Gooding & Company, Pebble Beach Auction, August 24-25, 2018

2018 was Gooding & Company’s second year selling on Friday evening and Saturday morning, creating a conflict with RM’s downtown auction on Friday that made downloading the Hammer Price app for smartphones necessary for keeping track.

Gooding’s headline lot – a car that would be a headline lot no matter where it appeared – was the ex-Gary Cooper Duesenberg SSJ Speedster, a dual carburetor supercharged short wheelbase monster with a purported 400hp. It sold for an American car record of $20 million hammer, $22 million with commission.

Gooding achieved other exceptional results in pre-WWII cars like the Packard 734 Speedster Phaeton (my choice for the most choice car of the Gooding sale, if not the auction weekend), the deliciously complete, original and patinaed Bugatti Type 51 and the concours restored ex-John W. Straus Bugatti Type 57C Atalante.

Gooding also brought the assortment of barn find cars that they have become renowned for bringing to market, and for achieving generous prices.

Here are the numbers:

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2018 122/146 83.6% 61.2% 11.6% $954,914 $363,000

[38%]

$116,499,500
2017 107/132 81.1% 60.8% 10.3% $854,669 $286,000

[33.5%]

$91,449,600
2016 114/137 83.2% 73.5% 8% $1,138,429 $425,000

[37.3%]

$129,780,950
2015 115/129 89.2% 67% 11.6% $1,113,896 $418,000

[37.5%]

$128,098,000

76 of the 146 lots offered are reported here, sorted by Marque, Model and Year. They were viewed on-site by Rick Carey, Greg Ingold, Andrew Newton and John Wiley. Greg, Andrew and John are absolved of responsibility for the final observations and comments which were reviewed and edited by me.


 

Lot # 120 2003 Aston Martin DB AR1 Speedster, Body by Zagato; S/N SCFAE62383K800037; Silver/Tan leather; Estimate $350,000 – $450,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $250,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $275,000. – Aluminum shift knob, wood dash and window trim. – Less than 1,000 original miles. The paint is excellent throughout. The underbody has a little use and could use detailing. The interior has no significant wear and still shows like new. – Sold at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale in 2005 for a then-record $248,400, then sold at RM Arizona last year for an excessive $379,500. This result was on the modest side and the car could have brought another few bids without being expensive. The DB AR1 has gone through a brief moment of excitement bringing prices in the range of the 2017 result for this car (a record) but have tapered off in recognition perhaps of their impracticality or competition from a growing number of other similarly impractical low-production supercars. The consignor can be understood for wanting to get out from under it, but the reported high bid is appropriate.

 

Lot # 110 1957 Aston Martin DB Mk III Saloon, Body by Tickford; S/N AM30031332; Engine # DBA960; Aston Martin Racing Green/Dark Green leather; Estimate $350,000 – $425,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $360,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $396,000. – Centerlock wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, luggage, books and tools. – Factory LHD car. Matching numbers. Excellent paint and chrome. Clean and recently detailed underneath. Light wrinkling to the seats and light wear on the carpets but not at all bad. Fully and properly restored, shown and driven since, including on the California Mille. It’s still gorgeous, plus a rare and desirably equipped early DB Aston. – Sold by RM at Amelia in 2002 for $57,200, a price that probably brought many to complain at the time about collector cars becoming unaffordable. So much for that position, even sixteen years ago. This result is in line with the car’s condition and contemporary transactions.

Lot # 010 1953 Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk I Coupe, Body by Allemano; S/N LML761; Engine # VB6J197L1; Red/Beige leather; Estimate $500,000 – $700,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $610,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $671,000. – Chrome centerlock wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, power windows, radio, triple Webers, quick release outside fuel filler, tools, jack, spare wheel. – Good paint. The windshield has some swirling and hazing. The grille and windshield surround are fairly dull compared to the rest of the brightwork. The underbody is well detailed and shows little use. The driver’s seat has some creasing for an otherwise immaculate interior. A well presented DB2/4 with beautiful one-off Allemano coachwork. Won its class at Pebble Beach in 1994 and appeared there again in 2005, which speaks to the quality of the work even though it was restored 25 years ago. – A very pretty car, possibly one of designer Giovanni Savonuzzi’s best for Allemano, and a really top notch restoration by Brian Hoyt. Its design and one-off coachwork, not the mention the performance of its 2.9 liter 180hp engine uprated by Aston for the first owner, are marks of a special car that were recognized by this mid-estimate result.

Lot # 019 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Coupe; S/N DB52072L; Engine # 4002081; Black/Tan leather; Estimate $750,000 – $900,000; Unrestored original, 4 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $650,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $715,000. – Chrome wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, pushbutton radio, air conditioning, 8-track tape player. – Cracked, crazed and scratched paint, which was changed from Autumn Gold at some point prior to 1980. Uneven fit on the hood. Window seals are mildly cracked. Chrome is flaking off the wheels. Sagging original seats show deep wear but not neglect other than visible stuffing in the rear passenger back. Black electrical tape applied to the rear deck vents. All original, neglected for quite a while, and still needs mechanical sorting. – Largely original and complete, this result is appropriate for its condition, with no discernable premium for its originality, just hits for its age and use. The result illustrates the “barn-find” dichotomy where more dirt and neglect brings a heavy premium while the consistent use and preservation of a car like this DB5 gets none. It is hardly rational, but that’s the way it is.

 

Lot # 024 1952 Bentley R-Type Continental 2-Dr. Fastback, Body by H.J. Mulliner; S/N BC1A; Engine # BCA1; Antelope Brown/Brown leather; Estimate $1,500,000 – $2,000,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,000,000. – RHD. 4-speed, wheel covers, air conditioning, pushbutton radio, fender mirror. – The first production R-Type Continental and delivered to Andre Simon in Paris (the GP driver?) Owned from 1970-2015 by musician Eric Weissberg. The older paint is very dull. The brightwork is faded and pitted throughout. The weather stripping is cracked. The engine bay has light patina and the underbody is covered in surface rust. The interior is old and worn, and the wood has some faded finish but no significant cracking. An untouched car from new other than a very old repaint and upholstery. – The reported high bid here overlooks this Continental’s history of being the first of its type and its long term ownership and care by Mr. Weissberg. Its condition endorses its originality. The bid here is enough for the car, but not for its history, although how much more those add to its intrinsic value is open to debate.

Lot # 134 1981 BMW M1 Coupe; S/N WBS59910004301421; Engine # M88425; White/Black leather, cloth inserts; Estimate $375,000 – $450,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $425,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $467,500. – Campagnolo wheels, Alpine cassette stereo, roof-mounted antenna, owner’s manual, tool roll. – The paint has several chips on the nose, a few more on the left side quarter panel above the wheel, and a few more behind the rear wheels. The left side rear reflector is missing. The underbody has been resprayed with a high gloss paint and it’s a bit dirty under there. The interior is well kept and doesn’t show much wear. Stored from the early 1990s until a few months ago, when it was fully sorted mechanically. Totally original and the thorough recent mechanical work is reassuring, but essentially just a driver quality M1. – This result leaves the new owner more than enough headroom to address the many service procedures and parts that will be needed to offset a quarter century of storage without spending more than it’s worth. The estimate range is surprisingly modest.

Lot # 125 1988 BMW M3 Coupe; S/N WBSAK0303J2195066; Diamond Black Metallic/Beige leather; Estimate $160,000 – $180,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $125,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $137,500. – 5-speed, alloy wheels, power windows, air conditioning. – 9,365 miles and one owner from new. Other than a light polishing scratch on the tail, it looks like a new car. – Prices for the first generation (E30) M3 took off like a rocket a few years ago and are still rising even as other BMW models are beginning to catch up. In today’s market, this is right-on for a like-new low-mile M3 such as this and gives it a full allowance for originality and low miles.

Lot # 012 2002 BMW M5 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N WBSDE934X2BZ99913; Titanium Silver/Black leather; Estimate $140,000 – $180,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $160,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $176,000. – 4,951/394hp, 6-speed, all books and tools as well as the VHS titled “Enjoying your new 5 Series.” – 500 original miles. Excellent original paint with no chips or blemishes, and the interior is immaculate. As close to new as it gets. – Sold for $48,400 at RM’s San Diego auction in 2010. The V-8 E39 M5 super sedan cost just under 70 grand when it was new, so this was a mind-bending result even for one so fresh and complete. Decent M5s of this vintage usually trade at way under half of this result, so the money here went for the lack of digits on the odometer. It is a car destined to be a display piece in BMW collections and will likely never tick over to 1,000 miles, or even 600.

 

Lot # 018 2015 BMW M5 30 Jahre 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N WBSFV9C52FD594222; Frozen Dark Silver Metallic/Charcoal; Estimate $175,000 – $250,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $135,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $148,500. – 4,941/600hp twin turbo V8, 7-speed dual clutch automanual, carbon ceramic disc brakes, night vision package, 30 Jahre Package with more power, tweaks to the drive mode settings, special paint and special badges. – Represented with 1,815 believable miles and looks like a new car. One of 29 of these special editions sold in the U.S. out of a production run of 300 total. – Sold here for more than a standard Competition Package M5 would have new, but BMW put out this limited edition model knowing that it would become collectible right away and this result wasn’t surprising. The most surprising aspect is that the owner(s?) could resist driving it and enjoying its prodigious performance.

Lot # 048 1931 Bugatti Type 51 Grand Prix; S/N 51132; Engine # 15; Dark Blue/Black leather; Estimate $3,200,000 – $3,700,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $3,400,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $3,740,000. – RHD. Partial passenger’s cover, Type 51 2.3 litre supercharged twin cam engine, aeroscreen, alloy wheels. – Raced without success by Bugatti in 1931, sold to Marguerite Mareuse for Jean-Pierre Wimille to drive in late 1931. La Turbie winner in March 1932, winner at Oran on April 24. After assorted events it was sold in 1935 to McClure Halley, dog-sitter to Mrs. Horace Dodge. Raced at the 1935 ARCA USA Grand Prix and the 1936 Vanderbilt Cup without distinction. The history gets more complex from there, involving George Weaver, Dave Uihlein, Bunny Phillips, Paul Moser. Restored for Klaus Werner with the (mostly) original engine rebuilt by Bunny Phillips in 1986 and original gearbox after years with an ohc Frontenac Ford installed for George Weaver in the 40’s. Authenticated by various experts including David Sewell and Sandy Leith. Used, but maintained, a Thirties’ race car as it might have appeared on the grid at La Turbie, a little oily and used with tired paint and scuffed upholstery but handsomely prepared and race-ready. – This is how a GP Bugatti should look and this example has the history and pedigree to go with it. Klaus Werner went to great lengths to reunite it with its important Bugatti bits. It was offered here in 2008 with a high bid of $2.8 million, then by RM at Monterey in 2010 with an almost identical $2.75 million high bid. The price it brought here is generous, but is fully supported by this Type 51’s condition and history.

Lot # 132 1938 Bugatti Type 57C Atalante Coupe; S/N 57766; Engine # C57; Black, Dark Blue/Brown leather; Estimate $2,800,000 – $3,300,000; Concours restoration, 1 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,550,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $2,805,000. – RHD. Body color wire wheels, Michelin tires, Marchal headlights, complete Bugatti road tool kit. – Concours restored. Excellent paint, chrome, upholstery and interior wood. Originally owned by Nicholas Stamati Embiricos and bodied by Gangloff as a Stelvio cabriolet. Ray Murray swapped the Stelvio body for this alloy-bodied Atalante from 57733 which he also owned. Passed through several hands including Al Garthwaite (who raced it in the 1947 Bridgehampton road race) and Dr. Sam Scher before ending up with Macy’s heir John W. Straus in 1955 until it was found in 2007. Restored in by Scott Sargent it was 2nd in class at Pebble Beach in 2011, Best in Show at Saratoga in 2012, at Hilton Head in 2014 and at Greenwich in 2017. Stated to be all-original and matching numbers. As good as it gets. – Sold for $852,500 at Christie’s Greenwich auction in 2007 in as-found condition fresh from John W. Straus’s barn, then at RM London in October 2008 after cleanup and being shown in the Preservation class at Pebble Beach, then at Gooding Scottsdale in 2013 for $2.035,000. RM offered it in New York in 2015 with a reported high bid of $1.7 million. It is an outstanding example of a rare Bugatti preserved for decades in largely complete condition, the ideal basis for a meticulously complete and accurate restoration, which is what it got.

Lot # 026 2010 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Convertible; S/N VF9SK2C28AM795302; Elegant White/Navy Blue; Estimate $1,500,000 – $1,800,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,050,000. – One of 150 16.4 Grand Sports built. – Less than 9,000 original miles and two owners from new. Slight stretching to the driver’s seat but otherwise still looks new. – Gooding sold this car here five years ago for $1,155,000, but in 2018 people are buying new Chirons and the Monterey auctions this year were packed (relatively speaking) with late model Bugattis. Mecum alone had four Veyrons. It seems like there were just too many of them in town, and this one failed to attract a reasonable offer.

Lot # 148 1975 Citroen CX 2200 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 00MC6789; Engine # 735002267; Blue/Blue cloth; Estimate $50,000 – $70,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $50,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $55,000. – Wheel covers, mud flaps. – Good original bumpers. Good repaint. Very good original interior with some light wear to the switchgear. The windshield is delaminating on the right side. Unrestored but well maintained underneath. These are still relatively affordable cars in Europe, but not any more here to judge by the presale estimate. This one has been babied and gotten care when it needed, but is still unrestored. – Bonhams sold a CX 2200 in Paris in February for $7,037 (Euros 5,750 at the time; this result is Euros 47,300.) Even with interest piqued in Monterey with Citroen a featured marque at the concours, with results like this containers of CX 2200 Citroens should already be lined up a French ports coming to the USA.

Lot # 054 1972 Citroen SM Coupe; S/N 01SB0102; Engine # 450368; Gold/Brown; Estimate $60,000 – $80,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $76,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $83,600. – 3-liter V6, automatic, wheel covers, power windows, air conditioning. – 70,449 believable miles indicated. Refurbished by Jerry Hathaway of SM World. Minor scratches and chips at the front but mostly good paint. The exterior trim is faded with light scratches. The front seats are dried and cracked in between the bolsters. In storage from 1983 until 2012, then sorted but not restored because it didn’t need to be. A solid, largely original US market SM. – The Citroen hype in connection with the Pebble Beach Concours must have gotten to the Pebble Beach Auction bidders because this is a 2+ price for a 3- example. Its originality helps, but not to this extent, and it is expensive.

Lot # 023 1967 DeTomaso Vallelunga Coupe, Body by Ghia; S/N 807DT0128; Engine # 476233E; Red/Saddle leather; Estimate $400,000 – $475,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $320,000. – Pirelli 175/70R13 Cinturato CN36 tires, leather upholstery, leather quilted parcel shelf cover, woodrim steering wheel, owner’s manual, spare keys, tool kit, jack. – Complete restoration to high standard begun in 2010 and completed in 2018. Excellent paint with only slight signs of road use. The brightwork is mostly sound other than some minor cracks at the seams of the passenger’s side window trim. Large scratch on the passenger’s window and some light marks to the windshield and enormous rear glass. Uneven panel fit on the hood. Misaligned seal on the upper right corner of the windshield, and a sagging seal at the rear glass. The underbody and engine are spotless. The interior is crisp and fresh. A recently finished restoration of a rare and gorgeous car, but it misses the mark in a few areas. – Having just completed the restoration the seller must be looking at a stack of eight years worth of restoration invoices and looking to get out from under them. However, this result is eminently fair for the car and its condition, even moderately generous, and warranted careful consideration.

Lot # 035 1935 Duesenberg SSJ Speedster, Body by LaGrande; S/N 2594; Engine # J-563; Grey, Light Grey sweep panel/Tan leather; Beige cloth top; Estimate $10,000,000 – $10,000,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000,000. – Dual carburetor supercharged inline eight purported to deliver 400hp, body color wire wheels, Dunlop tires, single cloth covered rear-mounted spare. outside exhaust headpipes. – The ex-Gary Cooper SSJ, sister car to Clark Gable’s. Built as a promotion by Duesenberg on a shortened 125-inch frame to a design by J. Herbert Newport. Later passed through John Troka to D. Cameron Peck, then to Briggs S. Cunningham who paid $3,500 for it in 1949 and finally to Miles Collier in 1986. Sound but aged and edge chipped paint. Sound but erratic chrome. Sound upholstery, worn older door panels. Faded, stained top and spare cover. Oily, road grimy chassis and suspension. Never fully restored, just maintained by two unparalleled enthusiasts for 68 years. More than good enough to tour with excitement but needs restoration before it’s shown. – The unquestioned highlight of this year’s Gooding & Company Pebble Beach auction, a car with history, performance and panache to spare. There can be no argument with the Pebble Beach bidders’ decision to pay a world record price for an American car at auction for it.

Lot # 145 1950 Ferrari 166 MM Berlinetta, Body by Touring; S/N 0060M; Engine # 0060M; Blue/Black leather; Estimate $6,500,000 – $7,500,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $5,500,000. – RHD. Silver painted wire wheels, Dunlop Racing tires, Marchal head and fog lights. – Raced by Cornacchia and Sarafini when new, then exported to Chinetti in New York after it was shown at the 1950 Paris Salon. Bought by Briggs Cunningham for whom it was upgraded to 195S specs, then entered in Sebring driven by Chinetti and finishing 7th overall and first in class. Later raced at Buenos Aires finishing 7th driven by Jim Kimberly, Bridgehampton (Phil Walters 2nd) and Watkins Glen (John Fitch 2nd.) Later owned by Henry N. Manney III, with a long, active career following until it was restored in 2001, taking second in class at Pebble Beach. Excellent paint, interior and bright trim. Freshly done to better than showroom condition without going too far. Represented as the original engine, chassis, gearbox and rear axle. – Sold by Gooding at Scottsdale in 2016 for $6,490,000 and seriously light of both the consignor’s expectations and the car’s history and condition at this bid.

 

Lot # 029 1972 Ferrari 246 GT Dino Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 03872; Engine # 135CS0000009684; Nocciola Metallizzato/Tobacco leather; Estimate $500,000 – $400,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $370,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $407,000. – Ansa exhaust, Becker stereo, leather-wrapped steering wheel. – Fantastic paint. The brightwork is very good with a few light scratches on the side window trim. The engine bay is very clean and the interior appears freshly redone. A thorough restoration finished in 2014 and shows very well. – It apparently showed even better at the Gooding Scottsdale auction seven months ago when it was reported sold for $462,000. Either result is an appropriate price for a quality Dino coupe but it was an expensive seven months and 71 more miles on the odometer.

Lot # 155 1974 Ferrari 246 GTS Dino Spider, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 08512; Pino Verde Metallizzato/Beige, Black leather; Estimate $600,000 – $500,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $480,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $528,000. – Chairs and flares, Campagnolo wheels, leather-wrapped steering wheel. Comes with the original tool roll, seat covers, manuals in their original folio, parts catalog, service directory, warranty and service books – Good original paint with a few stone chips to the nose and some chips behind the rear wheels. The brightwork is very good and without significant fading. The underbody is well detailed and shows little oxidation at all. The seats have some light creasing from use and the dash pad has what seems to be some water staining near the bottom of the windshield. Surprisingly well maintained car and almost too good to be original, but Ferrari owners have a tendency to pamper their cars. – Based on the condition, the 27,487 miles on the odometer are most likely all this Dino has covered in the past 44 years. It brought an heroic price for its condition, but the allure of never-apart and all original is strong and is reinforced by the unusually comprehensive documentation. It is expensive, but it deserves to be.

Lot # 016 1961 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet SII, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 2489GT; Engine # 2489GT; White, Silver hardtop/Red leather; Gray top; Estimate $2,300,000 – $2,000,000; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,550,000. – Borrani wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, tools and books, multiband radio, hardtop with integrated sunroof, Ferrari Classiche certified. – Stunningly finished paint with excellent panel fit. The brightwork is shiny and near flawless. The chassis and engine bay have been meticulously redone and maintained since. The interior shows almost no wear. A stunning, concours level restoration. Shown at Amelia and the Cavallino Classic previously with five platinum awards – This is an outstanding SII Cab in all respects and displays well in its White, Silver/Tan livery even though that’s not the original Amaranto. It sold at Gooding & Company’s Amelia Island sale in 2015 for $2,090,000 ($1.9 million hammer) and there is no reason for it to bring less here.

Lot # 053 1958 Ferrari 250 GT TdF Berlinetta, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N 0905GT; Engine # 0905GT; Metallic Grey/Grey leather; Estimate $6,500,000 – $7,500,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $6,000,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $6,600,000. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Englebert tires, covered Marchal headlights and fog lights, quick release fuel filler, single sail panel vent, cold air box – Owned for 52 years by Fred Peters. Engine replaced in Italy in the 60’s with 092D, restamped 0905GT. Restored in 2014, subsequently Coppa Bella Machina winner at the 2016 Cavallino Classic. Excellent paint, chrome and pristine interior. The underbody and engine compartment are like new. An outstanding TdF with an epic and important history. – The only TdF in the Monterey auctions, it also benefited from its long association with Fred Peters. With all that going for it, the result was only modest even taking the replaced engine into account. It is a Ferrari to be owned with pride and confidence and driven, as Fred did for many years, with enthusiasm.

Lot # 057 1963 Ferrari 250 GT/L Lusso Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 5117GT; Engine # 5117; Pino Verde Metallic/Tobacco Brown leather; Estimate $1,700,000 – $2,000,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,350,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,485,000. – Chrome spoke Borranis, Marchal headlights and fog lights, Michelin XVS tires. Ferrari Classiche certified. – Ex-Reggie Jackson. Restored in 2009 and awarded Platinum at Cavallino. Very good paint, chrome and interior. The underbody and chassis were done like new and show some age and use but have been little used and well-maintained in the past nine years. – Sold by RM here in Monterey in 2008 before the most recent restoration for $770,000. The result here is reasonable and only $165,000 more than the barn find example sold here on Saturday. All in all not a very strong result for Lussos in Monterey.

Lot # 177 1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Lusso Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 5201 GT; Engine # 5201; Silver/Red leather; Estimate $1,400,000 – $1,800,000; Unrestored original, 4 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,200,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,320,000. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Dunlop tires, Blaupunkt multi-band radio, Marchal headlights and fog lights. – Stored and unused for forty years. Dull, cracked, dirty old repaint. Stiff, cracked, rodent eaten aged replacement upholstery. Dull, rusty chrome. Dirty, corroded, messy engine compartment. Literally, a ratty barnfind with a sound, solid body. – The allure of “barn find” is exemplified by this Lusso, which needs tens of thousands of dollars of work before it even runs and that only as a prelude to a six-figure restoration. It sold for only $290,000 less than the finest and most expensive Lusso this week and just $165,000 less than Lot #65 in showroom condition which sold here yesterday. This result is nothing if not optimistic.

Lot # 041 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Berlinetta Alloy, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 09063; Engine # 09063; Rosso Rubino/Tan leather, Brown cloth; Estimate $12,000,000 – $14,000,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $10,300,000. – Silver painted Borrani wire wheels, Dunlop Racing tires, braced rollbar, aluminum Talbot outside mirror, closed crankcase ventilation. – Raced when new for NART by Pedro Rodriguez at Nassau, then in 1970 in the Daytona 24 driven by Harley Cluxton III and Ronnie Bucknum. Later owned by Albert Obrist and successful used car dealer Bernie Ecclestone. 6-carb intake installed before Daytona 1970. Very good paint except for light orange peel on the sail panel vents. Unblemished upholstery. The engine compartment and chassis are like new with only light use and age, remarkable for a Ferrari restored in 1994. – Offered by Brooks Auctioneers at Quail Lodge in 2000 where it was passed on a reported high bid of $980,000, then reported sold by RM at Amelia in 2001 for $1.1 Million. Gooding sold a sister 275 GTB/C (s/n 09051) here last year for $14,520,000. This one has a more important U.S. race history but an older restoration that is hardly significant in accounting for the willingness of the buyers to pay $3 million less for it. Perhaps the alloy body 275 GTB/C buyers were fixated on RM’s 250 GTO.

Lot # 164 1965 Ferrari 275 GTS Spider, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 07957; Engine # 07957; Silver/Red leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $1,500,000 – $1,800,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,600,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,760,000. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires Ferrari Classiche certified. – Very good paint, chrome and upholstery with no wear or stretching. The underbody and engine compartment were restored like new, then driven a little. Panels fit well and are impressively flat. 2013 and 2018 Concorso Ferrari Platinum winner and in exceptionally good condition for an older restoration. – Some Ferrari results in Monterey seemed to be disconnected from recent value histories, but this 275 GTS ticked all the right boxes and brought a representative price.

Lot # 042 1989 Ferrari 328 GTS Spider, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFXA20A4K0082125; Nero Metallizzato/Crema leather; Estimate $250,000 – $200,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $167,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $184,250. – Blaupunkt CD stereo, books, tools, jack, Ferrari Classiche certified. – Excellent original paint. The underbody is clean and shows minimal fading from sitting. The interior is very clean and only shows minimal creasing to the driver’s seat. Well maintained, with just 1,925 miles and with few indications of use. – Wow! Talk about an originality premium, this is it! The result here is 50% more than an otherwise perfect 328 GTS. The new owner may be able to drive it, oh so carefully, another thousand miles without seriously denting the originality premium, but a scratch or a stone chip will be a calamity and this Ferrari is likely to spent the rest of eternity in a climate controlled garage.

Lot # 062 1965 Ferrari 330 GT SII Coupe 2+2, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 07761; Engine # 07761; Black/Tan leather; Estimate $475,000 – $400,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $375,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $412,500. – Ansa exhaust, Borrani wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, pushbutton radio. – The paint has chips to both the upper and lower parts of the nose. The front and rear bumpers have hazing and light pitting, and the window trim has some hazing. The engine bay is clean and not overly aged. The interior is good with some stretching and creasing to the driver’s seat and some lighter creasing to the passenger’s seat. Restored in the 1990s and used plenty since. – Sold here in 2013 for $368,500 and somewhat more used now than it was then but the bidders overlooked that, instead focusing on its overall quality and its highly generous estimate. It would not have been a great value had it sold for the 2013 price and at this result is an expensive 330 GT SII.

Lot # 119 1967 Ferrari 330 GTC Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 10513; Engine # 10513; Oro/Beige leather; Estimate $600,000 – $700,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $475,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $522,500. – Centerlock alloy wheels, Pirelli tires, power windows, AM-FM-8-track, engine internal number 3064. – Good old color change repaint, creased and lightly soiled original upholstery. Dirty original underbody and chassis. Owned for four decades by Donald Millard, Jr. and not messed with but aging gracefully. – The pre-sale estimate range is reasonable in an historic context, but not in the present market and this car’s present condition for which this is a reasonable result.

Lot # 150 1967 Ferrari 330 GTC Speciale Coupe, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 9653; Engine # 9653; Ice Blue/Charcoal leather; Estimate $3,300,000 – $3,800,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $3,100,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $3,410,000. – Power windows and windwings, Becker Europa AM-FM, covered halogen headlights, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, air conditioning, engine internal number 2506. – 1967 Pininfarina Geneva Show car. First owned by heart transplant pioneer Dr. Michael DeBakey and later by his brother Dr. Ernest DeBakey, Norm Silver and John Mecom, Jr. Restored in the early 90’s to better than new and still with impeccable cosmetics. Driver’s door is not quite flush but all gaps are even. One of four built with the concave-shaped rear window. Hasn’t been used in some time and in need of mechanical recommissioning. – This is an exceptional Ferrari with rare limited production bodywork with many desirable features. The bidders recognized its appeal and made a strong statement of value with this result.

Lot # 122 1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona NART Spider, Body by Michelotti; S/N 14897; Light Blue, Black sills/Beige leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $500,000 – $700,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $520,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $572,000. – Chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin XWX tires, Becker Europa AM-FM, Veglia air conditioning. – 1974 Torino Motor Show display car. Superficial repaint, worn original upholstery. Nasty original underbody. Rebodied by Michelotti to make it look like a Corvette. Unused for nearly two decades, recently service to return it to running condition but still in need of mechanical attention before it can be driven on the road. One of five similar Spiders commissioned by NART, it originally was upholstered in Arancio with a matching padded Targa bar, both now lost, presumably somewhat to the detriment of chassis stiffness. – Distinct from the Competition NART Spider offered this week at RM Sotheby’s the Corvette-ness is less obvious in this example. It’s a rather attractive car and despite its sitting in static storage for two decades can be returned to usable condition with only extensive (but expensive) mechanical work. It is not going to be overlooked on a show field and is good value for the money at this result.

 

Lot # 033 1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N 14867; Engine # B950; Blu Dino Metallizzato/Beige leather, Black bars; Estimate $1,000,000 – $800,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $660,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $726,000. – Alloy wheels, Ansa exhaust, leather-wrapped steering wheel, tool roll, handbooks, Ferrari Classiche certified. – Excellent paint other than a few chips on the lower nose. The brightwork has minor hazing. The underbody is excellent with only minor oxidation behind the rear wheels. The interior presents very well and has only minor use indicated on the seats by light creasing. A gorgeous older restoration little to pick on. 2013 FCA Platinum, Coppa GT and Coppa Bella Macchina, 2014 Cavallino Classic Platinum. – An outstanding Daytona in particularly attractive colors and with a pleasingly comprehensive restoration and presentation that is backed up by several prestigious specialist awards. Its result is at the strong end of recent Daytona prices even though it is a third under the exaggerated presale low estimate. It is a great Daytona, but it brought a generous retail price.

Lot # 146 2015 Ferrari 458 Speciale Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFF75VFA3F0211863; Grigio Scuro Opaco (Matte Dark Grey), Matte Black roof/Black Alcantara; Estimate $375,000 – $450,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $350,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $385,000. – Grey calipers, carbon brake discs, carbon fiber seats, dark grey forged wheels, navigation, parking sensors and camera, telemetry, titanium exhaust pipes. – Just over 100 miles and to all intents and purposes a new car. The retail price including $117,063 of options was $412,557. – And it was enjoyed for less than 100 miles. Bizarre, but not uncommon in Monterey this year.

Lot # 022 1955 Ferrari 500 Mondial SII Spider, Body by Scaglietti; S/N 0556MD/0446MD; Engine # 446; Light Blue/Red; Estimate $5,500,000 – $7,500,000; Competition restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $4,550,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $5,005,000. – RHD. Marchal headlights and fog lights, silver painted Borrani wire wheels, Dunlop Racing tires, driver’s head fairing, metal passenger’s seat cover. – Excellent paint and upholstery. Restored like new by its multi-generational owner. Bought Francois Picard and obligingly stamped by Ferrari with the chassis number of Picard’s 735 Sport, 0556MD. Traded back to Ferrari, it raced for the Scuderia at the Venezuela GP in 1955 driven by Harry Schell and Eugenio Castellotti, finishing 1st in class and 5th overall. Then sold to Porfirio Rubirosa with two class firsts at Nassau and one at Sebring in 1956. Later sold to Charles Hassan, then Robert Ready Davis who stored it at a Rambler dealership in the Bay Area after the differential seized. It was purchased there by Robert Phillips in 1960 a U.S. Navy Supply Corps Lieutenant J.G. He has owned it ever since, compiling a series of racing appearances and at least one cross-country trip during Navy reassignments which culminated in his promotion to Rear Admiral and Paymaster of the Navy before retiring in 1988. Then began a comprehensive personal restoration that brought the Mondial 1st in class and the Enzo Ferrari Trophy at Pebble Beach in 2008. Documented with a (rare as hen’s teeth) 2003 Ferrari Classiche Heritage Certificate and a voluminous history file. It is just a cool thing, with a marvelous history of 58 years’ continuous custodianship. – Befitting a meticulous Porkchop (Naval line officers’ vernacular for their Supply Corps brethren) the research and documentation accompanying this 500 Mondial sets a new standard for “comprehensive”. Some years ago Adm. Phillips and I discovered a connection when in the mid-Sixties he was quartered on USS Navarro (APA-215), the station ship in DaNang, Vietnam where I was an even more junior officer enamored of my recent purchase of an Alfa GTV. Little did we know our orbits would intersect fifty years later in the nexus of Ferraris – at the time I probably didn’t even know what a 500 Mondial was. As he related at the auction, the car is, first, a big check to the IRS, then his grandkids’ college tuition. Oh, the transaction value? It is no more than the car’s history and condition deserved. The new owner should be proud to carry on the tradition.

Lot # 133 2005 Ferrari 575 Superamerica HGTC Convertible, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFGT61A650144211; Rosso Corsa/Tan leather; Estimate $700,000 – $900,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $830,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $913,000. – 6-speed, 19-inch modular alloy wheels, Bridgestone tires, carbon fiber interior trim, climate control, factory stereo, Red calipers, SF shields, electrochromic hardtop, books, car cover, tonneau cover, jack, tool kit, tire inflator, Ferrari Classiche certified. – Lightly soiled driver’s seat, otherwise like new with 2,600 miles. One of 43 Superamericas believed built with the 6-speed. – Top down and go like the wind, this is an exciting Ferrari even with “only” 540hp. It’s almost criminal that it’s covered only 2,600 miles in thirteen years (200 miles per year), but not unusual for late model Ferraris. This is a huge premium for the 6-speed manual, on the order of $350K, but is in keeping with recent transactions in late model 6-speed Ferraris.

Lot # 059 2005 Ferrari 575M Maranello Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina; S/N ZFFBV55AX50140879; Red/Black leather, Red bars; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $165,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $181,500. – 5-spoke modular alloy wheels, PZero tires, SF shields, Red calipers, carbon fiber brake discs, Daytona seats, HGTC handling package. – 2,700 miles like new except for sand microchips on the hood. 2016 FCA Platinum award winner – This is a notable premium for low miles, the Daytona seats, HGTC package and Platinum history, but isn’t beyond the realm of reason for an example of this quality and specification.

Lot # 171 2011 Ferrari 599 GTO Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFF70RDT6B0176787; Metallic Black, Matte Titanium roof/Tan Alcantara, Black inserts; Estimate $500,000 – $575,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $485,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $533,500. – SF shields, Grey 5-spoke wheels, Black calipers, carbon fiber brake discs. – 1,500 km and like new. – Reasonably estimated and bought at this result with no tangible premium for the negligible kilometers.

Lot # 137 2011 Ferrari 599 SA Aperta Spider, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFF72RHA5B0181885; Grigio Titanio/Black leather, Red stitching; Estimate $1,300,000 – $1,600,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $975,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,072,500. – Carbon fiber roof panel, Red calipers, SF shields, F1 gearbox, climate control, Pirelli PZero tires, heated carbon fiber power seats, navigation, carbon fiber roof panel and interior trim, parking sensors, tools, books, car cover, Ferrari Classiche certified. – Like new with 2,700 miles among the four owners it’s had in seven years. One of 80 built and Ferrari Classiche certified. – It has added one owner and about 200 miles since it was sold by Gooding in Scottsdale in 2017 for $1,485,000, an expensive interlude that, assuming a seller’s commission of 8%, cost $588,000, about $2,900 per mile, not counting maintenance, storage and insurance.

Lot # 124 1966 Ferrari Dino 206 S Berlinetta, Body by Pininfarina; S/N 00106; Yellow/Black leather, Dark Blue cloth inserts; Estimate $2,000,000 – $3,000,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,800,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $3,080,000. – Centerlock 5-spoke alloy wheels, Goodyear Blue Streak tires. – Pininfarina’s second pre-production prototype, 1966 Torino Motor Show display car, with longitudinal engine mounting. Restored by Mike Sheehan in the early 90’s. Excellent paint, chrome and interior. The engine compartment and chassis are nearly like new except for a little storage dust. Stored for a quarter century, recently serviced to run and drive but needing more work before hitting the road. – Historically significant and different in many ways from production 206 and 246 GTs that followed including the longitudinal engine, longer tail and the long chrome spear down the side recess for the rear air intakes. It is at this price an unusual opportunity to acquire a seminal and distinctive Ferrari.

Lot # 112 1991 Ferrari F40 Coupe, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFFGJ34B000088083; Red/Red cloth; Estimate $1,000,000 – $1,200,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $954,545 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,050,000. – Modular alloy wheels, PZero tires, Ferrari Classiche certified. – Assembly #04898. Good clearcoat repaint with small masking oversights. Unblemished upholstery and belts. The engine compartment and chassis are aged and oxidized. Sound and well-maintained, represented with 16,501 km from new. – F40 is the last predominantly analog Ferrari supercar, placing a premium not on algorithms and sensors but on the driver’s butt, hands and feet. It’s gradually losing favor among nouveau riche who think active traction control, active braking and a bevy of self-managed aerodynamic tweaks are essential to going fast. In case they’re listening, F40 is the way to demonstrate your Villeneuve/Schumacher/Nuvolari instincts and responses. Sold here in a post-block transaction, with relatively high kilometrage, this is a driver’s challenge at a realistic price.

Lot # 106 2017 Ferrari GTC4 Lusso 70th Anniversary Edition Shooting Brake, Body by Pininfarina-Scaglietti; S/N ZFF82WNA4J0231715; Rosso Corsa Metallizato, Blue, White stripes/Chamois Alcantara; Estimate $500,000 – $700,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $475,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $522,500. – Black calipers, carbon brake discs, sticker SF shields, 20-inch alloy wheels, Michelin tires carbon fiber interior trim, all-wheel drive, 7-speed Automanual, 4-wheel drive, 4-wheel steering – 70 miles and like new. 70th Anniversary Testa Rossa 0666 commemorative livery. – This is a GTC4 Lusso 4-seat hatchback with custom accoutrements and barely more than delivery miles for something like $150,000 more than a GTC4 Lusso without the 70th Anniversary trim. Nothing, that is, n-o-t-h-i-n-g about this 4-seat hatchback has anything to do with Testa Rossa s/n 0666 except some stripes and numbers. Calling it a “Lusso”, in the sense of a 250 GT/L, is misrepresentation writ large. The new owner may like it, but a Hot Wheels-themed Ferrari would be more honest.

Lot # 031 2014 Ferrari LaFerrari Coupe, Body by Ferrari; S/N ZFF76ZFAXE0207442; Black/Black; Estimate $3,600,000 – $3,200,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,800,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $3,080,000. – Optional carbon body panels, Red calipers, Bluetooth, parking sensor and camera, Manettino steering wheel, carbon-ceramic brakes, 19/20-inche alloy wheels, carbon fiber roof, outside mirrors, wheel caps, $80,000 in options, Ferrari Classiche Yellow Book certified, all accessories. – Represented with 1,050 miles and one owner from new, with only has a hint of seat time on the driver’s side. Like-new, as most every other LaFerrari still is. – This is a “high mileage” LaFerrari and an appropriate price for it.

Lot # 103 1969 Ford Bronco Wagon 4×4; S/N HM9028S; Orange, White/White, Black; Estimate $180,000 – $220,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $110,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $121,000. – Front and rear limited slip differentials, 32″ BF Goodrich All Terrain T/A tires, Warn locking hubs, quick disconnect sway bar links, Steering column mounted tach, AM radio. Reportedly sold by Ford for $1 to Holman & Moody. – Excellent paint with no notable blemishes. The bumpers are like new, the driver’s side door trim has a few deep scratches, and the chrome wheels are highly polished. The driver’s side vent window has a few minor scratches. The engine compartment is fully restored and shows no notable use. The underbody has been highly detailed and the interior has no notable flaws. A gorgeous restoration done to an extent rarely seen on trucks. – Built as a test vehicle and then sold to Holman & Moody and restamped with a Holman & Moody VIN. Presumed to be the precursor to the Stroppe Baja Broncos that came soon after. Speculated to potentially bring a record price, it was the third vehicle of the day and fell absolutely flat. There were two bids, then things stalled and it was rolled off the block in less than a minute. There are blank spots in this Bronco’s history before its discovery and restoration in 2016, which goes far to explain the modest but fair result here.

Lot # 056 1967 Ford GT40 Mk IV Coupe; S/N J10; Red, White stripes/Black vinyl, cloth; Estimate $2,500,000 – $3,000,000; Rebodied or re-created, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,750,000. – RHD. Centerlock alloy wheels, Hoosier tires, Cibie halogen headlights, Marchal fog lights. – Attractive but thick paint. Orderly chassis and engine. The issue with this “Mk IV” is that it was never built by Ford Advanced Vehicles. It was an unfinished tub sold to the Agapiou brothers in Los Angeles and built into an open top Can-Am car, the G7A, and driven with little success by John Cannon, Jack Brabham, Vic Elford, George Follmer, David Hobbs and Peter Revson. It has one notable Can-Am result, at Fuji in 1970 driven by Cannon, otherwise a string of DNFs. Crashed by Cannon at Riverside, the parts and damaged tub were put aside. Acquired in the early 90’s by Marty Yacoobian who began to reassemble it to Mk IV specs. It languished until 2013 when the current owners finished it up with replica bodywork, 427 power and Kar Kraft T-44 transaxle. – What is this? It isn’t a J-car. Nor is the extent to which the tub was damaged at Riverside described and it might be just as easy to build a new one and confer J-10’s identity upon it. The services of a forensic examiner are needed to establish how much is old and how much is new but the lack of documentation offered here suggests it’s more new than old. A documented J-car is worth a bundle, but the reported high bid here is generous enough for this car’s history.

Lot # 039 1975 Gulf-Mirage GR8 Race Car; S/N GR8802; Gulf Blue, Orange stripe/Black; Estimate $2,500,000 – $3,500,000; Competition restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $1,950,000. – RHD. Cosworth-Ford V-8, 482hp, Hewland DG300 5-speed transaxle, Lucas MFI, spares package including ZF and Hewland transaxles and three sets of wheels and tires. – Repainted over old, cracked paint. Dirty interior but orderly engine compartment and chassis. Not pretty but the emphasis on the running, driving bits is where it belongs. 3rd at LeMans in 1975 driven by Jean-Pierre Jaussaud and Vern Schuppan (its sister car won). 2nd in 1976 (Lafosse/Migault) and in 1977 (Schuppan/Jarier), 10th in 1978 (Schuppan/Lafitte/Posey and a DNF in 1979 (Schuppan/Jaussaud/Hobbs). Subsequently demonstrated at the Monterey Reunion in 2014 and 2015 driven by Marino Franchiti – It is not unreasonable to conclude that a 5-time Le Mans entrant and 4-time podium finisher in clean, orderly, probably nearly race-ready condition is worth $2 million or more. It has immense possibilities for participation in important historic racing events.

Lot # 182 2016 Jaguar F-Type Project 7 Convertible; S/N SAJWA7A8XGMK27978; British Racing Green, White/Black leather; Black top; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $180,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $198,000. – 5 liter/575hp supercharged V-8, 8-speed automanual, Yellow calipers, rear wing, front splitter, the white roundels on the doors are a $10,000 option, for circles. – Like new. One of 250 total and 50 for the U.S. market, meant to evoke the D-Type racers of old. The 575hp and rear-drive setup of this racy Jag must be a hoot, but the car has been driven a paltry 50 miles. – Sold for a premium over its original $176,000 MSRP but nothing crazy. It’s a little sad that some of these special performance models designed with track driving in mind become instant collectibles and never actually turn a wheel in anger.

Lot # 101 1961 Jaguar XKE SI 3.8 Flat Floor Roadster; S/N 875830; Engine # R22029; Carmen Red/Black leather; Black vinyl top; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Unrestored original, 4- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $117,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $129,250. – Centerlock chrome wire wheels, woodrim steering wheel, radio, grille guard. – Faded and chipped paint covered in dust. It looks original, but it is a repaint and the bonnet is a replacement as well. The brightwork is faded and heavily pitted. The underbody is very oxidized as is the engine compartment. The interior is ratty with torn seat covers, cracked wood and shredded carpets. Put away in the ’80s and left to deteriorate. A heap in desperate need of everything and not currently running, but it’s a desirable Flat Floor Roadster and it has that barn find mystique. – This is not crazy barn-find money for a dirty, rodent hotel, deteriorated flat floor XKE. It is reasonable money for a dirty, rodent hotel, deteriorated flat floor XKE. It will take every dollar left between this price and the value of a meticulously restored flat floor XKE to make it into the latter, and even that may not be enough.

Lot # 157 1966 Jaguar XKE SI 4.2 Roadster; S/N 1E11769; Engine # 7E62949; Dark Opalescent Blue/Beige leather; Dark Blue cloth top; Estimate $220,000 – $260,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $325,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $357,500. – Centerlock chrome wire wheels, boot cover, woodrim steering wheel, tool kit, owner’s manual, service book, JDHT Certificate. – Flawless paint color changed from the original OE White. Smooth fabric top and very good interior. Mirror-like polish on the top of the engine. Clear fluid bottles. A fresh 2017 restoration in better than showroom condition. – This is an expensive XKE 4.2 Roadster, but its quality and presentation are so good the bidders can be forgiven for letting their enthusiasm get the better of their reason. Even at the high estimate, $65,000 less than the successful hammer bid, this would have been a solid value and a joy to own.

Lot # 116 1976 Lamborghini Countach LP400 Periscopica Coupe, Body by Bertone; S/N 1120182; Engine # 1120182; Pearl White/Blue, White Alcantara; Estimate $1,100,000 – $1,500,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $890,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $979,000. – Michelin XWX tires, Lamborghini Polo Storico documented. – Sold new in Japan where it remained until 2015 and represented as the matching numbers engine. Restored at the Lamborghini factory in the mid-90s. Just 550 km from new but not in great shape. The older repaint finish is mostly good, but there are a few chips and small cracks around the panel edges. There are also a few small blisters on the driver’s door and some finish is bubbling and flaking off the left rear wheel. The interior is very good and basically like new. A low-mile early Periscopica car that looks great without the big wings and fat bumpers of the later cars, but its condition is disappointing. – A $700K Lambo and a $190K low miles premium, a generous margin for a car that won’t be particularly satisfying to show. The odometer is destined to show on-and-off transported miles next time it’s seen, an artifact, not a car.

Lot # 126 1955 Lancia Aurelia B24 Spider America, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N B24S1077; Engine # B241098; Midnight Blue/Tan leather; Estimate $1,500,000 – $1,800,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,700,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,870,000. – Nardi kit, hub caps, hardtop, woodrim steering wheel, pushbutton radio. – Interior and mechanical systems refreshed in 2014 by Paul Russell. Hardtop has a retouched scratch. The chrome is unblemished. The grille is dull. The hubcaps are dull. Steering wheel hub needs polishing. Exterior lights are a little dull. The front badge is lightly scratched. Restored in 2012 but not done to show car standards, used a bit since which not even the ministrations of Paul Russel and Company could overcome. – Sold at Gooding Scottsdale in 2014 for $1,815,000 and here two years ago for $2,007,500 with 54 more km on the odometer since then. It would have been generously bought in its present condition for under $1.5 million making this an expensive acquisition.

Lot # 015 1995 Land Rover Defender 90 Utility; S/N SALDV3285SA978703; Arles Blue/Gray cloth; Estimate $140,000 – $160,000; Original, modified for competition or performance, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $145,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $159,500. – Rear-mounted spare, 4.6-liter engine from a later Land Rover, stainless steel lines, heated windshield, Hella auxiliary lights, brush guard, Warn winch, later air conditioning system, Alpine stereo. – Decent paint without noticeable damage. The underbody is aged and oxidized. The interior is very good and appears new. A reasonably well maintained Defender, well optioned and tastefully decked out. – The upgrades on this Defender seemed to tick all the right boxes for the Land Rover crowd, because even though good North American Spec (NAS) Defenders from the ’90s often touch 100 grand, this result was definitely expensive, especially with the modifications.

Lot # 162 1948 Maserati A6 1500 Coupe, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N 060; Engine # 085; Light Blue/Light Blue leather with cloth inserts; Estimate $850,000 – $950,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $725,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $797,500. – 1,488/85hp, 4-speed, chrome spoke wire wheels, Jaeger gauges, dash clock, banjo steering wheel. – Raced when new by Franco Bordoni, taking 1st in class at the 1949 Coppa Inter-Europa at Monza and repeating in 1950 driving for Maserati. Restored in the early naughts in Italy for John Bookout. Very good paint and body. The brightwork is excellent throughout. The underbody is fully restored and clean. The interior appears freshly redone. A very good, fresh restoration. – Not the most elegant thing ever shaped by Pinin Farina, but still striking and very well restored. It sold here two years ago for $852,500. It’s only done 66km since then, so it was an expensive couple of years of ownership but this still isn’t an unreasonable result for a nearly-guaranteed Mille Miglia entrant.

Lot # 037 1956 Maserati A6G/54 Berlinetta, Body by Zagato; S/N 2155; Engine # 2155; Silver-Grey/Blue leather; Estimate $4,300,000 – $4,600,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $3,400,000. – 1,986/160hp six, 4-speed, chrome spoke Borrani wire wheels, Michelin X tires, halogen headlights, side window rain deflectors, double bubble roof. – Raced for Maserati in the 1956 Mille Miglia by Luigi Fornasari who did not finish. Returned to Zagato for repairs. Later crunched again by Giacomo Moioli (“Noris”) again repaired by Zagato in 1958 in the present configuration with among other things hooded headlights and mildly notched roofline and exaggerated rear fenders. Acquired by John Bookout, Jr. in 2000 and restored to its 1958 configuration. Excellent paint and interior. Bright chrome and highly polished aluminum trim. The underbody is restored like new. – Sold by Poulain-Sotheby’s in Paris December of 2000 before restoration for $317,377 and reviewed with disdain for its then Kamm-tail coachwork. While it is eligible for lots of things, including the Mille Miglia, and its double bubble Zagato roof is eminently pleasing the bid here is realistic considering its many iterations (not all of them enumerated above.) It is, even with the checkered history, a marvelous beast.

Lot # 135 1955 Maserati A6GCS/53 Spider, Body by Frua; S/N 2110; Engine # 2050; Black, Banana stripe/Black leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $5,500,000 – $6,500,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $4,700,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $5,170,000. – Dry sump, gear-driven camshafts engine, 1,985/170hp, triple Weber40 DCO3 carbs, 4-speed, chrome spoke Borranis, Marchal headlights and fog lights – An older restoration to like new condition with a color reversal from the original Banana with Black stripe. Engine 2050, an A6G/54 number. Very rare ‘Short Body’ styling, probably one of two built. The instruments and dash show some age. Engine is dry sump with magneto and coil ignition. Still in nearly better than showroom condition. – Sold by Bonhams at Quail Lodge in 2002 where I fell copiously in love with it. Today it is in similar condition, with 326 more km on the odometer, a quality old restoration that is holding up better than it has any reason to. The result is almost 10x in 16 years but it is a marvelous, fast, beautiful car. Can’t help it: I’m still in love.

Lot # 136 1970 Mercedes-Benz 280SE 3.5 Cabriolet; S/N 11102712001545; Tobacco Brown/Cognac; Estimate $250,000 – $325,000; Older restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $260,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $286,000. – Automatic, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, air conditioning, Becker Mexico cassette stereo, owner’s manual, tools. – Very good paint and unblemished chrome. Mostly original but well-kept underneath. Very good interior. An older but lightly used restoration with no needs. – A quality 280SE 3.5 Cab bought for a realistic price that is fair to both the buyer and the seller.

Lot # 064 1971 Mercedes-Benz 280SE 3.5 Coupe; S/N 11102612002403; Tobacco Brown/Cognac; Estimate $120,000 – $140,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $68,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $74,800. – Automatic, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, air conditioning, Becker Europa stereo. – Good 10-year-old paint and upholstery. The chrome is unblemished. The window trim is scratched in places with some pitting as well. The doors fit poorly. Orderly but aged engine compartment. Original and reasonably well kept other than paint and seats, it makes an attractive driver but is impressive in no aspect except the brightwork. – Probably the stable-mate to the 280SE 3.5 Cab offered on Saturday as lot # 136 and an easy car to overlook in an auction jam-packed with Ferraris and Astons and Porsches, this imperfect, handsome and honest 3.5 went for no reserve at a price highly favorable to the buyer.

Lot # 140 1963 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster; S/N 19804210003254; Engine # 19898210000224; White, Black hardtop/Red leather; Black top; Estimate $1,800,000 – $2,200,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,300,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $2,530,000. – Alloy block, disc brakes, chrome wheels, Bullock-Rudge spinner hubcaps, whitewalls, luggage rack, Hirschmann and Karl Baisch luggage, hardtop, spotlight, US headlights, thoroughly documented from the original purchase, photos and factory documents – Paul Russell repaint 1999. Engine rebuild in 2015. Three owners. Largely original other than the repaint but only showing light general age. One of the last 300SLs built and bought new by a Cuban tobacco heiress, Mercedes de la Torrey Alcoz Pollack, fully documented since and has won awards at numerous concours events like Amelia Island, Meadowbrook and Pebble Beach. – This is a colorful history with impressive originality and rarely-seen factory options, but is it worth a $900,000 premium? Only the new owner can answer that question. For the rest of us this is an expensive 300SL Roadster.

Lot # 061 1956 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Coupe; S/N 1980406500143; Engine # 1989806500154; Red/Red leather; Estimate $1,100,000 – $1,300,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,025,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,127,500. – Hub caps, luggage, Becker Mexico radio, Talbot mirrors, books and tools. – Owned by the family of Hollywood real estate magnate L. Milton Wolf from 1958-2018. Resuscitated this year before the auction to run and drive. The older repaint is faded with deep cracks on the roof and driver’s side quarter panel. The underbody is aged, dirty and oily but not rusty. The interior is heavily aged although not damaged. Stashed away, heavily deteriorated and ready for a new owner to restore it back to its former glory. – Better than a barn-find, but not by a lot, this Gullwing brought a realistic price after its dozen year slumber. The new owner has plentiful choices, including keeping it in its present condition or embarking upon the perilous course of making it run and drive reliably without taking on the challenge and expense of a full restoration.

Lot # 105 1978 Mercedes-Benz 450SEL 6.9L 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 11603612003902; Astral Silver/Blue leather; Estimate $100,000 – $130,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $142,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $156,750. – Alloy wheels, climate control, power windows, Becker Mexico stereo. – Showing 18,962 miles. Good paint other than a small scratch below the windshield. Clean wheels. Very tidy underbody. Excellent original interior that looks nearly new. A remarkably kept unrestored car in good colors. 6.9s have started getting more expensive, and it’s the low-mile gems like this that bring the big money. – A monumental price that is way ahead of the curve. The 450SEL 6.9 was the absolute Queen of the Highways in the 70’s, even with only 250hp. Yes, it is probably one of the very best all original 450 SEL 6.9s around, but this is huge money for it.

Lot # 063 2014 Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG Black Series Coupe; S/N WDDR17HA4EA011147; Solarbeam Yellow/Black leather, Alcantara; Estimate $450,000 – $550,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $375,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $412,500. – Rear spoiler, front splitter, B&O stereo, forged wheels, Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires, books, import documents. – Less than 600 miles represented. One of just 30 in this color. Very good paint body and interior. Well-kept and still appears like new. – This car would have cost about 300 grand when it was new just four years ago, but limited high performance versions of already high end exotic cars tend to get collectible very quickly these days, as this and other results in Monterey demonstrate.

 

Lot # 143 1927 Minerva AF 32CV Sport Sedan, Body by LeBaron; S/N 56522; Engine # 56519; Green, Dark Green fenders and accent/Brown leather; Estimate $350,000 – $400,000; Concours restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $330,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $363,000. – 6.6 litre, 100+hp sleeve valve inline six-cylinder, Supralux headlights, wheel discs, blackwall tires, opening vee windshield, dual sidemounts, trunk rack, jump seats, rollup divider, window shades. – 2000 AACA Senior, 2001 Grand National, 2002 Pebble Beach class award and still impeccable. May have been displayed at the NY Auto Salon in 1926, one of only two built with this handsome coachwork and the only one with lefthand drive. No longer concours ready but close. – Sold by Gooding & Company at Pebble Beach in 2009 for $319,000, this is a stupendous, attractive, imposing car for a modest but realistic price today showing exactly the same 44,374 miles it did in 2009.

Lot # 147 1930 Packard 734 Phaeton Speedster, Body by Packard; S/N 184072; Engine # 44512; Grey, Light Grey fenders and accent/Blue leather; Blue cloth top; Estimate $1,000,000 – $1,400,000; Older restoration, 1- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,025,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,127,500. – Chrome wire wheels, Michelin tires, radiator stoneguard, single rear-mounted spare. – Restored better than new with some age and miles. Excellent paint, chrome top, and lightly stretched interior. Beautiful, fast and rare. One of 32 believed built in this body style and 5 known to survive. Owned by D. Cameron Peck in the 50’s. Sold to Wally Marsh in 1952 then restored for Knox Kershaw in the 90’s as it appears today. Class awards at Pebble Beach in 2001 and Amelia. CCCA National First Prize. The restoration’s age is belied by its nearly beyond perfect appearance. – The Packard 734 Speedster with its 385 cubic inch L-head eight and Jesse Vincent’s performance enhancements is right up there with Duesenbergs and V12 Marmons. The 734’s style and performance is legendary. This 734 Phaeton’s subtle livery, important provenance and quality older restoration are delightful. It is an automobile worthy of its $1 million price.

Lot # 131 1957 Porsche 356A 1300 Super Speedster, Body by Reutter; S/N 83051; Engine # 64648; Signal Red, Black hardtop/Black; Estimate $475,000 – $550,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $420,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $462,000. – 1,286/71hp Super engine, 4-speed, gold brightwork, woodrim steering wheel, Glasspar hardtop, Marchal driving lights, headlight stoneguards, tool kit, jack, owner’s manual, soft top, side curtains, tonneau cover, Kardex copy and Porsche CofA. – Represented as the matching numbers engine. Chrome finishes are aging with light spotting. Light scratches in the paint. Retouched small stone chips at the front. Porsche script and badges are a little tired. Faded gauge lenses. Otherwise a clean and sound interior. Restored in the 1990s and used at quite a few shows and driving events since. – An heroic result for a 1300 Super 356A Speedster with many needs, this much money could have bought a better example.

Lot # 051 1955 Porsche 550 Spyder, Body by Wendler; S/N 5500053; Engine # P90049; Silver, Red accent/Red vinyl; Estimate $4,000,000 – $5,000,000; Competition restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $4,050,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $4,455,000. – Dunlop Racing tires, Ivory banjo-spoke steering wheel, Bosch headlights, full width Plexiglas windscreen – Delivered new to Eldon C. Beagle in 1955 with 8 podium finishes in 14 races entered. Later restored for Lewis Markoff in the early 90’s. Numbers-matching Kardex and Porsche CofA. Excellent exterior cosmetics but beat up interior panels. Spotless engine compartment and chassis. – There were three Porsche 550 Spyders at Monterey this year, one 550 and two 550As, this being the lone 550 Spyder. It has a remarkably clear history and its matching numbers engine. The later 550A with 25 more hp at RM sold for $4.9 million. This is a quality car bought for a realistic number with its matching numbers engine. All of them appear to have had their interior body panels beaten out over tree stumps.

Lot # 176 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Speedster; S/N WP0EB0915KS173015; Black/Black; Black top; Estimate $250,000 – $325,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $240,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $264,000. – Black center Fuchs wheels, power windows, air conditioning, Blaupunkt cassette stereo, owner’s manual, tools, jack, original California plates still in their envelope. – Put into storage by the car’s first owner but fully serviced earlier this year. Creases on the driver’s seat cushion outer bolster but otherwise fresh and like new. Shows just 1,017 miles and is effectively a new car. – While the ’94 Speedster in this auction went for a bargain price, this one brought strong but appropriate money and about four times what it cost new nearly 30 years ago. At this price it will probably never turn a wheel except on and off transporters.

Lot # 052 1994 Porsche 911 Carrera Speedster; S/N WP0CB2960RS465437; Black/Black leather; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $152,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $167,750. – Alloy wheels, air conditioning, cassette stereo, cruise control, tools, jack, keys, air compressor.. – Light wear on the seat that corresponds with the 13,832 miles showing, but otherwise a pampered unrestored 911. – The 1994 Speedsters can be worth a little more than the perhaps more well-known ’89 cars, but although this was a perfectly good car with low miles, it sold for a low price well under Gooding’s reasonable presale estimate. In today’s 911 market, this was a pretty good buy, and much less than lot # 176, the ’89 Speedster with 1,017 miles that made an eye-watering $264,000 on Saturday.

Lot # 158 1993 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 3.8 Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ96ZPS497105; Engine # 62P85655; Guards Red/Black; Estimate $1,100,000 – $1,400,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $910,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,001,000. – Speedline modular wheels, fixed back racing seats with 4-point belt provisions, non-air bag steering wheel, biplane rear wing, owner’s manual, service directory, Porsche Motorsport parts book, spare keys, tool roll, stamped warranty book. – Very good paint overall with minor chips to the nose. The underbody is faded from use but with no oxidation. The interior shows minimal wear despite the 48,099 km represented as being from new. One of 55 road-going versions of the 964 Carrera RSR race car built for homologation purposes, and a well-kept if used three-owner car. Fitted with a turbocharged engine by RUF in 1997 but the original engine was reinstalled in 2012. – This seems like big money for a car with miles and a history of modification, but this is a highly collectible model that’s also rare enough that the opportunity to buy one is very scarce. It’s not much more than the $956,140 RM got for one with 16,652km at London in 2016, and less than the $1,655,000 they got for one with 6,826km at Amelia in March of this year.

Lot # 036 1994 Porsche 911 Carrera Turbo Coupe; S/N WP0AC2966RS480111; Guards Red/Cashmere Beige leather; Estimate $275,000 – $350,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $225,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $247,500. – Modular wheels, sunroof, whale tail, cassette stereo. – Very good paint without significant blemishes, and the underbody is very clean. The interior shows little wear from use. Showing 6,522 claimed original miles and looks like it. A very well maintained final year 964 Turbo. – 964 prices rocketed up over the course of 2014 and 2015 but they haven’t crashed. They’ve stayed high and just flattened out. The demand is still clearly there, as this spot-on result for a mint Turbo shows.

Lot # 181 1995 Porsche 911 GT2 Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ99ZTS393061; Engine # 61T00227; Bright Yellow/Red cloth; Estimate $400,000 – $600,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $560,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $616,000. – Pirelli tires, full race equipment. – The first 993 GT2 built. The paint is chipped and cracked across the chin splitter. The nose has numerous chips and cracks. The underbody and mechanicals show plenty of use and the interior is well kept but used. A maintained race car showing minor battle damage but still with its original engine, a tribute to the strength of the 993 motor, and to meticulous maintenance.. Fourth overall and second in class at Daytona in 1995 was the car’s best result, but raced actively in North America from 1995-97 including in the SCCA World Challenge. Fresh out of long term storage and not serviced. – Soon to be 25 years old and looking for a place to play, although there are many less expensive ways to do it with similar performance.

 

Lot # 047 2003 Porsche 911 GT2 Coupe; S/N WP0AB29993S696068; Classic Arctic Silver/Dark Grey leather; Estimate $150,000 – $200,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $115,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $126,500. – Yellow calipers, carbon fiber interior trim, shifter and handbrake handle, CD stereo, books, tools, records, Porsche CofA. – Showing 5,183 believable miles. The front splitter has some scrapes and the nose has a few minor chips, but otherwise the exterior is very clean and good. The interior is very good and the driver’s seat has little visible wear. Not quite like new given the mileage, but close. – The 996 GT2 basically took the GT3’s weight savings and performance enhancements up a notch, and it was more exclusive with a 300 grand asking price. It’s still in used car territory with prices currently at about half what they were or a little less, so this was a straightforward and appropriate result.

Lot # 028 1994 Porsche 911 RS America Coupe; S/N WP0AB2963RS419124; Guards Red/Black cloth; Estimate $150,000 – $180,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $150,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $165,000. – Alloy wheels, sunroof, whale tail, power windows, cassette stereo, air conditioning, books, tools, Porsche CofA. – Excellent original paint with no major blemishes. Very clean engine bay and underbody with minimal use. The interior appears like new. A well maintained rare 911 model showing 5,164 believable miles. – One of about 700 RS Americas, which feature a whale tail, Cup wheels and a lack of convenience features for the sake of weight. It’s an inherently collectible 911 variant and this one has appealingly low miles, but the price at no reserve was on the modest side. I could have conceivably brought quite a bit closer to 200 grand without being expensive.

Lot # 161 1966 Porsche 911 Spyder Roadster, Body by Bertone; S/N 13421; Engine # 960340; Black/Beige leather; Estimate $700,000 – $1,000,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,300,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,430,000. – 1,991/160hp 901/02 S-spec engine, 5-speed, Campagnolo wheels, woodrim steering wheel, power windows. – Good paint with a deep shine. Panel fit is very good. The front bumpers have some pitting. The tires are old and have major cracks between the treads. The underbody has a glossy undercoating that has chipped away in areas revealing oxidized metal underneath. Received a replacement engine at some point. Never restored but got attention when needed. Built as a potential specialist 911 variant for John von Neumann. Displayed at Geneva in 1966, it’s the only collaboration between Porsche and Bertone and other than the Carrera Abarth, any Porsche-Italian partnership is very rare. Static displayed for years, runs but will need extensive re-commissioning. – A ton of money for a 911, of course, but this car is completely unique and distinctive car, which counts for a lot for a model that has mostly looked the same for 50 years. Expect this car to go straight to high-dollar concours restoration, and the next time Porsche, the 911 or Bertone has a major anniversary year it will be hitting the show field.

Lot # 014 2015 Porsche 918 Spyder Weissach Roadster; S/N WP0CA2A10FS800596; Rhodium Silver Metallic/Black; Estimate $1,600,000 – $2,000,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,500,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,650,000. – Weissach package, which takes about 100 pounds of weight off the standard car. – Less than 100 original miles, the car is like new inside and out. – This result is in line with other recent 918 Weissach sales, which are coming up more and more in this barely driven condition.

Lot # 060 2004 Porsche Carrera GT Coupe; S/N WP0ZZZ98Z5L000078; GT Silver/Terracotta leather; Estimate $550,000 – $650,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $660,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $726,000. – Woodrim steering wheel, matching luggage, books, tools, Federalized and with supporting documentation. – The front lip has a few stone chips, but the rest of the paint is excellent. The underbody and interior show little use. A well maintained car with appropriate wear shown for the 4,500 miles represented. – As a halo-model Porsche and one of the last hypercars to offer a good-old-fashioned manual gearbox, the Carrera GT has a bright future in terms of collectability even though prices took a slight dip a couple of years ago. In today’s market, this result was pretty much spot on.

Lot # 044 2007 Porsche RS Spyder LMP2; S/N 9R6706; Black Carbon Fiber/Black; Estimate on request; Competition car, original as-raced, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $4,100,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $4,510,000 Est. – — Never raced except twice during the Monterey week at Laguna Seca. Essentially as-built and unused only showing some age and storage dust. – The consignor was described as having three RS Spyders and will be glad to know they’re worth so much.

Lot # 138 1994 RUF BTR2 Coupe; S/N W09CB0362SPR06009; Engine # CRM36014; Blutorange/Black leather; Estimate $700,000 – $900,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $600,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $660,000. – RUF wheels, RUF gearbox, aluminum door panels, manual steering. – Excellent paint and body. The underbody and engine are very clean and show little use. The interior is well maintained and shows little use as well. Wear to the seats that corresponds with the 11,189 miles showing. Used by RUF as a promo vehicle and featured in the factory brochure. – This car brought over twice what a normal 964 Turbo would expect to command, but for RUF fans this is an ideal example given its impeccable condition and connection to the company as a promo car. It’s hard to argue with this result.

Lot # 166 1967 Toyota 2000GT Coupe; S/N MF1010100; Solar Red/Black; Estimate $800,000 – $1,000,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $500,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $550,000. – Centerlock wheels, dual mirrors. – Beautiful paint with only a few minor chips on the underside of the nose. Very good brightwork. The headlight cover has some hazing on the inside, which appears to be dust. The underbody has been fully restored, although the gearbox does have a light oily film. The interior presents very well. A well performed restoration with few flaws to dwell in. Desirable LHD car owned by racer Otto Linton and in several collections since. – An auction veteran that sums up the past few years of 2000GT prices pretty well. It sold at Mecum Monterey in 2015 for $1,017,500 at the peak then hammered not sold there the next year at a $700,000 high bid after a $750,000 no-sale at Kissimmee in between. It failed to sell at Kissimmee last year at a $725,000 high bid and then finally sold again for $825,000 at Mecum Indy last year. The million-dollar Toyota was a short-lived trend, but this result is way under market and it could have brought a lot closer to 700 grand without being expensive. Once upon a time the 2000GT experts at Maine Line Exotics maintained, “The 2000GT tracks the 300SL Gullwing in value,” a relationship that is now firmly decoupled.

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