably the most well restored car there. Top dollar paid, and it bought a top quality Shelby.

Lot # F244 1951 Studebaker Commander State Convertible; S/N HS22043; Burgundy/Beige; White vinyl top; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $17,600 – 233/120hp V-8, 3-speed, wheel covers, whitewalls, fender skirts, column shift manual, factory radio, dash clock. – Previously in a museum. Fairly tired but presentable older paint and chrome other than some cracking on the doors. Tidy underneath. Slightly wavy body sides. Good restored interior. A neat bullet nose Studebaker and a rare convertible to boot, but essentially in driver condition. – Sold for $25,850 at Auctions America California in 2013. If anything, these cars are actually worth less than they were then, but this is nevertheless a really modest price for a solid and relatively rare car. The new owner is going to have a lot of fun with it on summer days and evenings with the too down.

Lot # S238 1966 Sunbeam Alpine V Roadster; S/N B94101524; Green/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $12,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $13,200 – Wheel covers, wood shift knob. – Dull original chrome. Dull repaint, but there are no major blemishes. Really rough unrestored engine bay. Good replacement top. The interior smells musty and the shift boot is missing, plus the gauges are dull. The seats are at least in good shape. A less handsome short tail fin Alpine, plus it is in rough (but salvageable) shape. The car card says it was restored five years ago. Either that just isn’t true, or the owner has a very loose definition of “restored”. – This is the kind of Alpine that you typically see on eBay that needs a lot and sells for a high four-figure price, so this money should leave the seller absolutely thrilled. The new owner, meanwhile, is already into this thing for more than its worth, and a scruffy auction car always needs more work than you think it will.

Lot # F003 1975 Triumph TR6 Convertible; S/N CF38276U; Delft Blue/Blue vinyl; Black vinyl top; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,150 – Dual Webers, road wheels, Michelin red line tires, boot cover, wood shift knob, AM/FM radio, power brakes. – Tidy engine bay, but used. Light road wear underneath. Lots of light detail scratches in the paint. Uneven door gaps. Incorrect wood for the dash but it looks good. Original gauges. Older but replaced seats. A solid enthusiast restored driver, as are many TR6s. – Strong but not undeserved money for a safety bumper TR6 that has some flaws but no major needs, plus the added bonus of extra punch from the Weber carbs.

Lot # F211 1978 Volkswagen Type 2 Campmobile; S/N 2382043995; Sage Green, White roof/Green plaid cloth; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $36,500 – Hub caps, all season tires, tables, sink, stove, curtains, original Panasonic AM/FM pushbutton radio. – Cracks in the front bumperettes. Showing 45,762 believable miles. Several dents and touch ups on the left side of the body. Several touch ups on the tail as well. Pitted exhaust tips. Tidy original engine bay. Very good, partly restored interior with green plaid. Not perfect, but good if you want a Westfalia to actually go out and see the country in. In these colors, it’s also about as ’70s as a pair of bell bottoms and an afro, if that’s your thing. – With 21-window Type 2s bring six figure prices this looks like a pretty good deal, not the mention the 2-liter engine that actually propels it down the highway at reasonable speeds. Go surfing with it. Venture off into the forest for a weekend of glamping. Its recreation value outweighs the reported high bid.

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