Auctions America Auburn Spring, May 11-13, 2017

Auburn Spring is a curious phenomenon, growing out of a desire (need?) to utilize the Auburn Auction Park that grew up from the annual Auburn auction over Labor Day weekend.

Auburn Spring has never been big, but it’s always been an opportunity to showcase a collection or disposition or two. This year saw two days of consignment auctions of cars and automobilia/memorabilia on Friday and Saturday. They were routine consignments for the most part but the exceptional element preceded the expected Auburn Spring: Thursday’s no reserve sale of the cars, tools, equipment, spares and who knows what else of the Level 5 Motorsports racing team.

It was epic.

Level 5 Motorsports was established by Scott Tucker who built an empire of payday loan companies. Without trying to parse the details, Tucker’s businesses poured millions into his pockets, which he apparently as quickly as he got the money turned into SCCA, then IMSA, then international racing teams. The Feds caught wind of it, descended and seized everything to settle multi-million dollar judgments.

The assembled bits, bobs and items filled the Auction Park’s Cord Building from wall to wall. There were Ferrari GT Daytonas, Honda Performance Development Le Mans Prototypes and Lola IMSA racers. Scattered around were mega-dollar phantasmagorical Ferrari and Porsche racers and an acre of tools, jigs, fixtures, pit carts, timing stands, spares and engines.

Everything was absolutely the finest quality, with travel cases that would do an F1 team proud. There was enough radio equipment to equip a good-sized police department. Big roller cabinets were filled with Snap-on tools. There were enough workbenches to fill a specialist shop, some steel and some wood-topped. There were U.S. pit boards, and European pit boards.

It was a mechanic’s fairyland.

Mechanics and team managers descended upon Auburn, gathered in quiet groups cagily consulting their note pads and nodding their bids in rapid sequence.

Ordinarily in a liquidation like this people might anticipate a deal or two. There were NONE among the Level 5 Motorsports consignment. If anything brought less than full retail it was not apparent. What buyers got was absolutely the finest, F1, Audi or Corvette Le Mans quality equipment, tools and facilities.

You know those fancy lighted frames inside an F1 pit box? Level 5 had several.

I had my eye on a Sparco seat … I could buy it cheaper on Amazon.

Auctions America should be proud of their accomplishment, hauling all this stuff to Auburn, sorting it out and presenting it in intelligent lots.

The Feds should be rejoicing: This was an epic result.

The 2017 results below include the cars in the Level 5 liquidation and several de-militarized WWII vehicles from the Auburn WWII Museum, but not the staggering results for the Level 5 equipment and spares.

 

Year Cars Sold/ Offered Sale % Sold < Low Est Sold > High Est Average Sale Median Sale Total $
2017 240/348 69% 70.3% 8.8% $37,746 $21,450

[56.8%]

$9,059,030
2016 287/393 73% 80.5% 3.6% $24,790 $17,875

[72.1%]

$7,114,815

 

2015 200/298 67.1% 83.5% 1.5% $25,134 $17,600

[70%]

$5,026,883
2014 636/780 81.5% $29,935 $24,000

[80.2%]

$19,038,570
2014 includes over 400 cars without reserve from the John Scotti Collection.


The onsite observations are by Rick Carey, Chris Winslow and Rob Bennett.

This auction’s presentation is organized differently. Usually it is by lot number, showing the progression through the sale. This sale reports 140 vehicles and to make finding specific cars they’re sorted by type (automobile, competition car and trucks) then by marque, model and body style.

2000 lot numbers are Friday, 3000 lot numbers are Saturday. The “L” lot numbers are Level 5 Motorsports cars.

This organization will become more significant in the next report, Mecum’s Spring Classic at Indianapolis where there are over 170 vehicles reported.

Your comments on this presentation order will be appreciated.

 

Lot # 3098 1959 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk I BT7 Roadster; S/N HBT7L1428; Blue, White/Blue piped in White; Estimate $50,000 – $55,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $47,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $52,250 – Overdrive, side curtains, centerlock wire wheels, banjo steering wheel. – Paint is excellent. There are a few minor scratches in the chrome, and the grille is older and oxidized. Wheels need polishing. Interior is good with some minor wear to the driver’s seat bottom. Gauges are clear and bright. Door panels are a bit loose. Engine bay is clean and restored. Cylinder head is losing its finish. Restored underbody could use detailing. An older restoration, but also given a recent major service. – Sold by Christie’s in 2006 for $58,750. Interestingly, Healey 3000 prices are about what they were back then, and for a BT7 in this condition this result is as appropriate today as it was 11 years ago. The seller probably bought it at Auctions America’s Hilton Head auction last November, paying just $39,600 for it, a tidy payday for six months’ ownership.

Lot # 2005 1956 Bentley S1 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N B119AP; White/White leather; Estimate $12,000 – $18,000; Unrestored original, 5+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $5,700 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $6,270 – Wheel covers, whitewalls, hood ornament, dual mirrors, pushbutton radio, burled walnut trim, rear tables. – Severely cracked paint shows rot hidden in the panels. Trim is loose in several places and there are large patches of paint about to fall off. Doors sag and do not close easily. Trim is severely aged, and the interior is terrible apart from newer front seats, although even those aren’t exactly good. All the woodwork and upholstery will need to be redone. Engine bay and frame are both dirty and it looks like the car sat out in a field before coming to sale. – If it’s even possible to get this thing back on the road, it won’t be easy. A bad Silver Cloud/Bentley S1 will suck your bank account dry, and this one needs many thousands of dollars in leather and wood alone, not to mention any mechanical work and the battle against the rust that is already present. At this price, the new owner could part this car out for more than he paid for it, which would be the easiest and probably most sensible thing to do unless this is a passion project.

Lot # 2010 1974 Buick Century Grand Sport 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 4D37U4H166076; Light Green/Black vinyl with cloth inserts; Estimate $3,000 – $6,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $4,900 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $5,390 – 455/230hp, automatic, power steering, power brakes, dual mirrors, bench seat, column shift, Sonomatic pushbutton radio. – Showing 99,348 miles. Old, possibly original paint is blistered and scratched. Bumpers are scratched and hazed. Some of the rear window trim is loose. Rear bumper filler panels are missing. Interior fair is fair, with the floral cloth bench seat showing some wear. Carpet is faded, but the gauges are clean and bright. Underbody is dirty and aged with some superficial rust. Engine bay is grimy but complete, with all finishes compromised and in need of work. Reportedly bought new as a graduation present, but in its current state it’s not a gift that you’d be all that grateful for. – What is intriguing about this Grand Sport is that it was special ordered with the bench seat, for someone young enough to be graduating from somewhere. That sounds like an invitation to hanky-panky, and an extremely indulgent benefactor anxious for grandchildren. In its present condition it is not conducive to much dalliance, but is an unusual car with potential for a realistic price.

Lot # 3008 1971 Buick GS Convertible Coupe; S/N 434671H203782; Red/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Estimate $20,000 – $25,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $18,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $20,350 – 350/260hp, column shift automatic, power steering and brakes, Magnum wheels, Radial T/A tires, bench seat, pushbutton radio, Ram Air hood and intake. – Good paint with a scrape on the passenger’s door. Sound chrome interior and top. Restored some time ago and showing age and a little use. Some attention and detailing will make it a much better car, or leave it as is and drive it with some pride. – The GS 350 was strictly a trim option in 1971, with nothing other than the functional Ram Air hood and intake to set it apart from an “ordinary” Skylark Custom with the 4-barrel 350. But it does set it apart and adds some $6-8,000 to its value as reflected in this result.

Lot # 3153 1963 Buick Riviera Sport Coupe; S/N 7J1103195; Black/Black leather; Estimate $28,000 – $34,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $27,500 – Power steering, power brakes, air conditioning, bucket seats, console, power windows, pushbutton AM radio, wire wheel covers, narrow whitewalls. – Paint is very good. New bumpers. Most of the trim is good. Door handles and vent windows show pitting, as do the taillights. Interior is newer and there is only minimal wear to the driver’s seat. Rusty finishes in the engine bay. Crack in the rear passenger’s window. Frame is worn there are a few spots of surface rust. A well optioned car, with a mix of fresh attention to some parts and neglect in others. – Represented as an original, unrestored Riviera, there is evidence of some paint work, but overall it appears to be what it claims, although it is better maintained than most unrestored cars 54 years old. The bidders responded to it with measured enthusiasm in arriving at this appropriate price.

Lot # 3132 1953 Buick Super Estate Wagon; S/N 16985358; Carlsbad Black, Wood/White, Red; Estimate $85,000 – $95,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,909 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $72,500 – 322/170hp, Dynaflow, directional signals, power steering, 12-volt electrical system, chrome wire wheels, whitewalls. – Gauges reported to work correctly, radio does not. New fuel tank, rebuilt carburetor and new filters. The paint is in good condition. Brightwork is good other than slight pitting on driver side rear seat door handle. The wood is in great condition with no evidence of drying or cracking. The interior is clean with no signs of wear. The window crank handle for the passenger side rear door is off but is not lost. The engine is correct and very clean. The engine compartment is clean and well detailed. Underbody is clean and shows very little wear. Body-off restored in 2006 and only showing superficial signs of wear. – Hammered not sold on the block at $57,000 and closed later in this negotiated transaction. It was sold at Gooding’s Pebble Beach auction in 2007 for $105,600 and was represented there as having 56,966 miles from new. Today its odometer shows 57,083, 117 more than ten years ago and the car is if anything in better condition than it was then. Station wagons have enjoyed a bump in popularity and value but that apparently doesn’t apply to older, high end, woodies like this Buick and the result here should make the new owner feel very good about the car and the price paid for it. It is a good value.

Lot # 2173 1993 Cadillac Allante Convertible; S/N 1G6VS3393PU128833; Red, White hardtop/Black leather; White top; Estimate $8,000 – $12,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $8,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $8,800 – Power seats with memory, power top, air conditioning, CD player, climate control, hardtop. – Good paint with a few scratches and blemishes on the nose. Glass is in good shape. Interior has wear to the seats and carpet but it corresponds to the 40,152 miles showing. Engine bay is quite dirty. Tires are old and should be replaced. With the consignor for the last 17 years. – The Allante offers Pininfarina bodywork and a V-8, but it wasn’t Pininfarina’s best work and the Allante is built on a front-drive platform. Values have been pretty flat for quite some time, and this is a perfectly appropriate result for a decent used example.

Lot # 3086 1960 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible; S/N 60F112805; White/Red vinyl; White vinyl top; Estimate $62,500 – $85,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $50,000 – 390/325hp, automatic, power steering, power brakes, signal seeking radio, power bench seat, wheel covers, wide whitewalls. – Poorly fit dashtop. Peeling rear bumper chrome, some trim bits and interior brightwork are dull. Worn and soiled driver’s seat cushion. Aged underbody. Good paint. Done a while ago and the age and marginal quality of the restoration are showing. – Sold at Auburn Fall in 2012 for $44,550 and at Ft. Lauderdale in 2013 for $63,250, the seller is highly optimistic in hoping to get out from under this Caddy for anywhere near what went into it four years ago. If there was money at, or close to, this bid it could have been taken and redeployed into something else.

Lot # 3131 1957 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible; S/N 5762080449; Wimbledon Gray/Black, White leather; Black top; Estimate $70,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $53,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $58,850 – Hydra-Matic transmission, power top, power windows, power seat, power steering, power brakes, remote mirror, AM radio with front speaker, factory wheel discs, whitewalls. – The paint is bright, but has some small scratches on the trunk, driver’s door and the hood. Brightwork is good with very light pitting on the side window trim. Interior is clean, with the front seats showing moderate wear. The carpet shows no wear or fading. Rear passenger’s arm rest seams are starting to separate. Convertible top is new. The engine bay is dirty and has not been detailed. The underbody shows mild dirt and wear. An older restoration currently in attractive driver condition, although it wouldn’t take all that much to get this car back to casually showable condition. – Attractive and unusual colors enhance the visual impression of this big-fin ’57 Cadillac and while it doesn’t show the best of care it is more than good enough to enjoyed. Some soap, water, solvents and elbow grease will go a long way toward increasing its enjoyment, and value.

Lot # 3031 1939 Caruso Sprint Car; S/N EOTARC 95; Engine # Maroon; Black vinyl/–; Estimate $10,000 – $15,000; Competition restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $14,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $15,400 – Canadian 8RT flathead, three Strombergs, 3-speed, later wide rim wire wheels with wide tires. – Restored long ago by Tommy Caruso, but not built by him. Chipped edges, brush painted frame. A usable vintage racer with a starter and 3-speed standard transmission. Documented race history. – The 3-speed and electric starter make this more usable than most vintage race cars and a sound value at this price.

Lot # 3067 1955 Chevrolet Bel Air 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N VC55B106550; Regal Turquoise, India Ivory/Blue vinyl with White cloth inserts; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $28,250 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $31,075 – 265/262hp, 2-barrel, dual exhaust, Powerglide automatic transmission, fender skirts, radio, heater, seatbelts, power steering and brakes. – The older paint is sound but there are many small scratches and touch ups. Brightwork is good. Interior is clean with light wear on the front seats. Engine bay is correct and recently detailed, though not spotless. Underbody is clean with little wear. A solid early tri-five Chevy that doesn’t have any major needs. – This result is pretty much right on the money for a base 2-door ’55 Bel Air Sport Coupe that was restored to showroom condition and is now moderately aged and driven.

Lot # 3087 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air Convertible; S/N VC57S260468; Engine # F533FD; Red/Red, Silver vinyl; White vinyl top; Estimate $65,000 – $75,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $81,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $89,100 – 283/245hp, Powerglide, power steering, manual brakes, spinner wheel covers, WonderBar radio. – Excellent paint, chrome and interior. Flat panels, even gaps, flush fits. The engine compartment underbody and chassis are like new. As good as could be asked for. – Described on the car card as a 270hp solid lifter engine, the engine suffix identifies it as the more tractable 245hp hydraulic lifter engine with Powerglide. Neither that discrepancy nor the 2-speed automatic seemed to deter the Auburn bidders who took it right through the upper estimate range by an 8% margin. On balance the bidders were more correct than the estimators and both the seller and the buyer should be content with the final result.

Lot # 3065 1985 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 Coupe; S/N 1G1FP87H7FL473328; Dark Red, Light Gray/Black; Estimate $14,000 – $18,000; Unrestored original, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $11,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $12,650 – 305/155hp, automatic, air conditioning, power brakes, power steering, power windows, glass T-tops, power seat, alloy wheels, cassette stereo, cruise control, remote mirrors. – Slight washing swirl in the paint that should polish out, but otherwise quite good original paint. Gaps are factory. Interior is fantastic other than very slight wear to the driver’s seat. There is some cracking on the door gaskets. Engine compartment is spotless and detailed. A bit worn on the underbody. Wheels have some oxidization. Represented as just 4,436 original miles, entirely believable based upon condition and mostly excellent. – Most third-gen Camaros are nowhere near this good, and it deserves the relatively big result achieved here despite a few flaws.

Lot # 2150 1972 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 RS Coupe; S/N 1Q87L2N156364; Orange, Black stripes/Black vinyl; Estimate $50,000 – $60,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $49,500 – Bored out 350, 4-speed, mag-style wheels, power steering, power brakes, split bumper, front and rear spoilers, rear sway bar, 3.73 Positraction. – Very good recent paint in original colors with only a few light scratches. Flat, even panels. Engine bay is excellent. Added exhaust headers. Some of the door gaskets are worn but the interior presents as new. Underbody restored as well. Fresh and ready to have fun with. – With a premium for the RS package, this result was right on the money and a sound value for the new owner.

Lot # 3093 1964 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu SS 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 45837L113023; Engine # F1028JR; Ermine White/Blue vinyl; Estimate $45,000 – $55,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $36,364 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $40,000 – 327/300hp, 4-speed, 3.08 Positraction, power brakes, spinner wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, buckets and console, pushbutton radio, factory shifter. – Restored like new, AACA National First Prize in 2010, Grand National in 2016. Very good paint, interior and chrome. Engine compartment is like new, as is the underbody. Still capable of taking home trophies. – Bid to $38,000 on the block and closed later with this result, a desirable car with a gorgeous restoration that the new owner can be proud to own, especially at this price.

 

Lot # 3090 1962 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 20867S111084; Engine # None; Red/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Estimate $65,000 – $75,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $54,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $59,400 – 327/250hp, 4-speed, spinner wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, cassette stereo. – Good paint, chrome, top, glass and interior. The engine compartment looks good on top but the engine number is nonexistent and the compartment itself has been squirted with chassis black from the top leaving road gunk on lower surfaces. The chassis was painted assembled, including painting the whole exhaust system. An auction car. – There is no representation of the drivetrain’s originality and the presentation is at best mediocre. Having made that observation the price it brought is appropriate for what it is, a base ’62 Corvette with a competent but erratic cosmetic fluffing.

Lot # 3088 1961 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible; S/N 10867S106381; Roman Red/Black vinyl; White top; Estimate $45,000 – $55,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $43,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $47,300 – 283/245hp dual quads, 4-speed, spinner wheel covers, whitewalls, WonderBar radio, aftermarket cassette stereo. – Represented as matching numbers. The older paint is still bright but there are touchups and scratches on the hood. Brightwork is fair with some dulling on the window trim. Interior is clean but the carpet and seats are worn and the carpet is faded. The engine bay is correct and complete but quite filthy with a layer of dirt and dust on top of the engine. The rest of the engine compartment is fair. Underbody shows some dirt and moderate wear. An older restoration that is quite tired but doesn’t have originality as an excuse for its condition. – There is no shortage of better ’61 Corvettes out there, but for somebody who wants a rewarding straightforward project this was a solid choice at an appropriate price.

Lot # 3123 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe; S/N 30837S109541; Engine # T1215HAH; Red/Red vinyl; Estimate $90,000 – $110,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $62,727 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $69,000 – 327, 4-speed, Hurst shifter, AM-FM, spinner wheel covers, narrow whitewalls. – Sound clearcoat repaint with some flaws. Decent chrome, bright trim and interior. The top of the engine compartment has had some quick cosmetic attention but not the bottom or the chassis. The right front fender appears to have had some work. A usable driver with a ’67 327/275hp engine number.. – A hot rod Corvette with decent cosmetics, superficial attention to the rest of the car and a later engine bid on the block to $71,00 but reported sold later with this realistic result. It’s a “Split Window Coupe” to be enjoyed and at this price (and with the later engine) one that can be upgraded with power steering and air conditioning with no effect upon its value, but greatly enhance its enjoyment.

Lot # 2054 1969 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe; S/N 194379S715950; Black/Brown vinyl; Estimate $20,000 – $25,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $15,100 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $16,610 – 350/300hp, 4-speed, air conditioning, power brakes, T-tops, tilt steering column, Rallye wheels, aftermarket side exhaust (original exhaust included). – The paint has cracked noticeably across the fender lines and there are large repaired chips and some scratches on the front. Brightwork is scratched and oxidized. The seats are in good shape but the carpet is faded and most of the interior shows noticeable age and wear. Engine was painted and there has been some mechanical repair. Underbody is dirty and there is some evidence of leaks. Kept presentable, but never restored, a driver quality chrome bumper Stingray. – Bought for a realistic price.

Lot # 3062 1984 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe; S/N 1G1AY078XE5106872; Red/Red leather; Estimate $14,000 – $18,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $10,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $11,550 – 350/205hp, automatic, air conditioning, power seat, power windows. – Represented with 8,500 miles. Minor scratches on the nose and near the driver’s door. Interior has light wear to the seats. Engine bay is tidy and lightly aged. A lightly used first-year C4. Not a time-warp example, but quite well preserved. – The ’84 is the least interesting of the C4s from a driver’s standpoint, but for a collector it has the notoriety of being the first model year of its generation. This one is good enough for a collection and brought a price wholly appropriate to its impressive level of preservation.

Lot # 3084 1965 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe; S/N 194375S121121; Silver Pearl/Black vinyl; Estimate $50,000 – $60,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $40,000 – 327/250hp, 4-speed, centerlock alloy wheels, woodrim steering wheel. – The paint still has luster but also several touch ups. Brightwork has some dulling and there is a dent in the window trim. Interior is clean but the seats and carpet are worn and fading. The engine is correct and clean. The engine compartment is clean with slight detailing. Underbody is clean with mild wear. No representation of matching numbers. An older body-off restoration of a ’65 with mostly basic equipment, it’s currently an attractive driver. – Even a pretty unremarkable ’65 Coupe in this condition can expect more than the reported high bid here, but to Corvette people documentation and history are important, and this car didn’t have it, so it was easy to pass over.

Lot # 2138 1954 Chevrolet Corvette Roadster; S/N E54S003218; Polo White/Red; Estimate $70,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $58,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $63,800 – Spinner wheel covers, whitewalls, WonderBar radio. – Paint is starting to fade and is cracking on the front and passenger’s side with a touch up on the passenger’s door. Brightwork is good. There is a small crack on the dash pad in front of the passenger. Engine bay is correct and nicely detailed. Underbody is clean with little wear. NCRS Top Flight in 2000, and it wouldn’t take a whole lot to get it back to show status. – There were over 10 times more 1954 Corvettes built than ’53s although they were largely identical and still provided more show than go. This makes them relatively affordable in the world of C1s, and this former show car that wears some age on top of a high quality restoration was bought for a price appropriate to its age.

Lot # 3163 1988 Chevrolet Corvette 35th Anniversary Coupe; S/N 1G1YY2189J5117598; White, Glass roof/White leather; Estimate $14,000 – $18,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $8,000 – Removable tinted glass roof section, rear window defroster, cruise control, six-way power seats, power windows, power steering and locks, air conditioning, console plaque number 1,794, Delco-Bose factory stereo system, painted alloy wheels with Goodyear Eagle F1 tires. – Represented with 49,000 miles. The paint is bright with two small touch ups, one on the hood and one on the rear deck lid. Slight cracking in the rubber seals around the passenger’s side window. Interior is clean but both seats show very heavy wear with cracking. The engine compartment is tidy and complete but a little dirty. The underbody has mild road wear. Reasonably well kept but unremarkable for a collectible special model, and the sorry state of the seats in this car attest to the quality of upholstery that GM used in the C4. – The all-white 35th Anniversary Corvettes numbered 2,050 examples and they can command twice as much as a standard 1988 model. When it comes to special editions like this, collectors prefer very clean low-mileage examples, and this one is just a used car. It’s arguably worth into five figures, but it got no love in Auburn.

Lot # 3091 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427/390 Coupe; S/N 194377S109577; Marlboro Maroon, Black stinger/Black vinyl; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $87,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $96,250 – 427/390hp, 4-speed, AM/FM, Rally wheels with trim rings and hubcaps, narrow whitewalls, 3.36 Positraction. – The car card describes this Corvette as original and unrestored with two owners and 26,131 miles from new. Nothing about it challenges that claim. The paint is crazing but shiny and original. Good chrome and original interior. Dry original underbody, orderly engine compartment. Highly original and in reassuring condition, documented with the original window sticker and Protect-o-Plate. – It is a wonder that consignors who find two owner, original miles, unrestored Corvettes like this don’t take them to Bloomington Gold and NCRS for the experts’ imprimatur before bringing them to auction. That oversight leaves an element of doubt that those buyers who don’t “know” in a state of trepidation. If this car turns out to be what is represented it is an attractive acquisition, and we’ll assume that the buyers in the “know” didn’t pursue it beyond a moderate wholesale price.

Lot # 3125 1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427/390 Roadster; S/N 194677S107497; Engine # 1229IQ 7107497; Light Yellow, Black stinger/Black; Black vinyl top; Estimate $75,000 – $80,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $72,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $79,750 – 427/390 L36, 4-speed, power brakes, side exhaust, Rally wheels with hubcaps and trim rings, radio delete, red line radial tires. – Good repaint, interior, top and major chrome. Engine compartment is superficially dressed up. Thin side window chrome. Good gauges with crisp faces and clear lenses. Orderly underbody. A clean and usable driver that probably came with Powerglide based upon the IQ-suffix engine number. – This Corvette is an intriguing combination – if the IQ-suffix engine number was read correctly. It is more ordinary now, but still intriguing and brought a serious price for a sound, if not pristine or meticulously restored, example. Call it fair to both the buyer and the seller, but enjoy driving it.

Lot # 3102 1969 Chevrolet Corvette 427/435 Coupe; S/N 194379S702051; Monza Red/Black; Estimate $55,000 – $60,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $40,000 – 427/435hp L71 engine, automatic, Positraction, 3.36 gears, tinted glass, original window sticker and Protect-o-Plate, BF Goodrich Silvertown red line tires, hub caps with trim rings. – The paint is bright but has swirl marks from detailing all over. Brightwork is good but with a few scratches around the front window. Interior is clean with little wear. Engine is correct, clean and recently detailed but unrestored. Underbody is tidy. Represented as in original condition and showing 67,230 miles. – A former Mecum veteran, not sold at a $30,000 high bid at Kissimmee in 2012, sold for $39,750 at Houston in 2013 and sold at Kissimmee in 2014 for $34,560. The reported high bid here wasn’t exactly a generous offer, but considering the automatic transmission choice it’s one worth considering, especially when taking consignment and transport fees for the next auction trip into account.

Lot # 2136 2003 Chevrolet Corvette 50th Anniversary Coupe; S/N 1G1YY22G635108950; Ruby Red, Red, White, Blue ribbons/Putty Grey leather; Estimate $25,000 – $30,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $28,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $30,800 – 350/350hp, automatic, full track equipment. – Le Mans Course Car # 3. 1,361 miles and like new except for some age. – Sold from the GM Heritage Collection at Barrett-Jackson’s Palm Beach auction in 2009 for $28,600 and now showing only 136 miles more than it did then and in comparable, barely used condition. Because a lap of Le Mans is 8.5 miles when a Safety Car period of continuous low speed laps is required the field is broken up into several groups, each circulating behind its own Course Car to hold the positions relative to the leaders and prevent competitors making up the whole (long) lap. This is one of those actively used Course Cars, not to be confused with an Indy 500 Pace Car, most of which are ceremonial parade cars. In other words, it has history.

Lot # 3118 1962 Chevrolet Corvette FI Convertible; S/N 20867S101969; Engine # F0928RF2101969; Silver/Red vinyl; Black vinyl top; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Recent restoration, 2+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $92,500 – 327/360hp fuel Injection, 4-speed, WonderBar radio, spinner wheel covers, blackwall bias ply tires, 4.11 Positraction. – Freshly restored to showroom condition and represented as the original drivetrain. Excellent paint, chrome and interior. Only sketchily represented as the original engine (“Original drivetrain reported”) but the block stamping is appropriate. – This is a sweet ’62 Corvette but the reported high bid should have been enough to separate it from its consignor at a bid just $7,500 below the low estimate.

Lot # 3089 1960 Chevrolet Impala 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 01837N238213; Engine # T0609H; Metallic Grey/–; Estimate $48,000 – $52,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $31,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $34,650 – 348/250hp, Turboglide, power steering, air conditioning, skirts, dual rear antennas, continental kit, pushbutton radio, wheel covers, whitewalls. – Dull mostly original paint, buffed through in a few places, with evidence of paintwork on the left front fender. Good upholstery and interior trim. Sound chrome with some scuffed stainless trim. Engine compartment is clean and orderly with some work evident. The underbody is original. Far too solid and original to do anything but enjoy it. – This is not quite the “Original and untouched throughout” Impala the car card claimed but it has no more work done to it than would be expected on a 57-year old car and factory air conditioning is rare. There is essentially zero premium for originality in this result which makes this a very good value for an astute buyer with an appreciation of originality and condition.

Lot # 2098 1969 Chevrolet Impala Convertible; S/N 164679S054875; Dover White/Red vinyl; White top; Estimate $26,000 – $34,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $24,000 – 350/300hp, automatic, original owner’s manual, service receipts, spare tire and jack, power convertible top, power windows, power brakes, Rally wheels, narrow whitewalls, cruise control, power trunk release, factory air conditioning. – Paint has scratches on the driver’s side near the trunk lid and some chips at the driver’s door hinge. Brightwork is starting to show a few spots of dulling. Interior is clean with no signs of wear. Engine bay is correct, tidy and lightly used. An attractive cruiser restored two years ago to appropriate but not excessive standards. – A wholly appropriate offer for this attractive but unremarkable car. The number isn’t likely to be any higher at another venue and in fact was even less at Auctions America’s Ft. Lauderdale auction six weeks ago where it was bid to only $19,000. If there was money anywhere near the reported high bid the consignor is delusional in not accepting it.

Lot # 2178 1950 Chevrolet Styleline Special Business Coupe; S/N 1HJ135278; Blue/Gray cloth; Estimate $14,000 – $18,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $11,100 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $12,210 – Later 235 engine, 3-speed, dual mirrors, spotlight, heater, defroster, pushbutton AM radio, fender skirts. – Chips and scratches on the driver’s door. Bumpers need refinishing. Trim is fair and complete but lightly aged. Door gaps are uneven and the hinges are a bit loose. Tidy mostly unrestored engine bay. Mostly unrestored underbody with paint over old undercoating. Decent aged interior. Unrestored, but has gotten cosmetic attention at various points. – This is a surprising price for an undistinguished old business coupe that the buyer may see as the basis for a custom car.

Lot # 3012 1961 Chrysler Windsor 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 81191196; White, Red roof/Red vinyl with cloth inserts; Estimate $20,000 – $25,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $17,600 – 383/305hp, pushbutton automatic, servo assist brakes, power steering, generator, dual horn, heater, remote mirror, pushbutton AM radio, split bench seat, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls. – Decent paint with minimal chips and scratches. Front bumper is excellent. The rear is new as well but has a recent scuff on it. Some trim pieces have been replaced, while others like the mirrors are very aged. Stainless trim has scratches and oxidization. Passenger’s side door will not fully open. Upholstery is newer, but not new. Carpet and window seals are worn. Undercar body and engine bay are dirty with some leaks. An intermittently cosmetically restored car, and nothing to write home about. – The optimism of specification writers in the early Sixties is manifest in the 305 horsepower rating for its 2-barrel 383 cubic inch engine. It’s unusual to see one like this today, most of them having been used up and scrapped long ago from lack of interest and it will be appreciated at Mopar shows. The price reflects collectors’ indifference. The new owner got a competent luxury Chrysler for the price of a ’61 Plymouth Fury.

Lot # 3029 1947 Chrysler Windsor Club Coupe; S/N 70574596; Light Yellow/Brown cloth; Estimate $12,000 – $16,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $14,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $15,400 – Fluid Drive, dual mirrors, spotlight, pushbutton radio, wheel covers, whitewalls. – Decent older paint. Brightwork needs polishing. The tires are represented as five years old, but the white portions are dry and cracking. Glass is delaminating and scratched. Engine needs detailing, and the firewall was not painted. Unrestored but mostly tidy underbody. Sound mostly restored interior. Represented as having been cosmetically restored 20 years ago, and that’s exactly what it looks like. – An imposing automobile that is good enough to use and affords the new owner plenty of opportunities to make better, although it is amply priced in this transaction.

Lot # 3107 1936 Cord 810 4-Dr. Sedan Westchester; S/N 8101580; Cool Orchard Green/Gray cloth piped in White; Estimate $55,000 – $65,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $49,500 – Pre-selector, dual mirrors, hub caps, whitewalls. – Chips and scratches throughout the older paint. Doors fit unevenly. Interior has loose trim edging. Lots of wear to the underbody. Engine bay is clean and well finished. Represented with $15,000 in recent work by John Craft. An older restoration in attractive colors but far from show-worthy. – What cost $15,000 in recent work is not apparent in the condition of this 810 Westchester, a mediocre car with little other than Gordon Buehrig’s Baby Duesenberg design to make it significant. The Auburn bidders, however, gobbled it up at this price.

Lot # 3176 1981 DeLorean DMC-12 Coupe; S/N SCEDT26T6BD001788; Stainless/Black leather; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Unrestored original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $23,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $25,850 – Power windows, steering and brakes, air conditioning, factory radio, factory wheels. – Numerous scrapes and scratches on the hood and there is some discoloring on the driver’s door. The trim shows scratches around the front window. The interior is clean but heavily worn despite the 8,616 claimed original miles on the odometer. There is a 3-inch rip in the driver’s seat and the headliner is starting to sag. Engine bay is clean and tidy, and the underbody has mild dirt and wear. With the consignor since 1989. A low-mileage, all-original car, but not a very good one and the imperfections in the stainless steel bodywork will take special attention to address. – A below average DeLorean bought for average DeLorean money. The buyer paid more attention to the small amount of digits on the odometer than to anything else.

Lot # 2015 1956 DeSoto Fireflite 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 50367179; Dark Blue Metallic, Light Blue/Maroon; Estimate $4,000 – $8,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $3,700 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $4,070 – 330/255hp, pushbutton automatic, pushbutton AM radio, power steering, power brakes, power windows, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls. – Repainted at some time in the past. There are chips, scratches, and major rust appearing in the quarter panels. Trim is very aged with lots of pitting and scratches. Gaps are fair at best, with some sagging to the doors and the trunk lid has rubbed on the edges. Driver’s mirror is broken. Front seat has a massive tear. Floorboard may be rusted out as well. Carpet is faded and the rear seat is ripped. The engine bay is aged and the engine was sprayed at some point, with exterior paint overspray in there. Underbody shows surface rust and age. An older cosmetic restoration of notable mediocrity, with plenty of miles since. – Auburn is often a place to find good, driver quality ’50s American cars and this car looks good enough from a distance, but it’s not for the faint of heart to get this car right and it will never be worth enough to recoup much of the money it will take to make it so, even at this price. In the end it’s just a mundane family sedan.

Lot # 3114 1971 Dodge Challenger 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N JS23N1B326221; Hemi Orange, Matte Black hood/Black vinyl; Estimate $55,000 – $65,000; Modified restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $49,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $53,900 – 440/390hp Six Pack replacing the original 383/300, 4-speed, tube headers, no power steering or brakes, Rally wheels with trim rings, Polyglas GT tires, pushbutton radio, console, pistol grip shifter, wing. – Very good paint, interior and major chrome, some scuffed bright trim. Good gauges and dashboard. The engine compartment is done nearly like new, even though it’s not the original engine. – A great deal of effort and money was spent creating something that isn’t what it pretends to be, a difference that in correct original cars might make a $10,000 difference. This thing was valued differently, with a huge premium for what it isn’t.

Lot # 3020 1966 Dodge Charger Fastback; S/N XP29G61252008; Black/Red vinyl; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Modified restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,750 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,825 – Later 440 engine replacing the original 383/325hp, automatic, Edelbrock carb, headers, power steering, power windows, bucket seats, console, floor shift. – Decent older paint. Doors don’t fit flush, and there is some waviness to the panels. Trim is poor with significant scratches. Bumpers are fair with some light scratching. Newer seat upholstery, but the carpet and dash are original and aged. Unrestored underbody. A superficially done body-on restoration with an engine from a later Charger. – The combination of mediocre cosmetics and a mis-matched engine don’t support a price of this magnitude.

Lot # 3113 1966 Dodge Coronet 500 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N WP23H67242453; Light Green Metallic, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Estimate $65,000 – $70,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $52,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $57,200 – 426/425hp Hemi, automatic, wheel covers with blue line tires, bucket seats, console with shifter, pushbutton AM radio, no power steering or brakes. – Good, smooth paint. The bumpers are new. Bright trim is mixed. The driver’s side door does not close easily. The engine compartment is fully restored and the underbody is excellent. The interior is like new. A relatively recent professional nut and bolt restoration with a few oversights, but the rare Street Hemi under the hood is what really sets this car apart. – Back in the days when “Hemi” was magic this car sold at Barrett-Jackson’s Palm Beach auction in 2008 for a breathtaking $123,200. Those days are behind us now and this result didn’t even match the $70,200 it was reported sold for at Dave Rupp’s Ft. Lauderdale auction in 2007. Time moves on and neglected or seemingly passé cars like this are opportunities for forward-looking collectors to put monumental cars in their collections at moderate prices, which this is.

Lot # 2028 1966 Dodge Monaco 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N DH23G63138614; Light Blue, White vinyl roof/Dark Blue; Estimate $7,000 – $10,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $8,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $8,800 – Power steering, power brakes, pushbutton AM radio, aftermarket wheels. – Paint has numerous chips, some of which are starting to rust. Chrome is fair with some pitting. Stainless trim is oxidized and scratched but not majorly. Gaps are factory. Engine bay has aged finish but has been cleaned up recently. Underbody shows dirt and some rust. Interior is fair with recent upholstery, but the carpet is faded. Interior panels look new. The vinyl roof is dirty. A mostly original but unimpressive car. – According to the VIN code this started life with a 383/325hp 4-barrel but now has a 318/230hp 2-barrel. It was reported sold here a year ago for $8,800, the same price it brought today, and is no bargain at this result.

Lot # 3094 1963 Dodge Polara 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 6332133686; Polar White/Light Blue; Estimate $45,000 – $55,000; Competition restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $40,909 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $45,000 – 426/425hp Max Wedge, cross ram dual quads, pushbutton automatic, radio, heater, bench seat, power windows, Govier documented. – The grille and trim could use cleaning up, but this car is in mostly remarkable condition after being fully and carefully restored in 2006. – Hammered not sold on the block at $41,750 then reported sold post-block at 45 grand. It was sold at RM Sotheby’s Arizona earlier this year for $52,250, which was thoroughly in bargain territory, and it doesn’t seem to have been used at all in the intervening months. It’s not clear why the seller decided to let go, but it was not a successful four months of ownership and the new owner can regard both the car and the deal with pride.

Lot # 2034 1949 Dodge Wayfarer 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N 37016522; Blue/Gray cloth; Estimate $8,000 – $12,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $7,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $8,250 – 230/103hp, 3-speed, dual outside mirrors, hub caps and trim rings, added turn signals, heater. – The paint is newer, but has noticeable chips and scratches on the front. Gaps are uneven. Doors sag and rub their frames. Bumpers are scratched and have a few noticeable dents. Trim is lightly scratched and needs polishing. There are notable paint lines in the jambs and some rubber has paint on it where it was improperly masked. Interior has newer seat upholstery. The headliner is dirty but not sagging. Gauges are clear but slightly dusty. Engine has lost all its finish, but does appear in good repair mechanically. An older partial restoration of a seldom seen early postwar Dodge, but no show car. – The base trim level for Dodge’s first postwar body redesign, the Wayfarer was nothing if not basic and it is somewhat amazing that this one has survived as well as it has. Survival has more to do with the price it brought than any intrinsic appeal, but it’s not unreasonably priced at this result.

Lot # 2075 1965 Ford Custom 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N 5D53Z156524; Light Blue/Light Blue vinyl with cloth inserts; Estimate $13,000 – $16,000; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $6,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $7,150 – 390/300hp, 3-speed, hub caps, narrow whitewalls, dual mirrors, AM radio. – Paint is badly oxidized, and there is rust in the drip rails. Trim is scratched and oxidized. The rocker covers and air cleaner are new, but the engine bay otherwise is dirty and there is evidence of rodents. Gaps are even and the panels are fairly flat. Rear seat looks new or unused, but the front is heavily worn. A project car. – A bare bones Ford with a big engine, it would have been an ideal liquor hauler in its early days, or perhaps as a car for an ambitious salesman who didn’t want to waste time between calls. It has potential as an enjoyable, unpretentious, driver that will surprise many cars with vaunted reputations on cruise night. Even with its flaws it is a sound value in this transaction.

 

Lot # 2186 1959 Ford Galaxie Club Sedan; S/N H9US122600; Black/Red vinyl with Black cloth inserts; Estimate $12,000 – $16,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $8,800 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $9,680 – 352/300hp, automatic, fender skirts, heater, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, later radio. – Paint has a few light scratches and swirl marks. One repainted chip. Trim is scratched and oxidized. Bumpers are excellent. Trim at the rear of the roof is heavily pitted. Engine was painted some time ago but now has rusted finishes. Interior is decent with a loose driver’s door panel. An older cosmetic restoration. – Was this a police car? It sure looks the part, other than having only two doors. On the other hand, it would make a pretty good anti-police car, or at least anti-Revenuer. It’s not fancy, but it’s also not expensive and has some endearing potential.

 

Lot # 2044 1963 Ford Galaxie 500 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 3U63Z123264; Corinthian White/Red cloth; Estimate $20,000 – $25,000; Modified restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $19,773 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $21,750 – 428, single 4-barrel, 4-speed, air conditioning, power steering and brakes, AM radio, Radial T/A tires. – The older paint is good. Rubber seals are hard and cracking around the car. Brightwork is dull and scratched on the window trim and there is pitting on the rear bumper. The interior has been restored and remains in good condition without any wear. Under the hood is a later year 428 engine instead of the original Z-code 390/300hp engine. Engine compartment is very clean and well detailed. Underbody is clean with mild wear. An older restoration with an upgraded replacement engine, so it offers the performance of a real 427/425 Galaxie without the massive price. – The look and performance of a 428, but not the price, makes this a sound value for the new owner in this transaction. Closed post-block at a reasonable approximation of the low estimate, both the seller and the new owner should be satisfied.

Lot # 2003 1967 Ford Mustang Coupe; S/N 7T01T283828; Dark Blue, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Estimate $3,000 – $6,000; Incomplete restoration, 5+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $1,700 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $1,870 – 200/120hp six, automatic, power steering, radio, wheel covers, vinyl roof. – Paint is unoriginal and completely uncared for. Vinyl roof is removed and the surface underneath is rusted. Severe open patches of metal have significant rust. Underbody is rusted and shows significant rot. Someone started painting this car again some time ago but never finished. Interior has mold on the seats. Severely deteriorated dash and gauges. Carpet is faded to a light brown. Engine bay shows enough new parts that it MIGHT run. An unremarkable car in every sense of the word, and it wouldn’t make financial sense to restore it. It would best serve as a donor car to keep other, better Mustangs alive. – A parts car, but at least it was bought for parts car money.

Lot # 3126 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 429 Fastback; S/N 9F02Z187777; Royal Maroon/Black vinyl; Estimate $275,000 – $325,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $240,000 – KK#1692. 4-speed, power steering, power brakes, pushbutton radio, chrome Magnum wheels, Polyglas GT tires, original Kar Kraft paperwork, Ford letter and build sheet documented. – Represented as original with one repaint, the engine compartment is freshly detailed to like new condition as has been the chassis and underbody. The original interior is good but the steering wheel shows age. Good repaint and chrome, thin door handle chrome. A somewhat challenged, largely original car represented with 36,292 miles. – There are many choice, largely original Boss 429s out there, not surprising when drivers reflect upon the handling compromises placed upon the Mustang chassis by the big, bulky, but eminently powerful 429 “Semi-Hemi” V-8. After this car left Auburn it went to Mecum Indy next week and was bid to $210,000. There’s a message in that experience.

Lot # 3117 1968 Ford Mustang GT Fastback; S/N 8F02R215456; Highland Green, Black stripe, Gold accent/Black vinyl; Estimate $120,000 – $145,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $95,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $104,500 – 428/335hp, 4-speed, no console, pushbutton radio, power brakes, smog equipment, chrome rally wheels, Polyglas tires, no power steering. – Restored like new with some paint flaws. The engine compartment, chassis and underbody are like new. Excellent chrome and interior. Sharp, crisp dash and gauges. A very good GT in like new condition. – Restored to Shelby Mustang standards, this R-code GT has left no stone unturned in re-creating a showroom-ready car. While this is SCJ money, the caliber of restoration makes a little variance realistic. We often say, “Buy the best car you can afford”, and this is an example of “best”, making a moderately generous price an understandable indulgence. The new owner needs to prepare no excuses for this Mustang GT.

Lot # 2040 1971 Ford Mustang Mach 1 SportsRoof; S/N 1F05H106670; Green/Green vinyl; Estimate $8,000 – $12,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $7,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $7,700 – 351/240hp, 4-speed, Ram air hood, power brakes, power steering, dual mirrors, dash clock, aftermarket radio, spoiler, Magnum wheels. – Rough paint with poor prep. There are small chips in the body and overspray covers the door gaskets and window seals. Bumpers and trim are oxidized and scratched. Doors don’t fit flush and the bottom of the driver’s door looks suspiciously thick. Hood gaps are tight. Engine compartment is dirty. Interior has been extensively redyed. Underbody has overspray and rust. A reasonable basis for a full restoration. – Bought for barely parts car money. It’s a car that’s arguably worth saving, but its fate may be that of a donor.

Lot # 2181 1973 Ford Mustang Mach 1 SportsRoof; S/N 3F05H187356; Medium Bright Yellow, Black Mach 1 stripes/Brown; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $7,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $7,700 – 351/177hp, automatic, aftermarket wheels. – Decent older paint with a touch up on front of hood. Brightwork is dull, and the chrome on the rear bumper is especially aged, with dull and scratched chrome as well as cracked rubber. Rebuilt 351 Cleveland. Underside of the hood is very dirty. Good lightly worn interior. Represented as an older restoration. Restored on a budget and owned on a budget, but not bad. – Based on the price paid the bidders seem to have seen this emasculated 2-barrel Mach 1 as the basis for restoration, an evaluation that is entirely appropriate, as is the price reflecting its condition.

Lot # 3080 2007 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 Convertible; S/N 1ZVHT89S675227880; Torch Red/Black, Red leather; Black top; Estimate $38,000 – $42,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $30,000 – 6-speed, manuals, extra keys, window sticker and paperwork. Goodyear tires, Brembo brakes, air conditioning, power windows, top, steering and brakes. – Represented with 10,000 miles. The paint is in very good condition. The interior is clean with very slight wear on the driver’s seat. The engine bay is very clean and well detailed. There are some paint scrapes on the inside of the hood where it is propped open. The underbody is clean and shows minimal wear. A well-cared for, low-mile used car. – The GT500 cost less than 50 grand when it was new, but it’s barely 10 years old and still in used car territory. And while 500hp is nothing to laugh at, there are plenty of faster and more sophisticated choices in the current crop of contemporary American muscle cars. It will be a while before an ’07 Shelby is considered collectible, and the owner of this one is unlikely to find bids much higher than this any time soon.

Lot # 3034 1956 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N P6FH343716; Black, Black hardtop/Black, White vinyl; White vinyl top; Estimate $25,000 – $30,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $17,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,700 – 312/225hp, automatic, power brakes, Town & Country radio, engine dressup, chrome wire wheels, porthole hardtop. – Restored in the 1970’s by the seller’s father, now with cracked and scuffed old paint and chrome, sound original upholstery. Dirty original engine compartment. A sound but tired driver or the basis for a straightforward restoration of a well-equipped T-bird. – At this price it is impossible for the new owner to go wrong.

Lot # 2189 1955 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N P5FH225948; Black/Black, White vinyl; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $21,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $23,650 – 292/198hp, automatic, wire wheel covers, whitewalls, dash clock, pushbutton AM radio, power steering, power brakes, power windows, power antenna, both tops. – Good paint. Bumpers have some scratches. Trim is scratched. Some finish is coming off of the engine. The top seal is loose and aged. Interior is fair, with age pitting to the chrome trim. Tires are dry cracked. Represented as a three-owner car. Body-off restored 10 years ago, but done on a budget to begin with and enjoyed plenty since. – Sold at no reserve for a price that’s on the cheap side, but the seller clearly got years of fun out of this car and shouldn’t be disappointed with the result as there is a lot of work that a self-respecting new owner will want to do.

Lot # 3082 1956 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N M6FH217380; Raven Black, Raven Black hardtop/White vinyl; Estimate $20,000 – $25,000; Older restoration, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,150 – 292/200hp, 3-speed, power steering, Continental kit, wheel covers, whitewalls, porthole hard top, no soft top, fender skirts, power seat, AM radio. – The paint is in poor condition with cracking and scratches all over. Brightwork is fair with dulling around both the front and rear windows. Interior is clean but seats show moderate wear. Engine bay is complete and correct but dirty and it appears the engine is leaking some fluids. Underbody shows some dirt and moderate wear. An old restoration that’s past its use-by date and ready for another round of work. – Discounted for the lack of a soft top, this is still a sound buy for someone looking for a straightforward restoration project and characteristic of older restored 2-seat T-Birds at Auburn this year.

Lot # 3141 1957 Ford Thunderbird Convertible; S/N D7FH372578; Flame Red/White vinyl; White top; Estimate $40,000 – $48,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $31,364 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $34,500 – 312/245hp, Ford-O-Matic, chrome wire wheels with Firestone whitewalls, power steering, aftermarket radio, fender skirts, spare tire and jack. – Good paint. The majority of the brightwork is good, although there is some slight dulling around the taillights. Seats show mild wear. There is a small hole on the dash pad in front of the driver’s seat that has been touched up with white paint. The engine bay is clean with heat rash showing on the exhaust headers. Underbody is clean with mild wear. A basic older restoration in driver condition. – Hammered not sold at $34,000 then sold post-block with this all-in result. With the 312/245 engine, lightly aged condition and no hardtop present, this car was never going to get bidders in a frenzy, but this is barely more than running project car money for an attractive driver. A good buy.

Lot # 2145 1962 Ford Thunderbird Sport Roadster; S/N 2Y85Z107892; Rangoon Red/Black; Black top; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $27,000 – 390/300hp, automatic, sport roadster tonneau cover, Kelsey Hayes wire wheels, narrow whitewalls, tilt steering column, power top, power steering, power brakes, air conditioning, build sheet and owner’s manual. – The paint is bright with full luster. There is a small chip on the front passenger-side quarter by the door. Brightwork is a bit dull. The interior shows very little wear. The engine bay is correct and very nicely detailed. Underbody is clean with mild wear. A well done restoration. Body-on restored in 2013 and still looking fairly fresh. – A real Sports Roadster from the factory, it deserved to bring closer to double the reported high bid.

Lot # 3046 1938 Ford V8 Deluxe Coupe; S/N 4520035; Black/Beige cloth; Estimate $22,000 – $26,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $24,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $26,950 – Radio, heater, skirts, hubcaps, trim rings, wide whitewalls, fog lights, blue dot taillights, banjo spoke steering wheel. – Good repaint and new upholstery and interior soft trim. Chipped steering wheel and original dash. Frayed old window channels. Dead, cracked old body seals. Dull body bright trim. Engine has been out and done to workmanlike standards. Usable but only passable. – Given a lick and a promise before the auction to make it look good under the lights, the seller did better today than at the last Auburn Fall when it was bid to $21,000. The price it brought is generous for its superficial presentation and the buyer may have had second thoughts upon taking a closer look on Sunday.

Lot # 2030 1948 Frazer Standard 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N F485015896; Light Blue/Tan, Dark Blue; Estimate $6,000 – $12,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $3,600 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $3,960 – 226/100hp, 3-speed, hub caps and trim rings, dual mirrors, oil filter, gauges, AM radio, heater. – Paint is fair with some cracking over the panel seams. Gas filler flap is worn through on edges. Rear quarter panel bottom shows signs of rust forming. Bumpers and trim are oxidized and scratched. Doors don’t fit flush. Interior has some split upholstery seams and faded carpet. Gauge lenses are age cracked. Engine had a coolant leak at the water neck and lost finish there. Underbody shows dirt and light rust. A basic old car that’s gotten intermittent work when necessary and is currently drivable, but barely presentable. – This fits the definition of a novelty car, one that few people are familiar with and that will get attention just for its quirkiness. There are many things it needs, some of them fixed at moderate cost but parts are nearly impossible to find. The Auburn Spring bidders thoughtfully valued it at a modest price that reflects all that it needs.

Lot # 3070 1937 Hudson Deluxe Eight Coupe; S/N 744238; Beige/Beige cloth; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $37,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $40,700 – “Electric Hand” preselector 3-speed, radio, heater, clock, skirts, body color wheels with hubcaps and trim rings, whitewalls, banjo spoke steering wheel. – Good paint, chrome and interior. Chassis and underbody are oily and road grimy. Steering wheel rim is covered with a lace on vinyl cover. The interior trim has an amateur woodgrain finish. Good gauges but not their bezels. A reasonable but not reassuring cosmetic redo. – Presentation is marginal, as is the workmanship, in what might well be called an “Enthusiast Restoration”, but the Hudson itself is rare and stylish. It was sold by Bonhams at Amelia Island fourteen months ago for $39,600 and this result is well within the envelope. What it needs is a good, caring, enthusiastic home where its many, but not critical, needs will receive attention and turn it into a much better car.

Lot # 3051 1953 Hudson Hornet Club Coupe; S/N 240138; Maroon/Blue vinyl, cloth; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $27,500 – 308/160hp Twin H-Power, automatic, pushbutton radio, hubcaps, trim rings, whitewalls, skirts, cabin heater. – Sound but scratched and chipped old paint. Sound upholstery, slightly hazy gauge lenses with good faces. The engine compartment is orderly but erratically redone. Chassis has been apart and restored, but not recently. Good chrome. A usable but not particularly good example. – This Hudson has charisma and every kid under the age of ten will immediately recognize it for a Hudson, the legacy of the movie “Cars”. A grandpa could be forgiven for buying it just to please the little kids and this price is no more than realistic for its specifications and condition.

Lot # 3026 1990 Jaguar XJS V12 Convertible; S/N SAJNW4845LC174220; White/Beige leather; Black top; Estimate $14,000 – $16,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $11,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $12,100 – 5,343/285hp, automatic, power brakes with ABS, alloy wheels, power windows, power door locks, power steering, air conditioning, cruise control, AM/FM cassette stereo, original tool roll. – Represented with clean CARFAX, original sales brochure & two sets of keys, new convertible top, and documentation of work completed. Paint has a small crack near the hood and the front window on the passenger’s side. Brightwork is good and bright. The interior is clean but both seats show moderate wear. The engine is a bit dirty but not bad. Showing 59,806 miles. Mostly original and in sound condition. – A stylish V-12 convertible with a clean, documented history bought modestly even taking the car’s flaws into account, but those savings will evaporate the first time something goes wrong with it, which is never very far off with an XJ-S.

Lot # 3180 1973 Jaguar XKE SIII V12 2+2; S/N UD1S74070; Pale Primrose/Tan; Estimate $15,000 – $18,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 5+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $12,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $13,200 – 4-speed, factory air conditioning, wire wheels, owner’s manual and factory diagrams, bonnet replaced early in ownership, needs exhaust system. – The paint is cracked, peeling and coming up all over. There is rust at the bottom of the rear window. Rubber seals are dried and cracked. Brightwork is dull and blemished. The interior is dirty and worn. The seats and carpet are faded and have heavy wear. Seats have tears as well. The engine bay is very dirty. Lots of dirt and wear underneath, and it needs an exhaust system. Represented as not running. Bonnet replaced after an accident, and the car has been in storage since 2002. Not quite a hulk to be cannibalized for parts, but still a daunting project car. – 12-cylinder Jags have never been financially feasible to restore, so this will be a labor of love (and blood, sweat, tears and dollars), but at least the new owner paid project car money for it and got one with a 4-speed.

 

Lot # 3142 1954 Kaiser Manhattan 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 003764; Light Green, Metallic Green roof/Green vinyl; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Unrestored original, 4 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $10,000 – McCulloch supercharged 226/140hp six, automatic, chrome wire wheels, wide whitewalls, windshield visor, side window visors, skirts, pushbutton radio. – Cracked, chipped, scraped old repaint. Sound original interior. Dull, pitted original chrome trim, good bumpers. Sound body. Dirty original engine compartment and chassis. New chrome wire wheels. Barely usable as is but more likely the basis for a straightforward restoration. – The McCulloch centrifugal supercharged managed to get 22 more horsepower out of Kaiser’s L-head six, a lot of complication for a moderate performance boost at a cost of $262 more than the unblown Kaiser Special. Although this is an intriguing old car, it’s in nearly appalling condition and the seller should have snapped any real money close to the reported high bid. Even fully restored it should bring much if anything over $30,000 and it’s more than $20,000 away from being restored.

Lot # 2197 1963 Lincoln Continental 4-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 3Y82N410548; Silver Mink/Blue vinyl with cloth inserts; Estimate $7,000 – $12,000; Unrestored original, 4 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $4,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $4,400 – Air conditioning, power brakes, radio, Super Ride radial whitewalls, hood ornament. – Bad old paint that’s faded with chips and scratches all over. The brightwork is in surprisingly good condition with only a handful of scratches and a ding on the driver’s side tail. The interior and carpet are significantly worn. The cloth covering by the driver’s door latch is torn. The paint around the driver’s door hinge and latch are chipped and missing. The engine is correct but dirty. The underbody is quite worn with a few visible rust spots. A project car with an undisclosed history. – Restoring a Continental of this vintage is not for the faint of heart, and there weren’t many in Auburn willing to undertake this one. The new owner paid little and really isn’t in this potentially rewarding project for very much money at all…yet.

Lot # 3151 1947 Lincoln Continental Cabriolet; S/N 7H173419; White/Dark Red leatherette; White vinyl top; Estimate $30,000 – $40,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $27,500 – Overdrive, hubcaps, trim rings, radio, skirts, wide whitewalls, remote spotlight. – Sound old repaint and interior but the top is aged and stiff. Very good chrome. Hazy gauge lenses. Dirty, oily underbody and engine. Sound body except for loose right side sill molding and blisters behind the right door. A decent place to start on a Continental restoration, but probably mechanically far from reliable as it is. – This Continental Cabriolet is not in as good condition as its stablemate coupe that crossed the block just before it. It brought comparable money, balancing condition against the much more desirable drop top coachwork and is a reasonable value at this price.

Lot # 3150 1948 Lincoln Continental Coupe; S/N 8H174752; Black/Red leather, Beige cloth; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $25,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $27,500 – Hubcaps, trim rings, wide whitewalls, skirts, pushbutton radio, overdrive. – Continental Club and AACA winner seven or more years ago. The paint has a few chips but the chrome and interior are very good. Engine compartment and underbody were restored like new and still present well if somewhat aged. Needs nothing to be toured with pride. – Sold at Mecum’s Spring Classic in Belvedere in 2003 for $21,000, after its sale here it went south to Mecum Indy a week later where it brought a reported high bid of $28,000. The odometer has added just 43 miles in the past fourteen years, but the car is in better condition now than it was then and this is a reasonable result.

Lot # 2192 1976 Lincoln Continental Coupe; S/N 6Y81A885642; Silver Diamond Fire/Red leather; Estimate $7,000 – $12,000; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $3,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $3,300 – Air conditioning, wheel covers, narrow whitewalls, factory radio, dash clock. – The original paint is decent but there is a touch up just above the front bumper and both doors have small chips in them. The interior is tidy but the seats are heavily worn. The strap to close the driver’s door is taped together. The engine bay is fairly filthy with a few spider webs, and the air cleaner hose is torn. Quickly washed up and brought out to auction, this car looks to have sat for much of its life given the 28,301 miles showing. Given the state of neglect under the hood, you probably wouldn’t be able to confidently drive it very far. – While not a total eyesore, it’s a fairly ratty car and it deservedly only attracted a handful of bids. The price seems cheap, but ’76 Continentals aren’t valuable and this was fair money for this one.

Lot # 2144 1956 Lincoln Continental Mark II Coupe; S/N C56C2533; Light Blue/White, Light Blue leather; Estimate $55,000 – $65,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $50,050 – Air conditioning, pushbutton radio, wheel covers, whitewalls. – Good older repaint, wavy rear bumper, scuffed front bumper. Creased and surface cracked but sound original upholstery. Good trim chrome. Good dash and gauges. Dirty chassis and underbody with original undercoat. A sound and largely original Continental, an AACA winner (but not recently.) – Done oh, so many years ago to standards that today call for it to be characterized as a cosmetic restoration this is an honest car that pretends to be no more than what it is. The style and understated elegance of the Continental is a milestone design. This one has the rare factory A/C and will be a rewarding piece to own and drive, especially at this realistic price.

Lot # 2171 1979 Lincoln Continental Mk V Bill Blass Edition Coupe; S/N 9Y89S697680; White, Dark Blue/White leather piped in Dark Blue; Estimate $10,000 – $15,000; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $6,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $6,600 – Bill Blass edition, power brakes, power steering, power windows, air conditioning, power seats, narrow whitewalls. – Partially repainted, but there is evidence of rust on the hood and there are scratches, rubs and chips in several places. Trim has light dings and scratches. Driver’s mirror is broken. Engine bay is dirty and there are several light oil leaks. Interior is quite musty and had several seat rips. Missing hood ornament. Showing 86,584 miles. An eye-catching car, as many of these decadent late ’70s land yachts are, but worn out. – Lincoln offered the Continental Mk V in several ‘Designer Editions,’ including Cartier, Bill Blass, Givenchy and Puce (not Gucci), with each finished in different color and trim packages. They’re distinctive, but not particularly rare or valuable and this beat up example got about what it deserved.

Lot # 2187 1979 Lincoln Continental Town Car 4-Dr. Sedan; S/N 9Y82S712199; Dark Blue/Blue leather; Estimate $7,000 – $12,000; Unrestored original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,400 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $2,640 – Power steering, air conditioning, Cartier dash clock, factory radio. – Paint is scratched on the rear passenger door and shows signs wear in area between the grille and bumper. Window seals are dried and cracked. Vinyl roof has slight fading and cracks in the rear. Trim around the rear window has chipped paint. Seats are all dirty and worn. Carpet is faded. Dash pad is faded and worn. Doors don’t close easily. Engine bay is original but has never been cleaned or detailed. Showing 86,153 miles. This car appears to have been used quite a bit early on in its life, then put away and not driven for some time. – A lot of car for the money only if you’re talking in sheer material terms, but still cheap even for a ratty old ’79 Continental.

Lot # 3097 1961 Mercedes-Benz 190SL Roadster; S/N 12104010019655; Ivory, Ivory hardtop/Red vinyl; None top; Estimate $60,000 – $65,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $57,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $63,250 – Weber carbs, hardtop only, body color wheels with trim rings and hubcaps, Michelin XZX narrow whitewalls, Becker radio. – Fresh repaint and new upholstery. No soft top frame. Underbody squirted with an erratic coat of chassis black. The engine compartment got pressure washed. The chassis plate is an erratically restamped repop. The lower body is heavily filled. This is a good car to avoid. – This lump was sold at Barrett-Jackson WestWorld in 2005 for $37,800 before the 190SL runup began. There’s no telling what its history since then has been, but based upon its presentation here its history hasn’t been benign. This price is all the money and then some for its condition and it has no upside at all.

Lot # 3063 1977 Mercedes-Benz 450SL Convertible; S/N 10704412040072; Golden Brown/Tan; Brown top; Estimate $25,000 – $30,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $19,750 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $21,725 – Automatic, tool roll and owner’s manuals, both tops, air conditioning, power windows, power steering, driving lights, wheel covers. – Good original paint other than numerous scratches on the area above the trunk lid. Brightwork has scratches on the bumpers and the trim. Interior is clean but shows moderate wear. Engine bay is tidy but not detailed. Underbody is clean with mild wear. An original, one-owner car showing just 33,427 believable miles claimed as all it has from new. – Carried along by the surge in prices for earlier SLs, the R107 shot way up in value over the past couple of years but things have settled down more recently. The seller is a little late but still more or less cashing out at the right time and getting an appropriate price albeit one that mostly overlooks the known mileage (835 miles per year.)

Lot # 3179 2004 Mercedes-Benz SL500 Convertible; S/N WDBSK75F44F074810; Silver/Grey leather; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Unrestored original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $19,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $21,450 – Retractable hardtop, power heated memory seats, CD stereo, AMG wheels, air conditioning, power windows, power locks. – Showing 69,612 claimed original miles with a clean CarFax. Paint has chips and scratches appropriate for a decently cared for driver. Wheels need polishing. Interior shows wear corresponding to the mileage. Steering wheel is worn. Engine bay is orderly but dirty. Headlights are oxidizing. A used car. – There are probably more sensible ways to spend this much money, but this car looks more expensive and stylish than the price here would suggest, largely because it cost about 90 grand when new.

Lot # 3109 1949 Mercury 9CM Coupe; S/N 9CM290057; Metallic Green/Beige cloth; Estimate $45,000 – $50,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $42,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $46,750 – 255/110hp, 3-speed, pushbutton radio, wheel covers, wide whitewalls, Unity remote spotlight, foglights, skirts. – Good clearcoat over the original paint. Good original chrome, upholstery and dashboard. Dry, unrestored chassis and underbody. Looks like a one year old car on top and inside, but not underneath. – This is an AACA-judged Survivor with clearcoat-preserved original paint and is highly impressive in both appearance and preservation. It was sold by RM at Meadow Brook in 2006 for $41,250 and has been driven a surprising 3,829 miles since then without any appreciable effect upon its condition. Equally remarkable, it has not been turned into a kustom kar. It is a choice piece of history and brought a corresponding price.

Lot # 2011 1953 Mercury Monterey 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 53SL111977M; Bittersweet Orange, White roof/White vinyl; Estimate $10,000 – $15,000; Older restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $8,750 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $9,625 – 255/125hp flathead, automatic, continental kit, wheel covers, whitewalls, dash clock, represented with fender skirts but they are not fitted. – The older repaint is starting to dull and both front panels have orange peel. There are scratches on both doors and a few chips on the trunk. Brightwork is dull and faded. The seats have faded and worn. Being white, they’re also showing dirt. The passenger’s side seat back has a tear. Carpet is faded and starting to pull away. The engine is correct and has been repainted but the paint is starting to crack. Excessive amount of black paint on the inside of the compartment. The paint is cracked and peeling on the upper firewall. Underbody is clean but shows mild wear. Restored and finished in eye-catching ’50s colors, but the work was done so long ago that it’s currently a tired car that you wouldn’t be particularly proud of. – At this price, the new owner has plenty of money left to address some of this car’s more immediate needs before putting it on the road to enjoy while further improving it in the meantime. It represents a decent value.

Lot # 3056 1951 Mercury Series 1CM Convertible; S/N 51SL71734M; White/White, Blue vinyl; White vinyl top; Estimate $38,000 – $48,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $38,500 – 255/112hp, 3-speed, pushbutton AM radio, power top, dash clock, added speakers, fender skirts, wheel covers, whitewalls, dual mirrors. – Decent older paint with numerous chips and scratches. Bumpers are oxidized and need rechroming. Trim needs polishing but appears complete. Top is dirty. Doors don’t fit flush. The interior was restored at some point but has some wear. Slightly dirty but maintained engine bay. An older budget restoration. – Done to indifferent standards and now showing its age as well, it is only the Mercury mystique that supports the price it brought. We can hope it will be kept in largely original condition and not turned into a typical Mercury custom.

Lot # 2055 1959 Metropolitan 1500 Series III Coupe; S/N E63131; Red, White/Black, White vinyl; Estimate $8,000 – $12,000; Cosmetic restoration, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $5,250 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $5,775 – Hub caps, narrow whitewalls, rear-mounted spare tire with cover, heater. – The paint is still bright but as been touched up so many times in so many different places it would be unrealistic to waste time listing them all. Brightwork is dull. Door handles are pitted. The interior and seats are all heavily worn. Engine and the engine compartment has some mild dirt and wear. Underbody is clean but shows wear and several spots of rust starting. Represented as an older cosmetic restoration, but it’s tired top to bottom. – This car reportedly comes out of a collection of Metropolitans, and when thinning the herd the easiest cars to part with are the worst ones. At least this example went for project car money, leaving the new owner some room to give the attention this car deserves, even if it will never be worth a ton.

Lot # 3129 1953 Nash-Healey Roadster, Body by Pinin Farina; S/N NHA1453; Engine # Red; –/Brown leather; Black cloth top; Estimate $80,000 – $100,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $99,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $108,900 – Overdrive 3-speed, pushbutton radio, wire wheel covers, wide whitewalls. – Good looking paint but with some microblisters and chips behind the hood scoop trim. Good lightly stretched upholstery. Restored underbody. Good glass and chrome. Unfilled holes for tonneau cover snaps. A pretty but flawed driver. – This is a generous price for a Nash-Healey in this condition. The seller should be grateful to the auctioneer for getting this much. The buyer might have some remorse on Sunday morning.

Lot # 2022 1973 Oldsmobile Delta 88 Royale Convertible; S/N 3N67H3M498495; Blue/White; White top; Estimate $5,000 – $9,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 4+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $2,750 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $3,025 – 350/180hp, automatic, wheel covers, power top, pushbutton AM/FM radio, cruise control, power steering, power brakes, power windows. – Old repaint with chips and scratches all over. Trim is scratched and oxidized. Doors don’t close well. Rust is appearing at the trim lines and wheel openings. Interior is musty and aged. Carpet is very faded. Engine bay is horrible, very rusted and dirty with some new parts slapped in to get it running. Very worn and dirty underneath. Represented with single family ownership, but it’s been in storage for 25 years and it doesn’t look like it was stored carefully. – It crossed the block at Auburn Fall in 2010 with a high bid of $4,200. A cheap, basic running project car for the tinkerer on a budget, and that’s the kind of price it commanded.

Lot # 2149 1972 Oldsmobile Hurst 4-4-2 Coupe Indy 500 Pace Car; S/N 3J57U2M204112; Ivory, Gold, White vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Estimate $45,000 – $55,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $22,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $24,750 – 455/275hp, automatic, Radial T/A tires, power brakes, power steering, air conditioning, bucket seats, center console, His’n’Hers shifter, W25 air induction hood, tinted glass, dash clock, AM/FM/8-track player, Protect-O-Plate. – Original but sound underneath. Lightly pitted bumpers. Tidy maintained engine bay. Older paint is crazing badly on top of the front fenders. Vinyl roof is slightly discolored but sound. Gold stripes are faded. Tiny rips in the driver’s seat. Otherwise very good original interior. This car is a 20-footer. It looks great at first glance and really is quite good, but it reveals all its flaws up close. – This 4-4-2 was reported sold twice at Barrett-Jackson WestWorld in 2011, on the first day (Lot #72.2) for $31,900 and later (Lot #1533.1) for $24,200. At the Leake fall Dallas auction it sold for $35,200, then at Mecum Houston five weeks ago for $44,000. That proved to be the pinnacle of price but the result here is a bargain basement price that is difficult to understand even with the restricted 275hp drivetrain. The new owner would seem to have nowhere to go with it but up.

Lot # 3073 1961 Oldsmobile Super 88 Convertible; S/N 615L09303; Provincial White/Red vinyl; White top; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $29,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $31,900 – 394/325hp, Hydra-Matic transmission, original sales invoice, owner’s manual and additional documentation. Power steering and brakes, Deluxe heater, radio, rear seat speaker, electric clock, narrow whitewalls, factory wheel covers. – There is a small touch up on the front quarter panel. Brightwork shows some dulling on window trim. Bumpers have been rechromed. Interior is clean but has moderate wear to the seats and the driver’s armrest is torn. Engine bay is correct with engine paint peeling and paint on the firewall that is cracked and peeling. Underbody is clean with mild wear. It may not win any beauty pageants now, but it’s a solid driver that will attract attention. – Sold at RM Motor City at St Johns in 2015 for $35,750. It’s worth exactly the same amount today, so while this result may be slightly more favorable to the buyer, it’s still wholly appropriate to this car’s age and condition.

Lot # 3111 1953 Packard Caribbean Convertible; S/N L411958; Maroon/White, Maroon vinyl; Beige cloth top; Estimate $100,000 – $110,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $70,000 – Ultramatic automatic, power steering, power brakes, 4-barrel, chrome wire wheels, wide whitewalls, power windows, power bench seat, continental kit. – 2010 AACA Senior National First Prize Winner. Very good paint, chrome. Good interior and top. Engine compartment is nearly like new. The underbody has been driven sparingly since it was restored. Some bright trim is lightly scuffed but still presentable. Not a show car any more but still eye catching. – Later Packard Caribbeans are more flamboyant that these early cars, but the design sits easily on this ’53, without embellishment. This one was sold at Ft. Lauderdale in 2012 for $90,200 and the seller is realistic in thinking the quality of its restoration and its preservation are worth somewhat more than the reported high bid here, although not the low estimate.

Lot # 2152 1970 Plymouth `Cuda AAR 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N BS23J0B305131; In Violet, Matte Black hood/Black vinyl; Estimate $60,000 – $70,000; Older restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $52,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $57,200 – 340/290hp, Six-Barrel, automatic, AM-FM, console, power brakes, quick ratio power steering, Rally wheels with trim rings, Radial T/A tires, spoiler, rear antenna. – Represented as the original engine. Badly bowed hood, good paint and original interior. Underbody was restored, then driven. The outside and engine compartment have been freshened more recently. New stainless steel brake lines. A fine driver. – The automatic is something of a disappointment but otherwise this is a desirable AAR ‘Cuda in ever-popular In Violet. The pre-sale low estimate is not an unreasonable aspiration but both the seller and the buyer can be complimented for arriving at this mutually agreeable result, especially after the seller got a number of miles of enjoyment out of it.

Lot # 3076 1969 Plymouth GTX 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N RS23L9E157729; Sunfire Yellow, Black hood and vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Estimate $42,000 – $48,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,455 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $39,000 – 440/375hp, automatic, bucket seats with console, vinyl roof, power brakes and steering, deluxe road wheels, red line radial tires. – The paint is good other than a few small chips just behind the driver’s door and a very small touch up on the driver’s door. Brightwork is good and shiny. The interior is clean with no signs of wear. Engine is clean with heat rash on the headers. Engine compartment is clean and detailed. Underbody is clean with little wear. California black plate car reportedly with the original owner until 2014. An attractive car, restored relatively recently to high enough standards and finished in attractive colors. – Hammered not sold on the block at $39,000 and closed later with this result which probably put $36-37,000 in the consignor’s pocket, a result that is fair to both parties.

Lot # 3116 1969 Plymouth Road Runner Hemi 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N RM23J9A142007; Light yellow, Black stripes and vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Estimate $75,000 – $80,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $65,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $71,500 – 426/425hp Hemi, automatic, buckets and console, red line tires, no hubcaps, Air Grabber hood, no power brakes or steering. – Very good older paint, chrome, interior, vinyl roof. The chassis and engine compartment were restored like new. A little age and surface rust but otherwise like new with no evidence of use. – RM sold this car in 2007 at Ft. Lauderdale at the height of Hemi-madness for $129,600. Since then it has languished, selling at the Rupp/Kruse Ft. Lauderdale auction in 2008 for $64,800, at Russo and Steele’s Hard Rock Ft. Lauderdale auction two months later for $83,600 and no-saling at Auburn Fall last September at $66,000. This is what it’s worth today, and it is attractive at this price, just to open the hood on cruise night to expose the looming Hemi engine.

Lot # 2148 1970 Plymouth Road Runner Superbird 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N RM23U0A165439; Tor Red, Black vinyl roof/Black vinyl; Estimate $100,000 – $125,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $82,727 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $91,000 – 440/375hp Super Commando, automatic, Rally wheels, trim rings, Polyglas GT tires, pushbutton radio, bench seat, power steering power brakes. – Mostly original with a poor older repaint with microblisters. Repainted over edge chips. Old undercoat in the wheel walls. Sound body with uneven door fits. Lightly scuffed bright trim. Sound, presentable, well preserved and not too good to drive. – Sold for $112,200 at Barrett-Jackson WestWorld in 2012, followed by a price of $121,000 at Kissimmee four months ago, this Superbird has since gone on a journey in search of the right buyer, appearing at Motostalgia’s Amelia Island auction in March where it no saled at a reported $115,000, Auctions America’s Ft. Lauderdale sale where the bid was $90,000 and at Mecum’s Houston sale just a week later where the bid was reported to be $95,000. The seller decided to stop giving it rides here in Indy and accepted this modest result in a post-block transaction. It is a manifestation of the fact that Superbirds have lost favor, particularly those with modest automatic transmission drivetrains.

Lot # 3053 1965 Plymouth Sport Fury Convertible; S/N P452235469; White/Dark Blue; Light Blue vinyl top; Estimate $22,000 – $26,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $16,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $17,600 – 383/330hp, automatic, power top, air conditioning, power brakes, power steering, bucket seats, console, dash clock, aftermarket radio, fender skirts, wheel covers, dual exhaust. – Decent older paint. Chrome is good with only light scratches on the bumpers. Trim is fair with some age and some oxidization. Engine bay needs cleaning but is not excessively dirty. Seat upholstery is newer. Gauge trim is pitted. Unrestored underbody. Small tear in the rear of the top. Cosmetically restored a while ago. – This Sport Fury brought a bid of just $13,500 at Auburn Fall last September and the seller accepted this slightly higher bid and moved on although it would not have been unreasonable to see it bring the presale low estimate. The new owner got a sound if aged Sport Fury convertible for a modest price.

Lot # 2146 1962 Pontiac Bonneville Convertible; S/N 862A5377; White/Light Green; Black top; Estimate $48,000 – $55,000; Recent restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $41,000 – 389/303hp, automatic, power top, air conditioning, power brakes, power steering, generator, heater, bucket seats, pushbutton AM radio, rear seat speaker, 8-lug wheels, PHS documents. – Paint is excellent. Bumpers have very light scratches. Panel gaps are slightly uneven around the trunk. Trim is excellent and well polished. Dash is lightly aged. Carpet is good with light fading. Seat upholstery is excellent. Engine bay is very good other than a light coolant seep. Underbody has been restored to like new as well. Other than a few minor details, this car has been very well restored and looks just about ready to show. – Sold for $30,800 at Russo and Steele Scottsdale last year. If much of the restoration work has been done by the consignor since that sale, he can’t expect to get that money back. The reported high bid here was worth considering even if it wasn’t generous, and the number isn’t likely to get much higher somewhere else.

Lot # 2053 1953 Pontiac Chieftain Deluxe Catalina Hardtop; S/N C8XH7918; Stardust Blue/Red with Gray inserts; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $13,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $14,850 – Power steering, heater, windshield visor, pushbutton radio, dual tone horns, stoplight viewer, fender skirts, whitewalls and wheel covers. – Paint is fair with some light scratches and a few chips from driving and age on the nose. Brightwork is oxidized. Glass is clear. Interior has a few seam tears and is dirty. Gauges are clear and bright. Engine bay was detailed on top but the lower areas dirty. Light road wear on an older undercoated chassis. An attractive if aged older restoration with lots of life left. – A lot of car and a lot of style for the money, particularly in this body style and these colors. A driver quality car bought for driver money, but this is a cool one.

Lot # 3016 1984 Pontiac Fiero SE Coupe Indy Pace Car; S/N 1G2AF37R5EP260244; White, Grey/Grey vinyl, Red cloth inserts; Estimate $6,000 – $9,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $3,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $3,850 – 151/92hp, automatic, air conditioning, AM/FM cassette stereo, tilt steering column, cruise control, power hatch release, rear defogger, power windows, power locks, sunroof, BF Goodrich tires. – Original paint with minor cracking on the front fascia, chips and scratches on mirrors, and slight deterioration of decals. Tidy used original engine bay and underbody. All original interior with slight wear on the driver’s seat. Wear around the edges on the console, but no tears or rips. All original and showing age, but more well kept than the 99,504 miles on the odometer would suggest. One of 2,000 built. – Sold at Auburn Fall last year for $3,630, now with 409 more miles on the odometer, this Fiero has given someone eight months’ use for less than the cost of a week’s rental from Avis.

Lot # 3009 1969 Pontiac Firebird Convertible; S/N 223679U132920; Engine # 0563433YI; Light Yellow/Parchment vinyl; White vinyl top; Estimate $22,000 – $28,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $19,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $21,450 – 350/265hp 2-barrel, automatic, Rally II wheels, Tiger Paw GTS tires, pushbutton radio, underdash CD stereo, console, power steering and brakes. – Good clearcoat repaint with a few fisheyes and masking oversights. Engine compartment got some quick cosmetics that overlooked any attention to the crusty engine. Sound, probably original, upholstery. A usable but indifferent driver. – At the risk of being branded a misogynist the characterization “secretary’s car” might usefully describe this cheeky Firebird convertible. It’s had a recent, decent repaint but shows little attention otherwise except to make it presentable on the auction block. The seller should be satisfied with the price it brought and the buyer satisfied with the price paid as long as there are no expectations of tire-burning performance.

Lot # 3164 1979 Pontiac Firebird 10th Anniversary Trans Am Coupe; S/N 2W87K9L135371; Nocturne Blue, Gold graphics/Black vinyl; Estimate $20,000 – $25,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $17,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $19,250 – 403/185hp engine, automatic, shaker hood, T-tops, power windows and brakes, bucket seats, snowflake wheels, Safe-T-Track rear end. – Bright original paint with a small chip on the front passenger’s side quarter panel, a small scratch on the hood and a small chip just above the driver’s door handle. The trim is in good condition. Interior is clean with seats showing moderate wear and the passenger’s seat has a small tear. The engine is correct, clean and recently detailed, although the rubber around the air cleaner has a small tear in it. Underbody is clean with mild wear. Unrestored and all original. Represented as 69,852 miles from new but looking like a car with much fewer. – Sold at Auburn Fall in 2015 for $15,675 showing just 7 fewer miles on the odometer. Even though this one has the base engine and an automatic, screaming chicken Trans Ams have been fairly hot for the past couple of years and this was something of a bargain for an imperfect but well cared for original in an unusual color. It could have brought another 5 grand without being expensive.

Lot # 2151 1972 Pontiac Firebird Formula 455 Coupe; S/N 2U87X2N515750; Sunset Orange/Black vinyl with cloth inserts; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $38,500 – 455 HO with 455 SD cam, automatic, Safe-T-Track, air conditioning, power steering, power brakes, power windows, pushbutton radio, single rear speaker, snowflake wheels, remote mirror. – Paint is excellent. Trim is good. Panel gaps are excellent and flat. Interior is excellent and fully restored. Engine bay is clean. Engine rebuilt 1,500 miles ago. Represented as matching numbers. Restored to like new condition and impossible to fault. – This result gives the new owner Trans Am performance at a moderate price, with beautiful, bright paint that is the antithesis of “Bandit” black and the refinement of a chicken-less hood. It is impossible not to like the car, or the price paid which is fair to both the buyer and the seller.

Lot # 2041 1978 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Coupe; S/N 2W87Z8L110264; Black, Red, Gold graphics/Red vinyl; Estimate $18,000 – $24,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $17,250 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,975 – 400/220hp, 4-speed, snowflake wheels, remote mirror, power steering, power brakes, later pushbutton AM/FM radio, Safe-T-Track, MSD ignition. – Represented as 65,315 original miles. Recently repainted, but there are cracks at the upper rear corners of the doors, on the driver’s side fender where a dent was over-filled, and in the driver’s quarter just aft of the door. Rear window surround is not properly attached. Wheels look new. Decals and graphics are new. Engine was sprayed in place and the remainder of the engine bay was sprayed black. Incorrect washer bottle. Interior has new carpet and seat upholstery, but the panels are noticeably aged. New exhaust underneath but otherwise unrestored. A superficial but good enough cosmetic restoration. – In the world of screaming chicken Trans Ams, it’s typically the low mileage originals that bring money. This is a solid car, but it’s been freshened up cosmetically so it appeals more to the driver than the collector, and at this price both parties can be satisfied.

Lot # 3019 1995 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Coupe; S/N 2G2F22P4S2235430; Black/Black leather; Estimate $16,000 – $22,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $13,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $14,300 – 350/275hp LT1, automatic, T-tops, rear spoiler, steering wheel radio controls, CD player, power driver’s seat, limited-slip, air conditioning, cruise control. – Showing 9,094 miles which the seller claims are from new. A few small chips and scratches in the nose and a scuff on the rear bumper, but otherwise good paint. Interior has light wear on the driver’s seat but that’s it. Aluminum surfaces in the engine bay have oxidization. Lightly used, and could be better given the low mileage. – LT1-powered Trans Ams, even good ones, can typically be had for around 10 grand. This isn’t a showroom fresh car, but the Auburn bidders treated it as if it were. An expensive result even with the low miles but a car that will respond in appearance and presentation to some assiduous attention to details and finishes.

Lot # 3077 1971 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Coupe; S/N 228871N120664; Cameo White, Blue stripe/Blue vinyl; Estimate $50,000 – $60,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $64,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $70,400 – 455/335hp, automatic, air conditioning, honeycomb wheels, power windows, power steering, power brakes, AM/FM radio, documented with the original bill of sale. – The paint is good with one small chip on front edge of the hood. Brightwork is good but trim around front and rear windows are starting to dull. The interior is clean with no signs of wear. The engine is correct. The engine and compartment are both clean and well detailed. Underbody is clean with little wear. Body-off restored in 2004 and a three-time Pontiac Club Champion 2010-12. A quality car that once was restored like new, although it no longer looks fresh. – The Auburn bidders (at least two of them) saw something in this Trans Am that kept their hands in the air until it reached this dramatic price 6.7% over the high estimate. As a consignor this kind of sublime intervention is the real lure of selling at auction.

Lot # 3027 1979 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am 10th Anniversary Coupe; S/N 2W87K9L140481; Solar Gold, Black graphics/Tan cloth; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $12,200 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $13,420 – 403/185hp, automatic, power steering, power brakes, power windows, air conditioning, remote mirrors, body-color snowflake wheels. – Good older repaint. Wheels need refinishing. The interior is largely unrestored but in decent condition with what looks like newer seat upholstery. The engine bay is dirty. Documented with the original window sticker and PHS paper. Not a bad car, but not a great one, either. – Not sold at Mecum Dallas five months ago at a high bid of $11,500. The seller can’t really be blamed for turning that offer down, but was persuaded to let it go at no reserve here in Auburn where it did slightly better.

Lot # 3033 1994 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am 25th Anniversary Convertible; S/N 2G2FV32P7R2245935; Arctic White, Blue stripe/White leather; White top; Estimate $14,000 – $16,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $10,000 – 350/275hp LT1, automatic, air conditioning, power top, power windows, CD stereo. – Good original paint with several chips and scratches on the nose. The interior is clean but the carpet and seats show moderate wear. The driver’s seat also shows a few small cracks. Tidy, lightly run engine bay, and the lining on the underside of the hood is torn in a couple of places. Showing 58,665 miles and in corresponding condition. The 25th Anniversary Trans Am was an appearance package only. – Even discounted for the automatic, a 25th Anniversary convertible in this condition can expect another 50% on top of the reported high bid here, so refusing it was understandable.

Lot # 3066 1999 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am 30th Anniversary Convertible; S/N 2G2FV32G8X2218692; White, Blue/White leather; Blue top; Estimate $18,000 – $22,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $12,000 – 346/320hp, automatic, air conditioning, power windows, power seat, power top, Ram Air hood, CD stereo. – A few chips and scratches in the nose but mostly good paint other than some of the blue parts flaking at the edges. Top has dirt rub from storage. Engine bay is dirty and needs detailing. Interior shows wear corresponding with the 90,040 miles showing. A collectible model, but in used car condition. – The 30th Anniversary Trans Ams had a special blue and white paint, just like the 25th anniversary cars five years before. They’re worth more than the 25th anniversary cars, though, and even a visibly used one like this deserved more than the reported high bid. The offer needs to be north of 15 grand before being worth consideration.

Lot # 2095 1986 Pontiac Grand Prix 2+2 Aerocoupe Coupe; S/N 2G2GJ37HXG2290415; Silver/Gray cloth; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $15,909 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $17,500 – 305/165hp, automatic, air conditioning, cruise control, bucket seats, console, power brakes, power steering, power locks, power windows. – Showing 405 claimed original miles. Interior looks and smells new. Underbody and engine bay are spotless. Kept in like new condition for the past 30 years. – Hammered not sold at $16,500 then reported sold later at a grand more. Pontiac barely made 1,000 of these Grand Prix Aerocoupes to homologate the aerodynamic tail section for NASCAR racing. While rare, it has dated ’80s styling and not much power to work with, so collectors aren’t exactly chomping at the bit to get their hands on one. This example sold for a number that is comparable to what other Aerocoupes have brought at auction recently. On the other hand, it sold a week later at Mecum Indy for a whopping $23,100 which sets the curve for Aerocoupes.

Lot # 2021 1974 Pontiac Grand Prix SJ 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 2K57Y4P203691; Brown, Beige vinyl roof/Brown vinyl; Visually maintained, largely original, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $9,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $9,900 – 455/250hp SJ engine, automatic, vinyl roof, bucket seats, console, floor shift, pushbutton radio, Cooper Cobra tires, power steering, power brakes, air conditioning. – Bubbling at the vinyl top edges. Lots of chips and scratches in the mostly sound original paint. Brightwork is fair with some light pitting. Carpet is faded. Door panels are very sun faded and aged. Driver’s seat is torn. Some of the interior trim is loose but appears complete. Gaps are even. Engine bay is very dusty and dirty but appears correct. There is a coolant leak at the thermostat as well. Underbody is dirty and unrestored. Mostly original and far from perfect, but presentable. – This is a generous price to pay for a $5,000 car, even with the extra 25hp of the SJ engine.

Lot # 3095 1967 Pontiac GTO Convertible; S/N 242677K131464; Gold/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Estimate $45,000 – $55,000; Cosmetic restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $38,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $41,800 – 400/335hp, 4-speed, power steering, power brakes, power top, bucket seats, console, PMD mag wheels with trim rings, pushbutton AM radio. – Good paint other than a run in the clearcoat on the nose. Rear bumper is new, but the front needs replating and the trim could use polishing. Erratically repainted engine bay and underbody. A mostly superficial cosmetic restoration, but still an attractive car. – Sold at Mecum Kissimmee last year for $47,300, then sold at Mecum Kissimmee this year for $41,250. Three very similar results in the span of a year and a half are a pretty good indication that this is what the car is worth.

Lot # 3018 1975 Pontiac LeMans Colonnade 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 2D37M51500528; Red, White vinyl roof/White vinyl; Estimate $18,000 – $24,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $23,750 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $26,125 – 350/175hp, automatic, air conditioning, power brakes, power steering, AM pushbutton radio, Rally wheels, narrow whitewalls. – Remarkable original paint with only a few minor scratches. Front bumper filler panel has a few major repaired scratches. Bumpers are good with only light scratches. Interior presents like new. Engine bay is clean and detailed. Showing 2,294 miles, which is represented as actual. Why anyone would keep a ’75 LeMans in such great shape is a mystery, but this one must be among the best in existence. – It could be among the best or it could be the absolute very best, which would explain this result. It’s a monumental price for such a car. There’s no other way to put it especially when its prior auction history includes being sold here in 2014 for $18,700 and at Ft. Lauderdale in 2015 for $12,295. The stars and planets were in alignment when this LeMans Colonnade crossed the block.

Lot # 3025 2003 Porsche 911 Coupe; S/N WP0BA29933S635466; Black/Grey leather; Estimate $16,000 – $19,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $17,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $18,700 – 3,596/310hp, Hankook tires on chrome rim 19-inch modular wheels, glass roof Targa package, wing, aero bits, loaded, Triptronic five-speed automatic transmission. – Stone chipped nose, foggy headlight covers, hood has been repainted, and not particularly well. Upholstery is sound but stretched and butt-polished. A used car. – Buyers of used Porsches expect their cars to be stock and visibly well-maintained. This one isn’t either of those things and the price matches its presentation.

Lot # 2132 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe; S/N WP0AB29941S687551; Silver/Black leather; Estimate $50,000 – $60,000; Unrestored original, 2- condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $48,000 – Active spoiler, sunroof, climate control, cross-drilled rotors, red calipers, power everything. – Showing 38,349 miles. The paint is very good and the interior has wear corresponding to the mileage. Engine bay is clean and maintained. Represented with a clean CARFAX, recent service and Porsche CofA A documentation, although the tires look like they don’t have much life left in them. – 911 Turbos of this era have the unfortunate stigma of being part of the unloved 996 generation, which isn’t quite fair because the Turbos were thoroughly different mechanically. That actually makes them a great value these days, though, offering exotic car performance and looks often for less than 50 grand even though they were six-figure cars when new. While this example is a clean, solid car, it doesn’t have any good options, it’s in the most common color and it’s not perfect. The reported high bid could have been gladly taken.

Lot # 3085 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe; S/N WP0AB29921S685197; Polar Silver/Dark Blue leather; Estimate $42,000 – $46,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $30,000 – 3.6/425hp, twin turbo, Tiptronic 5-speed, cross-drilled rotors, sunroof, navigation, power memory seat, US-spec bumperettes, partial woodrim steering wheel. – Headlights starting to haze and the rims have some curb rash. Showing 71,357 miles and corresponding wear to the seats. No representation of history or service. – With a Tiptronic and not much in the way of a service history, this is not a particularly desirable 996 Turbo, and the consignor didn’t get the hint that the people in Auburn showed with their bids. It could have gone to a new home at this price.

Lot # 2103 1986 Porsche 911 Turbo 930 Coupe; S/N WP0JB0935GS051424; Red/Tan; Estimate $70,000 – $75,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $72,273 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $79,500 – Black Fuchs wheels, air conditioning, power seats, heated driver’s seat, whale tail. – Paint is very good with only a few minor scratches and chips on the front. Some exterior trim is showing age. Wheels are clean. Interior has some wear to the seats and the carpet is faded. Engine bay is clean but aged. Showing 10,634 miles and very well kept. – 930s were easy six-figure cars not all that long ago, but this downright cheap transaction shows that things continue to soften for the first 911 Turbos, a no sale at Auburn Fall last year on a reported $70,000 bid.

Lot # L167.1 2014 Porsche GT3 Coupe; S/N WP0AC2A9XES183231; Black/Black leather, Alcantara inserts; Estimate $125,000 – $150,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $140,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $154,000 – 3.8 liter, 475hp, Black centerlock wheels, Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires, stereo, navigation, heated seats, power windows, 7-speed PDK transmission, ceramic brakes, carbon fiber interior, 18-way sport seats and more. – Like new and under 900 miles. Level 5 Motorsport liquidation. – Unusually fully equipped for a 911 GT3, with pretty much every option that could be loaded on it. Bought for a reasonable price.

Lot # 2007 1969 SEAT 600D Sedan; S/N BA457420; White/Red; Estimate $15,000 – $20,000; Older restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $6,200 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $6,820 – Dual mirrors, hub caps. – Paint has chips at the edges of the driver’s door. There is a small quarter sized dent aft of the driver’s door and some scratches in the paint with rust poking through. Uneven door gaps. Engine bay has finish issues but is clean. Underbody shows dirt, age and overspray. Interior is newer and in fair shape, but the gauges and interior trim are faded. Purchased in Spain, where it was previously restored to enthusiast standards. – SEAT is currently a Volkswagen subsidiary, but for years they built Fiats like the 600 under license, and the SEAT 600 was in fact the first car of many Spaniards during the ’60s and ’70s as the economy improved and the demand for cheap personal transport intensified. Contract-built cars like this are typically worth less than cars from the original country of origin, but even taking that into account this little driver came at a cheap price. Auburn might not have been the ideal place to sell something so eccentric, but the new owner got quite a deal.

Lot # 3115 1970 Shelby Mustang GT350 2-Dr. Hardtop; S/N 0F02M483101; Orange/Black vinyl; Estimate $85,000 – $100,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $70,000 – 351/290hp Ram Air, 4-speed, power steering and brakes, air conditioning, cassette stereo, power windows, 5-spoke wheels with chrome rings, Polyglas GT tires, rear window slats. – Good paint over older paint and some edge chips on the hood. The engine compartment is done nearly like new. Underbody was restored and shows subsequent use. Good major chrome with weak quarter window trim. Poor driver’s door fit. Painted assembled with some masking misses and dull along the door openings. Cracked old quarter window seals. A competent cosmetic restoration to decent driver condition. – The ’70 Shelby GT350 is an ordinary Mustang 351 with some trim items, body parts and Shelby badging. It doesn’t even have a Shelby VIN. The Shelby mystique is strong, but this is an ordinary car in decent condition that could reasonably have gone away at the reported high bid.

Lot # 3122 1968 Shelby Mustang GT350 Convertible; S/N 8T03J193205-02136; Metallic Dark Green/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Estimate $110,000 – $125,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $100,000 – 302/250hp, 4-speed, 10-spoke Shelby alloy wheels, Goodyear Speedway tires, power steering, power brakes, pushbutton radio, rear antenna, fog lights. – Good paint, chrome and interior. Freshly restored and like new inside, outside, underneath and under the hood. – How the publicists at Ford/Shelby got to “GT350” from a 302/250hp Mustang with identity bits is quite a stretch but Shelby buyers don’t much care, nor do they think about the fact this series had a cooking engine more frequently seen in down-market Mustangs. The bid here is reasonable for what it is.

Lot # 3124 1968 Shelby Mustang GT500KR Fastback; S/N 8T02R203191-02492; Lime Gold/Black vinyl; Estimate $160,000 – $200,000; Unrestored original, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $200,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $220,000 – 428/335hp, 4-speed, 10-spoke Shelby alloy-wheels, E70-15 Goodyear Speedway tires, console, power brakes, power steering, pushbutton radio. – Shrinking and lightly crazing original paint, scratched bumper chrome, dull wheels and front fender trim. Good original interior, dash and gauges. Thin door handle chrome. Dry, dirty original underbody. The clean, orderly engine compartment has had detailing attention, at least on top. Represented as all original with 22,994 miles and nothing about the car refutes that. – This was one of the show stars at this year’s Auburn Spring, and it fully deserved its billing for its originality and sympathetic preservation. Its price is no more, or less, than it deserved.

Lot # 2031 1977 Triumph Spitfire 1500 Convertible; S/N FM63197U; Orange/Black vinyl with houndstooth cloth inserts; Black top; Estimate $8,000 – $12,000; Visually maintained, largely original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $3,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $3,850 – Pushbutton radio, heater, wood dash. – Repainted with noticeable chips and scratches on the front as well as overspray on the door window trim. Bumpers are very pitted. Top is aged and faded. Decent interior with faded carpet and rub though on some of the black trim panels. Engine bay is partially cleaned but not detailed. Underbody is dirty with some surface rust. Not restored but not original, either. It’s a cheap driver, as most Spitfires are. – Sold no reserve at a price slightly favorable to the buyer. Spitfires have long been about as cheap as a classic roadster can get, and they’ve gotten cheaper still over the past couple of years.

Lot # 2060 1958 Triumph TR3A Roadster; S/N TS28261L; Green/Tan vinyl; Estimate $16,000 – $22,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $18,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $20,350 – Centerlock wire wheels, luggage rack, dual wing mirrors, banjo steering wheel. – The paint is oxidizing and has scratches and chips. Bumper chrome is heavily worn. Trim is oxidized. Seat vinyl is stretched and ill-fitting. Tach and speedo are clear and bright but the other gauges are faded. Unrestored underbody. An older enthusiast-restored TR in driver condition. – This would be a fun car to go out and enjoy the TR3’s famous scarily low-cut doors and other joys of open-air motoring, but it’s nothing to take too seriously and TR3 values don’t seem to be going anywhere. This was a straightforward, appropriate transaction.

 

Lot # 3002 1973 Volkswagen 181 Thing Convertible; S/N 1832421212E; Engine # AM012366; White/Black vinyl; Black vinyl top; Estimate $13,000 – $18,000; Older restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $13,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $14,850 – Chrome wheels, hubcaps, radial blackwalls, side curtains, Sapphire radio, fog lights, roll cage. – Sound repaint with light orange peel and over some small depressions. Good interior and top. Fresh underbody. Clean, fresh, orderly engine compartment. Done to unusually good standards and ready for summer. Described as restored in 2004, it looks much, much more fresh. – This Thing brought $16,500 at Barrett-Jackson in Scottsdale in 2009, after the 2004 restoration. The result here is (barely) within the pre-sale estimate range, appropriate to Things values today.

Lot # 2019 1969 Volkswagen Beetle 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N 119956859; Green/Green, White vinyl; Estimate $8,000 – $12,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $7,600 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $8,360 – Roof rack, rear luggage rack, hub caps, headlight eyebrows, fog lights, bucket seats, added CD stereo. – Bubbles and pitting in unpolished paint. The doors stick out. Trim is oxidized. The front bumper has a dent. Added roof rack and rear luggage rack look new. Carpet is older but the seats look newer. Engine bay looks clean. A car done over on a budget, with most of the work seemingly done a while ago. Even though this is Indiana, the car looks ready for the beach with the bright colors, roof rack and surfboard. – The Beetle underwent big changes for 1968, most notably larger bumpers and taillights as well as a padded dash. Post-1968 Beetles aren’t as valuable as earlier examples, but they have pretty much the same look and feel and for someone on a budget they make a great cheap classic. This example was attractive and sound enough to have fun with, and it was bought at a straightforward, appropriate price.

Lot # 3022 1972 Volkswagen Beetle Convertible; S/N 1522137568; White/Black vinyl; Black top; Estimate $14,000 – $18,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $7,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $7,700 – Rear defrost, radio, hub caps. – Old repaint with cracks and chips on the front. Hub caps have some rust on them. Chrome trim and bumpers are pitted. Good, straight newer top. Overspray in the engine bay, but it’s tidy and maintained. New seat covers and carpet. Dash is cracked and the gauges are original. New radio. A cosmetic restoration that’s good enough for casual driving. – The cosmetic issues and general age didn’t go over well with the Auburn bidders who arrived in Auburn having read the description of a “Nice original example” and found themselves looking at something else. The result is on the cheap side for a ’72 Beetle convertible, but it deserves little or nothing more than what it brought.

Competion Cars

Lot # L237 2008 Crawford Ferrari 430 Grand Am; S/N BILL OF SALE; Red/Black; Estimate $125,000 – $175,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $72,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $79,750 – Dinan engine, Crawford built tube frame 2008 Grand Am specs, EMCO gearbox, Motec engine management, carbon fiber body. – An orderly and well-built but raced car that looks the part. Level 5 Motorsports liquidation. – No doubt this “Ferrari” is wicked fast, but it has no place to race competitively, just a dynamite track day car.

Lot # L266 2005 Ferrari 360 Modena Challenge Berlinetta; S/N FFYR51B000126986; Black, Chrome roof/Red cloth; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $57,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $63,250 – BBS wheels, VIN plate removed, number stamped in the passenger side floor pan. – Pretty rough, used, dusty and aged. An SCCA car. Level 5 Motorsports liquidation. – Track day excitement is in the future of the new owner of this 360 Challenge, after a thorough inspection and mechanical servicing.

Lot # L239 2012 Ferrari 458 GTD Berlinetta; S/N F142GT33486GAM; Black, Chrome roof/Black cloth; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $215,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $236,500 – Specially constructed GT Daytona class Ferrari 458 GTD – Orderly but used, scuffed nose. Raced at Daytona and Sebring in 2014 and appears to be in as-raced condition. Level 5 Motorsports liquidation. – While this 458 GTD is no longer a class win contender it will credibly acquit itself at all but the highest levels of motorsport and the Auburn bidders seemed to appreciate that possibility with this price.

Lot # L244 2012 Ferrari 458 GTD Berlinetta; S/N F142GT33484GAM; Black, Chrome roof/Red cloth; Estimate $225,000 – $275,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $420,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $462,000 – Hewland 6-speed paddle shift, aluminum monocoque, racing suspension, 4,498cc/550hp engine. – Orderly and appears to be clean and race ready. 2014 GTD class winner at Daytona, 2nd in class at Sebring, 14th at Monterey, 8th at Belle Isle, 2nd at Watkins, 4th at Indianapolis, 5th at Road America, 8th at VIR, 11th at CoTA, 7th at Road Atlanta. Level 5 Motorsports liquidation – A successful race car in high quality well maintained condition that looks like it’s been prepared for another season of racing. At least two people coveted it and paid serious money for it.

Lot # L246 2006 Ferrari F430 GT2 Berlinetta; S/N F131EVOGT2440; White/Black cloth; Estimate $175,000 – $225,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 2 condition; – Reserve; Hammered Sold at $205,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $225,500 – 3,996/450hp, 6-speed sequential shift gearbox, BBS wheels, PZero tires, SF shields, fire system. – Barely if at all used and represented as having been used only for testing, probably a euphemism for Scott Tucker’s joy rides. Level 5 Motorsports liquidation. – With comparable Porsche GT2s bringing eye-popping money this stock, little used Ferrari GT2 is a sound value at this result.

Lot # L179 2012 HPD ARX-03 LMP2; S/N 03; Black; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $80,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $88,000 – No engine (designed for an HPD HR28TT twin turbo V6), Hewland 6-speed sequential gearbox. – Roller, no engine. Otherwise clean and race ready. Raced at Le Mans and Sebring, class winner at Petit Le Mans in 2012. Level 5 Motorsport liquidation. – One of several complete and partial ARX-03s in the Level 5 liquidation, proving that Scott Tucker never scrimped on cars and backup.

Lot # L180 2012 HPD ARX-03 LMP2; S/N 09; Black; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $100,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $110,000 – No engine (designed for an HPD HR28TT twin turbo V6), Hewland 6-speed sequential gearbox. – Roller with no engine. Otherwise race ready. One of Level 5 Motorsports 2012-13 LMP2 team and driver championship cars. Level 5 Motorsports liquidation. – Someone must have seen great value in these now outdated ARX-03 race cars. There also were two tubs in the sale as well and probably enough spares and support equipment to field another full car. The amount of quality equipment in the liquidation of Scott Tucker’s team was amazing.

Lot # L300 2011 Lola B1143 LMP2; S/N HU04; Black; Estimate $50,000 – $75,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $102,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $112,750 – Set up for a Honda HPD HR28TT V6/60 deg. 4v 2799cc twin turbo engine, Lola HT six-speed sequential gearbox – Roller, no engine. Clean, orderly, little used. Class winner at Sebring and Road America in 2011, 10th overall at Imola 6 Hours. – It will be interesting to see how these cars are transformed and what gets stuffed into the empty space between the driver and the gearbox. At prices like this leaving it as is for display is not an option.

Lot # L296 2011 Lola B1183 GTP; S/N HU05; Black/Black; Estimate $10,000 – $15,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $75,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $82,500 – Roller, no engine, Lola paddle shift – Clean, orderly, raced, damaged tub and assembled for photo and display use. 10th at Le Mans in 2011, raced at Sebring and Long Beach in 2012. Level 5 Motorsports liquidation. – The bidders in Auburn apparently saw more than a static display car in this Lola.

Lot # L298 2012 Lola B1280 GTP; S/N HU05; Black/Black cloth; Estimate $75,000 – $100,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3+ condition; – Reserve; Hammered Sold at $117,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $129,250 – OZ wheels, Michelin tires. – Roller, no engine, set up for a Judd 3.6 liter V8. Clean used racecar with history with Dempsey Racing at Lime Rock (7th), Mid-Ohio (9th), Road America (9th), Laguna Seca and Road Atlanta. Level 5 Motorsports liquidation. – It may have been a liquidation sale, but there were no bargains among the Level 5 cars or equipment.

Lot # L163 2001 Porsche “Hurricane” 996 Turbo Coupe; S/N None; Black/Black carbon fiber; Estimate $100,000 – $150,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 2- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $117,500 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $129,250 – 3.6 liter, twin turbocharged 1,050hp engine, Megaline paddle shift gearbox, all-wheel drive, Motec engine management, water cooled PFC brakes and more. – Clean, orderly and race ready. A sort of technology demonstration project undertaken by Scott Tucker’s Level 5 Motorsports with Kelly Moss to see just how far a “Porsche 911” could be taken. The answer is pretty far and this is a 911 in silhouette only. Level 5 Motorsports liquidation. – The performance capability of this “Porsche” has been demonstrated and would be ideal for track days for anyone with a fulltime team of professional race engineers, tuners and fabricators. Money was no object in building it and the price it brought is barely a nickel on the dollar of what was invested.

Lot # 3160 2008 Toyota NASCAR Cup 2-Dr. Sedan; S/N SLP0307COT016TRB033; Metallic Blue, Red Bull/Black; Estimate $30,000 – $35,000; Competition car, original as-raced, 3 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $32,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $35,200 – – Orderly but very used and somewhat dirty. Represented to be in road race configuration as raced at Watkins Glen and Sonoma and more recently used as an historic racer. – This is an appropriate price for a used but currently race prepared NASCAR road racer.

 

Trucks

Lot # 2013 1983 Chevrolet El Camino Conquista Pickup; S/N 1GCCW80H4DR232828; Desert Tan, vinyl roof/Brown; Estimate $8,000 – $12,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3 condition; With Reserve; Not sold at Hammer bid of $6,500 – 305/150hp, automatic, air conditioning, power steering, power brakes, cruise control, pushbutton AM/FM radio, narrow whitewalls, bed rails. – Repainted in the original color with some minor scratches on the hood. Nose is not well aligned with the fender. Both bumpers are very aged. Stainless shows pitting. Interior has a recently spray dyed seat that is in good shape but the dye has rubbed off on the seat belts. Carpet is faded. Gauges are clear. Engine bay is fairly tidy and maintained, but the engine has lost large portions of paint. Bed has dirt and scratches in it. A presentable but not great unrestored driver. – Not a special Conquista in any way, best suited for weekend utility hauling around a suburban estate. There’s no reason it shouldn’t have gone home at the reported high bid.

Lot # 3106 1947 Diamond T 201 Pickup 1-ton; S/N 2012840; Red, Green accent/Red vinyl; Estimate $45,000 – $60,000; Recent restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $45,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $49,500 – Hercules 236/91hp six, 4-speed, red steel wheels, blackwall tires, rubber bed floor mat, single sidemount, accessory turn signals, red painted bumpers. – Good paint, chrome trim and upholstery. Restored thoroughly to very good standards and not overdone, but not scrimped, either. – Diamond T 201 1-ton pickup prices display absolutely zero rationale and have ranged all over the scale from low six figures mid-Twenties. This 201 is restored well, to better than truck standards, and its price is mid-scale, moderate for the quality of the restoration.

Lot # 2133 2004 Dodge Ram SRT-10 Regular Cab Pickup; S/N 3D7HA16H34G210280; Red/Black leather, suede; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Unrestored original, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $31,818 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $35,000 – 500hp V-10 engine from the Viper, 6-speed, factory spoiler, air conditioning, 6-disc CD changer, Hurst shifter, bucket seats, console. – Showing 1,834 miles and looks it. Engine bay looks factory fresh. Documented with the original window sticker and sales order. A barely broken in Viper-powered truck, which probably spins its rear tires every time you even look at the gas pedal. – Hammered not sold on the block at $31,000, closed later with this result. Branding is everything and Dodge wanted to exploit the Viper mystique, but someone should put a set of chrome stacks behind the cab and a set of “Li’l Red (Express) Truck” stickers on the doors.

 

Lot # 3134 1947 Dodge WC 1/2 Ton Pickup; S/N 81191745; Red/Tan, Brown vinyl; Estimate $20,000 – $30,000; Truck restoration, 2 condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $20,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $22,000 – 3-speed, alternator, heater, wood bed, spare tire carrier, hub caps, whitewalls. – Fiberglass fenders. Excellent paint. Chrome is well finished. Some scratched glass and loose window gaskets. Aftermarket gauges are clear and bright. The interior firewall, though, is not painted and visible. The engine bay is clean and mostly correct other than the added alternator. Restored to slightly better than truck standards and quite eye-catching. – This is a serious work truck, returned to production after WWII virtually unchanged from pre-war, and it no doubt has lived an active work life. This vintage truck was in high demand and usually were worked to death before being abandoned in some remote location where they were left to return to the earth, which seems to have happened to the fenders on this WC. Rescued from oblivion, it has received a quality restoration to unusually high standards, for which the consignor got little financial compensation. It is worth every penny of the price paid, and would not have been out of line had it brought a few thousand dollars more.

Lot # 3169 1951 Ford F-1 Pickup; S/N BDA83AH5121357; Strata Blue, Black/Red vinyl; Estimate $35,000 – $40,000; Truck restoration, 2- condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $26,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $28,600 – 239/100hp flathead V8, deluxe heater, generator, pushbutton radio, added turn signals, dual mirrors, wood bed floor, stainless bed strips, column shift 3-speed, hub caps and trim rings, wide whitewalls. – Driver’s side running board is heavily scratched. Some minor blisters in the finish on the passenger’s side door. Bumpers are excellent. Chip in the grille paint. Clean engine bay with a slight fuel leak from the carb. The wood bed floor could use refinishing. Body-off restored to truck standards. – The few noted flaws do little to detract from this F-1’s quality restoration and appeal, particularly at this moderate price.

Lot # 2037 1980 GMC Caballero Pickup; S/N TW80JAD500416; Light Blue, Dark Blue/Blue cloth; Estimate $12,000 – $16,000; Cosmetic restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $5,800 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $6,380 – 305/155hp, automatic, air conditioning, aftermarket radio, column shift, Cragar wheels, Radial T/A tires, power steering, power brakes, tonneau cover. – Recently painted with minimal scratches, but there is some wave to the panels. Driver’s door does not close properly. Trim rubber was cut to hide wear. Engine bay has been lightly cleaned but not detailed. Carpet is worn, but the seat upholstery looks new. Decent underbody with a few spots of superficial rust. Represented as a cosmetic restoration. Done on a budget. – Lots of people don’t even know the Caballero existed, partly because they looked almost identical to the El Camino and partly because the Chevy version is much more common. For example, in 1980 over 10 times as many El Caminos were built as Caballeros. People also tended to work these things hard, so they’re not often seen today. This probably isn’t anybody’s dream car, but it’s rare and a sure conversation starter bought for a bit less than typical market value.

Lot # 3049 1939 Hudson Series 98 Pickup 3/4-Ton; S/N 9819599; Beige/Tan leather; Estimate $35,000 – $45,000; Modified restoration, 2 condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $35,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $38,500 – 202/114hp, Twin H-Power, 3-speed, overdrive, air conditioning, cassette stereo, cruise control, hubcaps, trim rings, bed mounted spare, chrome front bumper, grille guard, carpeted bed floor. – Excellent paint, good chrome and interior. Underbody and frame are like new. – Of course Hudson didn’t offer Twin H-Power in 1939, but that’s only a quibble on what makes this pickup fun to own, not to mention the added air conditioning. It is practical, rare and sure to get attention whether it’s on tour or in the Home Depot parking lot on weekend errands. It was sold here in 2013 for a generous $48,400 and was bid to only $29,000 at last year’s Auburn Fall. With only two others known to the Hudson club, who is to argue with this result?

Lot # 3058 1938 Hudson Terraplane Pickup; S/N 8845914; Red/Black vinyl; Estimate $40,000 – $50,000; Customized restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $30,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $33,000 – 350 V8, automatic, air conditioning, turn signals, black painted bed, single sidemounts, body color wheels, hubcaps, trim rings, wide whitewalls, fog lights, chrome front bumper and grille. – Very good paint, chrome and interior. Bed shows some practical use. The underbody has been restored like new with subsequent use. An attractive, usable truck. – Despite the modifications this Terraplane had instant appeal for anyone (and particularly for a fireman) looking for a multi-purpose, rare pickup. It is nothing if not unique and the price it brought can be judged only vaguely so the decision of the Auburn bidders will have to stand as determinative.

Lot # 2016 1985 Jeep Grand Wagoneer Station Wagon 4×4; S/N 1JCNJ15N7FT093182; White, Woodgrain/Tan; Estimate $5,000 – $6,000; Unrestored original, 3- condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $5,250 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $5,775 – 360/144hp, automatic, power brakes, power steering, air conditioning, power windows, power locks, cruise control, remote driver’s mirror, tinted glass, rear defrost. – Paint is fair, lightly faded with several scratches and chips. Gaps are factory. Brightwork is aged and scratched. Bumpers are scratched. Woodgrain exterior trim is pretty destroyed from time in the sun. Rubber exterior bits are also baked well beyond repair. The interior is aged and worn corresponding with the 131,140 miles showing, but it isn’t terrible other than very cracked seats. Engine bay is relatively tidy and maintained. Underbody is aged but not rusted. Given the TX inspection stickers and dry but baked presentation, this looks like a truck that spent much of its life out in the desert. It’s tired, but probably worth saving. – The seller here may have been trying to capitalize on a recent surge of interest in Grand Wagoneers, with some really solid examples commanding well over $20,000. This one isn’t much more than a beater, though, and it brought a price that was appropriately cheap.

Lot # 3050 1938 Plymouth PT57 Pickup; S/N 8618983; Dark Green, Black fenders and accent/Tan vinyl; Estimate $25,000 – $35,000; Truck restoration, 3+ condition; No Reserve; Hammered Sold at $18,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $19,800 – Whitewalls, body color wheels, hubcaps, Riteway   headlights, oak bed floor, stainless steel bed strips, single sidemount. – Fresh mediocre paint. Frame and engine have been done to pickup standards. Right hood top has several deep scratches, dull steering wheel. Dull, dented hubcaps, dull hood ornament. Good grille and bumper chrome. A rare pickup done to indifferent standards. – The restoration quality (if it can be called a restoration at all) is disappointing and less than this rare Plymouth pickup deserved. The Auburn bidders concurred in that judgment with this price, which is appropriate for the condition but leaves some room for betterment.

Lot # 3136 1985 Toyota FJ45 Land Cruiser Pickup; S/N FJ45948615; Beige/Grey vinyl; Estimate $35,000 – $40,000; Enthusiast restoration, 3+ condition; With Reserve; Hammered Sold at $33,000 plus commission of 10.00%; Final Price $36,300 – 2F gas engine, AVM locking front hubs, new Mud Terrain T/A tires, air conditioning, pushbutton radio. – Very good paint and interior, straight body. Cab roof has exposed sound deadening padding. Chassis and engine are done mostly like new. A usable FJ done to enthusiast standards showing 7,000 km on its odometer. – The exposed felt padding inside the roof is troubling but probably not significant. More important is the general attention to details and reassuring quality of workmanship. FJs bring widely variable prices that seemingly know no consistent rationale but even by those highly variable standards this is a sound example bought at a realistic price.

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